Radio New Zealand National. 2015-02-22. 05:00-23:59.

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A recording of Radio New Zealand National from 5am to midnight. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

22 February 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns for Sunday; 3:05 Going Home To Die, by Debbie Roome (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Danger Dog, by David Hill, told by Stephen Lovatt; Silver, by Anthony Holcroft, told by Glenis Levestam; Grandma joins the All-Blacks, by Helen McKinlay, told by Helen Moulder; Silver, by Anthony Holcroft, told by Glenis Levestam; Taniwha, by Robyn Kahukiwa, told by Peter Kaa; A Stall at the Market, by Mary Chetwin Powell, told by Carmel McGlone (RNZ)

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries including Insight, sport from the outfield, politics from the insiders, plus Mediawatch, music and The Week in Parliament

=AUDIO=

07:10
Uruguay defends big tobacco challenge
BODY:
Uruguay is the second-smallest country in South America, with a population of just 3.4 million. It's in a David and Goliath fight against tobacco giant Philip Morris, based in Switzerland and maker of the famous Malboro brand, over cigarette packaging.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Uruguay, tobacco, Philip Morris
Duration: 13'15"

07:24
ASH responds to plain packing delay
BODY:
Here at home, Parliament's health committee in August gave the green light to legislation to introduce plain packaging for cigarettes. The proposed legislation won't be passed until the legal challenge to plain packaging in Australia has been settled.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: plain packaging, tobacco, smoking
Duration: 5'23"

07:30
The Week In Parliament for 22 February 2015
BODY:
A wrap-up of the week in Parliament.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'59"

07:32
The Week In Parliament for 22 February 2015
BODY:
A wrap-up of the week in Parliament.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'59"

07:47
Fiji casino project bites the dust
BODY:
The business community in Fiji is disappointed the country's first casino project has fallen over but is confident the Government will get it right the second time around.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Fiji
Duration: 3'53"

07:51
Bid to tackle youth unemployment in Auckland
BODY:
This week the Auckland Council and Youth Connections held a jobfest for youth at the Manukau campus of MIT, connecting thousands of youth with employers.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland, employment, unemployment, youth employment
Duration: 8'33"

08:12
Insight for 22 February 2015 - The Cost of Domestic Violence
BODY:
Philippa Tolley looks at whether progress is being made on dealing with New Zealand's shocking domestic violence statistics.
EXTENDED BODY:
All of those involved in tackling domestic violence believe this social blight is costing New Zealand dearly.
As an Insight investigation has been finding out, the high levels of aggression within New Zealand families are resulting in on average in 29 deaths every year, and up to half of all police time is taken up dealing with domestic violence.
Listen to Insight - The Cost of Domestic Violence
Treasury has estimated that each death costs this country $4 million, but those working with the victims of abuse point to the personal toll. Lives lost, injuries suffered and families and individuals living with fear.
But New Zealand's high rates of family violence are hardly a secret. There have been any number of working groups and taskforces, and numerous reports have been written about what should be done.
Just over six month's ago, the government announced a package of proposals it hoped would make a difference
But the current Justice Minister, Amy Adams, says she wanted to know exactly what is going on before deciding on what steps to take.
"There are lots of well meaning agencies, both in government and in the NGO sector, all with absolutely the right motivation and trying very hard, but you get to a stage when there is such a crossover that the scarce resources of government are not being used well...if we all have our own victims' centres and or own support processes...look you just run round in circles."
Among the plans is one to set up and test an intensive case management system. But in Palmerston North, a similar initiative is already underway and on trial for three months.
The idea is that police will now get in touch with a victim within 24 to 48 hours after the event which sparked their intervention and they will also involve the local women's refuge.
Detective Sergeant Philip Skoglund, who is the Family Violence Intervention Co-ordinator for Manawatu, says senior regional officers wanted to try giving victims more support in order to stop the same thing, or worse, happening again.
Officers enter a volatile situation and often focus on calming things down, removing the offender and perhaps arresting and charging someone and until now often the victim is just left by themselves a home, he said.
Until extra officers were allocated to follow up with victims he says they were only able to offer "a bit of a band-aid solution."
But he says the question now will be how to assess the success of the initiative, especially after such a short time.
Dr Ang Jury, the manager of the Palmerston North Women's Refuge, shares those worries. She believes a programme like this could begin to slow the increase in the number of families suffering abuse.
"Research is really clear, that if you want to engage with victims you can't do it a week after the event. You need to be talking to them while they are still thinking about it, still worrying about it and while they still think that things could be different," she said.
Dr Jury believes this scheme has so much potential to improve lives and would like the government to focus on the good work already being done.
But the government's proposals are much wider ranging than just testing and starting intensive case management, and include establishing a Chief Victims' Advisor and reviewing the Domestic Violence Act, to a nation-wide roll out of home security services.
The funding available for all of this is $9.4m over 4 years.
How far that money will stretch worries Catriona MacLennan, a barrister who works in the area of family law and domestic violence.
"I don't see how we can make in-roads into abolishing domestic violence unless we put significant resources in, but police investigate 95,100 reported incidents every year (2013). That's about 260 a day. How can you expect about 2.5m a year to go anywhere near tackling that properly?" she said.

Topics: life and society, crime
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: domestic violence
Duration: 27'59"

08:40
Merrill and Malik Fernando -Time for Tea
BODY:
Merrill Fernando founded tea brand Dilmah in the 1950s, producing single origin Ceylon tea in Sri Lanka. He's in New Zealand, with his sons Malik and Dilhan, whom he named the brand after.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Sri Lanka, tea
Duration: 17'54"

09:06
Mediawatch for 22 February 2015
BODY:
An unpaid bill ends a political honeymoon; online outlet Scoop offers itself to the public with crowd funding; 50 Shades dominates submissive media; efforts to push Jessie Ryder into the ring; Gallipoli's TV casualties.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'48"

09:40
Ragen Chastain - Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness
BODY:
Self-described size diversity activist, Los Angeles based Ragen Chastain is a writer, blogger and professional choreographer and is in training to be an ironman athlete. She's also had to face fat shamers - people who have a negative view of larger people.
EXTENDED BODY:

Ragen Chastain does the splits on Wall Street. Photo: Substantia Jones for the Adipositivity Project.
Self-described size diversity activist, Los Angeles-based Ragen Chastain is a writer, blogger and professional choreographer and is in training to be an ironman athlete. She's also had to face fat shamers – people who have a negative view of larger people.
She talks to Wallace Chapman.
Ragen documents her experiences in her blogs Dances With Fat and Iron Fat and her book Fat: The Owners Manual - Navigating a Thin-Obsessed World with Your Health, Happiness and Sense of Humor Intact.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'10"

10:06
Rhonda Samoa - The Precariousness of Work
BODY:
Rhonda Samoa is a truck driver, a graduate of the New Zealand Film School, and the sister of Mark Samoa who was killed in a work accident on the Wellington waterfront in 2013. She remains optimistic about the ability of workers to negotiate safe and fair work conditions as long as they stick together.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: employment, workplace safety, workplace wellbeing
Duration: 12'53"

10:20
Guy Standing - The Precariat Charter
BODY:
Professor Standing argues that 800 years after the Magna Carta the time has come for a new charter representing the interests of those facing job insecurity and disenfranchisement internationally.
Topics: life and society, economy
Regions:
Tags: class, employment
Duration: 32'41"

10:50
McWorkers of the World Unite
BODY:
Anggie Godoy and Genoby Jaimes both work in McDonalds restaurants in Los Angeles and were in New Zealand recently - with Hannah Joravsky of the Fight for $15 and a Union Campaign - to learn from New Zealand McDonalds' workers who were the first anywhere in the world to successfully negotiate a collective contract.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: employment, employment conditions
Duration: 7'20"

11:05
Josey Baker - The Toast Craze
BODY:
Many of us eat it every day, but toast is set to be the "in" food for 2015. Josey Baker - head baker and owner of The Mill, a coffee shop/bakery in San Francisco - started putting artisan toast on the menu in early 2014.
EXTENDED BODY:

Many of us eat it every day, but toast is set to be the "in" food for 2015. Josey Baker – head baker and owner of The Mill, a coffee shop/bakery in San Francisco – started putting artisan toast on the menu in early 2014. Since then the city has experienced a toast craze.
Josey Baker talks to Wallace Chapman about turning the staple into a fad.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: toast
Duration: 15'22"

11:28
Matt Thomson - Craft Whisky
BODY:
Matt Thomson from award winning distillery Thomson Whisky in Auckland explains the growing popularity of the spirit, where it originated and how to craft the perfect drop.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'31"

11:42
David George Gordon - The Bug Chef
BODY:
David George Gordon, nicknamed The Bug Chef, is the author of the best seller The Eat-a-bug Cook Book. He believes that bug-eating (entomophagy) could be among the best ways to combat world hunger and helping to curb climate change.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: insects
Duration: 16'32"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
In this hour, Wallace Chapman talks to Silvina Echarte Acevedo, the legal adviser heading the Uruguayan Ministry of Public Health's defence against Philip Morris. The tobacco giant is suing Uruguay over public health moves to cut smoking. The director of Action on Smoking and Health New Zealand, Stephanie Erick, discusses the impact of the company’s actions in Uruguay and Australia on New Zealand’s bid for standardised cigarette packaging. Also – The Week in Parliament, Fiji’s casino bid bites the dust, and tackling youth unemployment in Auckland.
8:12 Insight The Cost of Family Violence
Family violence investigations take up more police time than any other offending and the cost to individuals is extreme. The Minister of Justice, Amy Adams, says on average in this country 14 women, 7 men and 8 children are killed in domestic violence related incidents every year. She speaks of New Zealand having one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the OECD. But after so many years of awareness raising and taking action why has very little changed? Philippa Tolley investigates what can be done and what, if anything, is being planned.
8:40 Merrill and Malik Fernando –Time for Tea
Merrill Fernando founded tea brand Dilmah in the 1950s, producing single origin Ceylon tea in Sri Lanka. He's in New Zealand, with his sons Malik and Dilhan, whom he named the brand after. Merrill, 84, and son Malik discuss the importance of single origin tea, why hand picking is so important and the secret to brewing the perfect cup.
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch looks at a media outlet that’s offering itself to the public, but will the public actually want it? Also: A headline-making unpaid bill; the media interest in a troubled sportsman; and how Fifty Shades of Grey dominated the submissive media.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Ragen Chastain – Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness are not Size Dependent
Self-described size diversity activist, Los Angeles based Ragen Chastain is a writer, blogger and professional choreographer and is in training to be an ironman athlete. She's also had to face fat shamers – people who have a negative view of larger people. Ragen documents her experiences in her blogs Dances With Fat and Iron Fat and her book Fat: The Owners Manual - Navigating a Thin-Obsessed World with Your Health, Happiness and Sense of Humor Intact.

Ragen Chastain does the splits on Wall Street. Photo: Substantia Jones for the Adipositivity Project.
10:06 Rhonda Samoa – The Precariousness of Work
Rhonda Samoa is a truck driver, a graduate of the New Zealand Film School, and the sister of Mark Samoa who was killed in a work accident on the Wellington waterfront in 2013. Rhonda knows a thing or two about the precariousness of work in the 21st Century, having been made redundant twice in the last six years, but she remains optimistic about the ability of workers to negotiate safe and fair work conditions as long as they stick together.
Photo: Rhonda Samoa at the Paremata Jetty following one of her regular 12 hour shifts.

10:20 Guy Standing – The Precariat Charter
Guy Standing, professor of development studies at the University of London, is the author of The Precariat Charter: from Denizens to Citizens, a follow up to his bestselling The Precariat Charter. Professor Standing argues that 800 years after the Magna Carta the time has come for a new charter representing the interests of those facing job insecurity and disenfranchisement internationally.
10:50 McWorkers of the World Unite
McDonalds, like Coca Cola, has become a symbol of globalisation. It’s an example of a corporation successfully working with business people across the world to provide services to the world’s consumers. But its workers have also become a symbol of what Guy Standing, and others, call the precariat: Non-unionised, young people – often tertiary educated – earning little more than the minimum wage, and with little job security. Anggie Godoy and Genoby Jaimes hope to change that. They both work in McDonalds restaurants in Los Angeles and were in New Zealand recently – with Hannah Joravsky of the Fight for $15 and a Union Campaign – to learn from New Zealand McDonalds’ workers who were the first anywhere in the world to successfully negotiate a collective contract.

Genoby Jaimes (left) and Anggie Godoy of the Fight for $15 and a Union Campaign.
11:05 Josey Baker – The Toast Craze
Many of us eat it every day, but toast is set to be the "in" food for 2015. Josey Baker – head baker and owner of The Mill, a coffee shop/bakery in San Francisco – started putting artisan toast on the menu in early 2014. Since then the city has experienced a toast craze. Josey Baker’s book Bread gives an insight into turning the staple into a fad.
11:28 Matt Thomson – Craft Whisky
Wine was popular, then New Zealand saw a surge in craft beer. Now craft whisky is trending internationally. Matt Thomson from award winning distillery Thomson Whisky in Auckland explains the growing popularity of the spirit, where it originated and how to craft the perfect drop.
11:42 David George Gordon – The Bug Chef
David George Gordon, nicknamed The Bug Chef, is the author of the best seller The Eat-a-bug Cook Book. He believes that bug-eating (entomophagy) could be among the best ways to combat world hunger and helping to curb climate change. While some might get squeamish at the thought of eating bugs, David creates palatable culinary masterpieces using spiders, crickets, ants and scorpions.
Recipe: Huhu Grubs

The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook. Centre: David George Gordon. Photo by Joel Rogers. Right: Deep Fried Tarantula Spider. Photo by Chugrad McAndrews.

=PLAYLIST=

Song: Michael Jackson - Rock with You
Composer: Rod Templeton
Album: Off the Wall - Michael Jackson
Label: Epic Records
Broadcast Time: 8:38

Song: Pitch Black – South Of The Line
Album: Rude Mechanicals
Label: Remote Recordings
Broadcast Time: 9:37

Song: Lost in the Supermarket - The Clash
Composer: M Jones. S Strummer
Album: London Calling
Label: Columbia
Broadcast Time: 10:06

Song: Dynamite
composer T Neilson/D Davidson
Album: Tami Neilson: Dynamite
Broadcast Time: 10:35

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

Malcolm Beattie's been rescuing swimmers on Port Waikato's Sunset Beach for 50 summers. The 70 year old has just been given his 50 year badge at Surf Life Saving NZ's Awards for Excellence (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:05
Port Waikato Sunset
BODY:
If your bones haven't told you to stop, you keep going!" So says septuagenarian lifeguard Malcolm Beattie.
EXTENDED BODY:

Malcolm Beattie and a brand new rescue buggy.
“Your bones will tell you when it’s time to stop. Fortunately my bones are still in great shape!” - 70-year old Malcolm Beattie.

David Steemson meets Malcolm Beattie at the Sunset Beach Lifeguard club to find out about life as a life guard.

Malcolm Beattie’s been rescuing swimmers on Port Waikato’s Sunset Beach for fifty summers. The seventy year old has just been given his fifty year badge at Surf Life Saving New Zealand’s Awards for Excellence.
For thirty years Malcolm has been President of the Sunset Beach Lifeguard Service and back in 1971 he and mate Bob Harvey got the first helicopter rescue service going.
“I remember the first rescue I did from a chopper. There were seven surfers swept away by the current, very, very, rugged surf. Two of us had to jump from the helicopter and it was pretty hairy trying to hook them up to the winch, one by one.”

Malcolm reckons there have been bumper crowds at Sunset beach this summer. More rescues as a result too.
The Friday I visit late in January there is a small crowd of mostly youngsters in the water, but no lifeguards on duty. Malcolm’s volunteers only operate on weekends. We go for a drive in the club’s new John Deere all-terrain buggy, but we have stop and wade into the shallows for Malcolm to shout warnings about a dangerous rip.
The Sunset lifeguards rescue up to forty people each summer. But they also do a lot of preventative work, warning folk to get out “before they become another statistic”.
Malcolm points out the club’s beach lookout tower that was rebuilt five years ago after the old one got washed away.
“But we had big 4.5 metre tides over winter and there’s been more serious erosion. Now the new tower’s only metres from the new cliff face…. I think we might be in trouble again” he grimaces.
Malcolm grew up in Pukekohe, came surfing here, and in 1964 joined the then tiny club.
“There were no baches, just our surf club tin shed, sited about fifteen metres in front of our present lookout. That spot is well under the water now.”

Malcolm still carries out weekend rescue duties as part of the Master’s patrol, and each year he goes through rigorous tests, to retain his badge. If he keeps passing, he’s not planning to give up any time yet.

Port Waikato Surf Life Saving Patrol's first club house in 1959.
Topics: money, climate, life and society
Regions: Waikato
Tags: surfing, lifesaving, Port Waikato Sunset Beach Lifeguard service
Duration: 25'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour

=AUDIO=

12:40
Hikoi - Nancy Brunning
BODY:
Actor and director Nancy Brunning bases her first play, Hikoi, on her own family story and sets it in the 1970s and 80s - the years of Bastion Point and Springbok Tour protests, predictions of the demise of Te Reo Maori, and Dame Whina Cooper's hikoi to Parliament. Hikoi premieres at the Auckland Arts Festival.
EXTENDED BODY:

Actor and director Nancy Brunning bases her first play, Hikoi, on her own family story and sets it in the 1970s and 80s - the years of Bastion Point and Springbok Tour protests, predictions of the demise of Te Reo Maori, and Dame Whina Cooper's hikoi to Parliament.
Hikoi premieres at the Auckland Arts Festival.
Nancy Brunning talks to Lynn Feeman about Hikoi.
Topics: arts, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: theatre, Springbok Tour, hikoi, Auckland Arts Festival
Duration: 18'14"

13:25
Dunedin Sound goes operatic
BODY:
Is adapting those sparse, dark and brooding Dunedin Sound songs from the 1980s into operatic versions genius or sacrilege? Arranger and member of The Verlaines Graeme Downes reckons it's the former. Dunedin born soprano Anna Leese joins Graeme and other Dunedin Sound stalwarts as The Southern Sinfonia presents: Tally Ho! Dunedin Sound Songs & Singers.
EXTENDED BODY:

Is adapting those sparse, dark and brooding "Dunedin Sound" songs from the 1980s into operatic versions genius or sacrilege?
Arranger and member of The Verlaines Graeme Downes reckons it's the former, as he tells Lynne Freeman.
Dunedin born soprano Anna Leese joins Graeme and other Dunedin Sound stalwarts as The Southern Sinfonia presents: Tally Ho! Dunedin Sound Songs & Singers this Saturday at the Dunedin Town Hall.
Radio New Zealand Concert and Music 101 are recording the concert for later broadcast.

Topics: arts, music
Regions: Otago
Tags: Flying Nun, Verlaines, The Clean, Dunedin
Duration: 11'48"

13:48
Shona McCullagh
BODY:
The co-founder of the New Zealand Dance Company has been named the country's top creative entrepreneur for 2015. She talks about what it takes to be an entrepreneur in the arts, the importance of mentoring young dancers, and the company's upcoming Australasian tour of the war themed production Rotunda.
EXTENDED BODY:

“Like many, many other artists you’re working as a freelancer, so you have many irons in the fire. Lots of artists develop a teaching practice, to help support not only the growth of their personal artistic practice but also to support themselves financially.”

Artistic director, producer, choreographer, short film maker and co-founder of The New Zealand Dance Company Shona McCullagh has been named the country's top creative entrepreneur for 2015.
She talks to Lynn Freeman about what it takes to be an entrepreneur in the arts, the importance of mentoring young dancers, and the company's upcoming Australasian tour of the war themed production Rotunda.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: dance, arts funding, entrepreneurship
Duration: 10'55"

14:36
Niki Hastings-McFall
BODY:
Plant a tree and a bird will come, says artist Niki Hastings-McFall. But will they still turn up if you wrap the tree in thousands of artificial lei? Niki is doing just that in her new work, Fale Ula for the Auckland Arts Festival. She's hoping to attract both birds and people back into central Auckland's Aotea Square. Justin Gregory went to meet Niki and found her chatting with her pet magpie, Mr Goose.
EXTENDED BODY:

Fale Ula: Niki Hastings-McFall Work 3. Photograph: Michael Pöhlmann. Niki Hastings-McFall installation for Wunderruma, GalerieHandwerk, Munich 2014.
Plant a tree and a bird will come, says artist Niki Hastings-McFall.
But will they still turn up if you wrap the tree in thousands of artificial lei?
Niki is doing just that in her new work, Fale Ula for the Auckland Arts Festival.
She's hoping to attract both birds and people back into central Auckland's Aotea Square.
Justin Gregory went to meet Niki and found her chatting with her pet magpie, Mr Goose.
Topics: arts
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: installation, conservation, Pasifika, Auckland Arts Festival
Duration: 10'20"

14:50
The history of censorship
BODY:
Dr Geoff Kemp looks back at censorship through the ages, and how these days it's mainly regarded as the enemy of free speech. Censorship Moments: Reading Texts in the History of Censorship and Freedom of Expression is published by Bloomsbury.
EXTENDED BODY:

Dr Geoff Kemp looks back at censorship through the ages and how these days it's mainly regarded as the enemy of free speech.
Censorship Moments: Reading Texts in the History of Censorship and Freedom of Expression is published by Bloomsbury.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: literature, censorship, Dr Geoff Kemp
Duration: 8'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:40 Hikoi - Nancy Brunning

Actor and director Nancy Brunning bases her first play, Hikoi, on her own family story and sets it in the 1970s and 80s - the years of Bastion Point and Springbok Tour protests, predictions of the demise of Te Reo Maori, and Dame Whina Cooper's hikoi to Parliament. Hikoi premieres at the Auckland Arts Festival.
1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
1:34 Dunedin Sound goes operatic
Is adapting those sparse, dark and brooding Dunedin Sound songs from the 1980s into operatic versions genius or sacrilege?
Arranger and member of The Verlaines Graeme Downes reckons it's the former.
Dunedin born soprano Anna Leese joins Graeme and other Dunedin Sound stalwarts as The Southern Sinfonia presents: Tally Ho! Dunedin Sound Songs & Singers this Saturday at the Dunedin Town Hall.
Radio New Zealand Concert and Music 101 are recording the concert for later broadcast.
1:47 Shona McCullagh

The co-founder of the New Zealand Dance Company has been named the country's top creative entrepreneur for 2015. She talks about what it takes to be an entrepreneur in the arts, the importance of mentoring young dancers, and the company’s upcoming Australasian tour of the war themed production Rotunda.
2:05 The Laugh Track

A rare joint interview with Australasia's favourite satirists, John Clarke and Bryan Dawe.
2:35 Niki Hastings-McFall
Plant a tree and a bird will come, says artist Niki Hastings-McFall. But will they still turn up if you wrap the tree in thousands of artificial lei? Niki is doing just that in her new work, Fale Ula for the Auckland Arts Festival. She’s hoping to attract both birds and people back into central Auckland’s Aotea Square. Justin Gregory went to meet Niki and found her chatting with her pet magpie, Mr Goose.
2:43 Dr Geoff Kemp

Dr Geoff Kemp looks back at censorship through the ages, and how these days it's mainly regarded as the enemy of free speech. Censorship Moments: Reading Texts in the History of Censorship and Freedom of Expression is published by Bloomsbury.
3:05 The Drama Hour
We premiere this year's winner of the New Shorts competition. It's The Big Squeak by Teresa Bass, a unique take on the trad Film Noir. Also we remember Michael Bennett's surreal The Taking of Chicken Town.

===4:06 PM. | The Life Worth Having===
=DESCRIPTION=

A discussion from a Whanganui forum examining the links between economic and environmental health in NZ, especially in the regions and smaller centres (1 of 2, RNZ)

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Whakatāuki mo 22 o Hui Tanguru (February) 2015
BODY:
Mo tātou a Mo Ka Uri a muri ake nei. For us, and those that follow us. This week's whakatāuaki is explained by Ranui Ngarimu nō Ngāti Mutunga, Ngāi Tahu.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: te reo Maori
Duration: 27"

18:08
Kiwa Digital - Māori stories on a digital platform
BODY:
Kiwa Digital's Māori development advisor Nikora Wharerau and Illustrator Munro Te Whata discuss the process of taking traditional māori Purakau (stories) and publishing these on a digital platform. The recently launched four-part series, Ngā Atua Māori is a set of graphic novellas written by Rereata Mākihā, Waihoroi Shortland and Nikora Wharerau. Munro worked on the imagery and story-boards. The result is an interactive series available for download in the App store or Android for viewing on tablets. Justine Murray talks to the duo about the creative process, te reo māori and how other iwi can tell their stories in a similar way.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: te reo Maori, Kiwa Digital
Duration: 17'50"

18:25
Matatini - A few thoughts
BODY:
Attending a couple of summer festivals is a good way to record a wide range of opinions on a certain topic, Justine Murray asks a few people which Kapa Haka group will get their support at this year's upcoming Te Matatini National performing arts festival held in Christchurch.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini, kapa haka
Duration: 4'18"

18:29
Ranui Ngarimu - Hosting Te Matatini 2015
BODY:
South Island iwi Ngai Tahu are hosting the 2015 Te Matatini, the annual National Performing Arts competition that attracts tens of thousands of people from around Aotearoa. Marae, hotels, motels and homes will host up to 2000 performers from 45 groups. Christchurch is still in the re-building phase following the 2011 earthquakes, but chairperson of the Waitaha Cultural Council Trust Ranui Ngarimu says Waitaha Iwi are excited to host the event in just under two weeks' time, as she explains with Justine Murray.
EXTENDED BODY:

Ranui Ngarimu. Photo courtesy of Waitaha Cultural Council Trust.
South Island iwi Ngai Tahu are hosting this year's Te Matatini, the biennial national kapa haka festival that attracts tens of thousands of people from around Aotearoa.
The logistics, accommodation and planning of the event at Christchurch’s Hagley Park have been three years in the making,
The event, which is just two weeks away, is being hosted by Waitaha Cultural Council Trust with support from Te Rūnanga o Ngai Tahu and Christchurch City Council.
Chairperson of the Waitaha Cultural Council Trust, Ranui Ngarimu, says the Waitaha iwi are excited to be hosting the festival, but that it’s also about saying thank you to iwi who showed their support to Christchurch following the 2011 earthquakes, as she explains to Justine Murray.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini, Ngai Tahu, kapa haka
Duration: 11'36"

18:32
Nga Tāonga Kōrero - Tauranga Kapahaka Competition 1970
BODY:
It was in the early 1960's that Māori came together to celebrate performing arts, the venue was held at the Tauranga Queens Elizabeth Memorial Hall. In 1970, Wiremu Parker (1914 - 1986) attended the event and talks about the various waiata sung by Waioeka of Opotiki, Ngāti Rangiwewehi and Ngāti Poneke. Turirangi Te Kani (1915 - 1990) addresses the crowd, and the then Minster of Māori Affairs Duncan Mcintyre talks about the importance of Māori Culture groups.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: kapa haka, culture
Duration: 11'23"

=SHOW NOTES=

Auckland based company Kiwa Digital has created a four-part series of bi-lingual graphic novellas that tell traditional māori stories. Launched at the end of January, the first book Te Orokotimatanga o te Ao tells the story of The Creation. Māori Develoment Advisor Nikora Wharerau and Illustrator Munro Te Whata talk about the creative process of research, story-boarding, production to launching it online, and how digital publishing could be used to tell the stories of other iwi and hapū.
In a recording from 1970, Wiremu Parker (1914 - 1986) presents coverage of the kapa haka festival held in Tauranga Moana.
At a couple of summer festivals, Justine Murray asks a few concert-goers who they will be supporting at Te Matatini, the National Kapa Haka festival.

===7:06 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:05
One in Five: Ngā Tukemata O Kahungunu
BODY:
For more than 20 years now Jim Edwards has been working alongside people with disabilities. He runs a kaupapa Māori daily activities programme under the umbrella of Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu Charitable Trust. It's based near Hastings in Hawkes Bay.
EXTENDED BODY:
In 1993 Shane Bruere fell off a roof and after spending 11 weeks in a coma was left with a permanent brain injury.
When Carol Stiles visited Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu’s vocational services programme, Shane was sanding down a support boat that will accompany a waka down the Clive River.
The programme, run by Jim Edwards, strives to replicate the support Māori traditionally gave people with disabilities in a way that works in 2015. Twenty men take part in the kaupapa Māori programme that sees them caring for gravestones in urupā, maintaining marae, carving and supporting waka excursions. They also mow lawns, chop firewood and maintain vehicles.
Shane, who also comes to the cultural activities programme twice a week, says it means a lot to him to be able to work at Nga Tukemata o Kahungunu.
“Because I accept the benefit I consider myself a dole bludger and that’s a bummer…. I feel if I work as a volunteer doing whatever, wherever helping, then I am not a dole bludger…. it may only be a little job but helping’s helping.”

Carol Stiles meets Shane, Jim and others at the Hawkes Bay service to find out about more about the programme.
Topics: disability, te ao Maori
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: waka, support services
Duration: 19'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

=TRANSCRIPT=

Carol Stiles: Good evening and welcome to One in Five. I’m Carol Stiles. Today we’re meeting a man who has been working alongside people with disabilities for more than 20 years. These days Jim Edwards runs a Kaupapa Māori daily activities programme for people living with disabilities. It’s based near Whakatu, near Hastings.
Jim Edwards: It’s called Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu - the eyebrows of Kahungunu. And that’s the name of the trust that we formed in 1990.
Carol Stiles: And what’s the significance of the name?
Jim Edwards: It’s the eyebrows of Kahungunu, well known in the history of the areas between Mahia and Wairarapa, where this great chief had a tā moko on his forehead, what they call a tattoo, identification of who he is amongst other chiefs. He’s also well known for using his eyebrows to lure the women away from their husbands, creating warfare between one tribe and another. It is well known that that’s how he became the victor of seven wives belonging to other chiefs. And that was his way of gaining more property. He’s got the largest section of the East Coast, from Mahia right through to Wairarapa under his name – Kahungunu.
Carol Stiles: Jim says a kuia suggested the name for the trust – Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu – to keep the story of Kahungunu alive, so that it would be retold every time someone asked about the name. It was also in the hope that the story would provide a link with the past and to traditional Māori values.
Jim Edwards: Because of the disabled area, they need support. It’s about need, not about want. Our people used to āwhina them, look after them, keep them at home and make sure they’re looked after right to the end of their days. And I spoke to my elders and suggested ‘Look, maybe, we’re all freezing workers, we’re all big money-earners, but what have we given back?’
Carol Stiles: It’s Jim’s hope that the trust can replicate the support that used to be given to people with disabilities in a model that works in today’s world.
Jim Edwards: The elders pass on. The next generation isn’t so interested because they’ve got to go out and seek a life too. They’ve got employment to find and they’ve got a family to bring up, so their hands are full. So unfortunately the disabled who are their own families are put in homes where they’re looked after, mind you, but it’s’ not the same as being with their own. We will never bring back those days, but we can certainly help to make sure that they have as good a life as they could possibly have. But our understanding with the name ‘Tukemata’ was taking it back in time.
Carol Stiles: You’re a Māori provider, but you take non-Māori, too, don’t you?
Jim Edwards: We take anyone that’s wanting to come on the programme. We’d love to take on the ladies, but we’ve got to have a lady supervisor.
Carol Stiles: Over the course of the year 20 people between the ages of 16 and 65 take part in the weekday programme.
(Chainsaw roars)
Carol Stiles: Hello! Hello! What are you doing here, Jonathan?
Jonathan: I’m doing weeding down the banks.
Carol Stiles: Is this one of the things that you like to do?
Jonathan: Ah, yes.
Carol Stiles: What else do you do around here?
Jonathan: Uh, just bits and pieces like chopping wood and lawn mowing and that.
Carol Stiles: What were you doing before you came here?
Jonathan: I was at school over in Napier.
Carol Stiles: How many days a week are you out here?
Jonathan: Three days a week.
Carol Stiles: And the other two days what are you doing?
Jonathan: Days off, at home on my phone.
Carol Stiles: OK, well, I’ll let you get on. Thanks!
Jonathan: No worries.
(Chainsaw starts up)
Jim Edwards: We do our own thing, created from all those years ago. We don’t waiver off that, but during that time we’re able to create a 20-metre 40-person fully carved war canoe. That was one of our achievements. I wanted to do something on water. We’d already been doing it on land so I wanted to do it on water.
Carol Stiles: So you and the people you worked with built this?
Jim Edwards: The disabled that were there at the time, they all helped with their different ways and means, whatever they could assist in. I took disabled into the bush with me. We stayed there in quarters or in conservation huts, looked for suitable timber. They might have with the cups of tea, boiling the kettle or something like that, and we slept under canvas. And we were able to bring the timber in from conservation department areas providing we covered the costs of retrieving it. I did all the milling, tree felling, if need be, if they weren’t already down. And we slabbed the material for what we needed for this waka.
Carol Stiles: What do you do with the waka these days?
Jim Edwards: It’s in the Clive River. I’ll take you down later on and show you. And it’s in the water for two years, comes out March next year for its maintenance. We bring it out in May, we put it back in the beginning of November. And that’s when the exercises of the school excursions start again.
Carol Stiles: So schools come down?
Jim Edwards: All the schools go through this process. The waka was built for education for all nationalities both male and female, and it’s the only fully carved war canoe that’s called a waka toa, made out of native timber, that offers that service. All other waka toa are put away for special occasions. My vision all those years ago was to create something for all to enjoy so we can all go back in time when the story is explained or told, similar to the Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu name. Disabled [people] helped when we started; they’re still helping today, all these years later.
Carol Stiles: They run the tours?
Jim Edwards: Yes, they’ve all got a job to do. I give them responsibilities.
Carol Stiles: And some of these guys come out in the support boats?
Jim Edwards: Some of them are told to do photos so that the photos go back to the schools. Then there’s students that stay on the pontoon, which I will show you later, for safety for on and offloading. And the you’ve got the ones on the banks that supply the lifejackets, make sure they’re all given the right sizes, all clipped on properly. We can do the cruise ships now, we’ve been doing them for eight years. When the ships come so many go to the wine trail, so many go to the art deco trail and so many come to us. When I take the disabled groups out, we invite them what we call a Big Week Out, one week before Christmas and one week after Christmas. I allow the whole week because of the pace it takes to load them on and unload them. Their parents and their guardians, their caregivers, all come with them to make it safe. They come from Masterton, Palmerston, Levin, all the outside areas. They come up for a week and they stay at a marae and they visit the areas around here, and the waka is one of them. Disability, elderly and Cancer Society programmes are all free. They just give a donation towards petrol for the support boats. When they get on they’re a bit shaky, but when they get off they’re doing the haka, they’re stamping their feet, ‘cause I do all the protocol actions on the water. And it’s just amazing seeing them walk around with their tongues sticking out and they’re waving and they’re googling their eyes. They love it. So you know they’ve never been offered that because people haven’t got the time, you know, or the material to do it with. The waka has created that…that closeness and that understanding, you know? And of course when they go on the marae they see these big poupous, these big carvings looking down on you. You know they’re very reluctant to go up, then in the end they’re starting to stroke them. They become friends. And that’s what it’s all about. Understanding that difference. Our people, our tipuna carved them because they’re protecting what’s behind them.
(Turning radio off) Come on, guys. Put your things away. This lady wants to talk to you. Then if you start getting on to your little projects then she can just see what you do. Is that alright with you?
Carol Stiles: Yeah that would be great. Yeah, yeah, yeah. My name is Carol, Carol Stiles.
Roly: Hello, Carol. This is Shane Bruere, he’s from Bupa House.
Carol Stiles: Hi, how are you going?
Roly: This is Jonathan. He’s living with mum and dad. And, yeah, I’m Roly.
Carol Stiles: So, Roly, what’s happening here today? What’s everyone busy doing?
Roly: Maintenance on the mowers so we’re ready to mow lawns. Teru, he’s working on a poupou over here. He’s doing his carving. Come over, I’ll show you. There it is there. I’ll show you. That’s a poupou that he’s doing, just basically a telephone pole, really.
Teru: I started down this end with a V chisel, but because it’s pine it started ripping. That’s why then I started with the machine.
Carol Stiles: So how long have you been coming here?
Teru: I’m not too sure. I can’t remember. About three years.
Carol Stiles: Yeah...And what do you like to do when you come? What’s your preferred thing to do?
Teru: Anything that’s going. Whatever.
Carol Stiles: Do you like the waka?
Teru: Yes
Carol: What’s your job down at the waka?
Teru: To let it off the pontoons so then they can start rowing. I’ve actually been on there once, but I prefer to stay on the bank.
Carol Stiles: (Laughs) OK. So this will keep you busy for a while, though?
Teru: Yes.
Carol Stiles: What will happen to it when it’s finished?
Teru: I think it’s going up by…
Jim Edwards: The main sign - Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu Charitable Trust - is going out on the entrance to the gate. And there’ll be two of those. And the sign will be between them. Also Teru did the carvings on this miniature waka here.
Carol: Oh. Who taught you how to carve?
Teru: I taught myself ‘cause I went to jail for three years. Then I was going into the carving room and seeing all the art that other inmates were doing and I thought that I want to do that, too. So then I bought a V chisel and just started creating something.
Carol Stiles: And do you like coming here?
Teru: Yes. I look forward to it.
(Moving away)
Carol Stiles: What was your name again, sorry?
Shane Bruere: Shane
Carol Stiles: What are you doing here, Shane?
Shane Bruere: I’m just sanding the boat so we can take it out for the um waka excursions. And sometimes I row with them. But usually they prefer the children to be on.
Carol Stiles: Right. So this is a dinghy, is it, that goes alongside the waka?
Shane Bruere: It’s to make sure in case the waka has a problem aye or if someone has a problem aye we’ve got people to look after it.
Carol Stiles: What other things do you typically do here?
Shane Bruere: I always fill the H20 containers up for the umm (pause) gardens, to make sure they’ve got H20 ‘cause it’s a bummer if they cark it.
Carol: You water all the plants around the place?
Shane (Laughs) I was getting all the terminology, sorry.
Carol Stiles: Do you like coming here?
Shane Bruere: Well, I’m not a dole bludger if I work here as a volunteer. Because I accept the benefit I’ve considered myself a dole budger, and that’s a bummer. ‘Cause I fell off a roof on the 4 January ’93 and I was unconscious for 11 weeks, so that sucked the big one. And yet I feel if I work as a volunteer doing whatever, wherever, helping, then I’m not a dole bludger. It may not be a nine-to-five job on my own, but it’s helping, and to myself that means a lot, that I’m contributing to the workforce. (Sanding) It may only be a little job, but helping is helping.
Carol Stiles: What’s happening over here?
Roly: Oh a bit of maintenance. We do furniture. We found old frames and they were steel frames – chairs and bases for tables. And we turned them into outdoor furniture. Yeah, so the boys docked them, Shane and his friend. They basically worked together docking all the timber, and I finished it off. And then there’s an example right there. A round table - 1,100 in diameter and four matching chairs – rubbish that basically would have went to the dump.
Carol Stiles: You do marae restoration, as well, do you?
Roly: Yes, we do. That’s in Wairoa. And the marae is called ‘Hinemihi”’, which is our family marae. And, yes, we do maintenance there.
(Lawn mower running and then turning off)
Jim Edwards: This lady’s going to talk to you.
Carol Stiles: Hi, what are you doing here?
Daniel Brider: Ah cleaning mower and washing them down.
Carol Stiles: Where will they be used?
Daniel: Around here and at the Clive river.
Carol Stiles: You mow the lawns down there, too? Is this what you like doing best, mowing?
Daniel: (giggles) Yes.
Carol Stiles: What else do you do?
Daniel: All sorts here. Firewood and all sorts, yeah.
Carol Stiles: Are you fixing the mowers?
Jim Edwards: Yes, this is what their skill was from the Heretaunga Land Skills. They were experienced in this sort of thing.
Carol Stiles: So they were at a programme and it closed?
Jim Edwards: Yes, it closed just recently.
Carol Stiles: So now you’re lucky to have them here.
Jim Edwards: Yes no, no they’re very skilled. I found out what their skills were and put them in the most appropriate place.
Carol Stiles: Do you run out of things to do?
Jim Edwards: No. I was brought up in this world. It was hands-on. We didn’t even have a tractor, we only had horses. So we made fun with those sort of things as kids. We grew up with it. We understood that it wasn’t money that made you happy, it was the way you created yourself.
Carol Stiles: You do a little bit of maintenance, I heard, at Wairoa, at the marae, you’ve done some maintenance there?
Jim Edwards: I’ve been there since 1995. And we just decided to set up another programme like this next door. And it’s got an old dwelling on it that I own and that’s that’s going to be our quarters. And I’m turning that into a nursery. And we’ll grow native trees and everything else like we did here. That will hopefully supply the cemeteries, the urupas, we call them, ‘cause we stand up old headstones in old cemeteries, stand them back up. A lot of them have fallen over ‘cause they’re the old sandstone ones. And the fences have gone. Stock have gone in to get the grass and actually knocked the stones over. So we stand them up, we create that space and re-fence them, redo them. (Sound of sanding) They love it. As I’ve got something to offer them, maintenance, sanding down, painting, showing them how to do different things. We’re not experts, but we give it a go. Our gear is old and ugly, but they chug along. So that’s what it’s all about is enjoying life.
(Walking)
So this is another one of our maintenance areas.
Carol Stiles: You restore vehicles, too?
Jim Edwards: And machinery. ‘Cause I’ve found where they come from they’re all good at it. And there’s Paul and Danny. I bought those old tractors for that project. And we’ve started it but it got a bit cold.
Carol Stiles: So when it gets a bit warmer they’ll be on the job out here.
Jim Edwards: Yes, and our Land Rover, that’s what we use to go out into the bush to take our saws and everything else when we go and do milling. ‘Cause there’s still logs out there and conservation reserves that are offered for the purpose of what we do, for repair work. And that’s always a need. You know I try and stockpile while I’m able to, and when the next generation comes in and takes over everything is ready.
Carol Stiles: That’s for the waka – to repair the waka?
Jim Edwards: That goes through a fair bit of timber once it starts. ‘Cause timber is like anything else. When it’s sitting in the water for a length of time it does create that unfortunate rot.
Carol Stiles: You mow down at the landing. Do you get paid for that?
Jim Edwards: No, no no. That’s all part and parcel of our programme. Because I lease the land off the council, but we use the facilities for the purpose. So our way of giving back is to maintain. And that’s how it is in Wairoa, that’s how it is everywhere we go. We go to the marae, we stay on the marae free of charge. Our koha is returning maintenance back to them. And umm it’s an understanding with the students. If you give something back there’ll always be something in return later on. And that’s what our culture is about. That’s what our people are all about. You make sure that your reserves are always there when you want them.
(Sounds of working)
Jim Edwards: Could you and Danny fill up the water containers and fill it with the chook bins, please? It looks a bit empty around there. OK. Alright, Dan. Could you get some buckets of water and fill up the blue lids over there for the chooks and the one down the back there, please?
Carol Stiles: What are you scraping off?
Daniel: All the grass.
Carol Stiles: Does it get caught in there?
Daniel: Yep
Carol: Does that slow things down a bit or…?
Daniel: It can do.
Carol Stiles: Hey, what do you think of this place?
Daniel: Good
Carol: You’ve only been here…?
Daniel: Six months.
Carol Stiles: So what’s good about it?
Daniel: All the work out here, yeah.
Carol Stiles: Daniel Brider ending that report. You also heard from Jim Edwards from Hawkes Bay’s Ngā Tukemata-O-Kahungunu Charitable Trust. I’m Carol Stiles and that was One in Five. You can hear that programme and any other from our archive by going to the One in Five page on the Radio New Zealand website.
That’s it for One in Five this week. We’ll be back at the same time next week with more on the issues and experience of disability. Until then, ka kite anō.

===7:35 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===7:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical Hour One - 22 February 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners the chance to learn about the colourful,dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53'43"

21:05
Sounds Historical Hour Two - 22 February 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful,dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:07 Intro
Music in tonight’s Sounds Historical features finalists in the 1957 Have a Shot talent quest run by 1ZB Auckland. First prize was £75 ($3,500).
8:09 Artist: The Buccaneers 4’39”
Song: n/s
Composer:
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
8:15 Today in New Zealand History - February 22 1938 4’27”
Death of historian Thomas Lindsay Buick.
8:21 Artist: David Johnson (Piano accordian) 4’32”
Song: Dance of the Hours
Composer: Ponchielli
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
8:27 Memories from Dan Greaney 13’54”
Recalls the violence in Wellington in 1932 during the worst days of the Depression. Recorded in 1971.
8:42 Artist: Trevor Greaves & Allan Gallagher 4’51"
Song: Strange Little Girl
Composer: n/s
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
8:48 New Zealand a Republic? 4’19”
In March 1994 Prime Minister Jim Bolger was promoting Republicanism for New Zealand, something the present prime minister is not advocating. In this 1994 interview Jim Bolger suggests 2000 would be a good year to shed the monarchy. Linda Rose asked him if a referendum would be needed.
8:53 War Report 24 - 22 February 2014 6’37”
Report from the Clutha Leader in which Chaplain Major Grant (who would be killed at Gallipoli) describes the bad liquor being sold to New Zealand troops in Egypt. Three examples of New Zealand versions of popular war time songs sung by Les Cleveland. Nurse Ida Willis describes setting up hospitals in Egypt and a London correspondent tells his New Zealand readers that the New Zealanders are likely to soon be fighting with the Second Army in France. A Whangarei picture theatre advertises pictures of the navy in action and of New Zealand troops in London in the Lord Mayor’s Show.
Music:
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Artist: Les Cleveland
Song: Who’ll Come a Fighting the Kaiser with Me
Composer: Trad
Album: Radio New Zealand
Artist: Les Cleveland
Song: We Are Bill Massey’s Army
Composer: Westcott
Album: Radio New Zealand
Artist: Les Cleveland
Song: Boys of the old Brigade
Composer: McGuigan
Album: Radio New Zealand
9:06 As I Remember 3’50”
The Traveller Top by Robert Mann.
9:12 Artist: Tarawa Sisters 3’09”
Song: Picnic
Composer:
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
9:16 As I Remember 5’23”
The Terminal by Lorna Tolley, read by Prue Langbein.
9:22 Artist: Leo McCaffrey 4’36”
Song: Cottage by the Lea
Composer:
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
9:27 Police patrol in 1988 2’03”
In January 1988 there was success in Takapuna with a new police patrol system with Constable Scott Carter on his horse Nightwatchman. Henry Grant reports.
9:30 Artist: Western Samoans 2’55”
Song: Watcha Know, Joe
Composer: Young
Album: Sound Archives
Label: n/a
9:34 Joan Bolger, wife of National Party leader Jim Bolger 22’00”
In August 1987 Joan Bolger, wife of National Party leader Jim Bolger, talked about her involvement in the campaign, political life and her home life. Following the unsuccessful attempt in 1987, National under Bolger benefited from public concern over Labour’s “Rogernomics” reforms and gained the biggest majority government in New Zealand history in 1990 when Jim Bolger became Prime Minister at the age of 55.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Quintessentials; TV themes like Sanford and Son and film scores like The Color Purple, We Are The World/USA for Africa, Chaka Khan and his first album with Michael Jackson, Off The Wall (5 of 7, Radio Express)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274249

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 19:00:00

Date 22 Feb 2015

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