Radio New Zealand National. 2015-07-16. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

16 July 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Swamp Fever, written and told by Gerard Hindmarsh (2 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 16 July 2015
BODY:
Sudden downpower floods parts of south, west Auckland, Global Dairy Auction prices fall again, Auckland's character suburbs at risk, Deadline looms for flag designs, Lawyer backs sacking of Barfoot and Thompson employee, and Government told to axe its spy agencies.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 34'30"

06:07
Sports News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'17"

06:20
Pacific News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'10"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
The MP for Tamaki Makaurau, Peeni Henare, says he's heartened to hear that more hapu are ready to negotiate a Treaty settlement in the north; The Waitangi Tribunal has asked to hear further argument on whether it should hold an urgent inquiry into the Trans Pacific Trade Agreement; The Flag Consideration Panel says its received a significant number of flag designs that include Maori symbols.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'34"

06:40
Sudden torrential rain floods parts of Auckland
BODY:
A sudden torrential downpour flooded about 70 homes in west and south Auckland in just three hours last night.
Topics: weather
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'47"

06:43
Auckland's character suburbs are under threat.
BODY:
Heritage groups are concerned Auckland's character suburbs are under threat.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'49"

06:47
Forecast payout could be in firing line
BODY:
Fonterra's forecast payout to farmers could be in the firing line after a major fall in dairy prices overnight.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, Dairy payout
Duration: 45"

06:48
Last Cantometer shows dip as rebuild activity peaks
BODY:
A special measure of Canterbury's economy has been scrapped after three years, as the frenzied activitiy around the rebuild eases.
Topics: business, economy
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 1'45"

06:50
Orion Health gears up for opportunities in $50 billion industry
BODY:
Orion Health is gearing up to seize opportunities in an industry that is set to grow by 20 billion US dollars in the next five years, but it admits it has to do more to sell its own story and attract investors.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Orion Health
Duration: 1'59"

06:52
PGG Wrightson agrees to 50% purchase in Agrocentro Uruguay
BODY:
PGG Wrightson says it makes sense for it to buy a half share in one of its customers in Uruguay for an undisclosed amount.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: PGG Wrightson
Duration: 52"

06:53
LanzaTech expects further European opportunities
BODY:
The carbon recycling firm, LanzaTech, has its eyes on further opportunities in Europe.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: LanzaTech
Duration: 1'34"

06:54
China surprises with 7% economic growth in second quarter
BODY:
Growth in China's economy has beaten expectations in the second quarter, but is still at the lowest levels since the global finacial crisis.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: China
Duration: 1'18"

06:56
Uncertainty about Greek food supplies
BODY:
An importer of Greek food products says suppliers in the country could go under with harsh austerity measures.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Greek debit crisis
Duration: 2'29"

06:58
Morning markets for 16 July 2015
BODY:
On Wall St, stocks have risen after the Federal Reserve Chair, Janet Yellen, said the Fed was on track to raise interest rates this year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 58"

07:08
Sports News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'58"

07:11
Sudden downpower floods parts of south, west Auckland
BODY:
A sudden torrential downpour turned roads into rivers, about 70 homes have been flooded in west and south Auckland in just three hours last night.
Topics: weather
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: floods
Duration: 4'13"

07:16
Global Dairy Auction prices fall again
BODY:
The price of New Zealand's single biggest export, whole milk powder, has fallen again - slumping at auction overnight.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: dairy price
Duration: 3'46"

07:24
Auckland's character suburbs at risk
BODY:
Auckland's character suburbs are under threat after the Auckland Unitary Plan's independent hearings panel turned down a push by the Auckland Council to protect all houses built before 1944.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: character suburbs
Duration: 5'01"

07:30
Deadline looms for flag designs
BODY:
Today's the final chance for people to have a go at designing a new flag.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: flag
Duration: 3'17"

07:37
Lawyer backs sacking of Barfoot and Thompson employee
BODY:
A leading employment lawyer says the Barfoot and Thompson employee sacked yesterday for leaking confidential housing data has only themselves to blame.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Barfoot and Thompson
Duration: 3'08"

07:41
Ansuha Bradley on the Flooding In Auckland
BODY:
Ansuha Bradley is in Papakura
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: floods
Duration: 1'23"

07:42
Months before flood damaged homes habitable
BODY:
Some of the residents worst affected by Whanganui's record flood last month may not be able to return home for at least another three months.
Topics:
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: floods
Duration: 3'19"

07:45
Police victim shooting says its like David v Goliath
BODY:
The man who was hit by shrapnel from a police bullet as members of the Armed Offenders Squad hunted a drug fuelled gunman says he feels like he's taking on Goliath.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: police conduct
Duration: 3'39"

07:52
Chemical caps for Taupo farms could work across NZ.
BODY:
Farmers near some of New Zealand's most polluted waterways could have their stock numbers capped.
Topics: rural, environment
Regions:
Tags: water quality, nitrogen
Duration: 2'50"

07:55
Preventing falls adds costs to housing
BODY:
The pro-business think tank, the New Zealand Initiative, says WorkSafe's campaign to prevent falls on residential construction sites is emotional and adding thousands of dollars in unnecessary costs.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: workplace safety
Duration: 3'05"

07:58
Preventing falls necessary for workplace safety
BODY:
Graham Burke the president of the Specialist Trade Contractors Federation an umbrella group for subcontractors within the construction industry.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: workplace safety
Duration: 1'56"

08:07
Sports News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'11"

08:11
Phil Twyford in our Auckland studio
BODY:
Labour says the sacking of a Barfoot and Thompson employee for leaking confidential housing data is disappointing but is taking none of the blame.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'22"

08:17
Government told to axe its spy agencies
BODY:
The Government's been told it should be axing its spy agencies, not reviewing them.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: GCSB, SIS
Duration: 3'09"

08:21
Auckland Council's push to protect pre-1944 houses 'unnecessary'
BODY:
Auckland residents say they feel deflated and ignored after the rejection of a council proposal to protect character housing areas built before 1944.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'40"

08:27
Dr Randii Wessen on the Pluto Flyby
BODY:
After yesterday's historic flyby of Pluto more detailed images of Pluto are now arriving at mission control in Maryland.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Pluto
Duration: 3'19"

08:28
Internet video software vulnerable to attack
BODY:
Mozilla Firefox has blocked the Adobe Flash software from running in its browsers because of massive security vulnerabilities.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'20"

08:33
Markets Update for 16 July 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'20"

08:38
Port fuel tank safety assessment begins tomorrow
BODY:
An urgent safety assessment of Lyttelton Port's fuel tanks starts tomorrow, but it is unclear how long it will take, leaving those nearby anxious for answers.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Lyttelton Port
Duration: 3'18"

08:43
Video cameras for Lower Hutt Parking Wardens
BODY:
Parking wardens and animal control officers in Lower Hutt are the latest to be fitted with video cameras to try and stop people abusing them.
Topics: life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: body cameras
Duration: 3'22"

08:45
Te Manu Korihi News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
The Waitangi Tribunal has asked to hear further argument on whether it should hold an urgent inquiry into the Trans Pacific Trade Agreement; The MP for Tamaki Makaurau, Peeni Henare, says he's heartened to hear that more hapu are ready to negotiate a Treaty settlement in the north; The Flag Consideration Panel says its received a significant number of flag designs that include Maori symbols.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'24"

08:50
Fonterra payout could be heading much lower
BODY:
Another tumble in dairy prices overnight has at least one investment analyst predicting Fonterra's farmgate payout could drop to the 3-dollar mark.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: dairy prices, Dairy payout
Duration: 2'51"

08:53
New rules to 'put raw milk farmers out of business'
BODY:
Some farmers who produce raw, unpasteurised milk say new regulations will put them out of businesses and stop their thousands of customers getting hold of it.
Topics: farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'28"

08:56
Movie buffs to feast on 168 films in this year's film festival
BODY:
The New Zealand Film Festival opens in Auckland today. Movie buffs will get to choose from 168 -films covering several different genres - with some sessions already sold out.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, NZIFF
Duration: 3'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: I Am Not Esther, by Fleur Beale, read by Hana Pomare (9 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:07
Dairy prices
BODY:
The overall average for dairy commodities in the Global Dairy Trade auction fell 10.7 percent to $US2082 per tonne.
Topics: rural
Regions:
Tags: milk price, Fonterra, Dairy payout
Duration: 13'24"

09:21
What now for Dairy farmers with new drop in price?
BODY:
National Manager of Agriculture, BNZ.
Topics: rural
Regions:
Tags: milk price, Fonterra, Dairy payout, BNZ
Duration: 5'53"

09:27
New information from Pluto
BODY:
A new picture of Pluto's surface shows evidence of active geology and mountains comparable to the Rockies and nearly as high as Aoraki/Mt Cook. NASA has presented the first images acquired by the New Horizons probe during its historic flyby of Pluto. Dr Jim Green is NASA's Planetary Science Division Director.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Pluto
Duration: 7'40"

09:35
The future of the Olympic Games
BODY:
Belinda Wheaton and Holly Thorpe are Waikato University researchers who've been commissioned by the IOC to find out the youth perceptions of the Games. Olympic organisers are trying to turn around diminishing numbers of youth viewers. The IOC is already considering including surfing in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020, but is considering whether more lifestyle sports, such as skateboarding and parkour should be included. Dr Wheaton and Dr Thorpe will conduct research across five continents over the coming year before making recommendations to the IOC.
Topics: sport, politics, health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Olympic games
Duration: 14'34"

09:51
UK correspondent - Dame Ann Leslie
BODY:
The Greek debit crisis, wimbledon and the royal family.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 8'04"

10:11
Lying, a pandemic of deception - how to spot a liar
BODY:
Lie detector Pamela Meyer is a leading deception detection expert in the US and the CEO of Calibrate, which is a deception detection training company based in Washington DC. She claims we're facing a pandemic of deception, and says there are tools people can employ that can help take back the truth. She will talk about what gives people away - indicators of lying such as your posture, eyes, breathing rate, fidgets, and a host of other indicators. Are white lies okay to smooth the way, how often are we lied to, and the ability of lying to break up families and bring down organisations.
EXTENDED BODY:

Photo: CC BY 2.0 Tristan Schmurr
Lie detector Pamela Meyer is a leading deception detection expert in the US and the CEO of Calibrate, which is a deception detection training company based in Washington DC.
She claims we're facing a pandemic of deception, and says there are tools people can employ that can help take back the truth.
She talks about what gives people away - indicators of lying such as your posture, eyes, breathing rate, fidgets, and a host of other indicators. Whether white lies are okay to smooth the way, how often we are lied to, and the ability of lying to break up families and bring down organisations.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Pamela Meyer, lying, deception truth, Simpatico Networks
Duration: 22'37"

10:35
Book review: 'Blackout' by Sarah Hepola
BODY:
Published by Hodder, RRP$37.99. Reviewed by Elisabeth Easther.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Blackout, Sarah Hepola
Duration: 4'20"

11:07
New technology with Sarah Putt
BODY:
Sarah Putt discusses the demise of chat site Reddit's chief executive and problems with its moderation; and how twitter has started selling advertising.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Twitter, Reddit, Service
Duration: 14'03"

11:24
Wild Boys - A Parent's Story of Tough Love
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to Dutch-Australian writer about her book Wild Boys, which explores the challenges of 'tough love' from a mother's perspective and offers an intimate insight into reconnecting teenagers with their families and communities. Helena Pastor wrote Wild Boys to shine a light on the difficulty she faced raising one of her four sons, the mistakes she made and how she learned to deal with challenges by ultimately using tough love.
EXTENDED BODY:

Photo: Simon Scott.
Kathryn Ryan talks to Dutch-Australian writer about her book Wild Boys, which explores the challenges of 'tough love' from a mother's perspective and offers an intimate insight into reconnecting teenagers with their families and communities.
Helena Pastor wrote Wild Boys to shine a light on the difficulty she faced raising one of her four sons, the mistakes she made and how she learned to deal with challenges, ultimately by using tough love.
Topics: books, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Helena Pastor, wild boys, tough love, difficult teens, parenting
Duration: 17'31"

11:46
Film review with Dan Slevin
BODY:
Opening day of the NZ International Film Festival in Auckland, Dan tell us about the films he's seen and what the themes are.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Film Festival, film, NZIFF
Duration: 13'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Dairy prices
The overall average for dairy commodities in the Global Dairy Trade auction fell 10.7 percent to $US2082 per tonne. Alex Wright, Northland Dairy Farmer, Fonterra Shareholder and Member of Federated Farmers; Ashley Cullen from Northland Federated Farmers; and Scott Wishart, National Manager of Agriculture, Bank of NZ.
09:20 New information from Pluto
A new picture of Pluto's surface shows evidence of active geology and mountains comparable to the Rockies and nearly as high as Aoraki/Mt Cook. NASA has presented the first images acquired by the New Horizons probe during its historic flyby of Pluto. Dr Jim Green is NASA's Planetary Science Division Director.
09:30 The future of the Olympic Games
Belinda Wheaton and Holly Thorpe are Waikato University researchers who've been commissioned by the IOC to find out the youth perceptions of the Games. Olympic organisers are trying to turn around diminishing numbers of youth viewers.
The IOC is already considering including surfing in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020, but is considering whether more lifestyle sports, such as skateboarding and parkour should be included.
Dr Wheaton and Dr Thorpe will conduct research across five continents over the coming year before making recommendations to the IOC.
09:45 UK correspondent Dame Ann Leslie
10:05 Lying, a pandemic of deception - how to spot a liar
Lie detector Pamela Meyer is a leading deception detection expert in the US and the CEO of Calibrate, which is a deception detection training company based in Washington DC.
She claims we're facing a pandemic of deception, and says there are tools people can employ that can help take back the truth.
She will talk about what gives people away - indicators of lying such as your posture, eyes, breathing rate, fidgets, and a host of other indicators. Are white lies okay to smooth the way, how often are we lied to, and the ability of lying to break up families and bring down organisations.
10:35 Book review: 'Blackout' by Sarah Hepola
Published by Hodder, RRP$37.99. Reviewed by Elisabeth Easther.
10:45 The Reading: 'I Am Not Esther' by Fleur Beale, read by Hana Pomare
The tale of a teenager's battle for identity after her mother sends her to live with relatives in a closed religious sect (9 of 10, RNZ).
11:05 New technology with Sarah Putt
New Technology commentator Sarah Putt discusses the demise of chat site Reddit's chief executive and problems with its moderation; and how twitter has started selling advertising.
11:20 Wild Boys - A Parent's Story of Tough Love by Helena Pastor
Kathryn Ryan talks to Dutch-Australian writer about her book Wild Boys, which explores the challenges of 'tough love' from a mother's perspective and offers an intimate insight into reconnecting teenagers with their families and communities. Helena Pastor wrote Wild Boys to shine a light on the difficulty she faced raising one of her four sons, the mistakes she made and how she learned to deal with challenges by ultimately using tough love.
11:45 Film review with Dan Slevin
Today is opening day of the NZ International Film Festival in Auckland, Dan tell us about the films he's seen and what the themes are.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Gladys Knight & the Pips
Song: I heard it through the grapevine
Composer: Whitfield/Strong
Album:
Label: Motown
Time: 10:08
Artist: The Be Good Tanyas
Song: The Littlest Birds
Composer: Holland/Parton
Album: Blue Horse
Label: Putumayo
Time: 10:34
Artist: Little Johnny Taylor
Song: You win, I lose
Composer: Clifton
Album:
Label: Promo
Time: 10:42
Artist: JJ Cale
Song: Hey Baby
Composer: Cale
Album: Troubadour
Label: Mercury
Time: 11:20
Artist: Eddie Brockell
Song: What I am
Composer:
Album:
Label:
Time: 11:40

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

06:52
PGG Wrightson agrees to 50% purchase in Agrocentro Uruguay
BODY:
PGG Wrightson says it makes sense for it to buy a half share in one of its customers in Uruguay for an undisclosed amount.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: PGG Wrightson
Duration: 52"

06:53
LanzaTech expects further European opportunities
BODY:
The carbon recycling firm, LanzaTech, has its eyes on further opportunities in Europe.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: LanzaTech
Duration: 1'34"

12:00
Midday News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
Federated Farmers shocked at the drop in dairy prices and the Greek parliament passes a crucial bailout bill amid violent clashes in Athens.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'15"

12:17
Cut to interest rate expected
BODY:
Weaker than expected inflation, compounded by a fall in dairy prices, has economists pretty much certain the Reserve Bank will cut the benchmark interest rate next week
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rate
Duration: 1'01"

12:18
Dollar falls after dairy price drop
BODY:
The New Zealand dollar has fallen about two percent against its American counterpart, after a weaker than expected dairy result overnight.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand dollar
Duration: 1'37"

12:20
Manufacturing activity picks up
BODY:
Growth in the manufacturing sector has picked up strongly, despite a drag caused by the reduced dairy payout.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: manufacturing sector
Duration: 1'31"

12:22
Gentrack signs deal with UK water company
BODY:
Gentrack has signed what it describes as a substantial contract with a large British water company.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Gentrack
Duration: 36"

12:24
Midday Markets for 16 July 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Bryan Shepherd at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'12"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
King Country Energy, in the central North Island, has appointed Linda Robertson to its board as an independent director.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: King Country Energy
Duration: 23"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
The All Blacks halfback TJ Perenara believes Friday night's test against Argentina gives him the prime opportunity to dethrone Aaron Smith as the side's number one halfback.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'49"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

=AUDIO=

13:09
Your Song - 'Bad To The Bone'
BODY:
Tara Sutherland from Banks Peninsula has chosen 'Bad To The Bone' by George Thorogood
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'00"

13:22
New Zealand A to Z - Matiu/Somes Island
BODY:
With historian Lynette Shum and Liz Mellish co-chair of the Matiu/Somes Island Charitable Trust.
EXTENDED BODY:
Matiu Some's Island is the biggest of Wellington Harbour's islands and has a fascinating history.
In pre-European times the island was host to several pā which acted as lookout posts and refuges as well as a way station for people travelling by waka between other pā which surrounded the harbour. Matiu Somes also played a defensive role during both World Wars. They were host to gun emplacements and anti-submarine equipment.
There's a darker side to the island's history. It was the site of detainment camps for people declared "undesirable aliens" during the wars. That included everyone from Tongans with German last names to socialists. One of the most tragic stories is the man known as the Leper of Somes Island.
These days Matiu Somes is owned by Te Ātiawa and serves as a nature reserve administered jointly by the iwi, Department of Conservation and the Matiu/Somes Island Charitable Trust.
Paul Brennan talks with historian Lynette Shum and co-chair of the Matiu Somes Island Charitable Trust Liz Mellish.
Matiu Somes Island in pictures
Related

Your Place - Matiu-Somes Island
Detention and prevention
Zombie run a hit in the capital
The mysteries of Matiu-Somes Island revealed
Fluttering Shearwaters on Matiu-Somes Island
Hydrogen on Matiu Somes Island
Wellington's Little Penguins

Topics: history
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Matiu-Somes Island
Duration: 31'40"

14:07
Pie Time - Tim Aspinall
BODY:
It's that time again - the annual pie awards have kicked off, with judging taking place in Auckland today. We speak to head judge, Tim Aspinall, about this years' entries.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: pie awards
Duration: 12'54"

14:20
Future of an historic Wurlitzer organ in doubt
BODY:
The almost 90-year-old Wurlitzer organ at Avondale's Hollywood cinema has to move now that the building has been put up for sale. It's one of only three Wurlitzer organs left in New Zealand after their hey-day during the silent movie era. This one is said to be one of the best two in the Southern Hemisphere. We speak to the Chairman of the Wurlitzer Organ Trust of Auckland, James Duncan, about what it might take to move this complicated, colossal instrument - and where the ideal new home for it may be.
Topics: history, music
Regions:
Tags: Wurlitzer organ
Duration: 9'41"

14:45
Feature Album - Multi-Love
BODY:
This afternoon it's 'Multi Love' released at the end of May by The Unknown Mortal Orchestra an American and New Zealand rock band composed of singer, guitarist and songwriter Ruban Nielson, bassist Jake Portrait and drummer Riley Geare.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Multi Love, Unknown Mortal Orchestra
Duration: 15'04"

15:10
Expat - Tracee Knowler
BODY:
Tracee is a New Zealand Red Cross aid worker doing disaster management work in the Marshall Islands.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'31"

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 16 July 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'29"

21:46
Children Mixing Screens with Food
BODY:
As young people use screens more and more, public health researcher Sam Marsh is looking into how much food they are eating when using different media like computers and TVs.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Ruth Beran
Avoid mixing screens with food.
That’s the recommendation of University of Auckland’s public health researcher Sam Marsh who has been conducting studies looking at children’s food intake when using screens like TVs and computers.
Sit at a table when you’re eating,” she says. “Talk to your kids, interact with them while they’re having their food and then if they’re going to have screen time that’s separate.”

Sam conducted two studies to support her recommendations, the first was with 20 boys aged 9 to 13 which compared what they ate while watching TV, playing video games, and using a computer recreationally. The boys came in on three separate days using a different screen on each day. She found that the boys ate 820 kcal in an hour while watching TV, as compared with 685kcal while using the computer, and 696 kcal while playing video games.
So quite a lot of food, which is important because research shows even 100 kcal per day over a year is enough for a kid to put on weight,” she says.

The children had a selection of food, from chips and chocolate, to yoghurt, cheese and crackers, and coke and water. The food was measured before the kids came into the room, and after they left. There was a preference for the energy dense food, which was what the researchers assumed would be the case.
The study was conducted in the after school period to recreate the natural environment of coming home from school and sitting in front of TV or playing games. Sam says this was “to see how much they would eat in that really small amount of time.”
The boys ate more while watching television, as compared to playing on the computer, which was somewhat more to playing video games. Sam says this was unexpected: “We thought they would be using their hands more and completely not eating really, but they ate a lot in all three conditions.”
At the end of the study the children were asked what they had eaten and only one child, on one occasion could remember everything they had eaten during the past hour. “Everybody else had to look at the empty wrappers to be able to tell us what they’d eaten,” says Sam. “They’re really distracted.”
The other study that Sam conducted compared watching TV with using multiple screens in the hour after school with 78 boys and girls aged 13 to 18 years. The study did not find a significant difference, but Sam says if the study was conducted again it would be done differently. “We didn’t make the kids use multiple screens at once, we just put them in a room with multiple screens and said they could use them at the same time,” she says. This makes it hard to know if there was simply no difference, or whether there was no difference between the two behaviours.
The energy intake for this study was similar though to the previous study, with the children eating 758 kcal when exposed to multiple screens, and 681 kcal with a single screen.
Sam has hypothesised as to why the children ate so much. The first is that they’re really distracted. “They’re not actually aware of what they’re eating, the food is [just] in front of them,” she says. Being distracted means the children are not aware of when they are full and also don’t remember what they’ve eaten. “If you have a meal in front of a screen, you’re more likely to eat more after as well because you can’t actually remember what you ate,” she says. Eating in front of a screen also becomes a learnt behaviour so that sitting in front of a screen like the TV is associated with food.
It’s recommended that children above five years use a screen for only two hours per day. A survey of the children in the second study found that screens were being used up to five hours a day. The hours quickly add up because children are not just watching TV, they are also using computers, iPads and even smart phones. “We haven’t done a lot of research in New Zealand on it, but in the age group two and over I think it’s around 50% of children are watching more than two hours of TV a day,” says Sam. “Which is a bit scary.”
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: children, food, ipad, TV, computer, games, eating
Duration: 18'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
Bad To The Bone - George Thorogood. Chosen by Tara Sutherland of Little River.
1:20 Our New Zealand A to Z - Matiu/Somes Island
On New Zealand A to Z today it's M for Matiu/Somes Island. The biggest of Wellington Harbour's islands and host to a fascinating history.
2:10 Pie Time - Tim Aspinall
It's that time again - the annual pie awards have kicked off, with judging taking place in Auckland today. We speak to head judge, Tim Aspinall, about this year's entries.
2:20 Historic Wurlitzer Organ - James Duncan
The almost 90-year-old Wurlitzer organ at Avondale's Hollywood cinema has to move now that the building has been put up for sale. It's one of only three Wurlitzer organs left in New Zealand after their hey-day during the silent movie era. This one is said to be one of the best two in the Southern Hemisphere. We speak to the Chairman of the Wurlitzer Organ Trust of Auckland, James Duncan, about what it might take to move this complicated, colossal instrument - and where the ideal new home for it may be.
2:30 NZ Reading - Shooting The Moon
Nick tells Pip he can have Horace if he doesn't get a deer on his first hunt and Pip is alarmed and impressed by a poem of Nick's he finds. Camping out with dad for his first hunt, Nick awakes early and takes a photo of a deer drinking at the swimming hole. When the moment comes to shoot for real, Pip deliberately misses. His angry father misjudges the path and falls down the cliff. Pip finds him unconscious, and climbs to get help.
2:45 Feature album
Multi-Love by Unknown Mortal Orchestra.
3:10 Expat - Tracee Knowler
Tracee is a New Zealand Red Cross aid worker doing disaster management work in the Marshall Islands.
3:20 BBC Witness - Marie Curie
The first person to win two Nobel prizes for her pioneering research into radioactivity. Working with her husband, Pierre, Marie Curie identified two new elements Polonium and Radium. Their discoveries paved the way for modern treatments of cancer and other illnesses.
3:35 Our Changing World - Ruth Beran
Young people these days are using screens more and more, but exactly how much food are they eating when using different media like computers and TVs? Public health researcher Sam Marsh from the University of Auckland has been looking into it, and Ruth Beran meets her and watches as two children demonstrate how easy it is to eat and play. Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Jim Mora, Zara Potts, Chris Trotter and Linda Hallinan.

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 16 July 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'29"

16:03
The Panel with Chris Trotter and Linda Hallinan (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Chris Trotter and Lynda Hallinan have been up to. The research director of Rabobank Hayley Moynihan joins the Panel to discuss the latest dairy price fall. How serious is this latest downturn? Is Barfoot and Thompson's data about its offshore clients sacrosanct as they said? It was leaked to Labour by an employee who's now been fired. A Whanganui City Councillor wants window washers at intesections to have to abide by regulations like council contractors. Video cameras for Hutt City Council officers to combat physical, verbal abuse.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 24'48"

16:05
The Panel with Chris Trotter and Linda Hallinan (Part 2)
BODY:
Research on what rosemary does to your brain. And parsely, sage and thyme for that matter. What the Panelists Chris Trotter and Lynda Hallinan have been thinking about. UK woman reads 'Go Set a Watchman' in 25 minutes. A British speed reader has finished Harper Lee's novel in less than half an hour. Submissions for the new flag design close today. Mayor Len Brown has referred his poor choice of parking in a cycle lane yesterday to Auckland Transport "asking for it to be treated the same way as any such case".
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 25'37"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Chris Trotter and Lynda Hallinan have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'22"

16:11
Latest dairy price fall
BODY:
The research director of Rabobank Hayley Moynihan joins the Panel to discuss the latest dairy price fall. How serious is this latest downturn?
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: dairy prices
Duration: 7'40"

16:19
Barfoot and Thompson and Chinese property buyers
BODY:
Is Barfoot and Thompson's data about its offshore clients sacrosanct as they said? It was leaked to Labour by an employee who's now been fired.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Chinese, Asians
Duration: 6'28"

16:25
Call for clampdown on Whanganui window washers
BODY:
A Whanganui City Councillor wants window washers at intesections to have to abide by regulations like council contractors.
Topics:
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: window washers
Duration: 2'38"

16:27
Cameras for Hutt City parking wardens
BODY:
Video cameras for Hutt City Council officers to combat physical, verbal abuse
Topics: technology
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Video cameras
Duration: 4'18"

16:34
Research on herbs
BODY:
Research on what rosemary does to your brain. And parsely, sage and thyme for that matter.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Herbs
Duration: 5'47"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Chris Trotter and Lynda Hallinan have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'06"

16:45
Speed reading record
BODY:
UK woman reads 'Go Set a Watchman' in 25 minutes. A British speed reader has finished Harper Lee's novel in less than half an hour.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: speed reading
Duration: 4'51"

16:50
Sky TV ad
BODY:
The latest ad on TV for the Sky City Casino and Hotel complex.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Sky City
Duration: 47"

16:51
New flag design
BODY:
Submissions for the new flag design close today.
Topics: politics
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Tags: flag
Duration: 4'24"

16:55
Len Brown's poor parking
BODY:
Mayor Len Brown has referred his poor choice of parking in a cycle lane yesterday to Auckland Transport "asking for it to be treated the same way as any such case".
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Len Brown
Duration: 3'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 16 July 2015
BODY:
Fonterra cuts 523 jobs as the dairy price takes another big hit. MPs in Greece vote to bring in tough new austerity measures and the husband of wife killed by listeria wants hospital to admit responsiblity.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'55"

17:07
Fears grow for farmer well-being
BODY:
Fonterra is cutting 523 jobs as it pushes ahead with restructuring plans to cut costs and make the company more resiliant in an increasingly volitile market.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 4'27"

17:12
Fonterra job cuts likely from head office - analyst
BODY:
Dairy giant Fonterra has announced it's cutting 523 jobs. Fonterra declined to be interviewed, but an agribusiness analyst, Keith Woodford, is with us.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 6'06"

17:18
MPs in Greece vote to bring in tough new austerity measures
BODY:
In Greece, thousands of angry protesters took to the streets of Athens hurling molotov cocktails at police while inside Parliament politicans also vented their fury over an austerity package one described as social genocide.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis
Duration: 5'09"

17:24
Husband wants hospital to admit responsiblity
BODY:
The husband of a woman who died from listeria contaminated meat she ate in hospital blames the Hawkes Bay District Health Board and wants the Chief Executive Dr Kevin Snee to admit responsiblity.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Listeria
Duration: 5'53"

17:34
Today's market update
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'14"

17:36
Auckland council blames weather not drains for flooding
BODY:
There've been complaints that poor drainage was partly to blame for last night's flooding in parts of South and West Auckland.
Topics: weather
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: floods
Duration: 4'17"

17:45
Judge expresses frustration at delayed setencing
BODY:
A judge has expressed frustration about delays in sentencing a woman who faked cancer to illicit thousands of dollars in public donations.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: faked cancer
Duration: 2'14"

17:47
Law change essential for battered women
BODY:
An anti-violence group wants battered woman who kill their abusive partners to be able to argue self defence.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: battered woman
Duration: 4'07"

17:51
Top 5 NZ songs of 1981 revealed
BODY:
But now in 2015, five New Zealand classics have been picked as the finalists for the long lost scroll.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: APRA, 1981
Duration: 3'38"

17:55
Govt needs to do more - Maori IT experts critical
BODY:
Māori IT experts are warning about a digital divide in New Zealand. The Government is spending two billion dollars on improving broadband internet access throughout New Zealand, but tangata whenua say rolling out cables is not enough to ensure they're connected to the digital world. Te Manu Korihi's Nina Fowler reports.
Topics: te ao Maori, technology
Regions:
Tags: broadband
Duration: 3'01"

18:07
Sports News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'01"

18:11
Farmers hurting after another drop in milk prices
BODY:
Fonterra is cutting 523 jobs and says more could go in the coming months as it pushes ahead with plans to cut costs and make the company more resiliant.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 7'33"

18:21
Richie McCaw and Dan Carter prepare for hometown crowds
BODY:
It may be the last hometown test match for Richie McCaw and Dan Carter, but neither are showing any signs of getting sentimental.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby
Duration: 2'54"

18:24
Nelson city council receives report on trafalgar centre
BODY:
The Nelson City Council has been told it will have to spend up to 13-million dollars to save its main civic building.
Topics:
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: Trafalgar Centre
Duration: 3'44"

18:28
Research finds LED lights kills food poisoning bacteria
BODY:
New research shows blue LED lights in refrigerators could help prevent people getting food poisoning.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: blue LED
Duration: 3'04"

18:38
Journalists accused of defaming the Navy in Thailand
BODY:
An Australian journalist and his Thai colleague are on trial in Phuket charged with defaming the navy after they quoted a paragraph from an award winning story by Reuters.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Phuket, Thailand
Duration: 3'30"

18:45
Calls for more Govt money to fight kauri die-back
BODY:
The government being asked to fork out more money to fight kauri die-back, a fungal disease that kills both young and old trees alike, for which there's no known cure.
Topics: science
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: kauri die-back
Duration: 3'45"

18:49
Te Manu Korihi News for 16 July 2015
BODY:
An environmental trust says iwi are leading the way in cutting the amount of nitrogen seeping into Lake Taupo - but there are fears their efforts to clean up the rohe are in vain; Some Maori military veterans and their whanau are being excluded from the first Waitangi Tribunal kaupapa inquiry because their iwi's Treaty claims have already been settled; Maori IT experts say a lack of pay equality and information are creating a digital divide in New Zealand.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'35"

18:54
Young people texting for help
BODY:
More and more young people seeking help by text. Youthline says six years ago most from people called in about their problems, but there's been a big shift and now a massive 91 percent of people text-in to get advice.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Youthline
Duration: 4'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:10
Sea levels rising?
BODY:
Is the impact of storms on the New Zealand shoreline on the increase due to sea level rise as a result of global warming? Bryan Crump speaks to Dr. Richard Gorman, Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist with NIWA.
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: storms, shoreline erosion, coastal erosion, sea level rise, global warming, NIWA
Duration: 19'33"

20:42
Video Games - Matt Maguire
BODY:
Joystick ninja and GamePlanet editor Matt Maguire solves the riddles, beats the bad guys and saves the Earth countless times on a myriad of gaming platforms - Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.
Topics: arts, business, education, technology
Regions:
Tags: video games, computer games, virtual reality, augmented reality, Nintendo, Satoru Iwata, HoloLens
Duration: 15'53"

20:59
Conundrum
BODY:
Conundrum clue number seven.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 18"

22:59
Conundrum
BODY:
Conundrum clue number eight.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:10 Sea Level Rising
Is the impact of storms on the New Zealand shoreline increasing due to sea level rise as a result of global warming? With Dr Richard Gorman, Coastal and Estuarine Physical Processes Scientist with NIWA.
7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

[video] https://youtu.be/_MC3XuMvsDI
[video] https://youtu.be/mMHejG4lPHs

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies for 16 July
BODY:
Simon Morris looks at the recent burst of women-oriented films – including Far From The Madding Crowd, Inside Out, The Falling and Man Up. He also talks to a successful New Zealand cinematographer, Ginny Loane.
EXTENDED BODY:

Simon Morris looks at the recent burst of women-oriented films – including Far From The Madding Crowd, Inside Out, The Falling and Man Up. He also talks to a successful New Zealand cinematographer, who happens to be a woman – Ginny Loane.
The Big Picture with Simon Morris.
After a couple of weeks off I’ve returned to a decidedly healthier looking bunch of titles. Not only does the International Film Festival seem bulging at the seams with intriguing, bizarre and entertaining films, but the movies on general release are a huge improvement on what was on offer a few weeks ago.
The most interesting thing about this month’s movies is how many of them are by, with, about and for women.
Inside Out almost entirely takes place inside the psyche of a little girl. Magic Mike XXL is a blown-up, and rather terrifying, hen-party. Man Up turns the usual “bozo guy looking for love” comedy formula into a bozo woman, played endearingly by Lake Bell. Even the Beach Boy bio-pic Love and Mercy – is taken from a woman’s point of view.
One of New Zealand cinema’s unsung heroines, Ginny Loane is that very rare thing - a woman cinematographer, and also one of the best we have. Ginny is naturally keen to see more women-driven stories on our screens, and she certainly can’t complain at the moment.
Two current films could probably only have been made by women – the second Madame Bovary of the year, directed by Frenchwoman Sophie Barthes, and an odd little film called The Falling, directed by Englishwoman Carol Morley.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review
Duration: 23'33"

19:31
The Falling - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris looks at the recent burst of women-oriented films - including The Falling.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Falling is about mass hysteria at a girl’s school. It stars Game of Thrones’ Arya Stark, Maisie Williams, as the intense and troubled Lydia, struggling with problems at home, rebellion at school, and particularly her intense feelings for her best friend Abbie.
It all comes to a head with an outbreak of fainting at the school, led by Lydia. It starts out as perhaps extreme attention-seeking on her part, but the craze develops a life of its own.
The unique aspect of The falling is the non-judgemental tone. Clearly women understand this kind of frenzy more than men, no matter how well-meaning.
These are implicitly female adolescent urges that manifest themselves – at the harmless end of the spectrum - in outbreaks of enthusiasm for One Direction and the Twilight series, and at the other end, I suppose, the Witch Trials of Salem.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review, teenagers, hysteria
Duration: 1'47"

19:35
Far From The Madding Crowd - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris looks at big costume drama Far From the Madding Crowd.
EXTENDED BODY:
A woman-led story more to my taste – possibly because the original, classic novel was written by a man - is the new version of Thomas Hardy’s Far From The Madding Crowd.
Far From The Madding Crowd was always going to suffer from comparisons with John Schlesinger’s 1960s film, with its perfect casting of Julie Christie as Bathsheba, torn between Mr Right – Alan Bates, Mr Wrong – Terence Stamp, and Mr Father Figure – Peter Finch.
In this version Carey Mulligan is terrific as the young woman who inherits a farm, and spends the rest of the film looking for someone worthy to share it – and her.
Carey Mulligan is the best actress of her generation. Her co-stars though are a bit of a mixed bunch. Belgian star Matthias Schoenaerts is surprisingly good as the West Country English farm-hand, patiently waiting for Bathsheba to stop being seduced by glamour and riches. Michael Sheen is a little one-note, as the love-struck Lord of the Manor, while Tom Sturridge as the wastrel, Sergeant Troy, is frankly under-powered.
You could say the same about the film. Danish director Thomas Vinterberg - one of the founders and leading lights of the old Dogme movement – seems determined to avoid melodrama at all costs. The cost though is an emotionally neutral, arms-length rendition of Hardy’s seething, suppressed passion. It’s all a bit restrained and under-populated for a film called Far From The Madding Crowd.
Despite a riveting central performance, this proves that Hardy – like Jane Austen and the Brontes – only works with a bit of melo amongst the drama.
Topics: arts, books
Regions:
Tags: film, film review, Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd
Duration: 3'16"

19:40
New Zealand cinematographer Ginny Loane - At The Movies
BODY:
Simon Morris talks to successful New Zealand cinematographer Ginny Loane about hacking it in a man's world.
EXTENDED BODY:
Simon Morris talks to successful New Zealand cinematographer Ginny Loane about hacking it in a man's world.
Ginny Loane is that rare thing in the film industry, a woman cinematographer, or Director of Photography as they're known in the biz. The under-representation of women in all sorts of key positions has been on the mind of the New Zealand Film Commission anyway, with a new scholarship championed by Jane Campion aimed at getting more women behind the camera.
Ginny's strongly involved in this, but I'd had my eye on her for ages, notably for her brilliant work in short films. She's currently working on Lee Tamahori's new film The Patriarch, so I am delighted to talk to her.
The scholarship for the Jane Campion CineFem Scholarship for women cinematographers will be announced shortly, and you can see Ginny’s work on Lee Tamahori’s film The Patriarch early next year.
Here's an example of Ginny's work in the advertising realm:
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review, cinematography
Duration: 13'40"

7:30 At the Movies
Films and movie business with Simon Morris.
8:10 Windows on the World
International public radio documentaries - visit the Windows on the World web page to find links to these documentaries.
8:40 Video Games
Joystick ninja and GamePlanet editor Matt Maguire solves the riddles, beats the bad guys and saves the Earth countless times on a myriad of gaming platforms – Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.
9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:06
Cleaning Up Our Coastlines
BODY:
After more than a decade of cleaning up Auckland's waterways and removing 22 shipping containers full of rubbish, the Sea Cleaners Trust is ready to tackle the rest of our coastline.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Veronika Meduna
A kitchen sink, car tyres, a trampoline and even a jar of mercury – that’s just some of the items that volunteers with the Sea Cleaners Trust have pulled out of the Waitematā Harbour.
In just over a decade, the trust has collected about 30 million bits of rubbish from Auckland’s local waterways – enough to fill 122 shipping containers.
Hayden Smith, one of the visionaries behind the trust, says New Zealand’s beaches are littered with rubbish, and most of it is plastic, from larger items such as drinking bottles right through to tiny grains he calls “mermaid’s tears”.
These small pellets are used to make plastic products and they are easily blown off a truck or washed down the storm water system – just like any other rubbish.
Primarily it’s off the streets. Everything comes down through the storm water system when it rains, whether it’s from individuals dropping debris, cats and dogs ripping open rubbish bags, wind blowing rubbish around, or stuff falling off trucks. It’s all centred around major population centres – and the sea is downhill from everywhere.

For Hayden Smith, the marine clean-up project began as a personal transformation. He had been working for his family business in the transport industry but was looking for something that he could feel more passionate about. He explored the adventure tourism industry, and it was while working as a kayaking guide, that he found himself literally paddling through rubbish.
“Every single kayaking trip that I was meant to be taking was blown out by a significant storm that had rolled through. After about the tenth time this had happened, I thought I need to … go for a paddle upstream to get on the water.
“It was whilst paddling into the eye of the storm and being under the Auckland Harbour bridge that I was surrounded by rubbish, and being so low in the water in the kayak, I was right amongst it.”
He says the experience was a turning point. “The moment I felt that the city has taken responsibility for what is happening on the land but that there’s nothing taking place on the water. That’s where the mission started.”
More than a decade ago, the Sea Cleaners trust launched its first vessel – the Phil Warren, named after late chairman of the Auckland Regional Council for his environmental initiatives – and began cleaning up the Waitematā Harbour.
Since then, 3.6 million litres of rubbish (or about 30 million individual pieces) have been pulled out of the mangrove forests lining the coastline.
A few years ago, Hayden Smith chartered a sea plane and flew across the North Pacific gyre, perhaps better known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, where convergence currents accumulate vast amounts of rubbish – an estimated 70 pieces of plastic per square metre.
That mission strengthened his determination to clean up New Zealand’s coastlines around the major cities before the rubbish can drift further offshore.
The cities are the sources of rubbish. If we’re not there to collect the rubbish and we’re not able to engage the communities to help us clean up their place, the rubbish builds up and ends up leaving the cities and heading into the Pacific Ocean.

To this end, the trust is now ready to tackle more than just Auckland’s marine rubbish problem and has launched the 15,000km Project to clean up all of New Zealand’s coastline. Hayden Smith says he is inspired by the number of people wanting to volunteer, but still expects the clean-up mission to take years, if not generations. “Unfortunately, with what we’ve seen, I don’t think that, certainly not in my lifetime, we’ll ever see an ocean free of plastic.”
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: oceans, Waitemata Harbour, marine pollution, plastics, Sea Cleaners, North Pacific gyre, plastic pollution
Duration: 12'26"

21:20
Marine Science Round-Up
BODY:
A baby colossal squid, studying under-ice algae in Antarctica, New Zealand sea lions, and a better fishing trawl net.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
The New Zealand Marine Sciences Society held its annual conference in Auckland last week. As anyone who goes to scientific conferences knows, there was wide range of interesting and thought-provoking papers presented. There were nearly 200 presentations over three days, on topics as diverse as estuary dynamics and Maui’s dolphin population modelling, and I thought I’d share some key findings from a handful of researchers in an Our Changing World mini marine conference.
Baby Colossal Squid
“Like most small individuals of the glass squid family when it’s out of the water it looks a little like a deflated plastic bag. We think it’s really cute, of course! It’s got little tiny silly fins on the end, and the mantle is mostly transparent so you can see the organs inside. And it’s got little arms that already have the hooks and suckers on them … and the eyes aren’t the nice round globes you see in the adult, but they’re actually out on very small stalks.”
Kat Bolstad, Auckland University of technology, on a baby colossal squid

Kat Bolstad and her team of PhD students from the Lab for Cephalopod Ecology and Systematics (ALCES) at Auckland University of Technology, work on the taxonomy of a range of squid species, from arrow to giant and colossal. Deep sea colossal squid (Mesonychoteuthis) are, of course, famous for their vicious swivelling hooks and can grow up to 6 or more metres. In 2014, Kat was involved in the live stream of a colossal squid dissection at Te Papa, in Wellington. But at the moment Kat is excited about a somewhat smaller specimen: a 12-centimetre long ‘baby’ collected by NIWA earlier this year during the New Zealand-Australia Antarctic Ecosystems Voyage.
The squid is the smallest specimen of colossal squid ever seen, and is half the length of two other small specimens collected by NIWA on an earlier Antarctic expedition.
Colossal squid belong to the squid family Cranchiidae, or “glass squids”, and as the name suggest the young squid is almost completely transparent.
“The timing is perfect,” says Kat, ‘As we’re just working on a paper now about the growth of colossal squid and what they look like in their different life stages.”
Climate Change and Under-Ice Algae in Antarctica
“We found that as you increase the amount of CO2 in the sea water that the productivity of the algae [under the sea ice] increases, which might make you think that the effects of ocean acidification will be positive. But interestingly, we’ve done some combined experiments with acidification and warming, and when you increase the temperature of the water by 0.4 of a degree … that causes the ice crystals to start to melt, and all this algae drops off the underside of the ice.”
Drew Lohrer, benthic ecologist, NIWA

Drew Lohrer from NIWA is part of a team investigating the effects of climate change on the algae that grows on the underside of Antarctic sea ice. Each spring when light returns to the frozen continent a thick layer of this algae develops, and it’s at the base of the Antarctic food web. To study it in situ the team have developed some innovative chambers.
“We developed these novel incubation chambers, and so as the algae photosynthesise we can measure the production of oxygen to measure their photosynthetic rates,” says Drew. “They’re cylinders made of clear plastic material and they have little air pockets so when scuba divers deploy them we use our own air bubbles to push them up against the under surface of the ice.”
The researchers are able to add varying amounts of carbon dioxide to each of the chambers, which is a proxy for changing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. As sea water absorbs CO2 the pH is lowered and the water becomes more acidic. The results so far show that the algae, which is mostly diatoms, becomes more productive as CO2 levels increase.
Ocean acidification will affect the ability of calcifying organsims, that use calcium to make, for example, shells, to calcify. Diatoms, however, aren’t calcifying so they aren’t affected in this manner, and instead they use the extra CO2 to increase their rate of photosynthesis.
However, increasing the temperature of the sea water from -1.9°C to -1.4°C causes the algae to slough off the sea ice and fall to the sea floor.
“While you might get a slight positive effect of added CO2 in the sea water, you may get big changes due to increases in the temperature of the sea water,” says Drew.

New Zealand Sea Lions and Population Modelling
For many years the subantarctic Auckland islands have been the stronghold for the highly threatened New Zealand sea lion. However in the last 15 or so years the Auckland Islands population has declined to fewer than 10,000 animals, and the number of pups being produced each year has halved. The New Zealand sea lion was recently upgraded to the highest category of ‘endangered’ on the IUCN Red List, and in the New Zealand threat classification system they are listed as “nationally critical” which is the highest threat status.
The decline of sea lions at the Auckland Islands is due to a complicated mix of factors including disease outbreaks, affecting both pups and adults; nutritional stress and changes in diet from animals such as octopuses and large fish to smaller fish; mortality of adults caught as by-catch in the squid and southern blue whiting trawl fisheries. As well, sea lions are preyed on by animals such as great white sharks, and some pups are dying after getting stuck in deep wallows on Enderby Island.
There were several papers presented at the 2015 Marine Sciences Society conference on modelling the impact of sea lion mortality in the southern squid fishery (a fishing area known as SQU6T). Bruce Robertson from the University of Otago is calling for better monitoring of the sea lion excluder devices or SLEDs that the squid trawl fishery uses to try and prevent sea lions drowning in the nets. The SLEDs were introduced in 2001, and as a result live sea lion captures are no longer being reported. However, Bruce says that the lack of monitoring means it is impossible to know if sea lions are drowning in the nets and their bodies being ejected by the SLEDs and not recorded. University of Otago PhD student Stefan Meyer also gave a paper at the conference titled ‘demographic analysis reveals ineffective bycatch mitigation in the Auckland Islands trawl fishery.’ In a recent interview in the Otago Daily Times he said the key to conserving the sea lion population is to focus efforts on adults, rather than pups.
Jim Roberts from NIWA also presented his work analysing population data collected over many years by the Department of Conservation. At the same time as sea lion numbers at the Auckland islands are declining, smaller populations on Campbell and Stewart Islands and in southern New Zealand are increasing, and he says that comparing the differences between the different populations is key to understanding what is happening with the population at the Auckland Islands. MPI and DoC are jointly developing a NZ Sea Lion Threat Management Plan, and Jim is working on a risk assessment model that forms part of this plan.
A Better Net
Plant and Food Research, MPI and the fishing companies Aotearoa Fisheries, Sanford and the Sealord Group have been collaborating to develop a better trawl net. The Precision Seafood Harvesting project began in 2012, and the partners hope that the $48-million investment over six years will result in annual economic benefits of $43.6-million by 2025.
Plant and Food Research scientist Damian Moran says the work so far has focused on the end of the trawl net, which is known as the cod end. They have developed a flexible PVC liner tube that is designed to catch fish, keep them in good condition and also let out undersize ones. Traditionally what happens in trawl nets is that fish continue swimming inside the net, but as they tire in the strong water flow they are swept into the cod end and become caught against the back of the net. The new design dramatically lessens the water flow in the cod end, which allows the fish to continue swimming. When they are brought aboard the boat these fish are in a better state and have much less fin damage than fish caught in traditional nets.
To date trials of the liner have ‘indicated that although fewer undersized snapper escaped the liner than anticipated, the survival rates of fish caught in the liner and then released were higher because they were still swimming inside it when they reached fishing boat decks.’ Damian says that the survival rate of juvenile snapper released after being caught was a very high 80%.
Plant and Food Research’s web site describes the ‘Modular Harvesting System (MHS) as a prototype system that uses an understanding of the physical, physiological and behavioural aspects of fish to target specific species and fish sizes, as well as enabling fish to be landed in a better condition than with traditional harvesting systems. The fish are landed in a live, semi-rested state, maintaining the quality of the animal and increasing its value on the export market.’
The Precision Seafood Harvesting sustainable fishing technology which was a winner at the 2014 New Zealand Innovator Awards and the 2014 KiwiNet Research Commercialisation Awards.
Topics: science, environment, Antarctica
Regions:
Tags: colossal squid, Antarctica New Zealand, sea ice, marine algae, climate change, fishing industry, trawl net, Precision Seafood Harvesting, New Zealand sea lions, marine mammals, fisheries by-catch
Duration: 16'33"

21:34
Salt, Blood Pressure and the Brain
BODY:
A new study in rats shows that the link between high salt intake and high blood pressure is caused by changes in the brain
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
The link between salt and high blood pressure is well known, but until now scientists haven’t understood how high salt intake leads to hypertension. Now a large international study of rat brains, published in the journal Neuron, has shown that lots of salt causes changes in key brain circuits.
The University of Otago's Colin Brown says that he and then-PhD student Su Young Han were involved in a part of the study that showed that in an animal model “eating just salt and nothing else … [will cause] blood pressure to increase. And that increase is caused by changes in the brain that changes the secretion of a hormone called vasopressin and causes blood vessels to contract. Those [vasopressin] cells stop responding to the change of blood pressure the way they should, and that was our contribution to the study.”
“Vasopressin is well known as an anti-diuretic hormone and when it’s released into the blood stream it helps to retain water,” says Su, “And also it can act to constrict the blood vessels, so basically it helps to increase blood pressure.” Normally, when blood pressure increases a feedback circuit works to lower vasopressin secretion and lower blood pressure.
Su carried out the experiment, and she looked at vasopressin cells in the brains of rats that had been drinking salty water for a week. She found that vasopressin activity was much higher than normal. She says that normally vasopressin cells lower their activity when there is a brief increase in blood pressure, but in the salt-loaded rats there was no such response.
“Consumption of chronic salt somehow changes how the vasopressin neuron responds to an increase in blood pressure” says Su.

Colin says that this work, combined with that of the Canadian researchers at McGill Faculty of Medicine showed that there’s a break in the normal feedback regulation that causes the inappropriate secretion of vasopressin. To date this finding applies only to rats.
While Su points out that vasopressin isn’t implicated in all cases of human high blood pressure, Colin says that nevertheless this work might open up the possibility of revisiting vasopressin receptor antagonists as a method for control of high blood pressure in people who don’t respond well to current drug treatments.
Topics: science, health
Regions:
Tags: salt, blood pressure, hypertension, brain, medicine
Duration: 11'21"

21:46
Children Mixing Screens with Food
BODY:
As young people use screens more and more, public health researcher Sam Marsh is looking into how much food they are eating when using different media like computers and TVs.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Ruth Beran
Avoid mixing screens with food.
That’s the recommendation of University of Auckland’s public health researcher Sam Marsh who has been conducting studies looking at children’s food intake when using screens like TVs and computers.
Sit at a table when you’re eating,” she says. “Talk to your kids, interact with them while they’re having their food and then if they’re going to have screen time that’s separate.”

Sam conducted two studies to support her recommendations, the first was with 20 boys aged 9 to 13 which compared what they ate while watching TV, playing video games, and using a computer recreationally. The boys came in on three separate days using a different screen on each day. She found that the boys ate 820 kcal in an hour while watching TV, as compared with 685kcal while using the computer, and 696 kcal while playing video games.
So quite a lot of food, which is important because research shows even 100 kcal per day over a year is enough for a kid to put on weight,” she says.

The children had a selection of food, from chips and chocolate, to yoghurt, cheese and crackers, and coke and water. The food was measured before the kids came into the room, and after they left. There was a preference for the energy dense food, which was what the researchers assumed would be the case.
The study was conducted in the after school period to recreate the natural environment of coming home from school and sitting in front of TV or playing games. Sam says this was “to see how much they would eat in that really small amount of time.”
The boys ate more while watching television, as compared to playing on the computer, which was somewhat more to playing video games. Sam says this was unexpected: “We thought they would be using their hands more and completely not eating really, but they ate a lot in all three conditions.”
At the end of the study the children were asked what they had eaten and only one child, on one occasion could remember everything they had eaten during the past hour. “Everybody else had to look at the empty wrappers to be able to tell us what they’d eaten,” says Sam. “They’re really distracted.”
The other study that Sam conducted compared watching TV with using multiple screens in the hour after school with 78 boys and girls aged 13 to 18 years. The study did not find a significant difference, but Sam says if the study was conducted again it would be done differently. “We didn’t make the kids use multiple screens at once, we just put them in a room with multiple screens and said they could use them at the same time,” she says. This makes it hard to know if there was simply no difference, or whether there was no difference between the two behaviours.
The energy intake for this study was similar though to the previous study, with the children eating 758 kcal when exposed to multiple screens, and 681 kcal with a single screen.
Sam has hypothesised as to why the children ate so much. The first is that they’re really distracted. “They’re not actually aware of what they’re eating, the food is [just] in front of them,” she says. Being distracted means the children are not aware of when they are full and also don’t remember what they’ve eaten. “If you have a meal in front of a screen, you’re more likely to eat more after as well because you can’t actually remember what you ate,” she says. Eating in front of a screen also becomes a learnt behaviour so that sitting in front of a screen like the TV is associated with food.
It’s recommended that children above five years use a screen for only two hours per day. A survey of the children in the second study found that screens were being used up to five hours a day. The hours quickly add up because children are not just watching TV, they are also using computers, iPads and even smart phones. “We haven’t done a lot of research in New Zealand on it, but in the age group two and over I think it’s around 50% of children are watching more than two hours of TV a day,” says Sam. “Which is a bit scary.”
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: children, food, ipad, TV, computer, games, eating
Duration: 18'17"

9:06 Our Changing World
Science and environment news from New Zealand and the world.
10:17 Late Edition
A review of the leading news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 Music 101 pocket edition
A contemporary music magazine with interviews and music from New Zealand and overseas artists, coverage of new releases, tours, live sessions, music festivals and events.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

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Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274393

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 16 Jul 2015