RNZ National. 2016-04-05. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

05 April 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (RNZ); 2:05 New Jazz Archive (2 of 12, PRX) 3:05 Blind Bitter Happiness, written and read by Peter Feeney (5 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 5 April 2016
BODY:
International tax experts back up Inland Revenue warnings and say New Zealand's gaining a reputation as a tax haven. Helen Clark is tipped to announce today she will seek the United Nations' top job and warnings from forensic pathologists their profession is in crisis with serious implications for criminal trials.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'18"

06:05
Sports News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'40"

06:07
Sports News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'49"

06:13
Serco could run more prisons in NZ
BODY:
Having to pay eight million dollars to the government for its mis-management of Mt Eden prison hasn't stopped Serco from saying it might apply if the contract comes up again.
Topics: politics, crime
Regions:
Tags: Serco
Duration: 2'52"

06:18
Early Business News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

06:24
Morning Rural News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'09"

06:37
Govt dismisses 'tax haven' label but tax experts sound warnings
BODY:
The Government says it is ridiculous to suggest New Zealand is a tax haven.
Topics: law, politics, business
Regions:
Tags: tax haven
Duration: 3'24"

06:40
Southern DHB walks away from 15 year dispute
BODY:
The head of the Southern district health board says it was time a draw a line under its 15 year dispute with South Link Health.
Topics: health
Regions: Southland
Tags: South Link Health, Southern DHB
Duration: 2'38"

06:49
Large number of public companies to be caught by OIO change
BODY:
The Overseas Investment Office says it's going provide more clarity over what qualifies as an overseas company amid confusion over a recent change to its interpretation of the law.
Topics: law, business
Regions:
Tags: OIO, Overseas Investment Office
Duration: 1'08"

06:50
Lawyers say oio response not that satisfactory
BODY:
The law firm that raised the concerns isn't that impressed by the OIO response.
Topics: law, business
Regions:
Tags: OIO, Overseas Investment Office
Duration: 35"

06:51
NZ's robust tax rules don't address tax evasion concerns
BODY:
A tax expert says the government needs to review the operation of foreign trusts based here to address public concerns New Zealand's tax system isn't rigorous enough.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tax system
Duration: 1'11"

06:52
Rakon sees great potential for growth with "Internet of Things"
BODY:
The technology manufacturer, Rakon, says it's planning to raise 10 to 15 million dollars later this year to fund the roll out of a network offering the Internet of Things.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Rakon
Duration: 2'40"

06:55
Employee confidence may take a hit later in the year
BODY:
Employees may have started the year feeling confident about the labour market, but the year might end on a gloomy note.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: labour market
Duration: 56"

06:56
China's love affair with NZ creates opportunities
BODY:
A senior Chinese diplomat says his country's love affair with New Zealand is opening doors and making it easy to do business with our largest trading partner.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: China, tourism
Duration: 1'30"

06:57
Morning markets for 5 April 2016
BODY:
Wall Street is a touch softer but for no particular reason.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'02"

06:58
Business briefs
BODY:
The telecommunications company, Spark, has launched a wireless broadband service for New Zealanders living in cities and towns who are frustrated with slow or unreliable copper broadband.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'06"

07:11
New Zealand's reputation at risk over tax haven investigation
BODY:
International tax experts say New Zealand's reputation is at risk despite assurances from the Government the country doesn't operate as a tax haven for foreigners.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: tax haven
Duration: 5'55"

07:17
Labour: John Key must come clean on offshore trust loopholes
BODY:
The Prime Minister John Key rejects any suggestion that New Zealand is a tax haven.
Topics: law, politics
Regions:
Tags: tax haven
Duration: 4'52"

07:22
Clark tipped to announce bid for UN top job today
BODY:
There are reports this morning that Helen Clark will announce today she will seek the United Nations' top job.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Helen Clark, UN
Duration: 2'45"

07:25
Forensic pathology service on brink of collapse
BODY:
A forensic pathologist is warning the country is on the brink of a 'catastrophic unravelling' of the service.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Forensic pathology service
Duration: 4'00"

07:29
Southern DHB walks away from 15 year dispute
BODY:
The Southern District Health Board has decided to walk away from a 15-year dispute with a doctors organisation without a resolution.
Topics: health
Regions: Southland
Tags: South Link Health, Southern DHB
Duration: 2'57"

07:36
Amnesty fears for deported migrants
BODY:
The first deportations of refugees from Greece have just taken place under a deal between the European Union and Turkey.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greece, Turkey, refugees
Duration: 3'36"

07:40
Balcony collapse due to overloading
BODY:
An independent report has found overloading caused last month's Dunedin balcony collapse that left eighteen people injured.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: Balcony Collapse, Balcony
Duration: 4'15"

07:44
New airline agreements boost links to Turkey
BODY:
Flying to destinations such as Turkey, Israel and Nepal could get easier thanks to new airline agreements the Government's just approved.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: airlines, flying
Duration: 2'19"

07:49
Auckland council woos wealthy travellers
BODY:
We've been reporting this morning on how the world's rich and powerful hide their money in tax havens. The Auckland Council wants some of them to spend their money legitimately, and is trying to woo them to invest and take holidays in Auckland.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: tourism
Duration: 4'01"

07:53
Kremlin dismisses tax evasion claims as "Putinophobia"
BODY:
Russian President Vladimir Putin is perhaps the highest profile individual linked to shadowy financial transactions conducted on behalf of clients by Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Russia, Putin, tax havens
Duration: 2'30"

07:56
Lydia Ko created golfing history
BODY:
Lydia Ko created golfing history, becoming the youngest person to win two LPGA majors, when she took out the A-N-A Inspiration in California yesterday.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: golf, Lydia Ko
Duration: 2'55"

08:07
Sports News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'57"

08:11
Tax expert says New Zealand's role in tax avoidance is shameful
BODY:
A tax expert says New Zealand's role in tax avoidance highlighted by the 'Panama Papers' is shameful.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: tax havens
Duration: 3'49"

08:15
New proposal to kick-start Ngapuhi's Treaty negotiations
BODY:
A new proposal to kick-start the stalled Ngapuhi Treaty negotiations is already running in to trouble.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi
Duration: 3'04"

08:18
Fiji suffers again after Winston
BODY:
Heavy rain and flooding has caused more devastation to parts of Fiji which is still in a national state of emergency after Cyclone Winston hit six weeks ago.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Fiji, Cyclone Winston
Duration: 3'40"

08:22
Northlanders meet to demand future for rail
BODY:
More than 2-hundred Northland people packed a Whangarei theatre last night to demand a future for rail in the region.
Topics: transport, politics
Regions: Northland
Tags: rail
Duration: 3'34"

08:26
Whairiri Ngata welcomed home for the last time
BODY:
The skies opened above Hiruharama Marae last night, torrential rain poured down as about 100 mourners welcomed broadcaster and author Whai Ngata home to Ruatoria.
Topics:
Regions: East Coast
Tags: Whairiri Ngata
Duration: 3'05"

08:29
Markets Update for 5 April 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'05"

08:34
Is the police's social media presence improving policing?
BODY:
The police are increasingly turning to Facebook and Twitter to help fight crime but just how well it's working is still unclear.
Topics: internet
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 3'17"

08:38
Ashburton locals steaming over plans for water
BODY:
Angry Ashburton residents are meeting tonight to discuss ways to stop a deal which would see more than 40 billion litres of water removed from the drought-prone region.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: water, Ashburton
Duration: 2'58"

08:41
Evidence of ritual human sacrifice in early New Zealand
BODY:
New research has uncovered the role ritual human sacrifice has played in the evolution of modern New Zealand
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: ritual human sacrifice
Duration: 3'09"

08:44
Drug checks spike in wake of Sharapova's positive test
BODY:
Hundreds of New Zealand athletes nervous about medications and supplements they're taking, have inundated the national sport's drug agency with queries.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: drugs
Duration: 3'44"

08:49
Chch businesses worried low speed limits will wreak havoc
BODY:
Christchurch businesses are worried the new 30 kilometre per hour speed limit in the central city will be a disaster for retailers.
Topics: transport
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: speed limit, Christchurch
Duration: 3'30"

08:55
Feathered cloak presented to Defence Force
BODY:
A kahu huruhuru, or Maori feathered cloak, with a special connection to the battlefields of Gallipoli was presented to the Defence Force in a ceremony yesterday evening.
Topics: defence force, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: kahu huruhuru, Maori feathered cloak
Duration: 3'01"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Where The Rekohu Bone Sings by Tina Makereti A spirit who exists in the 'no place' watches over his descendants living at the end of the 19th and 20th centuries (2 of 15, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:10
Helen Clark's bid for the top UN job
BODY:
Helen Clark is to announce that she is putting her name forward to become the UNited Nations Secretary General, replacing Ban Ki Moon. Helen Clark has headed the UN Development Programme for the past 7 years - the third highest position in the UN. Michael Powles was the NZ Permanent Representative to the United Nations from 1996 to 2001. He's a former Deputy Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and a former ambassador to several countries, including China
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'48"

09:22
Health Ministry responds to nurses' pleas for more support
BODY:
The Ministry of Health's Chief Nurse, Jane O'Malley, responds to claims by the Nurses' Organisation that graduate nurses are being pushed into jobs with limited support and too much responsibility
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: employment
Duration: 14'49"

09:39
The overdiagnosis epidemic
BODY:
An Australian researcher says increasing numbers of healthy people are being unnecessarily labelled sick - potentially at the behest of drug companies. Writing in the Australian Prescriber Dr Ray Moynihan points out that many of the expert panels which write guidelines for diagnosing diseases are made up of doctors with financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry. He says the problem has got so bad some doctors are recommending that clinicians deliberately break the rules to avoid unnecessary diagnoses.
EXTENDED BODY:
Increasing numbers of healthy people are being unnecessarily labelled sick – potentially at the behest of drug companies, says an Australian researcher.
Writing in the Australian Prescriber, Dr Ray Moynihan points out that many of the expert panels which write guidelines for diagnosing diseases are made up of doctors with financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.
He tells Kathryn Ryan the problem has got so bad some doctors are recommending that clinicians deliberately break the rules to avoid unnecessary diagnoses.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: pharmaceuticals, doctors, prescription
Duration: 10'47"

09:50
US Correspondent Steve Almond
BODY:
Presidential elections. Sex education research. Nina Simone Biopic.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'15"

10:06
Helen Clark announces candidacy for UN top job
BODY:
Kathryn speaks with Helen Clark just after her annoucement in New York.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Helen Clark, United Nations, UN
Duration: 13'01"

10:20
How Grace Oakeshott faked her death in 1907 and fled to New Zealand
BODY:
The remarkable true story of Englishwoman Grace Oakeshott, who faked her own death in 1907 so she could escape her marriage and flee to New Zealand with her lover.
EXTENDED BODY:
British author Jocelyn Robson has been researching the life of Englishwoman Grace Oakeshott, who faked her own death in 1907 so she could escape her marriage and flee to New Zealand with her lover.
Jocelyn Robson talks with Kathryn Ryan about the remarkable true story.
Grace and Harold Oakeshott were active socialists and had no children - which was unusual for that time. Grace in particular was very active in womens' rights, she was on the Womens' Industrial Council, and fought for better working conditions and educational opportunities for women.
Jocelyn Robson came across Grace Oakeshott's work by accident, and was intrigued, she wanted to write about her, but then discovered she has died at 35. In 1907 a pile of her clothes was found at a beach in Brittany where she has been vacationing. It was assumed she was drowned, and her husband later remarried.
It was some time later that Jocelyn Robson discovered that Grace had in fact faked her own disappearance, and had gone to settle in New Zealand with her lover, Dr Walter Reeve, changing her name to Joan Reeve. Jocelyn Robson pored through archives and interviewed the relatives of Grace, her husband Harold, and Walter Reeve for her book Radical Reformers and Respectable Rebels.
Topics: history, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Jocelyn Robson
Duration: 19'50"

10:40
Book review - The Forgetting Time by Sharon Guskin
BODY:
Reviewed by Elisabeth Easter, published by Macmillan.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'33"

11:06
Rod Oram
BODY:
Fonerra annual result. Health and Safety reforms.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'21"

11:25
Let's talk about death
BODY:
It's one of the only certainties life but one of the least discussed subjects when it comes to talking about how you want it do it.... dying. But a group in Australia is aiming to change the culture around how people approach death, getting past the taboos so they can talk about their wishes with their loved ones. The Groundswell Project was started by Clinical Psychologist and grief counsellor Kerrie Noonan, and Playwright Peta Murray in late 2009. The idea is to put back some of the care and control over what happens when people die, within communities. Kerrie Noonan was recently in New Zealand as a guest of Mary Potter Hospice.
EXTENDED BODY:
It's one of the only certainties in life, but one of the least discussed subjects when it comes to talking about how you want it do it... dying. A group in Australia is aiming to change the culture around our approach to death, getting past the taboos so people can talk about their wishes with their loved ones.
The Groundswell Project was started in late 2009 by clinical psychologist and grief counsellor Kerrie Noonan and playwright Peta Murray. The idea is to put back some of the care and control over what happens when people die, within communities.
Kerrie Noonan was recently in New Zealand as a guest of Mary Potter Hospice. Kathryn Ryan asks her whether we are getting better at preparing in advance for our deaths.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Groundswell, Kerrie Noonan, death, dying, death literacy, hospice
Duration: 19'19"

11:44
Media commentator - Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Media Commentator, Gavin Ellis will talk about Radio New Zealand's new Charter that recognises it operates in the digital age. Also, the death of two more industry stalwarts, Ross Jennings and Whai Ngata. and Gavin will look at the final edition of The Independent which printed its last newspaper last week. Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Helen Clark's bid for the top UN job
Helen Clark is to announce that she is putting her name forward to become the UNited Nations Secretary General, replacing Ban Ki Moon.
Helen Clark has headed the UN Development Programme for the past 7 years - the third highest position in the UN.
Michael Powles was the NZ Permanent Representative to the United Nations from 1996 to 2001. He's a former Deputy Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and a former ambassador to several countries, including China
09:10 Health Ministry responds to nurses' pleas for more support
The Ministry of Health's Chief Nurse, Jane O'Malley, responds to claims by the Nurses' Organisation that graduate nurses are being pushed into jobs with limited support and too much responsibility
09:20 The overdiagnosis epidemic
An Australian researcher says increasing numbers of healthy people are being unnecessarily labelled sick - potentially at the behest of drug companies. Writing in the Australian Prescriber Dr Ray Moynihan points out that many of the expert panels which write guidelines for diagnosing diseases are made up of doctors with financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry. He says the problem has got so bad some doctors are recommending that clinicians deliberately break the rules to avoid unnecessary diagnoses.
09:45 US Correspondent Steve Almond
10:05 How Grace Oakeshott faked her death in 1907 and fled to NZ
The remarkable true story of Englishwoman Grace Oakeshott, who faked her own death in 1907 so she could escape her marriage and flee to New Zealand with her lover.
Grace and Harold Oakeshott were active socialists and had no children - which was unusual for that time. Grace in particular was very active in womens' rights, she was on the Womens' Industrial Council, and fought for better working conditions and educational opportunities for women.
British author, Jocelyn Robson came across Grace Oakeshott's work by accident, and was intrigued, she wanted to write about her, but then discovered she has died at 35. In 1907 a pile of her clothes was found at a beach in Brittany where she has been vacationing. It was assumed she was drowned, and her husband later remarried.
It was some time later that Jocelyn Robson discovered that Grace had in fact faked her own disappearance, and had gone to settle in New Zealand with her lover, Dr Walter Reeve, changing her name to Joan Reeve. Jocelyn Robson pored through archives and interviewed the relatives of Grace, her husband Harold, and Walter Reeve for her book Radical Reformers and Respectable Rebels.
[gallery:1916]
10:35 Book review - The Forgetting Time by Sharon Guskin
Reviewed by Elisabeth Easter, published by Macmillan
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Rod Oram
11:30 Let's talk about death
It's one of the only certainties life but one of the least discussed subjects when it comes to talking about how you want it do it.... dying. But a group in Australia is aiming to change the culture around how people approach death, getting past the taboos so they can talk about their wishes with their loved ones.
The Groundswell Project was started by Clinical Psychologist and grief counsellor Kerrie Noonan, and Playwright Peta Murray in late 2009. The idea is to put back some of the care and control over what happens when people die, within communities. Kerrie Noonan was recently in New Zealand as a guest of Mary Potter Hospice.
[image:63994:full]
11:45 Media Gavin Ellis
Media Commentator, Gavin Ellis will talk about Radio New Zealand's new Charter that recognises it operates in the digital age. Also, the death of two more industry stalwarts, Ross Jennings and Whai Ngata. and Gavin will look at the final edition of The Independent which printed its last newspaper last week.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Streets of Laredo
Song: Dear Leron
Composer: S Gibson / D Gibson
Album: Volumes I and II
Label: Dinealone
Time: 0935
Artist: Albert Hammond Jr
Song: In Transit
Composer: Hammond / Larue
Album: Yours to Keep
Label: Rough Trade
Time: 1121

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
The former Prime Minister Helen Clark has confirmed she will run for the top job at the United Nations. The Revenue Minister says his main responsibility is to ensure New Zealanders pay tax.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'16"

12:17
Business opinion falls in Q1 - NZIER survey
BODY:
Business confidence has fallen with market volatility, a gloomy dairy sector, and a likely fall in sales, weighing on sentiment.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Business confidence, NZIER survey, building sector
Duration: 2'29"

12:19
OECD's Gurria defends efforts to restrict tax aviodance
BODY:
The OECD secretary general, Angel Gurria, says his organisation's efforts to restrict global tax avoidance are working.
Topics: business, economy, crime
Regions:
Tags: OECD, tax avoidance, Financial Crime
Duration: 1'36"

12:21
Sigfox sees great potention for Rakon's low cost technology
BODY:
The brave new technology world of the Internet of Things may become a lucrative source of earnings for local chip maker, Rakon.
Topics: business, economy, technology
Regions:
Tags: Computer Chips, Rakon, Sigfox
Duration: 1'20"

12:22
Midday Markets for 5 April 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'28"

12:24
Business briefs
BODY:
Auckland's biggest real estate agent, Barfoot and Thompson says the median price in the city climbed 8 percent in March, on the month before, to 798-thousand dollars.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: real estate, cars
Duration: 1'26"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
Sonny Bill Williams is reportedly close to returning to French rugby club Toulon later this year.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby, golf, cricket
Duration: 2'33"

12:33
Midday Rural News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:14
The History Of Human Sacrifice - Joseph Watts
BODY:
A new research paper looking into human sacrifice in nearly one hundred cultures, including pre-European New Zealand, has just been published. The study looked at Austronesian cultures, and delved into how equal and heirarchical a culture was and the role religion played, in relation to human sacrifice. It was published the journal Nature, and was a collaboration between researchers from the University of Auckland's School of Psychology, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and Victoria University. Joseph Watts is a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland, and he's the lead author of the study.
Topics: life and society, history
Regions:
Tags: Human Sacrifice, death, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Duration: 11'17"

13:26
Social media addiction - Philipa Thornton
BODY:
FOMO, FOBO, and NoMo are among a growing list of acronyms relating to people's fear of not being able to check their social media feed, and it has psychologists scrambling to keep up. Philipa Thornton is a New Zealand Clinical psychologist based in Sydney, and she's speaking about online addictions at the Australia-New Zealand addictions conference in Queensland next month.
EXTENDED BODY:
'FOMO', 'FOBO', and 'NoMo' are among a growing list of acronyms relating to people's fear of not being able to check their social media feed, and psychologists are scrambling to keep up.
Psychologist Philipa Thornton tells Jesse Mulligan what happens in our brains when we check social media:
Philipa Thornton is a New Zealand clinical psychologist based in Sydney, and she's speaking about online addictions at the the Australian and New Zealand Addiction Conference in Queensland next month.
Topics: life and society, technology, internet, science
Regions:
Tags: Fomo, FOBO, social media, addiction
Duration: 8'28"

13:34
Trust Crisis - Prof Michael Macaulay
BODY:
Is there a crisis of distrust in New Zealand? A new study commissioned by Victoria University's Institute for Governance and Policy Studies has found that New Zealanders have little trust in government, and that trust has decreased quite dramatically over the last three years. The Institute's Director, Michael Macaulay says the rankings offer a snapshot of the current political climate, which is typified by low voter turn out and a public largely disengaged with politics.
Topics: life and society, politics
Regions:
Tags: Victoria University's Institute for Governance, confidence, government
Duration: 7'56"

13:43
Favourite Album - New Age Savage
BODY:
New Age Savage - Pretty Wicked Head and the Desperate Men.
EXTENDED BODY:
Tim Cadogan of Alexandra selects New Age Savage from Invercargill band Pretty Wicked Head.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Pretty Wicked Head and the Desperate Men
Duration: 16'27"

14:10
Night Mayor on Cuba Street - Jason Krupp
BODY:
You'd be hard pressed to describe Wellington's recent CubaDupa festival as anything but an outstanding success. Two days of street food, live music, street artists, and throngs of happy attendees. If such a complaint were to be made, it would probably focus on the number of drunk people wandering the streets late at night, and the 'menace' they represent. Jason Krupp is a research fellow at the New Zealand Initiative business think tank and he's been looking into the ways 'vibrant' cities elsewhere in the world handle the tension between nightlife and community concerns.
Topics: life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Cuba Street, Night Mayor, CubaDupa, Public Drunkeness
Duration: 9'02"

14:18
Classic New Zealand Album
BODY:
Love & Disrespect - Elemeno P with Dave Gibson
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Elemeno P
Duration: 41'39"

14:18
Panel Pre-Show
BODY:
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'00"

15:11
Tim Urban, master procrastinator
BODY:
Tim Urban is an accomplished entrepreneur and one of the most popular writers and illustrators on the Internet. Elon Musk is even a fan of his blog Wait But Why. As a major procastinator, he has spent years trying to figure out why he ignores the "to do" list even undergoing an MRI. He has found strategies that help and shares them on his blog and in a recent TED talk.
EXTENDED BODY:
Tim Urban is an accomplished entrepreneur and one of the most popular writers and illustrators on the internet. Elon Musk is even a fan of his blog Wait But Why.
Urban graduated from Harvard, went to university in New Zealand and got fired by Donald Trump from The Apprentice – all of which is truly exceptional given his lifelong habit of putting things off to the last minute.
Tim Urban is a master procrastinator, who has spent years trying to figure out why he ignores the 'to do' list, even undergoing an MRI. He has found strategies that help and shares them on his blog and in a recent TED Talk.
He talks with Jesse Mulligan:
Topics: science, technology, business, internet
Regions:
Tags: Wait But Why, procrastination
Duration: 22'48"

21:46
Three decades on the tail of Hector’s dolphins
BODY:
After more than 30 years of studying the world's smallest dolphins Liz Slooten and Steve Dawson still enjoy getting out on the water to observe Hector's dolphins, writes Alison Ballance.
EXTENDED BODY:
After 32 years and thousands of hours in the company of the world’s smallest dolphins, cetacean experts Professors Liz Slooten and Steve Dawson haven’t lost their boundless enthusiasm and drive to learn more about Hector’s dolphins.
Two to three mornings a week when the summer weather is calm enough, the University of Otago researchers head out onto Akaroa Harbour. Partners in life as well as work, Profs Slooten and Dawson are a familiar sight zigzagging away from the small township of Akaroa, following the same route they do every trip.
Prof Dawson describes Hector’s dolphins as “incredibly boat-positive and very curious”.
“They’re wonderful little animals really,” he says. “Especially when they’re in a bigger group we can just turn [the engine] off and they’ll seem to centre their activities around the boat … it makes what we do much, much easier.”
Prof Slooten says that on a good summer’s day they might see 80 to 100 Hector’s dolphins in Akaroa Harbour, and that even on an average day they’ll probably encounter a few dozen.
Photo IDs
When they encounter a group of dolphins Prof Dawson gets out his camera, with its telephoto lens, and they spend time with the group, looking out for dolphins that have natural markings or ‘tags’.
“If there are any dolphins in the group with nicks out of the fin or colouration markings he’ll photograph those,” says Prof Slooten.
Back at base these photos are added to an ever-growing photo ID library, and compared to previous photos to see if these are familiar dolphins or new animals.
Prof Dawson says the natural markings are the best kind of tag he could hope for, and about 10 percent of the population is recognisable from these natural marks.
The photo catalogue includes about 300 dolphins that are still alive. As the study has been running for longer than a dolphin life span (Hector’s dolphins only live to 25) many of the original dolphins have now died. This number includes about 50 mature females that have been seen with at least one calf.
Counting every dolphin
The pair’s career-long fascination with Hector’s dolphins, which they argue should be called New Zealand dolphins, began in 1984 when they surveyed 8300km of coastline in a 3.8m inflatable boat. The six-month survey resulted in the first reliable data on the distribution of Hector’s dolphins and led to the creation of the New Zealand Whale and Dolphin Trust.
They have identified four genetically distinct populations of Hector’s dolphins: Maui’s dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, and the other three populations occur on the west, east and south coasts of the South Island.
Saving the dolphins
While Maui’s dolphin is currently estimated to number just 55 or so animals, the other populations together number just over 7000. Maui’s dolphins are listed as critically endangered, and the other populations as endangered.
Hector’s dolphins reproduce very slowly, with a female producing one calf on average every three years. This results in a low population growth rate of just 2 percent a year, and means the species is very vulnerable to any unnatural deaths, such as dolphins drowning in gill nets.
Prof Slooten says the population had been doing a “nosedive’ in the 1980s.
“When we started this study it wasn’t unusual to find dead dolphins floating around or on beaches, that had been caught in gill nets or trawl nets. So really it was carnage in the '80s and '90s,” says Prof Slooten.
They were appalled at the high number of dolphins they were seeing that had drowned in fishing nets and their strong science-based advocacy resulted in the creation of New Zealand’s first marine mammal sanctuary in Akaroa Harbour, in 1988. The sanctuary extends four nautical miles offshore but research has showed the dolphins range out to 20 nautical miles offshore in winter.
“We’ve now got this protection that’s ensured the population is no longer doing a nosedive, so now it’s somewhere between stable or very slowly decreasing, but we need to push the protection further offshore to allow the population to grow.”
‘Dolphins Down Under’
Prof Slooten says most people are stunned by the small size of the Hector’s dolphins, which are just 1.2-1.4 metres long. They are the most coastal of the four species of dolphins that are common in New Zealand waters and are recognisable by their rounded dorsal fin.
The Hector’s dolphin population in Akaroa Harbour is the basis of a booming ecotourism industry and each year thousands of people join trips on dolphin watching and dolphin swimming boats.
If you’d like to find out more about Hector’s dolphins, and Profs Slooten and Dawson's research project, their book ‘Dolphins Down Under - understanding the New Zealand dolphin’ (Otago University Press 2013) is a fascinating read. The book includes information on everything from dolphin acoustics to social behaviour.
Topics: environment, science
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Hector's dolphin, dolphins, marine mammals, conservation, population decline, New Zealand Whale and Dolphin Trust
Duration: 18'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First Song
'Hurtin' - Margo Price.
1:15 Social Media Addiction - Philipa Thornton
FOMO, FOBO, and NoMo are among a growing list of acronyms relating to people's fear of not being able to check their social media feed, and it has psychologists scrambling to keep up. Philipa Thornton is a New Zealand Clinical psychologist based in Sydney, and she's speaking about online addictions at the Australia-New Zealand addictions conference in Queensland next month.
1:25 The History Of Human Sacrifice - Joseph Watts
A new research paper looking into human sacrifice in nearly one hundred cultures, including pre-European New Zealand, has just been published. The study looked at Austronesian cultures, and delved into how equal and heirarchical a culture was and the role religion played, in relation to human sacrifice. It was published the journal Nature, and was a collaboration between researchers from the University of Auckland's School of Psychology, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and Victoria University. Joseph Watts is a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland, and he's the lead author of the study.
1:35 Trust Crisis - Prof Michael Macaulay
Is there a crisis of distrust in New Zealand? A new study commissioned by Victoria University's Institute for Governance and Policy Studies has found that New Zealanders have little trust in government, and that trust has decreased quite dramatically over the last three years. The Institute's Director, Michael Macaulay says the rankings offer a snapshot of the current political climate, which is typified by low voter turn out and a public largely disengaged with politics.
1:40 Favourite Album
2:10 Night Mayor on Cuba Street - Jason Krupp
You'd be hard pressed to describe Wellington's recent CubaDupa festival as anything but an outstanding success. Two days of street food, live music, street artists, and throngs of happy attendees. If such a complaint were to be made, it would probably focus on the number of drunk people wandering the streets late at night, and the 'menace' they represent. Jason Krupp is a research fellow at the New Zealand Initiative business think tank and he's been looking into the ways 'vibrant' cities elsewhere in the world handle the tension between nightlife and community concerns.
2:20 Classic New Zealand Album
Love & Disrespect - Elemeno P with Dave Gibson.
3:10 Feature Interview
Tim Urban is an accomplished entrepreneur and one of the most popular writers and illustrators on the Internet. Elon Musk is even a fan of his blog, Wait But Why. He graduated from Harvard, even went to University in New Zealand and got fired by Donald Trump on the Apprentice, all of which is truly exceptional given his life long habit of putting things off to the last minute. Tim Urban is a master procrastinator. He's spent years trying to figure out why he ignores the "to do" list even undergoing an MRI. He has found strategies that help and shares them on his blog and in a recent TED talk.
3:30 Our Changing World
Hector’s dolphins are one of the world’s smallest dolphins, and they have been the focus of a 32-year study by the University of Otago’s Liz Slooten and Steve Dawson. Alison Ballance joins the pair on their research boat in Akaroa Harbour to hear how they use photos and natural markings to identify the dolphins.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE'S SONG:

ARTIST: Margo Price
TITLE: Hurtin' (On The Bottle)
COMP: Margi Price
ALBUM: Midwest Farmer's Daughter (Unreleased)
LIVE: Third man records

FEATURE ALBUM:

ARTIST: Pretty Wicked Head and The Desperate Men
TITLE: Rise and Shine
COMP: Shaun Kirkpatrick, Vaughan Burtenshaw, Kane Kerr
ALBUM: New Age Savage
LABEL: Independent

ARTIST: Pretty Wicked Head and The Desperate Men
TITLE: All New Zealand Heroes
COMP: Shaun Kirkpatrick, Vaughan Burtenshaw, Kane Kerr
ALBUM: New Age Savage
LABEL: Independent

ARTIST: Pretty Wicked Head and The Desperate Men
TITLE: Girl At The Mercy of The Orbit of The Moon
COMP: Shaun Kirkpatrick, Vaughan Burtenshaw, Kane Kerr
ALBUM: New Age Savage
LABEL: Independent

CLASSIC NEW ZEALAND ALBUM: Love & Disrespect - Elemeno P

ARTIST: Elemeno P
TITLE: Urban Getaway
COMP: Dave Gibson, Justyn Pilbrow
ALBUM: Love And Disrespect
LABEL: Universal

ARTIST: Elemeno P
TITLE: Fast Times In Tahoe
COMP: Dave Gibson, Justyn Pilbrow
ALBUM: Love & Disrespect
LABEL: Universal

ARTIST: Elemeno P
TITLE: Every Day's A Saturday
COMP: Dave Gibson, Justyn Pilbrow
ALBUM: Love & Disrespect
LABEL: Universal

ADDITIONAL SONG:

ARTIST: Jamie XX
TITLE: Loud Places (Feat: Romy)
COMP: Jamie Smith, Romy Madley-Croft, Rick Nowels, Tony Sarafino
ALBUM: In Colour
LABEL: Young Turks

THE PANEL: HALFTIME SONG

ARTIST: ZZ Top
TITLE: Sharp Dressed Man
COMP: Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill, Frank Beard
ALBUM: Eliminator
LABEL: Warner

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

14:18
Panel Pre-Show
BODY:
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'00"

16:05
The Panel with Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Greive (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Grieve have been up to. Al Gillespie talks about what Helen Clark is up against for UN's top job. Al Gillespie looks at what the secondment of Egyptian imans to New Zealand mosques means. The theory of building more houses doesn't seem to be the answer to our biggest city's housing crisis according to new statistics.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'40"

16:06
The Panel with Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Greive (Part 2)
BODY:
What women say men should wear. What the Panelists Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Grieve have been thinking about. Criminal lawyer Anne Stevens discusses the rise in New Zealand's incarceration rate. Who should be held responsible for student flat balcony collapse? Animal rights activists say China's treatment of dogs in dog meat festival is blackening the country's name. Some comments from Panel listeners.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'15"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Grieve have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'35"

16:10
Helen Clark in running for UN Secretary General
BODY:
Al Gillespie talks about what Helen Clark is up against for UN's top job.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: The UN, national identity
Duration: 7'40"

16:17
Egyptian imams headed to NZ
BODY:
Al Gillespie looks at what the secondment of Egyptian imams to New Zealand mosques means.
Topics: politics, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Egypt, Imams, Islam, Muslims, Radicalisation, Al-Azhar University
Duration: 5'04"

16:22
Auckland won't build out of housing shortage
BODY:
The theory of building more houses doesn't seem to be the answer to our biggest city's housing crisis according to new statistics.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: building, houses, Housing Shortage
Duration: 7'14"

16:32
Women tell men what to wear
BODY:
What women say men should wear.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: clothes, fashion, Mens Fashion, Jean Shorts
Duration: 3'16"

16:35
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Lynda Hallinan and Duncan Grieve have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

16:37
NZs conviction rate
BODY:
Criminal lawyer Anne Stevens discusses the rise in New Zealand's incarceration rate.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: convictions, police, courts, Incarceration
Duration: 6'35"

16:44
Dunedin balcony collapse
BODY:
Who should be held responsible for student flat balcony collapse?
Topics: law, life and society
Regions: Otago
Tags: Balcony, Collapse, Dunedin
Duration: 2'22"

16:46
Animal rights
BODY:
Animal rights activists say China's treatment of dogs in dog meat festival is blackening the country's name.
Topics: food, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Dog Meat, China, Chinese food, Dog meat festival, animal rights
Duration: 5'52"

16:52
Beggars - a political hot potato
BODY:
Should tricky issues be battled head-on and to hell with being PC?
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 2'59"

16:55
Listener feedback
BODY:
Some comments from Panel listeners
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 5 April 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here. It begins 5 minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:07
More than 180 jobs to go at Fisher and Paykel
BODY:
More than 180 jobs will be lost after Fisher and Paykel announced it is closing its East Tamaki Factory.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fisher and Paykel, jobs, E Tu
Duration: 3'16"

17:11
Former PM announces UN candidacy
BODY:
Helen Clark has announced her intention to run for the top job at the United Nations, after almost 7 years as the Administrator of its Development Programme.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN, security, United Nations, UN Development Programme
Duration: 7'07"

17:18
Ongoing speculation about Clark's chances at UN bid
BODY:
What are Helen Clark's chances at the UN's top job? Security Council Executive Director Ian Martin joins Checkpoint.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN, security, United Nations
Duration: 3'37"

17:22
NZ detainee dies in Australian detention centre
BODY:
There are reports that a New Zealand man who died in an Australian detention centre overnight was viciously attacked by other detainees.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: detention centre, death, Australia, Australian immigration, Serco
Duration: 4'37"

17:22
NZ detainee dies in Australian detention centre
BODY:
There are reports that a New Zealand man who died in an Australian detention centre overnight was viciously attacked by other detainees.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: detention centre, death, Australia, Australian immigration, Serco
Duration: 4'37"

17:22
Fisher & Paykel CEO discusses loss of 180 jobs
BODY:
Fisher & Paykel Appliances' CEO, Stuart Broadhurst discusses the company's plans to close its East Tamaki factory.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fisher & Paykel, jobs, employment
Duration: 4'48"

17:34
Evening Business for 5 April 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'57"

17:38
Government grilled over tax haven claims
BODY:
Pressure is mounting on the Prime Minister to strengthen the rules surrounding the country's controversial foreign trusts.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts, tax haven, Question Time
Duration: 3'04"

17:41
Iceland PM under pressure to resign
BODY:
143 politicians around the world have been implicated following the release of the Panama papers. Iceland's PM is consequently facing pressure to resign.
Topics: economy, politics
Regions:
Tags: Iceland, Panama Papers, tax havens
Duration: 3'52"

17:45
Charging for water will incentivise better use
BODY:
Academics and environmental groups say putting a charge or tax on water use would force the resource to be better used and improve conservation outcomes. Kate Gudsell reports.
Topics: environment, economy
Regions:
Tags: water, Charge
Duration: 4'33"

17:49
Can the TPP make it through Congress?
BODY:
Despite having been signed by a number of trade ministers around the world, there is still no certainty as to whether the TPP will be ratified by US Congress. Congressman Matt Salmon joins Checkpoint.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: TPP, America, election, congress, free trade
Duration: 5'53"

17:55
Trump's wife steps up to the podium
BODY:
Donald Trump's wife Melania has made a brief and rare campaign speech for her husband in Milwaukee ahead of the Wisconsin primary tomorrow.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: America, election
Duration: 1'18"

17:57
CTU, MBIE meet over pay botchup
BODY:
The Labour Inspectorate held a meeting today with the Council of Trade Unions to talk about the 24-thousand workers that have been shortchanged on their holiday pay since 2012.
Topics: politics, business
Regions:
Tags: holiday pay, unions, CTU
Duration: 2'42"

18:05
Sports News for 5 April 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'30"

18:09
Helen Clark becomes 8th candidate for top UN job
BODY:
The former Prime Minister, Helen Clark, has become the eighth candidate in the contest to become the next secretary-general of the United Nations.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: United Nations, Secretary-general
Duration: 4'01"

18:12
Crown to acknowledge it's role in the decline in te reo Maori
BODY:
The Maori Development Minister, Te Ururoa Flavell, will make an amendment to the Maori Language Bill tonight, but says the change is not an attempt to address all historic grievances around te reo Maori.
Topics: politics, te ao Maori, language
Regions:
Tags: Maori Language Bill
Duration: 2'11"

18:15
Reports of hands and feet photo scam growing
BODY:
Netsafe has received around a dozen complaints about an online scam that cons people into taking photos of their hands and feet for an art project, in exchange for money they never see.
Topics: crime, internet
Regions:
Tags: scam, Feet, hands, Netsafe, students, Fetish website
Duration: 3'30"

18:18
Reports of altercation before NZ detainee death
BODY:
There are reports that a New Zealand man who died in an Australian detention centre overnight was viciously attacked by other detainees.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian Detention Centre, 501 Detainees
Duration: 5'09"

18:25
New way forward for Ngapuhi treaty settlement
BODY:
A new report is pushing for the Northland based Iwi to change the way it's negotiating.
Topics: te ao Maori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi, Treaty Settlement, Tuhoronuku
Duration: 3'03"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 5 April 2016
BODY:
The big question in Question Time arose from the allegation in leaked documents called the Panama Papers that New Zealand is a tax haven. Prime Minister John Key says tax havens are secret and New Zealand cannot be one because it has disclosure rules. Greens member's bill opening trusts to scrutiny is blocked by the government. John Key calls Greens finance spokeswoman, Julie Anne Genter, "barking mad" for supporting it, sparking a 10-minute argument after opposition parties demand an apology despite her saying she was not offended. Speaker rejects requests for an urgent debate on the tax haven issue.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - Family Connections
BODY:
A couple of years ago, Auckland photographer Jessie Casson travelled to Sri Lanka with her husband and three children (then 15 months, 3 years and 7 years) to meet their sponsor child Thanushan and his family...
EXTENDED BODY:
A couple of years ago, Auckland photographer Jessie Casson travelled to Sri Lanka with her husband and three children (then 15 months, 3 years and 7 years) to meet their sponsor child Thanushan and his family.
Jessie tells Bryan Crump about the experience:
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel, Sri Lanka, Childfund, sponsor child
Duration: 19'41"

20:12
Nights' Pundit - Philosophy
BODY:
Philosopher at large Ann Kerwin often muses on the ways we can and could think... Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein - Plato is at Olympia University and is keen to participate in a neurological study...
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: philosophy, Plato, Googleplex, Rebecca Goldstein
Duration: 19'28"

=SHOW NOTES=

[gallery:1854]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Family Connections
a couple of years ago, Auckland photographer Jessie Casson travelled to Sri Lanka with her husband and three children (then 15 months, 3 years and 7 years) to meet their sponsor child Thanushan and his family...
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 5 April 2016
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream; American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks; and the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream; American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks; and the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Primal Scream, Robbie Fulks, Birds Of Chicago
Duration: 28'39"

19:30
Chaosmosis by Primal Scream
BODY:
Nick Bollnger checks a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollnger checks a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream.
It’s 25 years now since Primal Scream seized their moment. At the height of acid house, this Scottish rock band did what might look obvious on paper but which no one had had either the inspiration or attitude to do: combined the trippy electronic dance music of the day with old school rock’n’roll. The result was Screamadelica, an album that still ranks on those lists of the great and good. But a quarter century on, what else have they come up with?
Chaosmosis is Primal Scream’s eleventh and latest album, and if you had heard nothing they have done since Screamadelica you might think they hadn’t had a single new idea in all that time. The opening track, ‘Trippin’ On Your Love’ is Screamadelica redux: Martin Duffy’s Nicky Hopkins-inspired piano and guitarist Andrew Innes’s wah-wah licks melded with one of those instant-party house grooves, while Bobby Gillespie gets chorus help from Californian sister singers Haim.
One device they have used to make Chaosmosis seem more relevant and contemporary is to ring in some younger and frequently female voices. There are Haim’s harmonies on that opening track, and there’s edgy twenty-something singer Sky Ferreira who alternates lines with Gillespie on ‘Where the Light Gets In’, another of the album’s hookier cuts.
But despite Primal Scream’s reputation as a bunch of rock’n’roll bad boys, Chaosmosis is a slick, poppy and essentially calculated piece of work. And perhaps that is the main thing that has changed over the quarter century since Screamadelica. Back then, this was a band that genuinely didn’t seem to give a toss what people thought; evidenced in the way they followed that big breakthrough by shedding the acid house beats, relocating to the American South and making a follow-up that sounded like Glasgow’s answer to the Black Crowes. And their approach remained as wilful for a while after that, as they free-ranged through dub and Krautrock on Vanishing Point, punk and industrial on XTRMNTR.
But few bands stay restlessly creative forever, and those mid-period Scream albums – which seemed rather messy and unfocussed at the time – stand out now as feats of imagination compared to this.
Songs featured: Trippin’ On Your Love; Golden Rope; Feeling Like A Demon Again; I Can Change; Where the Light Gets In.
Chaosmosis is available on Ignition Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Primal Scream, music review
Duration: 7'46"

19:30
Upland Stories by Robbie Fulks
BODY:
Nick Bollinger listens to American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger listens to American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks.
Like a great country singer should, Robbie Fulks has songs to make you laugh and songs to make you cry. And his new album’s got both.
I first became aware of Fulks with his 1998 Geffen album Let’s Kill Saturday Night – a well-promoted set which, as it turned out, was to be his one brush with a major label. With a hard-rocking band behind him, his smart, country-tinged songs almost passed as contemporary rock’n’roll. But a square peg like Fulks was never really going to fit into the round hole of the majors, and ever since then he’s been releasing - at fairly regular intervals – records that lean increasingly towards the sparseness and timelessness of hillbilly music.
He’s an excellent guitarist and surrounds himself with musicians of equal calibre. He’s also a fine singer, with more than one mode of delivery, and a masterful songwriter, who constructs his words and tunes with an artisan’s craft. Some of the songs are funny (try ‘Aunt Peg’s New Old Man’), but more often they are poignant and pointed.
If Upland Stories had a subtitle it might be the name of one of its standout songs: ‘America is a Hard Religion.’ There’s a running theme here of working people in America’s forgotten heartland, trying to believe in a country that has manifestly let them down. There’s something here of the eye and ear of James Agee, whose collaboration with photojournalist Walker Evans produced the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, the seminal and shocking document of the Great Depression. So perhaps its not surprising that another of the standout tracks, ‘Alabama At Night’, is directly inspired by Agee and Evans’ travels in the 1930s. The song may be set in the Great Depression, but one senses that story could as easily be unfolding right now, and that same quiet and particular type of observation runs right through the record.
Like his last album, 2013’s Gone Away Backward, Upland Stories was recorded by Steve Albini. And though better known for his work on The Pixies’ Surfer Rosa, Nirvana’s In Utero, or the excoriating sounds of his own band Shellac, when it comes to capturing acoustic music no one does it better - with Fulks’ voice crisp, present and out in front, and the instruments arranged beautifully around the singing, like a concert in your living room.
Not everyone hits a hot streak twenty years into their recording career, but Upland Stories finds Robbie Fulks making the best music he ever has.
Songs featured: South Bend Soldiers On; Aunt Peg’s New Old Man; America Is A Hard Religion; Alabama At Night; Never Come Home; Fare Thee Well Carolina Gals.
Upland Stories is available on Bloodshot Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Robbie Fulks, music, music review
Duration: 9'28"

19:30
Real Midnight by Birds of Chicago
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
For almost a decade, musician and record producer Joe Henry lived and worked out of a South Pasadena residence known as The Garfield House: built at the turn of the last century for Lucretia Garfield, widow of the late American President James Garfield. Last year he packed up his studio and moved on. But before he did, he made this.
Real Midnight, the second album by Birds Of Chicago, has the distinction of being the last record produced by Joe Henry in the Garfield House, concluding a list that includes albums by Over The Rhine, Mary Gauthier and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, not to mention several by Henry himself.
It’s hard to tell how much it’s the house and how much it’s Henry that gives all these records a certain unifying mood. One thing’s for sure, though: Birds Of Chicago fit right in.
Formed just four years ago, they are helmed by a romantic couple, JT Nero and Alice Russell. Nero (whose name is actually Jeremy Lindsay) used to front a soul-influenced indie band, JT and the Clouds, based in Chicago. Russell sang with the Canadian quartet Po’ Girl. They hooked up when the two acts were touring together, and Birds Of Chicago is the result.
Nero is a rootsy singer and songwriter. Left to his own devices you could imagine him forging an identity in the mould of a Jeff Tweedy - as you can hear on the songs where he takes the lead.
But it’s Russell’s voice that lifts Birds Of Chicago out of the folksy-country realm and takes them somewhere much closer to soul or R&B. The combination of Nero’s country inflections and Russell’s gospel choruses has an early-70s vibe to it: that period when gospel and country were meeting in the music of Delaney and Bonnie, Leon Russell and a bunch of others.
But despite the palpable joy Nero and Russell have found in working together – effectively disbanding their previous groups to create this new one – there’s a note of unease that runs through their songwriting. Or perhaps it’s just that finding this apparent love and stability, they have allowed themselves to contemplate the big existential questions. As they ask in the sombre title song: ‘What are you going to do with your days left in the sun?’
Nero and Russell have coined the phrase ‘secular gospel’ for the music they make as Birds Of Chicago, and it’s apt – not just sonically, with hymnal chords and choral harmonies, but also thematically. There’s nothing overtly religious here, but there’s a preoccupation with the transience of life, and the inevitable questions about what comes next.
Real Midnight may be sombre in its themes, but its varied in its settings. At times it comes down to almost field-recording simplicity, with Russell singing a cappella, but they can also build a chorus to near-anthemic heights, which is what they do in the song that might best encapsulate the mood of the whole album. Called ‘Remember Wild Horses’, it’s a song that looks back at what’s been lost, accepts the transient nature of things, then moves ahead with an open heart and voices raised to the heavens.
Songs featured: Dim Star of the Palisades; Colour of Love; Time and Times; The Good Fight; Estrella Goodbye; Real Midnight; Sparrow; Barley; Remember Wild Horses.
Real Midnight is available on Five Head Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music review, Birds Of Chicago
Duration: 11'26"

7:30 The Sampler
music album reviews & music discussion with Nick Bollinger
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Philosophy
philosopher at large Ann Kerwin often muses on the ways we can and could think... Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein - Plato is at Olympia University and is keen to participate in a neurological study...
8:30 Window on the World - South Korea - The Silent Cultural Superpower pt 1 of 2
international public radio documentaries
9:07 Tuesday Feature - Exchanges at the Frontier: The Search for Neanderthal Genes
10:17 Late Edition
a round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour - Global Village
music from a myriad of cultures
... nights' time is the right time...

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 5 April 2016
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream; American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks; and the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream; American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks; and the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Primal Scream, Robbie Fulks, Birds Of Chicago
Duration: 28'39"

19:30
Chaosmosis by Primal Scream
BODY:
Nick Bollnger checks a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollnger checks a pop-tronic excursion from Scottish rockers Primal Scream.
It’s 25 years now since Primal Scream seized their moment. At the height of acid house, this Scottish rock band did what might look obvious on paper but which no one had had either the inspiration or attitude to do: combined the trippy electronic dance music of the day with old school rock’n’roll. The result was Screamadelica, an album that still ranks on those lists of the great and good. But a quarter century on, what else have they come up with?
Chaosmosis is Primal Scream’s eleventh and latest album, and if you had heard nothing they have done since Screamadelica you might think they hadn’t had a single new idea in all that time. The opening track, ‘Trippin’ On Your Love’ is Screamadelica redux: Martin Duffy’s Nicky Hopkins-inspired piano and guitarist Andrew Innes’s wah-wah licks melded with one of those instant-party house grooves, while Bobby Gillespie gets chorus help from Californian sister singers Haim.
One device they have used to make Chaosmosis seem more relevant and contemporary is to ring in some younger and frequently female voices. There are Haim’s harmonies on that opening track, and there’s edgy twenty-something singer Sky Ferreira who alternates lines with Gillespie on ‘Where the Light Gets In’, another of the album’s hookier cuts.
But despite Primal Scream’s reputation as a bunch of rock’n’roll bad boys, Chaosmosis is a slick, poppy and essentially calculated piece of work. And perhaps that is the main thing that has changed over the quarter century since Screamadelica. Back then, this was a band that genuinely didn’t seem to give a toss what people thought; evidenced in the way they followed that big breakthrough by shedding the acid house beats, relocating to the American South and making a follow-up that sounded like Glasgow’s answer to the Black Crowes. And their approach remained as wilful for a while after that, as they free-ranged through dub and Krautrock on Vanishing Point, punk and industrial on XTRMNTR.
But few bands stay restlessly creative forever, and those mid-period Scream albums – which seemed rather messy and unfocussed at the time – stand out now as feats of imagination compared to this.
Songs featured: Trippin’ On Your Love; Golden Rope; Feeling Like A Demon Again; I Can Change; Where the Light Gets In.
Chaosmosis is available on Ignition Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Primal Scream, music review
Duration: 7'46"

19:30
Upland Stories by Robbie Fulks
BODY:
Nick Bollinger listens to American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger listens to American heartland tales from Robbie Fulks.
Like a great country singer should, Robbie Fulks has songs to make you laugh and songs to make you cry. And his new album’s got both.
I first became aware of Fulks with his 1998 Geffen album Let’s Kill Saturday Night – a well-promoted set which, as it turned out, was to be his one brush with a major label. With a hard-rocking band behind him, his smart, country-tinged songs almost passed as contemporary rock’n’roll. But a square peg like Fulks was never really going to fit into the round hole of the majors, and ever since then he’s been releasing - at fairly regular intervals – records that lean increasingly towards the sparseness and timelessness of hillbilly music.
He’s an excellent guitarist and surrounds himself with musicians of equal calibre. He’s also a fine singer, with more than one mode of delivery, and a masterful songwriter, who constructs his words and tunes with an artisan’s craft. Some of the songs are funny (try ‘Aunt Peg’s New Old Man’), but more often they are poignant and pointed.
If Upland Stories had a subtitle it might be the name of one of its standout songs: ‘America is a Hard Religion.’ There’s a running theme here of working people in America’s forgotten heartland, trying to believe in a country that has manifestly let them down. There’s something here of the eye and ear of James Agee, whose collaboration with photojournalist Walker Evans produced the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, the seminal and shocking document of the Great Depression. So perhaps its not surprising that another of the standout tracks, ‘Alabama At Night’, is directly inspired by Agee and Evans’ travels in the 1930s. The song may be set in the Great Depression, but one senses that story could as easily be unfolding right now, and that same quiet and particular type of observation runs right through the record.
Like his last album, 2013’s Gone Away Backward, Upland Stories was recorded by Steve Albini. And though better known for his work on The Pixies’ Surfer Rosa, Nirvana’s In Utero, or the excoriating sounds of his own band Shellac, when it comes to capturing acoustic music no one does it better - with Fulks’ voice crisp, present and out in front, and the instruments arranged beautifully around the singing, like a concert in your living room.
Not everyone hits a hot streak twenty years into their recording career, but Upland Stories finds Robbie Fulks making the best music he ever has.
Songs featured: South Bend Soldiers On; Aunt Peg’s New Old Man; America Is A Hard Religion; Alabama At Night; Never Come Home; Fare Thee Well Carolina Gals.
Upland Stories is available on Bloodshot Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Robbie Fulks, music, music review
Duration: 9'28"

19:30
Real Midnight by Birds of Chicago
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the 'secular gospel music' of Birds Of Chicago.
For almost a decade, musician and record producer Joe Henry lived and worked out of a South Pasadena residence known as The Garfield House: built at the turn of the last century for Lucretia Garfield, widow of the late American President James Garfield. Last year he packed up his studio and moved on. But before he did, he made this.
Real Midnight, the second album by Birds Of Chicago, has the distinction of being the last record produced by Joe Henry in the Garfield House, concluding a list that includes albums by Over The Rhine, Mary Gauthier and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, not to mention several by Henry himself.
It’s hard to tell how much it’s the house and how much it’s Henry that gives all these records a certain unifying mood. One thing’s for sure, though: Birds Of Chicago fit right in.
Formed just four years ago, they are helmed by a romantic couple, JT Nero and Alice Russell. Nero (whose name is actually Jeremy Lindsay) used to front a soul-influenced indie band, JT and the Clouds, based in Chicago. Russell sang with the Canadian quartet Po’ Girl. They hooked up when the two acts were touring together, and Birds Of Chicago is the result.
Nero is a rootsy singer and songwriter. Left to his own devices you could imagine him forging an identity in the mould of a Jeff Tweedy - as you can hear on the songs where he takes the lead.
But it’s Russell’s voice that lifts Birds Of Chicago out of the folksy-country realm and takes them somewhere much closer to soul or R&B. The combination of Nero’s country inflections and Russell’s gospel choruses has an early-70s vibe to it: that period when gospel and country were meeting in the music of Delaney and Bonnie, Leon Russell and a bunch of others.
But despite the palpable joy Nero and Russell have found in working together – effectively disbanding their previous groups to create this new one – there’s a note of unease that runs through their songwriting. Or perhaps it’s just that finding this apparent love and stability, they have allowed themselves to contemplate the big existential questions. As they ask in the sombre title song: ‘What are you going to do with your days left in the sun?’
Nero and Russell have coined the phrase ‘secular gospel’ for the music they make as Birds Of Chicago, and it’s apt – not just sonically, with hymnal chords and choral harmonies, but also thematically. There’s nothing overtly religious here, but there’s a preoccupation with the transience of life, and the inevitable questions about what comes next.
Real Midnight may be sombre in its themes, but its varied in its settings. At times it comes down to almost field-recording simplicity, with Russell singing a cappella, but they can also build a chorus to near-anthemic heights, which is what they do in the song that might best encapsulate the mood of the whole album. Called ‘Remember Wild Horses’, it’s a song that looks back at what’s been lost, accepts the transient nature of things, then moves ahead with an open heart and voices raised to the heavens.
Songs featured: Dim Star of the Palisades; Colour of Love; Time and Times; The Good Fight; Estrella Goodbye; Real Midnight; Sparrow; Barley; Remember Wild Horses.
Real Midnight is available on Five Head Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music review, Birds Of Chicago
Duration: 11'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

The Search for Neanderthal Genes: Professor Svante Paabo talks about what does the DNA of our closest ancestors tell us about ourselves? (4 of 4, BBC)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 5 April 2016
Helen Clark to run for top UN job. Human sacrifice with Jessie Mulligan and in Dateline Pacific more flooding in Fiji.

=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (3 of 12, KMUW)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288178

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 05 Apr 2016

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