RNZ National. 2016-05-03. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

03 May 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (RNZ); 2:05 New Jazz Archive (PRX) 3:05 Closed, Stranger by Kate de Goldi read by Scott Wills (2 of 12, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 3 May 2016
BODY:
The Greens say John Key still has questions to answer about the actions of his lawyer. Mount Everest veterans say a recipe for disaster and death is unfolding on the mountain and a postie says she was threatened with jail for trying to protect people from scammers.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'53"

06:06
Sports News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'44"

06:09
Kiwi Leicester City fan flies to UK to sahre in Foxes win
BODY:
Leicester City is on the cusp of winning the English Premier League.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Leicester City
Duration: 4'35"

06:20
Early Business News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'33"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'02"

06:38
Opposition doubt PM's foreign trusts claims
BODY:
Lawyer Ken Whitney continues to work for the Prime Minister in spite of John Key saying he misrepresented him over his stance on New Zealand's controversial foreign trust regime.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Ken Whitney, trusts
Duration: 3'11"

06:42
Everest expedition leaders warn of using untrained sherpas
BODY:
Expedition leaders on Mount Everest are warning that too many inexperienced climbers are using untrained sherpas in cut-rate expeditions.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Mount Everest, climbing
Duration: 2'06"

06:49
Westpac sees further interest rate cuts
BODY:
Westpac Bank says the Reserve Bank's restrictions on house lending and other measures to take the heat of of the housing market have improved the quality of its lending book, even if the market is taking off again.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rates
Duration: 2'37"

06:51
Bank suggests 50 basis point cut to OCR
BODY:
Meanwhile ASB's chief economist suggests the Reserve Bank should cut the official cash rate by 50 basis points to 1.75 percent.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rates
Duration: 2'08"

06:54
Unseasonably higher tempreatures are disrupting business
BODY:
Unseasonably higher temperatures are disrupting businesses.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: temperatures
Duration: 2'37"

06:57
Energy analyst says solar still expensive
BODY:
An energy sector analyst says it is unlikely solar power will spread widely throughout the country and is expensive to install.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: solar power
Duration: 58"

06:58
Morning markets for 3 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 57"

07:07
Sports News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

07:11
Questions remain over decision to do nothing on foreign trusts
BODY:
Lawyer Ken Whitney continues to work for the Prime Minister in spite of John Key saying he misrepresented him.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Ken Whitney, trusts
Duration: 4'43"

07:16
Cut-rate Everest expeditions recipe for disaster
BODY:
A recipe for disaster and death is unfolding on Mount Everest. That's according to veteran climbers from New Zealand and Nepal who are warning increasing numbers of inexperienced climbers are trying to reach the summit with untrained sherpas in cut-rate expeditions.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Mount Everest, climbing
Duration: 3'35"

07:25
NZ Post worker threatened with jail
BODY:
A New Zealand Post worker who refused to deliver what she says were scam letters says she was threatened with the prospect of prison.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: NZ Post
Duration: 4'29"

07:29
Prescription drug, energy drink use within Warriors
BODY:
Drug Free Sport New Zealand says it's disturbed by reports members of the Warriors have been getting high by mixing prescription drugs and energy drinks .
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: drugs
Duration: 4'40"

07:38
Labour leader doubts Camp Taji mission can be done in 12 months
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key is leaving open the option of extending New Zealand's military mission in Iraq.
Topics: defence force
Regions:
Tags: Iraq
Duration: 4'48"

07:48
Official documents reveal strong lobbying for Keytruda
BODY:
Merck, the maker of the melanoma drug Keytruda is accusing Pharmac of ignoring the latest data on the drug's effectiveness.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Keytruda
Duration: 4'33"

07:54
Right-wing candidates may clash in bid for Akl Council seats
BODY:
The National Party-backed move to win control of the Auckland Council may end up pitting centre right candidates against each other.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland Council
Duration: 4'26"

08:07
Sports News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

08:11
Hospital food firm's intriguing tax recipe
BODY:
Compass, the multinational company currently under fire over its hospital food, is now having questions asked about its financial arrangements.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Compass
Duration: 4'44"

08:16
Pressure on Cruz to take Indiana
BODY:
The pressure is mounting on Ted Cruz to win in Indiana tomorrow in what many are seeing as his last stand.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 3'32"

08:20
Massey academic rejects Nick Smith's affordability claims
BODY:
An author of the Massey University report Nick Smith cited last week saying houses across the country are more affordable than when National came into government says the Minister was wrong.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: house prices
Duration: 6'18"

08:26
Selby and Ding meet at World Snooker Championship
BODY:
The World Snooker Championship final between England's Mark Selby and Ding Jinhui from China is nearing its conculsion at The Crucible Theatre in Sheffield.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: World Snooker Championship
Duration: 4'13"

08:32
Markets Update for 3 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'07"

08:36
New lure improves possum kill rate by 25%
BODY:
Using possum pee instead of icing sugar to lure the pests into traps looks set to dramatically increase how many possums the traps catch.
Topics: rural
Regions:
Tags: possums
Duration: 3'07"

08:40
Flood modelling changes in Christchurch
BODY:
Residents and the Christchurch City Council are at odds over whether some homes should have been rebuilt higher to avoid possible future flooding damage.
Topics: housing
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch, flooding
Duration: 2'32"

08:42
Second Nauru refugee set alight raises questions
BODY:
As we have been reporting this morning, a second refugee on Nauru Island has set herself on fire.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nauru, refugees
Duration: 5'00"

08:48
More than 2000 tell NZTA what they think
BODY:
Nelson's rush hour may seem miniscule to outsiders - with delays measured in minutes - but the city's traffic problem is dividing locals
Topics: transport
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: traffic
Duration: 3'23"

08:51
Leicester poised to win
BODY:
It's 2-all in the Spurs/Chelsea match at Stamford Bridge. 5 minutes to go, if it stays 2 all Leicester will win the English Premier League.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: football, English Premier League
Duration: 3'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Pack and Rifle by Philip Holden told by Russell Smith (2 of 3, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Environment Minister fronts up on water
BODY:
Water: Who owns it? Should there be a `price' on it? And what are the rights and interests of Maori in it? The government insists that no one owns water - and regional councils allocate the right to use it. However a Waitangi Tribunal ruling in 2012 found that Maori have traditional rights and interests in fresh water guaranteed by the Treaty of Waitangi. The government has ruled out a national settlement for water, or a national water allocation for iwi, holding talks instead with the Freshwater iwi leaders group.Meanwhile there's growing unease about large-scale water extraction for sale overseas by commercial companies. Not to mention the on-going issue of water quality in our rivers and lakes. Consultation on the governments Next Steps for Freshwater plan closed last month. Nine to Noon speaks to Environment Minister, Nick Smith.
Topics: politics, environment, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'20"

09:42
CYF review must better address Maori says researcher
BODY:
Maori comprise 60 percent of children in Child Youth and Family care and the findings of last month's review presented by the social justice Minister, Anne Tolley, stressed an increased emphasis on Kaupapa Maori approaches within CYF's redevelopment. Over the past three years University of Waikato's Associate Professor Leonie Pihama, director of Te Kotahi Research Institute, has been doing research to highlight why these kinds of values should be actively supported in social welfare.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: CYF, tamariki, children
Duration: 12'04"

09:54
Leicester City Football Club's rise to the top.
BODY:
Rob Tanner is the author of the book 5000-1 The Leicester City Story.

EXTENDED BODY:
Leicester City Football club has pulled off one of sport's greatest fairy-tales, clinching the Premier League title after starting the season as 5,000-1 outsiders,
To put that in perspective the bookies thought there was more chance of finding the Loch Ness Monster than the Foxes' Premier League win.
Leicester were handed the title after their nearest rivals, Tottenham Hotspur were held to a 2-all draw at Chelsea this morning, and cannot close the gap with two games to go.
The club , which struggled last season to stay in the Premier League, has never achieved such a feat in its 132-year history.
The Leicester Mercury's chief football writer & the author of the book 5000-1 The Leicester City Story is Rob Tanner.

Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: football, Leicester
Duration: 6'08"

10:08
Double amputee and New York marathoner Ian Winson
BODY:
When Ian Winson was taken to hospital in June 2011 his injuries were unlike any the doctors and surgeons had dealt with before. He'd been on his hands and knees inspecting a water pipe for leaks in an underground tunnel in Onehunga when 500 meters away two subcontractors were using a blowtorch to cut through a section of piping. The torch ignited a pocket of natural gas which had leaked into the pipe, causing a massive explosion. One Watercare worker was killed instantly while six others suffered injuries - the most severe of which were Ian's. He lost both his legs and one of his fingers - and suffered a traumatic brain injury which went undiagnosed for 18 months. Ian has documented his long road towards recovery in a new book, Never Give Up, that culminates with Ian becoming the first ever double above the knee amputee to compete in the New York marathon - he has hopes to eventually compete as a Paralympian.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand's physical rehabilitation facilities are lagging behind the rest of the world, double amputee and marathon runner Ian Winson says.
Mr Winson, a double above-the-knee amputee, lost his legs in a gas explosion in Auckland in June 2011.
He has documented his long road towards recovery in a new book, Never Give Up, that culminates with him becoming the first ever double above-the-knee amputee to compete in the New York marathon - he has hopes to eventually compete as a Paralympian.
Speaking to Nine to Noon today, he said he had only praise for the staff of the rehabilitation facilities but that the facilities were lagging behind the rest of the world in terms of equipment and they could do with a revamp.
"What I've always said is that the doctors and the nurses at Auckland hospital or at the hospitals around New Zealand are very good at putting people back together.
"But the real work only starts when you leave hospital and go to a rehab facility.
He said he had a chance to see rehab centre the Spalding unit in Boston and there was a feeling there that patients wanted to get better.
"When you go and visit some of our rehab facilities, it doesn't really make you feel - I wasn't too happy to go from hospital to rehab, let's put it that way."
However, he said New Zealand was slowly advancing when it came to prosthetics - it was just price that was a stumbling block.
"When I was in Boston I didn’t see anyone in the rehab unit with an old hydraulic leg, they were all on microprocessing legs, so they were all on computerised legs. That’s slowly happening with us, but you’ve got to be mindful… they are expensive, there’s no two ways about it."
He lost both his legs and one of his fingers - and suffered a traumatic brain injury which went undiagnosed for 18 months.
He said he had been through 26 surgeries since the accident, but was still feeling the psychological effects of the amputations.
"The psychological impact is still an ongoing thing, I had an hour's treatment yesterday with my neuropsychologist just trying to work out ways to deal with things and making sure I get enough sleep.
"It's a bit of a fight, the old brain and the new brain is definitely at each other at times."
However, he said New Zealanders were blessed when it came to ACC.
"It's just wonderful, when you think of what my life could have been like.
"The thing with ACC is you've got to come across with logic, you've got to come across with why you need things.
"There's a perception that if you have an injury, ACC will pay for the yacht, and they'll pay for the jet ski and they'll pay for this and pay for that and in hindsight that's really not what it's all about."
Recovery through sport and family
He said his wife's support had kept him and his family going, and his own drive kept him striving to remain active.
"It was always in the back of my mind that I would always get back into some kind of sport, I've played sport since I was about 5 years old, so sport is a central core to who I am and it was never going to let that diminish just because I've got physical injuries now.
"Early on in the rehabilitation process, you know, I was well aware of paralympics and how far that has come in the last 12 years and how the performance of paralympians or people with disabilities has really gone up several notches.
Mr Winson completed the New York Marathon in about four hours, and said it was an emotional day.
"They weren't over the moon about me being there pedalling a bike rather than a hand cycle, but they put a picture of me in the official results magazine, so... they can't be too upset that I competed.
He is now aiming to go to the Tokyo 2020 paralympics, and said he had reached some big milestones in the pool.
Dim memories of the accident
He said he had pieced together some of what had caused the accident, although it was mostly through the accounts of co-workers.
"I don't remember a lot, just little snippets - I don't remember the night before either."
He had been on his hands and knees inspecting a water pipe for leaks in an underground tunnel in Onehunga when 500m away two subcontractors were using a blowtorch to cut through a section of piping.
"Fourteen days later I sort of came out of a medical state where I could actually speak."
In court, it was found out the contractors had never actually tested the area for gas.
The council-owned water company was ordered to pay $396,000 for failing to protect its workers.
Related:

Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: disability, amputation, Paralympics, paralympian, watercare, health and safety
Duration: 33'35"

10:41
Book review - Dodge Rose by Jack Cox
BODY:
Reviewed by Stella Chrysostomou, published by Text Publishing.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'49"

11:06
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Why the Auckland housing market needs co-ordinated policies, and Huntly power station's reprieve.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'04"

11:25
The power of loyalty schemes
BODY:
Pieta Brown the Chief Analytics Officer at Loyalty New Zealand's 30-strong subsidiary Lab360. Loyalty NZ, best known for being behind the Fly Buys rewards scheme, is one of the country's most sophisticated data analytics companies - using things like targeted marketing, to better deliver what you want, but also make you buy more.
EXTENDED BODY:
What do loyalty schemes like Fly Buys know about you and how do they serve you? Kathryn Ryan asks Pieta Brown of Loyalty New Zealand – the company that operates Fly Buys.
Pieta Brown is the Chief Analytics Officer at Loyalty New Zealand's 30-strong subsidiary Lab360. Loyalty New Zealand is one of the country's most sophisticated data analytics companies – using things like targeted marketing to better deliver what you want, but also make you buy more.
Topics: technology, business
Regions:
Tags: data, flybuys
Duration: 18'12"

11:44
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Hilary Barry is the latest departure in a haemorrhaging of news talent from MediaWorks but has the company hit a femoral artery this time? Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Gavin Ellis, media, Mediaworks
Duration: 15'19"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Environment Minister fronts up on water
[image:66262:full] no metadata
Water: Who owns it? Should there be a `price' on it? And what are the rights and interests of Maori in it?
The government insists that no one owns water - and regional councils allocate the right to use it. However a Waitangi Tribunal ruling in 2012 found that Maori have traditional rights and interests in fresh water guaranteed by the Treaty of Waitangi. The government has ruled out a national settlement for water, or a national water allocation for iwi, holding talks instead with the Freshwater iwi leaders group.Meanwhile there's growing unease about large-scale water extraction for sale overseas by commercial companies. Not to mention the on-going issue of water quality in our rivers and lakes.
Consultation on the governments Next Steps for Freshwater plan closed last month. Nine to Noon speaks to Environment Minister, Nick Smith.
[image:66701:quarter] no metadata
09:20 CYF review must better address Māori says researcher
Māori comprise 60 percent of children in Child Youth and Family care and the findings of last month's review presented by the social justice Minister, Anne Tolley, stressed an increased emphasis on Kaupapa Māori approaches within CYF's redevelopment.
Over the past three years University of Waikato's Associate Professor Leonie Pihama, director of Te Kotahi Research Institute, has been doing research to highlight why these kinds of values should be actively supported in social welfare.
09:45 US correspondent, Steve Almond
10:05 Double amputee and New York marathoner Ian Winson
[image:66659:half] no metadata
When Ian Winson was taken to hospital in June 2011 his injuries were unlike any the doctors and surgeons had dealt with before. He'd been on his hands and knees inspecting a water pipe for leaks in an underground tunnel in Onehunga when 500 meters away two subcontractors were using a blowtorch to cut through a section of piping. The torch ignited a pocket of natural gas which had leaked into the pipe, causing a massive explosion. One Watercare worker was killed instantly while six others suffered injuries - the most severe of which were Ian's. He lost both his legs and one of his fingers - and suffered a traumatic brain injury which went undiagnosed for 18 months.
Ian has documented his long road towards recovery in a new book, Never Give Up, that culminates with Ian becoming the first ever double above the knee amputee to compete in the New York marathon - he has hopes to eventually compete as a Paralympian.
10:35 Book review - Dodge Rose by Jack Cox
Reviewed by Stella Chrysostomou, published by Text Publishing
10:45 The Reading
Pack and Rifle by Philip Holden told by Russell Smith (Part 2 of 3)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
Why the Auckland housing market needs co-ordinated policies, and Huntly power station's reprieve.
[image:66700:third] no metadata
11:30 The power of loyalty schemes
Pieta Brown the Chief Analytics Officer at Loyalty New Zealand's 30-strong subsidiary Lab360. Loyalty NZ, best known for being behind the Fly Buys rewards scheme, is one of the country's most sophisticated data analytics companies - using things like targeted marketing, to better deliver what you want, but also make you buy more.
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Hilary Barry is the latest departure in a haemorrhaging of news talent from MediaWorks but has the company hit a femoral artery this time?
Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
The government is investigating the Overseas Information Office's good character test, John Key says his lawyer used careless language on foreign trusts.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'14"

12:17
Tegel shares begin trading today
BODY:
The poultry producer, Tegel Foods, has begun trading on the New Zealand and Australian stock exchanges this morning, at a premium to its issue price.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Tegel Foods
Duration: 2'14"

12:19
ANZ Banking Group sees first half profit fall
BODY:
The ANZ Banking Group has seen its first half cash profit fall by nearly a quarter, while the New Zealand arm's profit also declined, reflecting a difficult trading period.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: ANZ Banking, ANZ
Duration: 1'13"

12:20
Air New Zealand highlights challenges ahead
BODY:
The national carrier, Air New Zealand, says strong tourism will continue to support the company's growth, but says increasing competition is a challenge.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Air New Zealand
Duration: 51"

12:21
Craigs issued formal warning
BODY:
The investment advisor, Craigs Investment Partners, has been given a formal warning by the markets watchdog for breaching anti-money laundering legislation.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Craigs Investment partners
Duration: 37"

12:24
Midday Markets for 3 May 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Melika King at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
Leicester City's English Premier League title dream became reality this morning as their only remaining challengers Tottenham Hotspur drew 2-all at Chelsea.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'34"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 3 May 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:14
Kiwi Leicester City fan celebrating historic victory
BODY:
Leicester City have won football's Premier League title in one of the greatest sporting stories of all time. They started their campaign as 5-thousand to 1 outsiders, after coming close to relegation last season. Actually taking the championship hinged on Tottenham not beating Chelsea - and just a few hours ago those teams drew, sending Leicester fans into a frenzy of celebration. Among those in joyful ecstasy was New Zealander Jim Small, a long time Leicester fan, who flew to the city from Christchurch on Saturday.
EXTENDED BODY:
Leicester City have won football's Premier League title in one of the greatest sporting comebacks of all time.
They started their campaign as 5-thousand to 1 outsiders, after coming close to relegation last season. Actually taking the championship hinged on Tottenham not beating Chelsea - and just a few hours ago those teams drew, sending Leicester fans into a frenzy of celebration.
Among those in joyful ecstasy was New Zealander Jim Small, a long time Leicester fan, who flew to the city from Christchurch on Saturday.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Leicester City, football, soccer
Duration: 8'09"

13:24
Proposal to create 80 hectare wetland in Bay of Plenty
BODY:
About 80 hectares of wetlands is being proposed for an area between Te Puke, Papamoa and Maketu in the Bay of Plenty. Over the course of the last one hundred years wetlands have all but disappeared with many being drained since the 1800s. Bay of Plenty Regional Council Kaituna Catchments Manger, Pim de Monchy explains what is involved.
Topics: environment
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: wetlands
Duration: 10'20"

13:35
Using honey bees to uncover the mysteries of anaesthesia-induced jetlag
BODY:
New research is being presented today on how to avoid jet lag like symptoms for patients who've been under anaesthetic. The researchers used honey bees to uncover some of the mystery of anaesthesia-induced jetlag and the findings are being presented today at the annual scientific meeting of the Austrlaian and new Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The lead researcher who's been looking at the bees and in particluar their waggle dance is Associate Professor Guy Warman from Auckland University's Department of Anaesthesiology.
EXTENDED BODY:
New research is being presented today on how to avoid jet lag like symptoms for patients who've been under anaesthetic. The researchers used honey bees to uncover some of the mystery of anaesthesia-induced jetlag and the findings are being presented today at the annual scientific meeting of the Austrlaian and new Zealand College of Anaesthetists. The lead researcher who's been looking at the bees and in particluar their waggle dance is Associate Professor Guy Warman from Auckland University's Department of Anaesthesiology.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: anaesthetic, bees, honey bees, honey, jet lag, jet lag symptoms, fatigue
Duration: 7'50"

13:43
Feature Album - Magical Mystery Tour
BODY:
Doug Barry Martin has chosen Magical Mystery Tour by the Beatles.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'14"

14:09
Bitcoin Mystery
BODY:
A New Zealand technology commentator and bitcoin fancier, Hamish MacEwan, examines Craig Steven Wright's claims that he is the mastermind behind Bitcoin.
Topics: technology, internet
Regions:
Tags: bitcoin
Duration: 8'51"

14:18
Great NZ Album - Pet
BODY:
Julia Deans talks about her fur patrol album "Pet".
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Fur Patrol
Duration: 42'01"

15:10
James Kerr on what the All Blacks can teach us about success
BODY:
Success is a great teacher. And no other sports team in history is as successful than the All Blacks. In 2010, one year before Coach Sir Graham Henry led the All Blacks to a World Cup, victory, best-selling author James Kerr spent 5 weeks studying the culture of the team. Kerr's 2013 book, Legacy: What the All Blacks Can Teach Us About the Business of Life, lays out the leadership and cultural changes that produced back to back World Cup winning teams. Now American football teams are using the book and the lessons learned from the All Blacks to turn around losing seasons.
EXTENDED BODY:
Success is a great teacher. And no other sports team in history is as successful than the All Blacks.
But in those dark days in 2003, after the bitter All Black loss to the Australians in the World Cup semi-finals, everyone knew something had to change.
When Sir Graham Henry came in, he started with the culture of the All Blacks, building on the Brian Lahore mantra, "better people make better All Blacks".
After back to back World Cup wins, you might say the rest is history, but it's not.
Now at least one major American football team is using the All Blacks playbook to turn around their team culture based on a book by best-selling author and business consultant James Kerr.
In 2010, one year before Henry led the All Blacks to a World Cup victory Kerr spent five weeks studying the culture of the team.
After his tenure following the team he laid out their winning formula in his 2013 book Legacy: What the All Blacks Can Teach Us About the Business of Life - 15 Lessons In Leadership, and descrbes how it can apply to businesses.
James Kerr's First XV - lessons from the All Blacks
I Sweep the sheds — Never be too big to do the small things that need to be done
II Go for the gap — When you're on top of your game, change your game
III Play with purpose Ask 'Why?'
IV Pass the ball — Leaders create leaders
V Create a learning Environment — Leaders are teachers
VI No dickheads — Follow the spearhead
VII Embrace expectations — Aim for the highest cloud
VIII Train to win — Practise under pressure
IX Keep a blue head — Control your attention
X Know thyself — Keep it real
XI Sacrifice — Find something you would die for and give your life to it
XII Invent a language — Sing your world into existence
XIII Ritualize to actualize — Create a culture
XIV Be a good ancestor — Plant trees you'll never see
XV Write your legacy — This is your time!
Topics: life and society, sport
Regions:
Tags: sport culture, team culture, coaching, success, culture, All Blacks
Duration: 23'04"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 3 May 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
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Duration: 14'32"

21:46
Whitebait mysteries – unravelling the lives of baby native fish
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Baby native fish are in the spotlight as freshwater biologists unravel the mysteries of where these tiny creatures go in the first weeks of their lives.
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“There’s a lot left to find out about the early life stages of our native fish – it’s largely been ignored.”
Matt Jarvis, University of Otago

Koaro, or climbing galaxiids, are an amazing native freshwater fish. Shaped like a cigar, with large dextrous fins, they are skilled at climbing, and can make their way up steep waterfalls. They are also well adapted to high water flow in rivers, and even make use of floods to spawn and lay their eggs.
As babies, they make up part of the whitebait catch, but we know very little about their early lives, and this is something that University of Otago researchers are investigating.
During the recent large floods on the West Coast, which resulted in the evacuation of several flooded hotels at Franz Josef, PhD student Jason Augspurger and assistant research fellow Matt Jarvis were in the field collecting some spawning koaro, to bring back to the lab for experiments.
“These fish are so well adapted to these floods, they’ve evolved with them,” says Matt. “And not only can they cope with them, they require them. They wait for these floods in order to spawn,”

Like other native galaxiid fish there are two kinds of koaro populations: in some of them young fish move out to sea for the first few months of their life, before returning to freshwater. This is known as diadremy. Other populations have become landlocked, and now move between streams and rivers and nearby lakes.
Jason has just begun investigating differences between the two kinds of populations, in particular the size of the koaro larvae when they hatch, how fast they grow, and how well they can swim during their first month of life.
Jason has found that landlocked koaro populations lay larger numbers of smaller eggs than the populations which migrate out to sea.
“The marine koaro have eggs that are about 25% larger than the land-locked fish,” says Jason. “I expect they’ll hatch out quite a bit larger, which means they can swim and cope with the marine environment [better].”

Blue-gilled bullies
Matt is looking at another native fish, the blue-gilled bully. He is particularly interested in how climate change and warming water might affect the baby bullies and their ability to migrate to sea.
Matt explains that when blue-gilled bullies hatch they are just 2-3 millimetres long, and they can’t feed in the river or stream. They have a yolk sac that is enough to sustain them for the first few days until they drift out to sea where they can feed on tiny plankton.
“The idea is that if the river water warms up they’ll use up their yolk sac faster because their metabolism increases,” says Matt, and that increases the chance they’ll starve before they make it out to sea.

“[The work] is still in the early stages but it’s looking as if instead of lasting a week [the fish larvae] might only last two or three days.”
However, Matt also points out that they don’t yet know how long it takes a baby bully to get out to sea. The next stage of the research is to catch and age small bullies at various places in the lower reaches of rivers and on the nearby coast to see how many days it has taken them to get there.
Work using isotopic signatures to find out which areas the young fish are spending most of their time has shown that they stay quite close to the stream or river they were spawned in.
Matt says this is useful as it shows that local conservation efforts to improve the quality of streams and rivers through replanting streams and river banks will have local benefits, as the fish are very likely to return to their own waterway rather than one many kilometres away.
“It looks like the whitebait really might stay quite close to the rivers they’ve come from,” says Jason.

Whitebait
The whitebait catch is made up of five different species of native galaxiid fish, including koaro. Inanga is the most well-known of the species, four of which are endangered.
Topics: science, environment
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Tags: native fish, koaro, whitebait, blue-gilled bully, freshwater
Duration: 13'16"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First Song: Don't let it bring you down, Neil Young
1:15 Kiwi Leicester City fan celebrates historic victory
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Leicester City have won football's Premier League title in one of the greatest sporting comebacks of all time.
They started their campaign as 5-thousand to 1 outsiders, after coming close to relegation last season. Actually taking the championship hinged on Tottenham not beating Chelsea - and just a few hours ago those teams drew, sending Leicester fans into a frenzy of celebration.
Among those in joyful ecstasy was New Zealander Jim Small, a long time Leicester fan, who flew to the city from Christchurch on Saturday.
1:25 Proposal to create 80 hectare wetland in Bay of Plenty
About 80 hectares of wetlands is being proposed for an area between Te Puke, Papamoa and Maketu in the Bay of Plenty. Over the course of the last one hundred years wetlands have all but disappeared with many being drained since the 1800s.
Bay of Plenty Regional Council Kaituna Catchments Manger, Pim de Monchy explains what is involved.
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1:35 Using honey bees to uncover the mysteries of anaesthesia-induced jetlag
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New research is being presented today on how to avoid jet lag like symptoms for patients who've been under anaesthetic.
The researchers used honey bees to uncover some of the mystery of anaesthesia-induced jetlag and the findings are being presented today at the annual scientific meeting of the Austrlaian and new Zealand College of Anaesthetists.
The lead researcher who's been looking at the bees and in particluar their waggle dance is Associate Professor Guy Warman from Auckland University's Department of Anaesthesiology
1:40 Favourite Album
Magical Mystery Tour: The Beatles
2:10 Bitcoin Mystery - Is Craig Steven Wright really Satoshi Nakamoto?
A New Zealand technology commentator and bitcoin fancier, Hamish MacEwan, examines Craig Steven Wright's claims that he is the mastermind behind Bitcoin.
2:20 Great New Zealand Album
Julia Deans talks about her fur patrol album "Pet".
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3:10 James Kerr on what the All Blacks can teach us about success
Success is a great teacher. And no other sports team in history is as successful than the All Blacks. In 2010, one year before Coach Sir Graham Henry led the All Blacks to a World Cup, victory, best selling author James Kerr spent 5 weeks studying the culture of the team. Kerr's 2013 book, Legacy: What the All Blacks Can Teach Us About the Business of Life, = lays out the leadership and cultural changes that produced back to back World Cup winning teams. Now American football teams are using the book and the lessons learned from the All Blacks to turn around losing seasons.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE'S SONG:

ARTIST: Neil Young
TITLE: Don't Let It Bring You Down
COMP: Neil Young
ALBUM: Earth
LABEL: Download

FEATURE ALBUM:

ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: The Fool on the Hill
COMP: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
ALBUM: Magical Mystery Tour EP
LABEL: Parlophone

ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: Blue Jay Way
COMP: George Harrison
ALBUM: Magical Mystery Tour EP
LABEL: Parlophone

ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: I Am The Walrus
COMP: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
ALBUM: Magical Mystery Tour EP
LABEL: Parlophone

ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: Flying
COMP: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Richard Starkey
ALBUM: Magical Mystery Tour EP
LABEL: Parlophone

THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM: Pet - Fur Patrol

ARTIST: Fur Patrol
TITLE: Lydia
COMP: Julia Deans. Fur Patrol
ALBUM: Pet
LABEL: Wishbone Records

ARTIST: Fur Patrol
TITLE: Andrew
COMP: Julia Deans. Fur Patrol
ALBUM: Pet
LABEL: Wishbone Records

ARTIST: Fur Patrol
TITLE: Hauling You Around
COMP: Julia Deans. Fur Patrol
ALBUM: Pet
LABEL: Wishbone Records

ADDITIONAL MUSIC:

ARTIST: Fat Freddy's Drop
TITLE: The Raft
COMP: Fat Freddy's Drop
ALBUM: Dr Boondigga
LABEL: NZ On Air - Kiwi Hit Disc

THE PANEL - HALF TIME SONG:

ARTIST: Garageland
TITLE: Tired and Bored
COMP: Jeremy R. Eade, Dave Goodison, Mark Silvey, Andrew Gladstone, Andrew Claridge
ALBUM: Last Exit to Garageland
LABEL: Flying Nun

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 3 May 2016
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Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 14'32"

16:05
The Panel with Joe Bennett and Tainui Stephens (Part 1)
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Topics - Another refugee has attempted self-immolation at Australia's detention centre on Nauru Island; Greg Barton of Deakin University discusses the desperation of those in Australia's detention centres. A postie is under investigation after not delivering what she thought was scam mail from Malaysia.
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Duration: 22'37"

16:06
The Panel with Joe Bennett and Tainui Stephens (Part 2)
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Topics - A former manager at a French perfume company is suing for what he's called "bore out" - being bored to depression. Rosemary Overell of the University of Otago discusses the launches of TV channels Bravo and Duke. Panelist and lawyer Mai Chen has been included in the Economist's list of the Top 50 Diversity Figures in Public Life. Air traffic controllers at Sydney Airport say they haven't been trained to deal with some failings of its plane tracking system.
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Duration: 26'53"

16:08
Panel Intro
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What the Panelists Joe Bennett and Tainui Stephens have been up to.
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Duration: 6'11"

16:14
Another self-immolation on Nauru
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Greg Barton of Deakin University discusses the desperation of those in Australia's detention centres.
Topics: refugees and migrants
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Tags: Australian Detention Centre, Australia, detention centres, Nauru
Duration: 10'08"

16:25
Postie refuses to deliver
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A postie is under investigation after not delivering what she thought was scam mail from Malaysia.
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Tags: post, mail, NZ Post, scam mail
Duration: 5'54"

16:33
Frenchman sues for boredom related illness
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A former manager at a French perfume company is suing for what he's called "bore out" - being bored to depression.
Topics: health
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Tags: boredom, tedium, menial jobs, boredom related illness
Duration: 5'09"

16:40
Panel Says
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What the Panelists Joe Bennet and Tainui Stephens have been thinking about.
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Duration: 5'00"

16:47
Blatant gender biased TV
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Rosemary Overell of the University of Otago discusses the launches of TV channels Bravo and Duke.
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Tags: TV, entertainment, gender, broadcasting
Duration: 10'14"

16:51
Mai Chen in list of international diversity influencers.
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Panelist and lawyer Mai Chen has been included in the Economist's list of the Top 50 Diversity Figures in Public Life.
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Tags: diversity
Duration: 43"

16:55
Sydney airport control tower worries
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Air traffic controllers at Sydney Airport say they haven't been trained to deal with some failings of its plane tracking system.
Topics: security
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Tags: Sydney Airport, plane tracking, Australia
Duration: 2'50"

16:57
Scary WIFI hotspot grounds Qantas flight
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A Qantas flight was left sitting on the tarmac in Melbourne after a passenger spotted a Wi-Fi hotspot titled "Mobile Detonation Device".
Topics: security
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Tags: Melbourne Airport, Australia
Duration: 49"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 3rd May 2016
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Watch Tuesday's full programme here.
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Duration: 00"

17:09
Bereaved family calls for foreign drivers' stand-down
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The family of a pregnant women killed in a Northland crash is calling for a mandatory stand-down period for foreign drivers when they arrive in the country.
Topics: law
Regions: Northland
Tags: driving, foreign drivers
Duration: 6'52"

17:16
How high is the bar at the OIO?
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The Overseas Investment Office is to be the subject of an independent review, following it granting approval for the sale of Taranaki's Onetai Station.
Topics: law, business, environment
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: Overseas Investment Office, Onetai Station
Duration: 6'31"

17:23
Kids missing for two days found in Masterton
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A brother and sister missing in Masterton since Sunday were found safe and sound. Reporter Michael Cropp joins us from outside the Masterton Police Station.
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Duration: 3'32"

17:27
Fairytale win for Leicester City FC
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In the face of extreme odds - 5000 to 1 - Leicester City has won English football's Premier League. Local MP Keith Vaz was out celebrating and joined Checkpoint to share the good news.
Topics: sport
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Tags: football, Premier League, Leicester City
Duration: 5'31"

17:35
Evening Business for 3 May 2016
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News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags: markets
Duration: 3'38"

17:40
Key defends stance on foreign trusts
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The Prime Minister has defended his relationship with ministers and his lawyer after allegations relating to a review of the foreign trust sector. Demelza Leslie reports.
Topics: politics, law
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Tags: John Key, Foreign trusts
Duration: 3'07"

17:44
Judge Andrew Becroft named new Children's Commissioner
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New Zealand's Principal Youth Court Judge, Andrew Becroft, has been appointed as the new Children's Commissioner to start in July.
Topics: law, life and society
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Tags: Youth Court, young offenders, Children's Commissioner
Duration: 4'38"

17:51
Australia signs off on Keytruda alternative Nivolumab
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Last night we revealed a claim by the drug company that makes melanoma drug Keyrtruda that Pharmac has been using incorrect data, which gives a "false and misleading impression of how effective the drug is." Melanoma patient Leisa Renwick She is now funding Keytruda herself.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: drug companies, melonoma, cancer, cancer treatment, Nivolumab, Keyrtruda, melonoma treatment
Duration: 6'52"

18:08
Govt orders investigation into OIO approval for farm sale
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The government has ordered an independent inquiry into the Overseas Investment Office after it was revealed it had approved the sale of a Taranaki farm to Argentinian brothers with serious convictions. Political reporter Benedict Collins has more.
Topics: politics, law
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: Overseas Investment Office
Duration: 2'53"

18:12
Influx of Queenstown residents to cheaper Cromwell
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Queenstown is facing a worsening accomodation crisis as hundreds of workers start to arrive for the busy winter ski season. From Queenstown Peter Newport reports.
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Regions: Otago
Tags: Queenstown, accomodation
Duration: 3'42"

18:16
Health Ministry admits mental health services are under strain
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The Justice Minister wants more money spent on mental health services for those appearing and being sentenced in the country's courts. Catherine Hutton reports.
Topics: health, politics
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Tags: mental health, mental health services, mental health funding
Duration: 3'42"

18:20
Drought in Zimbabwe leaves 4 mln facing starvation
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The worst drought in Zimbabwe in two decades has left up to 4 million people in the African nation facing starvation. Mana Rabiee from Reuters explains.
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Tags: Zimbabwe
Duration: 1'55"

18:25
Parramatta Eels punished for salary cap breach
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Our sports editor Stephen Hewson joins us.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 3'11"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 3 May 2016 - evening edition
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Bad start to the week for the New Zealand First party as their leader, Winston Peters, follows his transport spokesman, Denis O'Rourke, out the door, after the Speaker loses patience with the length of one of Mr O'Rourke's questions and then finds Mister Peters guilty of accusing him of bias. Further up the opposition's front bench, Labour leader, Andrew Little, and Greens co-leader, James Shaw, pepper the prime minister with questions about his lawyer in an unsuccessful attempt to link Mister Key with the newly controversial foreign investment trust industry.
Topics: politics
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Duration: 4'51"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:15
Our Own Odysseys - Offa's Dyke
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Nigel and Heather Roberts walked the 285-kilometre Offa's Dyke Path that follows the England-Wales border.
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Duration: 15'14"

20:15
Nights' Pundit - Left Thinking
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The UN climate talks in Paris last year - "COP 21" - gave rise to the Paris Climate Agreement, hailed by world leaders as an historic breakthrough towards preventing catastrophic climate change. But does the Paris Agreement really constitute a turning point? University of Otago political historian A.Prof Brian Roper weighs in.
Topics: environment, politics
Regions:
Tags: COP 21, climate change, global warming
Duration: 21'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:67421:half]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Offa's Dyke
Nigel and Heather Roberts walked the 285-kilometre long Offa's Dyke Path that follows the England-Wales border.
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 3 May 2016
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In this week’s Sampler, Nick Bollinger kicks off New Zealand Music Month with a slew of recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen; the epic first album of Auckland’s Mice On Stilts, and existential groove-pop of Wellington’s Joe Blossom.
EXTENDED BODY:
In this week’s Sampler, Nick Bollinger kicks off New Zealand Music Month with a slew of recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen; the epic first album of Auckland’s Mice On Stilts, and existential groove-pop of Wellington’s Joe Blossom.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors, The Cavemen, Mice On Stilts, Joe Blossom
Duration: 29'11"

19:30
Hope For A Mourning by Mice On Stilts
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Nick Bollinger surveys an epic first album from Auckland's Mice On Stilts.
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Nick Bollinger surveys an epic first album from Auckland's Mice On Stilts.
This album begins with a piano figure, solemn and staccato, while a singer offers a welcome of sorts – a seat by the fire. It’s a small touch of comfort in an environment that seems dark, misty and potentially hostile. From these ominous beginnings the track builds, slowly but majestically. The drums come in, chords hang like echoes in the rafters of a cathedral, and I think of a word not often uttered when describing New Zealand music: epic.
Though their name suggests a degree of Kiwi self-deprecation, Mice On Stilts is not a typical New Zealand band. There are things we seem to produce a lot of in this country - reggae, strumming singer-songwriters, garage bands - but epic rock groups have always been thin on the ground. Perhaps it’s a fear of being judged as too earnest or pretentious. But this Auckland group have cast any such worries aside. They have made a record that is musically ambitious and wears its heart on its sleeve.
Mice On Stilts are a group of up to seven members, and centres on the songs and singing of guitarist Ben Morley. He’s spoken in interviews about emotional and mental health issues he’s faced over the years, and these seem to underpin the songs on Hope For A Mourning, their first album. In more than one of these songs Morley seems to be singing to us from a gravesite.
There is an undeniable gloominess about this music. At times I imagine it’s what John Grant’s Queen Of Denmark might have been like, if it hadn’t had Grant’s devastatingly black sense of humour. Yet, easy though it is to forget, the title of Mice On Stilts’ album does contain the word ‘hope’ as well as ‘mourning’, and so – ultimately - does the music. After all, to take one’s darkest thoughts and turn them into something majestic, and at times truly beautiful, has got to be an act of hope.
Songs featured: Khandallah, Orca, Funeral, And We Saw His Needs…, The Hours, Hope For A Mourning.
Hope For A Mourning is available on Aeroplane Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Mice On Stilts, music, music review
Duration: 6'09"

19:30
All Of The Above by Joe Blossom
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Nick Bollinger delights in the existentialist groove-pop of Welllington's Joe Blossom.
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Nick Bollinger delights in the existentialist groove-pop of Welllington's Joe Blossom.
‘Hearts breaking into song’ sings Joe Blossom, summing up the mood of his excellent second album.
Joe Blossom started out as the solo performing name of Wellington-based musician Sean O’Brien, but has become something closely resembling a band, with drummer Chris Fawdray, bassist Phill Jones and vocalist Holly Beals joining O’Brien as collaborators, and other musicians coming and going, adding everything from saxophones to strings. Yet the music always seems to be built around O’Brien’s voice.
O’Brien has a vocal style that suggests the formative influence of British pop crooners like Bryan Ferry, Morrissey, or perhaps even ABC’s Martin Fry, with a strong falsetto that he puts to good use. But almost as important are the backing vocals, which are beautiful woven around his leads.
There’s a lyric sheet included with this album, and it’s a welcome thing. Not that the words are hard to hear; just that lingering over them in print is a different experience from hearing them sung. And even the inscription ‘For Albert’ or the subtitle (1905) on that title track are like cryptic clues to deciphering a song that on close inspection seems to be about the unknown Einstein, in the days before his discoveries were recognised by the world of science.
O’Brien, it seems, is a poetry buff as well as a historian; that’s clear from the opening song ‘Tyger Tyger', in which he invokes both William Blake and Dylan Thomas. But you’ll notice a lot of question marks on the printed page, too, which point to his own searching, philosophical frame of mind.
One song imagines ‘a slow jam… at the edge of oblivion’, and asks questions about wonder and beauty and what it is that heals our souls? But fine a craftsman as he is, O’Brien is neither precious nor exclusive when it comes to choosing material. And a welcome inclusion here is a song he didn’t write, by fellow Wellington band Terror of the Deep. With a 80s synth arrangement, a faintly Lennon-ish melody and a lyric that explores the “crooked streets of life’s bitter reason”, it fits right in.
Joe Blossom’s All of the Above is a lovely album and a real progression from Nocturnes, his debut of four years ago. It should be available through all he usual digital outlets, but I recommend the vinyl, with the lyric sheet.
Songs featured: The Breaking, The Only Voices, All of the Above (1905), Slow Jam, Here & Now.
All Of The Above is available on Cabbage Tree Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Joe Blossom, music, music review
Duration: 9'42"

19:30
Kiwi Garage Bands
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Nick Bollinger reviews recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen.
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Nick Bollinger reviews recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen.
Garage rock? You might say, ‘I know it when I hear it’, but let’s attempt a definition anyway.
The term was coined in the 70s for a type of music made in the 60s; all those thousands of bands that had sprung up in the wake of the British beat boom, across North America, South America, Australasia and just about everywhere else. These bands were raw and greasy – it was music you could picture being made in a garage, whether it actually was or not. And the fact of their obscurity was part of the deal. Though a few garage bands had one-off hits – the Standells’ ‘Dirty Water’, for instance, is a garage rock classic – too much success would disqualify them. The early Stones, for instance, would be garage rock if they hadn’t become the superstars other garage bands were trying to emulate. Garage rock evolved – if ‘evolved’ is the right word – with the arrival of punk rock. (In fact ‘punk rock’ – in the days before British punk – was an alternative term, sometimes used in America, for garage rock.)
But down through the decades, garage rock has become, rather than something achieved by glorious accident, a genre in its own right, studied and perfected by bands like the Raw Nerves.
This four-piece from Auckland just about compress the whole spectrum of garage rock into a chorus that goes “nobody gives a shit about you and your band”, summing up the anonymity, the sense of being swallowed by history, that is the essence of garage. And they have plenty more of this rough and ready garage rock – 60s tunefulness crossed with 70s punk.
More Nerves is the second full album the Raw Nerves have released, and it might be just a notch more hi-fi than their debut, though that’s relative. And don’t be deceived by the cover, which depicts the group as Viking berserkers and appears to be a homage to another subgenre altogether; the music is as garage as it gets. Though it’s been around digitally since last year, More Nerves is now available on vinyl – which of course is garage rock’s natural medium, a little crackle and static just adding to the authenticity.

The Raw Nerves album comes via 1: 12 Records, a local label devoted to vinyl and to the broad concept of garage rock. Among their other recent local releases is the latest record from the Conjurors. Also out of Auckland, I’d call them a garage supergroup, if that didn’t sound like a contradiction in terms. Enough to say that all the members have played in other local bands, including some quite sophisticated ones, like the Ruby Suns and the Brunettes. But here it’s all about gleeful primitivism.

But if the Conjurors are garage veterans with a long musical lineage, The Cavemen shows that garage rock is going to keep rejuvenating itself. Their name is like a license to get Neanderthal, which is a task these self-described ‘teenage cretins’ take to with paleolithic gusto.

There’s more punk than 60s pop in the Cavemen’s equation. The Ramones are evidently role-models. Their songs, which are consistently short and fast, are like two-minute cartoons. And in the same way the Ramones made a cartoon of dissolute New Jersey streetlife in songs like ‘Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue’, the Cavemen celebrate their New Zealandness in songs of questionable cultural pride like ‘Drink Driving’ and ‘At The Pub’. Other Cavemen songs are not so region-specific, but have choruses any cretin would be proud of. ‘Rock’n’roll retarded me!’, ‘Trash talking paint huffing girl’ or ‘She left me for Adolf Hitler.’
But my favourite local garage band might be the Situations. Though their music is simple and direct, it’s also played with finesse, which goes to show that garage is an attitude, not a lack of ability. The Situations remind me of Toy Love, from the late 70s, but also of the great New Zealand bands from the 60s – think the La De Da’s or Ray Columbus and the Invaders: bands whose records are ranked around the world as garage rock classics, though here at the time it was simply thought of as the best high-energy pop we could produce.
The Situations latest album is called Forever Scene Changes; something to do with several of the songs concerning experiences touring overseas. Yet what most of their hooky, immediate songs make me think of are scenes of suburban New Zealand.
Over the years I’ve seen the Situations in a lot of different situations - not just playing their own music but also as backing band for rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Wanda Jackson, as surrogate Invaders behind Ray Columbus, and rhythm section for fellow garage-rockers Shaft. And they have always come up with the goods. They have never been well-known, but have always been reliable, rock-solid, and a hell of a lot of fun. The definition of garage rock.
The Cavemen - The Cavemen; Raw Nerves - More Nerves; The Conjurors - Hints; available on 1:12 Records.
The Situations - Forever Scene Changes available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors, The Cavemen, 1:12 records
Duration: 13'26"

7:30 The Sampler
In this week's Sampler, Nick Bollinger kicks off New Zealand Music Month with reviews of recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen; the epic first album of Auckland's Mice On Stilts, and existential groove-pop of Wellington's Joe Blossom.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Left Thinking
The UN climate talks in Paris last year -"COP 21"- gave rise to the Paris Climate Agreement - hailed by world leaders as an historic breakthrough towards preventing catastrophic climate change. But does the Paris Agreement really constitute a turning point? University of Otago political historian A.Prof Brian Roper weighs in.
8:30 Window on the World
Forgetting Igbo - Nkem Ifejika can't speak the language of his forefathers. Nkem is British of Nigerian descent and comes from one of Nigeria's biggest ethnic groups the Igbo. He's one of the millions of Nigerians, who live in the diaspora - almost two hundred thousand of them live in Britain. From Nkem's own London-based family - where his wife is teaching both him and their son to speak Igbo - to the ancestral villages of Anambra State, 'Forgetting Igbo' reveals shifting perspectives on Nigeria's colonial past, emerging new ambitions for its future - and deep fault lines at the heart of its society.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
A Century Apart - A discussion chaired by Jim Mora at the Auckland Museum about the significance of the First World War. Three speakers bring local and global views to this topic including the development of war reporting & media censorship with a WWI interest, centred on the Armenian genocide of 1915-17. The panel features Associate Professor Maartje Abbenhuis, Dr Felicity Barnes, and Dr Maria Armoudian all from the University of Auckland.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
This week in the Global Village we head to Norway for music from two magnificent saxophonists who combine traditional and jazz influences - the pioneering Jan Garbarek and inventive contemporary player Karl Seglem. Also music from the Sweet Sunny North set from David Lindley and Henry Kaiser with over 60 Norwegian musicians, and "Norwegian Wood" from Herbie Hancock. Plus Jamaican sounds from African saxophonist Manu Dibango and roots reggae group Arise Roots.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
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A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

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19:30
The Sampler for 3 May 2016
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In this week’s Sampler, Nick Bollinger kicks off New Zealand Music Month with a slew of recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen; the epic first album of Auckland’s Mice On Stilts, and existential groove-pop of Wellington’s Joe Blossom.
EXTENDED BODY:
In this week’s Sampler, Nick Bollinger kicks off New Zealand Music Month with a slew of recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen; the epic first album of Auckland’s Mice On Stilts, and existential groove-pop of Wellington’s Joe Blossom.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors, The Cavemen, Mice On Stilts, Joe Blossom
Duration: 29'11"

19:30
Hope For A Mourning by Mice On Stilts
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Nick Bollinger surveys an epic first album from Auckland's Mice On Stilts.
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Nick Bollinger surveys an epic first album from Auckland's Mice On Stilts.
This album begins with a piano figure, solemn and staccato, while a singer offers a welcome of sorts – a seat by the fire. It’s a small touch of comfort in an environment that seems dark, misty and potentially hostile. From these ominous beginnings the track builds, slowly but majestically. The drums come in, chords hang like echoes in the rafters of a cathedral, and I think of a word not often uttered when describing New Zealand music: epic.
Though their name suggests a degree of Kiwi self-deprecation, Mice On Stilts is not a typical New Zealand band. There are things we seem to produce a lot of in this country - reggae, strumming singer-songwriters, garage bands - but epic rock groups have always been thin on the ground. Perhaps it’s a fear of being judged as too earnest or pretentious. But this Auckland group have cast any such worries aside. They have made a record that is musically ambitious and wears its heart on its sleeve.
Mice On Stilts are a group of up to seven members, and centres on the songs and singing of guitarist Ben Morley. He’s spoken in interviews about emotional and mental health issues he’s faced over the years, and these seem to underpin the songs on Hope For A Mourning, their first album. In more than one of these songs Morley seems to be singing to us from a gravesite.
There is an undeniable gloominess about this music. At times I imagine it’s what John Grant’s Queen Of Denmark might have been like, if it hadn’t had Grant’s devastatingly black sense of humour. Yet, easy though it is to forget, the title of Mice On Stilts’ album does contain the word ‘hope’ as well as ‘mourning’, and so – ultimately - does the music. After all, to take one’s darkest thoughts and turn them into something majestic, and at times truly beautiful, has got to be an act of hope.
Songs featured: Khandallah, Orca, Funeral, And We Saw His Needs…, The Hours, Hope For A Mourning.
Hope For A Mourning is available on Aeroplane Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Mice On Stilts, music, music review
Duration: 6'09"

19:30
All Of The Above by Joe Blossom
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Nick Bollinger delights in the existentialist groove-pop of Welllington's Joe Blossom.
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Nick Bollinger delights in the existentialist groove-pop of Welllington's Joe Blossom.
‘Hearts breaking into song’ sings Joe Blossom, summing up the mood of his excellent second album.
Joe Blossom started out as the solo performing name of Wellington-based musician Sean O’Brien, but has become something closely resembling a band, with drummer Chris Fawdray, bassist Phill Jones and vocalist Holly Beals joining O’Brien as collaborators, and other musicians coming and going, adding everything from saxophones to strings. Yet the music always seems to be built around O’Brien’s voice.
O’Brien has a vocal style that suggests the formative influence of British pop crooners like Bryan Ferry, Morrissey, or perhaps even ABC’s Martin Fry, with a strong falsetto that he puts to good use. But almost as important are the backing vocals, which are beautiful woven around his leads.
There’s a lyric sheet included with this album, and it’s a welcome thing. Not that the words are hard to hear; just that lingering over them in print is a different experience from hearing them sung. And even the inscription ‘For Albert’ or the subtitle (1905) on that title track are like cryptic clues to deciphering a song that on close inspection seems to be about the unknown Einstein, in the days before his discoveries were recognised by the world of science.
O’Brien, it seems, is a poetry buff as well as a historian; that’s clear from the opening song ‘Tyger Tyger', in which he invokes both William Blake and Dylan Thomas. But you’ll notice a lot of question marks on the printed page, too, which point to his own searching, philosophical frame of mind.
One song imagines ‘a slow jam… at the edge of oblivion’, and asks questions about wonder and beauty and what it is that heals our souls? But fine a craftsman as he is, O’Brien is neither precious nor exclusive when it comes to choosing material. And a welcome inclusion here is a song he didn’t write, by fellow Wellington band Terror of the Deep. With a 80s synth arrangement, a faintly Lennon-ish melody and a lyric that explores the “crooked streets of life’s bitter reason”, it fits right in.
Joe Blossom’s All of the Above is a lovely album and a real progression from Nocturnes, his debut of four years ago. It should be available through all he usual digital outlets, but I recommend the vinyl, with the lyric sheet.
Songs featured: The Breaking, The Only Voices, All of the Above (1905), Slow Jam, Here & Now.
All Of The Above is available on Cabbage Tree Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Joe Blossom, music, music review
Duration: 9'42"

19:30
Kiwi Garage Bands
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Nick Bollinger reviews recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen.
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Nick Bollinger reviews recent local garage rock releases from The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors and The Cavemen.
Garage rock? You might say, ‘I know it when I hear it’, but let’s attempt a definition anyway.
The term was coined in the 70s for a type of music made in the 60s; all those thousands of bands that had sprung up in the wake of the British beat boom, across North America, South America, Australasia and just about everywhere else. These bands were raw and greasy – it was music you could picture being made in a garage, whether it actually was or not. And the fact of their obscurity was part of the deal. Though a few garage bands had one-off hits – the Standells’ ‘Dirty Water’, for instance, is a garage rock classic – too much success would disqualify them. The early Stones, for instance, would be garage rock if they hadn’t become the superstars other garage bands were trying to emulate. Garage rock evolved – if ‘evolved’ is the right word – with the arrival of punk rock. (In fact ‘punk rock’ – in the days before British punk – was an alternative term, sometimes used in America, for garage rock.)
But down through the decades, garage rock has become, rather than something achieved by glorious accident, a genre in its own right, studied and perfected by bands like the Raw Nerves.
This four-piece from Auckland just about compress the whole spectrum of garage rock into a chorus that goes “nobody gives a shit about you and your band”, summing up the anonymity, the sense of being swallowed by history, that is the essence of garage. And they have plenty more of this rough and ready garage rock – 60s tunefulness crossed with 70s punk.
More Nerves is the second full album the Raw Nerves have released, and it might be just a notch more hi-fi than their debut, though that’s relative. And don’t be deceived by the cover, which depicts the group as Viking berserkers and appears to be a homage to another subgenre altogether; the music is as garage as it gets. Though it’s been around digitally since last year, More Nerves is now available on vinyl – which of course is garage rock’s natural medium, a little crackle and static just adding to the authenticity.

The Raw Nerves album comes via 1: 12 Records, a local label devoted to vinyl and to the broad concept of garage rock. Among their other recent local releases is the latest record from the Conjurors. Also out of Auckland, I’d call them a garage supergroup, if that didn’t sound like a contradiction in terms. Enough to say that all the members have played in other local bands, including some quite sophisticated ones, like the Ruby Suns and the Brunettes. But here it’s all about gleeful primitivism.

But if the Conjurors are garage veterans with a long musical lineage, The Cavemen shows that garage rock is going to keep rejuvenating itself. Their name is like a license to get Neanderthal, which is a task these self-described ‘teenage cretins’ take to with paleolithic gusto.

There’s more punk than 60s pop in the Cavemen’s equation. The Ramones are evidently role-models. Their songs, which are consistently short and fast, are like two-minute cartoons. And in the same way the Ramones made a cartoon of dissolute New Jersey streetlife in songs like ‘Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue’, the Cavemen celebrate their New Zealandness in songs of questionable cultural pride like ‘Drink Driving’ and ‘At The Pub’. Other Cavemen songs are not so region-specific, but have choruses any cretin would be proud of. ‘Rock’n’roll retarded me!’, ‘Trash talking paint huffing girl’ or ‘She left me for Adolf Hitler.’
But my favourite local garage band might be the Situations. Though their music is simple and direct, it’s also played with finesse, which goes to show that garage is an attitude, not a lack of ability. The Situations remind me of Toy Love, from the late 70s, but also of the great New Zealand bands from the 60s – think the La De Da’s or Ray Columbus and the Invaders: bands whose records are ranked around the world as garage rock classics, though here at the time it was simply thought of as the best high-energy pop we could produce.
The Situations latest album is called Forever Scene Changes; something to do with several of the songs concerning experiences touring overseas. Yet what most of their hooky, immediate songs make me think of are scenes of suburban New Zealand.
Over the years I’ve seen the Situations in a lot of different situations - not just playing their own music but also as backing band for rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Wanda Jackson, as surrogate Invaders behind Ray Columbus, and rhythm section for fellow garage-rockers Shaft. And they have always come up with the goods. They have never been well-known, but have always been reliable, rock-solid, and a hell of a lot of fun. The definition of garage rock.
The Cavemen - The Cavemen; Raw Nerves - More Nerves; The Conjurors - Hints; available on 1:12 Records.
The Situations - Forever Scene Changes available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, The Situations, The Raw Nerves, The Conjurors, The Cavemen, 1:12 records
Duration: 13'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A Century Apart - Why the First World War Matters Three speakers bring local and global views to this topic including the development of war reporting & media censorship with a WWI interest, centred on the Armenian genocide of 1915-17. The University of Auckland panel features Associate Professor Maartje Abbenhuis, Dr Felicity Barnes, and Dr Maria Armoudian.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (7 of 12, KMUW)

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Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288206

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 03 May 2016