Morning report. 1999-01-12

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Tono kōrero mai

0600 NEWS/WEATHER
0609 NZ NEWSPAPERS
0611 Māori NEWS 1616 NEWS STORY CLIMATE CHANGE - official weather statistics for 1998 show it was warmest year since records began 145 years ago. NIWA climate scientist Dr Jim Salinger says NZ likely to continue to warm and dairy areas, for example, could end up better for grape growing. Comment also from John Caradus, Inst of Agricultural Science, Sandy Scarrow of Agriculture NZ and Ruth Frampton, Agriculture ministry. (Julian Robins) IRAQ/KUWAIT - Kuwait defence ministry puts number of army units on maximum illegible because of "renewed Iragi threats" against it and neighbouring Arab states. Irag's parliament has said it holds Kuwait and Saudi Arabia partly responsible for US/UK air attacks against it. (BBC) IRAQ/US - another US bonb attack on missile site. USAF says fighter jets opened fire on missile sites posing threat to allied planes in no-fly zones set up to protect Kurds and Shi'ite Muslims. Live i/v with correspondent John McIntyre.
0620 RURAL NEWS HOT WEATHER forcing some farmers to cart water to stock. North Otago, parts of Canty. Hawkes Bay, Gisborne, Wairarapa, Manawatu, and Waiksto all browning off quickly, spurring fears of another drought. (Catherine Harris) HOT WEATHER - MILK PRODUCTION - tightening irrigations restrictions worrying South Island Dairy Co-op as weather makes inroads into milk production forecasts. Chair John Roadley comments. (Kevin Ikin) WEATHER YEAR - NIWA figures for 1998 show last year's weather most dramatic on record, driest in 80 years in areas like Gisborne, Hawkes Bay and North Canty but there was also massive amount of rain, with at least 12 floods. (Catherine Harris) SCRAPIE - new test for sheep disease developed in US has potential to do NZ much good. While scrapie doesn't exist in NZ, there are still periodic European illegible for NZ to expand its testing for disease and current procedures are costly. Comment from MAF's Stuart MacDiarmid. (Kevin Ikin)
0625 SPORTS STORY TENNIS - live i/v with Gary Ahern. (Brett Stevens in Heineken Open in AK)
0630 NEWS/WEATHER
0635 NEWS STORY Māori HOUSING - Te Puni Kokiri report critical of way Housing ministry delivers services to Māori. Māori Affairs minister Tau Henare says report damning indictment on ministry which he says needs to put more effort into developing strategies for improving housing for Māori. Comment also from Labour's Housing spokesman Graham Kelly, ministry of Housing chief exec David Smyth, and Phil Roxworthy, Te Runanga o te Rarawa. (Catherine Walbridge)
0639 INTERNATIONAL PAPERS
0642 NEWS STORY CRICKET - International Cricket Council establishes Code of Conduct Commission in response to allegations of match fixing and bribery. Comment from International Cricket Council chief exec David Richards, Australian Cricket Board chair Dennis Rogers and Christopher Doig, Cricket NZ. (Shona Geary)
0651 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL NEWS TOBACCO MERGER - British American Tobacco, world's second largest tobacco company, announces plans to merge with fourth-ranked Rothmans. Merged company will have 16% of world market. KIWI DOLLAR continues to hold on to recent gains. Citibank's Dan Sheridan links strong rise in Kiwi to appreciation in value of yen. (Bronwen Evans) ORIGIN PACIFIC, Nelson-based airline, promises to compete strongly with Air NZ and Ansett, announces expansion of services and routes on main trunk line to around 70 flights a week. Managing director Robert Inglis says company doesn't intend to be cut-price operation. (Bronwen Evans) INVESTMENT - latest Spicers personal index shows international shares provided best return for local investors last year. (Bronwen Evans) FINANCE/MARKETS MARKET REVIEW MENSWEAR - recent Business Leadership survey in Britain find what men wear could well reflect level of success in business. Ties especially revealing. WORLD TRADE ORGN - MIKE MOORE'S chances of leading orgn appear to be improving, with strong speculation that US is leaning towards his candidacy. (Chris Roberts) BUSINESS BRIEFS AUSTRALIA - GLASS CEILING - new survey conducted by Morgan and Banks shows only 12% of firms reported that half of senior managers are women. Morgan and Banks says still very few women on boards and in positions of power in Australia.

[Oriignal recording beings one minute prior to news]

0700 INTRO/NEWS illegible CHANGE - new crops, new growing regions and new pests all being considered as real possibilities following hottest year on record. Live i/v with Mark McNaught, Weather Workshop; live i/v with Agresearch spokesman Dr Steve Goldosn and Dr Peter Jamieson, NZ Inst for Crop and Food Research. Māori HOUSING - Te Puni Kokiri report says Housing ministry fails to look specifically at impact of housing policies and programmes on Māori. Live i/v with Māori Affairs minister Tau Henare and Housing ministry's chief exec David Smyth. IRAQ/KUWAIT - Kuwait puts part of military on full alert following intensifying of Iraq's verbal attacks. I/v with correspondent Jim Muir. (Mng Rpt) CRICKET - Code of Conduct Commission established by International Cricket Council, will ensure cricket boards have power to deal with serious allegations and deal with them in same way. Live i/v with NZ Cricket chair Sir John Anderson and ABC commentator Tim Lane.
0730 NEWS/WEATHER/SPORTS NZ PAPERS FINANCE UPDATE MISSING TEENAGER - army personnel to continue hacking through dense undergrowth in search of clues to disappearance of Kirsty Bentley. Live i/v with reporter illegible McKenzie. BAIL - Justice minister Sir Douglas Graham suggests changes to try to reduce increasing rates of re-offending by those on bail awaiting trial but VUW professor Warren Young says there's no evidence to suggest proposals to toughen bail procedures will work. Comment also from Police Assn president Greg O'Connor, Laureen Outtrim of Victim Support, and Neville Trendle, Asst Police Commissioner. (Blair McLaren) EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT members considering sacking EU's executive commission following accusations of fraud and mismanagement of budget. Live i/v with Martin Walker, "The Guardian". HOT HOLIDAY - visitors to Tahuna Beach holiday park in Nelson, southern hemisphere's largest, welcome heat wave. (Helen Shea)
0800 NEWS/WEATHER WEATHER YEAR - former MeetService forecaster Augie Auer puts last extremes of weather down to El Nino rather than global warming. President of West Coast branch of Fed Farmers, John Clayton, says Coast suffered effects of flooding and drought and farmers have changed methods as result. Both i/ved live. Māori HOUSING - Housing ministry defends performance, chief exec david Smyth says ministry has done a lot of work on Māori housing issues in past few years. Live i/v with Waipareira Trust chief exec John Tamihere and Hone Harawira, who has long involvement in Māori housing in Northland. INTERNATIONAL PAPERS OLYMPICS SCANDAL - Tom Welch, accused of bribing IOC members while campaigning for Salt Lake City to stage 2002 Winter Olympics, says gifts were contributions to Olympic Family. Several IOC members asked to explain their involvement in affair. Live i/v with John Hughes, "Deseret News". ANTARCTIC - HILLARY - expedition to South Pole making better progress. I/v with Peter Hillary. (Mng Rpt)
0830 NEWS/SPORTS ACT Party to spell out conditions it wants National minority govt to meet before it supports it in February confidence vote, wants more taxes cut and assets sold. Live i/v with leader Richard Prebble and Associate Finance minister and duty minister Lockwood Smith. U.S. - IMPEACHMENT - pornography publisher Larry Flynt offers $1 million to anyone who can prove adulterous affair with member of Congress or other high ranking official. (Catherine Drew, Feature Story) illegible SOLDIER - Amnesty Internatrional says new generation of weapons light enough and simple enough for 10 year olds to use helping to create child armies of killers and torturers. "In Firing Line" report estimates at least 300,000 children fighting in armed conflicts, many of them deliberately recruited by adults. Live i/v with Amnesty International spokesman Richard Bunting. PLUNKET SEAT - Plunket Society horrified at newspaper article saying one of its ex-rental safety seats being used by farming family on back of 4-wheeled farm bike, says practice extremely dangerous. Comment from national child safety adcisor Sue Campbell, OSH spokesperson Lisa-Marie Richan, and Malcolm Bailey, Fed Farmers president. (Diana Leufkens) BRITAIN - POLITICAL SCANDAL - govt struggling to repair damage done to standing and reputation following 3 weeks of resignations and scandals. In latest, ex-wife of Foreign Secretary Robin Cook accuses him in book of being drunk and adulterer. Live i/v with correspondent Dominic Waghorn.

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Year 1999

Reference number 59533

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Genre Radio news programs
Nonfiction radio programs
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
Robinson, Geoff, Presenter
Plunket, Sean, Presenter
Walley, Allan, Editor
Roberts, Chris, Producer
Brennan, Stephanie, Producer
Inwood, Glenn, Producer
Thomas, Gabriel, Producer
National Radio (N.Z.) (estab. 1986, closed 2007)

Duration 02:02:27

Date 12 Jan 1999

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