RNZ National. 2016-05-27. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

27 May 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Health Check (BBC); 1:05 The Friday Feature; 2:05 NZ Society; 2:30 The Sampler (RNZ); 3:05 Grievous Bodily by Craig Harrison read by John O'Leary (9 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 The Why Factor (BBC); 5:10 Witness (BBC) 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Friday 27 May 2016
BODY:
The Budget -- who wins and who misses out? We're joined by a panel for expert analysis. Disappointed dairy farmers react to Fonterra's milk price forecast and relief in Christchurch as police charge a 31-year-old man with Renee Duckmanton's murder.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 32'42"

06:06
Sports News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'05"

06:10
Government budget slammed for only addressing hot spots
BODY:
The Government's 2016 budget is being criticised by opposition parties for lacking vision but the Prime Minister says it builds on eight years of solid management.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 2'54"

06:13
$200m for CYF overhaul just the start
BODY:
The 200 million dollars announced in the Budget for the overhaul of Child Youth and Family is just initial funding for the project.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget, CYF
Duration: 2'13"

06:16
Vanuatu tourism bouncing back from Cyclone Pam
BODY:
Tourism leaders in Vanuatu say the industry is bouncing back from the hits taken by Cyclone Pam and concerns about the safety of its international runway.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Vanuatu
Duration: 3'57"

06:21
Early Business News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'07"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'17"

06:38
Delight and frustration greet long-awaited bowel cancer move
BODY:
A long-awaited Government commitment in the Budget to begin national screening for bowel cancer has been greeted with approval and frustration.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: bowel cancer
Duration: 3'27"

06:42
Schools react to surprise targeted funding in Budget
BODY:
School principals and teachers are divided by the Government's surprise decision to devote a funding increase to the students who need it most.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: funding
Duration: 3'01"

06:45
Maori arts set to flourish at the new 'Fame' for Aotearoa
BODY:
Two polytechnics have joined together to launch an ambitious creative arts hub on Wellington's Cuba Street with a strong focus on Maori performing arts.
EXTENDED BODY:
Two polytechnics have combined to launch an ambitious creative arts hub on Wellington's Cuba Street with a strong focus on Māori performing arts.
Whitireia New Zealand and the Wellington Institute of Technology (WelTec) are hailing "Te Auaha", the New Zealand Institute of Applied Creative, as a place where talented tāngata whenua will flourish.
The tertiary institutions said the creative hub costing $22.5 million would provide an environment for Māori to hone their creative talents and raise their profile. It is set to open in 2018.
Kura Moeahu is a Te Atiawa representative and on WelTec's Māori Advisory Board.
He came up with the institute's name, Te Auaha, and said the building's exterior and interior would incorporate Māori design.
He also said Māori culture was embedded in the institute's logo, in the shape of a waharoa (gateway).
The hub will cultivate traditional and cutting-edge Māori arts, Mr Moeahu said.
"We've also got to be very contemporary, we have to be very innovative, like tonight's performance we need to take it to the next level, the international level.
"So in terms of Te Kāhui Auaha [the 'cluster of creativity'] they've actually got an opportunity to carve and own the world."
Krystal Clarke, a third-year student doing a Bachelor of Applied and Performing Arts at Whitirea, said the amalgamation would make it easier to network with peers, mentors and industry professionals and was a natural fit with Māori tikanga.
"The idea of all the arts industries and different areas and genres of arts coming together will just help to develop the Māori culture - through art obviously, but through different mediums of art - it's almost like a tuakana teina system, like awhi atu awhi mai system, it's how we work as a Māori people."
A performing arts lecturer at Whitirea Kereama Te Ua is excited more than 1000 students will study at Te Auaha, a significant proportion of whom will be Māori.
Kereama Te Ua said the creative hub with its culturally rich, multi-disciplinary approach would nurture the creative skills of rangatahi (young people).
"The thing that I'm excited about with the whole collaboration with Whitirea and WelTec is that the collaboration and the possibilities of working together and creating work together I believe we are the 'Fame' of Aotearoa.
"We have all the arts in the one building. My students come with lots of superpowers, they're singers, dancers, actors, performers - all sorts, but mixing our superpowers with Weltec, man we're going to turn into 'The Avengers' and that's what's going to be really exciting for me."
As well as dance studios, Te Auaha would include recording studios, an in-house radio station, a theatre and cinema.
The polytechnics' joint chief executive Chris Gosling said Māori were a very important part of the student body, of performing arts and creative industries - and the hub would provide the ability to further their talent.
He said Māori participation was currently at 22 percent, but Te Auaha would work to increase that considerably.
"We want to empower and advance the skills of tāngata whenua"
Mr Gosling said it was essential the hub was conducive to encouraging their success.
"We're picturing this very much as a centre of excellence so it's one where we're really throwing down the wero (challenge) to students, Māori and non-Māori, to come here and be the best they can possibly be and we're doing that in an environment where we're trying to create the best chance of success for Māori students taking into consideration in a new way Māori tikanga and culture."
Mr Moeahu said the hub would provide a base for Māori arts to morph into a great, creative force.
"Māori never forget what your culture's about, but always take it to the next level because it'll create a positive energy and monster.
"Put it this way, a taniwha is lurking that's about to be unleashed unto the world."
Topics: arts, music, te ao Maori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: New Zealand Institute of Applied Creativity
Duration: 3'22"

06:50
No surprises budget stirs few business passions
BODY:
The government's budget fulfilled most business expectations offering no surprises, sticking to a consistent and middle of the road approach to spending and economic management.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 3'22"

06:53
Mainfreight sees strong sales and profit margins continuing
BODY:
One of the country's biggest transport firms, Mainfreight, sees continued growth in revenue and profit after reporting a strong full-year result.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Mainfreight
Duration: 1'31"

06:55
Sanford optimistic about growth ahead
BODY:
The listed fishing company, Sanford, is optimistic about growth ahead, but says the weather remains a key headwind.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Sanford
Duration: 1'38"

06:57
NZX steps up investigation into unusual price movements
BODY:
The sharemarket operator, NZX, is stepping up its efforts to find out what's going on behind unusual movements in share prices.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: NZX
Duration: 1'50"

06:58
Morning markets for 27 May 2016
BODY:
The sharemarket operator, NZX, is stepping up its efforts to find out what's going on behind unusual movements in share prices.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 47"

07:07
Sports News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'47"

07:11
The good, the bad and the ugly of Budget 2016
BODY:
Finance Minister Bill English delivered his eighth Budget yesterday - and with the books back in the black, science and health got the lion's share of the new money.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 23'20"

07:38
Farmers' cost cutting measures will flow on to hurt the economy
BODY:
Federated Farmers says the provincial economies will suffer from the flow-on effects of another season of low dairy payouts.
Topics: farming, business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 5'54"

07:44
Christchurch sex industry relieved after murder arrest
BODY:
A 31-year-old man has been charged with the murder of Christchurch woman Renee Duckmanton whose badly burnt body was found near Rakaia 12 days ago.
Topics: crime
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Renee Duckmanton
Duration: 2'53"

07:47
Obama: world leaders are "rattled" by Donald Trump
BODY:
Donald Trump has secured enough delegates at the Republican convention in July to become the Party's Presidential candidate.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US, Trump
Duration: 4'10"

07:51
Non-immunised visitors asked to wear masks to hospital
BODY:
As soon as the flu season hits Waikato DHB will be asking all hospital visitors who aren't immunised to wear a
Topics: health
Regions: Waikato
Tags: flu
Duration: 3'17"

07:56
A new era for the All Blacks
BODY:
A new era begins for the All Blacks on Sunday when coach Steve Hansen names his first squad since winning the World Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby
Duration: 3'12"

08:08
Sports News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'01"

08:11
Bill English reviews Budget 2016
BODY:
Finance Minster Bill English has confirmed he'd like to see tax cuts for middle income earners next year.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 6'10"

08:17
Labour: 'Sticking plaster' budget fails the test
BODY:
The Labour Party's finance spokesperson is Grant Robertson -- he's in our Wellington studio and has been listening to that.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 4'48"

08:21
Political editor Jane Patterson comments on Budget
BODY:
Listening to that is our political editor Jane Patterson.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 5'27"

08:27
Hiking the price of cigarettes
BODY:
There are doubts among smokers and anti-smoking groups alike that hiking the price of cigarettes to 30-dollars a packet will reduce smoking rates.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: smoking
Duration: 2'47"

08:29
Markets Update for 27 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 45"

08:35
Property Institute says Budget 'misses opportunities'
BODY:
The Property Institute says it's naive to think freeing up more Crown land will reduce house prices in Auckland.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Property Institute
Duration: 4'03"

08:39
Tourist tax could cover cost of 'negative side effects'
BODY:
As tourist numbers hit new records, there's growing support in the industry for a border tax or 'green levy' to cover the cost of hosting them.
Topics: politics, business
Regions:
Tags: tourism
Duration: 2'43"

08:43
NZ will take part in Battle of Jutland commemorations
BODY:
New Zealand will take part in commemorations in the United Kingdom next week to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Jutland.
Topics: defence force, history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'32"

08:46
Northland councils and Air NZ in talks over cuts
BODY:
Northland leaders and Air New Zealand are in talks over the airline's plans to cut services to the region.
Topics: transport
Regions: Northland
Tags: Air NZ
Duration: 3'57"

08:50
Cook Strait Whale Survey scrapped for 2016
BODY:
The Cook Strait Whale Survey will not go ahead this year after a corporate sponsor pulled out and the Department of Conservation was unable to cover the costs
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Cook Strait Whale Survey
Duration: 3'19"

08:55
Australian election news with Kerry-Anne Walsh
BODY:
The election campaign in Australia is the big news across the ditch and one person who is loving every minute of it is Kerry-Anne Walsh.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 4'02"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Fitz - The colonial adventures of James Edward Fitzgerald by Jenifer Roberts (5 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Are tough times ahead for schools and parents?
BODY:
The budget saw no increase in school operation funding which goes to pay for teacher development, learning support, power and water bills, technology and sports funding. Instead, the government announced a plan to provide 43 million dollars in extra funding for the children of long term beneficiaries. We discuss this with the PPTA General Secretary Michael Stevens and Sandy Pasley the President of the Secondary Principals' Association.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'54"

09:25
Adult vaccinations, is 50 too young for the shingles shot?
BODY:
There's concern that accurate information isn't getting through to adults about vaccination boosters, and when, or, if they should consider getting innoculated for conditions that can affect the elderly, such as shingles. Dr Nikki Turner is the director of the Immunisation Advisory Centre. She says with shingles in particular, there's no point getting innoculated prematurely.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Dr Nikki Turner, shingles, vaccinations, tetanus, measles, health
Duration: 12'15"

09:40
The slippery problem of eels
BODY:
Eels can live for up to a 100 years in the creeks and rivers of New Zealand but eventually they have to migrate out to sea and when they do they tend to get sucked into the turbines of hydrodams. As you might imagine, not many of them survive. Don Jellyman has spent much of his career studying New Zealand's eels as a NIWA scientist.
EXTENDED BODY:
Over the years, New Zealand has made great strides in helping baby elvers upstream into the creeks and streams where they make their homes.
Native longfin eels can live up to 100 years in the same spot before finally feeling the urge to head back out to sea to breed.
But when it comes time for them to make their way downstream they run into hydro dams and get sucked into the turbines - and as you might imagine, not many of them survive.
Don Jellyman is a freshwater fisheries scientist who's spent much of his career focusing on eels.
He says getting eels past hydro dams is a worldwide problem - but in New Zealand it's particularly difficult.
Read edited highlights from their conversation
Can we discuss some of the biology of eels, they take their time don’t they?
Yes, they do they’re a fascinating animal, they spawn once at the end of their life but in the case of female eels that can be 50-plus years.
[There are] two types – shortfin and longfin.
Yes, the shortfin is one we share with Australia and the Pacific and it doesn’t grow to such a large size, it tends to live in downstream areas. Females would be 25-30 years at maturity, But they biggie is the longfin – it’s only found in New Zealand and females can be in excess of 40 years old when they spawn.
So they both breed at sea?
Yes they do. Freshwater eels worldwide and there’s about 19 different species are basically a tropical species that’s invaded fresh water so the fascinating thing is that they all maintain a marine spawning – a tropical marine spawning are which in the case of our eels means a very long trek of about 5000kms.
What is happening with these dams?
It is a part of a worldwide problem. Getting small eels above dams is not too difficult. We can capture them and utilise their ability to climb, so we can have them climbing small ladders and dropping in to containers and we can physically transport them upstream and that happens. About 4-5 million eels are transferred upstream each year. But the difficulty is getting adult eels back down stream. They tend to migrate in conditions that make it very difficult to intercept them. So they like dark and stormy nights and closed in rivers. And under those conditions it’s very hard to divert them away from hydro station intakes.
It’s a worldwide problem, but in New Zealand is it particularly tricky?
Yes, it’s a particular problem that is extenuated in New Zealand partly because our rivers tend to be quite flashy. They rise and fall quite rapidly. Also our turbine design is a little different to overseas ones. We tend to have smaller diameter, but fast rotation turbines and there are two different types basically…but they both share this common issue of fast rotation speed, so all of those mitigate against the survival of large eels.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: hydrodam, eels, hydroelectric, tuna
Duration: 8'38"

09:48
Pacific correspondent Mike Field
BODY:
China's luxury food demand is turning sea cucumber into a lucrative but boom-to-bust business in the Pacific - threatening the environment and lives; Samoa and Tonga re-assert themselves as Christian states and remote Wallis Island is in a real game of thrones.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'35"

10:07
Finding dinosaurs in Antarctica
BODY:
More than a hundred years ago on his fatal expedition to the South Pole Robert Falcon Scott and his unlucky team discovered the very first fossils in Antarctica while trekking over the Transantarctic Mountains. The rocky remains hinted at much warmer past for the frozen continent and more finds since have revealed Antarctica was once covered in dense forest inhabited by all kinds of plants and animals - including dinosaurs. One of the members of the latest expedition to dig for fossils in the deep south was Australian palaeontologist Steven Salisbury from the University of Queensland.
EXTENDED BODY:
More than a hundred years ago on his fatal expedition to the South Pole Robert Falcon Scott and his unlucky team discovered the very first fossils in Antarctica while trekking over the Transantarctic Mountains.
The rocky remains hinted at much warmer past for the frozen continent and more finds since have revealed Antarctica was once covered in dense forest inhabited by all kinds of plants and animals - including dinosaurs.
One of the members of the latest expedition to dig for fossils in the deep south was Australian paleontologist Steven Salisbury from the University of Queensland.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
Let’s talk about the dinosaurs that lived in Antarctica. How many million years ago?
Most of the rocks there that have produced dinosaurs on the peninsula are between 71 and 66 million years old, so at the very end of the age of dinosaurs. Things that have been found down there that give us a bit of insight into the dinosaur fauna from that part of the world, include a very nice partial skeleton of an armoured dinosaur, a type of Ankylosaur. There’s been two or three different types of small two-legged plant-eating dinosaurs called Ornithopods, so about the size of a kangaroo and probably similar body proportions. And a couple of bits of Theropods. Meat-eating dinosaurs. There was a nice partial skeleton found in about 2005/2004. And one bone from a Sauropod dinosaur. One of those big long-necked, long-tailed plant eaters. And that’s pretty much it. Other than the birds and obviously birds being dinosaurs, we can’t rule them out of the whole thing. But most people are really interested in the non-avian dinosaurs and of course that’s what we’re into as well.
The first obvious question is how did the dinosaurs cope with the cold, but actually, was it that cold in this era?
The main thing you have to remember back then, was that Antarctica was connected to Australia. New Zealand was probably starting to pull away, or Zealandia, the big land mass that includes New Zealand and areas to the north of it, it was just starting to pull away at this time but it was probably still connected. The Antarctic Peninsula was probably connected to the southern tip of South America by a chain of islands, so as a consequence of that arrangement of these land masses, there was no circumpolar current in action.
The Southern Ocean didn’t really exist. We had Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans extending down to very high latitudes with much warmer waters than we get today, circulating at different points around the Antarctic coast. So the effect of that would have been that most of the time, with those warmer sea surface temperatures around Antarctica, it would have kept it a lot warmer than it is now. Antarctica doesn’t really start to freeze until the Southern Ocean starts to gain in size. That’s something that doesn’t really start to happen until about 20 million years ago.
So, back during the time when the rocks that we were looking at down there were deposited, it would have been much warmer than it is now. We see evidence of that, not just the types of animals that you find fossils of, so there’s a very rich marine life in the ocean there, but in a lot of areas where we are looking close to what were ancient river mouths, we are finding a lot of plant fossils. We’ve found lots of leaves and various types of these flowering plants. This all indicates that you have temperate forests living not far from where all of these fossils are occurring.
It really starts to paint a quite different picture of what that area was like at around the time all of these animals were around.
There are some theories that the Antarctic dinosaurs could potentially have survived the extinction event, whatever it was, that wiped out dinosaurs in other parts of the globe 65 million years ago. Do you give much credit to that theory?
At the moment there’s no evidence to suggest that any dinosaurs other than birds made it through the extinction event. We had a couple of areas that we looked at down in the peninsula where you see the transition from the end of the age of dinosaurs to the start of the age of mammals, we can actually put our finger on it, in the rocks. As yet we haven’t found anything above that line to suggest that any types of non-avian dinosaurs persisted.
It’s quite amazing, on one side of the hill you can be walking around and you’ll see ammonites and plesiosaur bones and things and on the other side, those animals are gone and things are very different. There’s fish and birds and things, but the non-avian dinosaurs and marine reptiles, the ammonites and things, disappear. It’s exciting to be in a place where you can actually see what happened in the rocks, there aren’t actually a lot of places like that around.
I think it’s a nice idea to imagine, maybe in the remote part of Gondwana, maybe in Antarctica or New Zealand, that some dinosaurs might have persisted, but as yet we haven’t found any bones to suggest that that is the case so at the moment we have to assume as we have for a while that the majority or all of them went extinct at about 65 million years ago.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Antarctica, dinosaurs
Duration: 23'52"

10:45
Budget 2016
BODY:
Finance Minister Bill English on why he'd like to see tax cuts for middle income earners next year.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: budget
Duration: 14'12"

11:08
New Music with Jeremy Taylor
BODY:
The covers album; does it signify an artist who has run out of ideas? Can a cover really be better than the original? Did a Grateful Dead tribute album really need to run to 5 discs? Jeremy Taylor lends an ear to covers sets from Bob Dylan, Mark Kozelek and the hefty Grateful Dead tribute set "Day Of The Dead"
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'54"

11:34
Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
BODY:
Is Joseph Parker ready to challenge for the World Heavyweight boxing title and what's happened to our Sevens teams?
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'17"

11:47
The Week that Was
BODY:
With Te Radar and Michele A'Court. The dangers of shopping on-line and why playtime whistles have been deemed 'too aggressive' at a school in England.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: comedy
Duration: 12'12"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Are tough times ahead for schools and parents?
The budget saw no increase in school operation funding which goes to pay for teacher development, learning support, power and water bills, technology and sports funding. Instead, the government announced a plan to provide 43 million dollars in extra funding for the children of long term beneficiaries. We discuss this with the PPTA General Secretary Michael Stevens and Sandy Pasley the President of the Secondary Principals' Association.
[image:59006:third] no metadata
09:20 Adult vaccinations, is 50 too young for the shingles shot?
There's concern that accurate information isn't getting through to adults about vaccination boosters, and when, or, if they should consider getting innoculated for conditions that can affect the elderly, such as shingles.
Dr Nikki Turner is the director of the Immunisation Advisory Centre. She says with shingles in particular, there's no point getting innoculated prematurely.
09:30 The slippery problem of eels
Eels can live for up to a 100 years in the creeks and rivers of New Zealand but eventually they have to migrate out to sea and when they do they tend to get sucked into the turbines of hydrodams. As you might imagine, not many of them survive. Don Jellyman has spent much of his career studying New Zealand's eels as a NIWA scientist.
[image:44258:full]
09:45 Pacific correspondent Mike Field
China's luxury food demand is turning sea cucumber into a lucrative but boom-to-bust business in the Pacific - threatening the environment and lives; Samoa and Tonga re-assert themselves as Christian states and remote Wallis Island is in a real game of thrones.
10:05 Antarctic Dinosaurs
[image:66377:full]
More than a hundred years ago on his fatal expedition to the South Pole Robert Falcon Scott and his unlucky team discovered the very first fossils in Antarctica while trekking over the Transantarctic Mountains. The rocky remains hinted at much warmer past for the frozen continent and more finds since have revealed Antarctica was once covered in dense forest inhabited by all kinds of plants and animals - including dinosaurs.
One of the members of the latest expedition to dig for fossils in the deep south was Australian palaeontologist Steven Salisbury from the University of Queensland.
10:30 The Reading
Fitz by Jenifer Roberts, read by Owen Scott. Part 5 of 10.
10:45 Budget 2016
Finance Minister Bill English on why he'd like to see tax cuts for middle income earners next year.
11:05 New Music with Jeremy Taylor
The covers album; does it signify an artist who has run out of ideas? Can a cover really be better than the original? Did a Grateful Dead tribute album really need to run to 5 discs? Jeremy Taylor lends an ear to covers sets from Bob Dylan, Mark Kozelek and the hefty Grateful Dead tribute set "Day Of The Dead"
11:30 Sports commentator Brendan Telfer
Is Joseph Parker ready to challenge for the World Heavyweight boxing title and what's happened to our Sevens teams?
11:45 The week that was with Te Radar and Michele A'Court
The dangers of shopping on-line and why playtime whistles have been deemed 'too aggressive' at a school in England.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Dinah Washington
Song: Is you Is or Is you Ain’t My Baby?
Time: 09:36

Artist: Opensouls
Song: Standing in the rain
Time: 1145

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
A chaotic court appearance for the man charged with Renee Duckmanton's murder, an emotional testimony from the survivor of Ashburton's Work and Income shooting.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'52"

12:17
Fisher & Paykel Healthcare posts record profit and revenue
BODY:
One of the country's biggest manufacturers, Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, has had a bumper year, with a record full-year profit and revenue.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Fisher & Paykel Healthcare
Duration: 1'35"

12:19
Trilogy's full-year profit and sales more than double
BODY:
The skin care and fragrance company, Trilogy International's full-year net profit has more than doubled, driven by strong growth in international markets, while its Trans-Tasman business exceeded expectations.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Trilogy International
Duration: 1'44"

12:21
New futures contract an improvement - PwC
BODY:
A new fresh milk futures and options contract being launched today by the sharemarket operator, NZX, offers large and small dairy farmers a way to mange milk price volatility.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: milk prices, dairy
Duration: 1'40"

12:23
Fonterra dragged into Australian election campaign
BODY:
Australia's marathon election campaign has included claims New Zealand's Fonterra and Australia's major dairy co-op have been exploiting suppliers.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: milk prices, dairy, Australia
Duration: 1'11"

12:25
Midday Markets for 27 May 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'04"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
The Black Caps home cricket schedule for the next two summers have been confirmed, and the spotlight is about to go on Elliot Dixon who could be set for one of the biggest weekends of his life.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 27 May 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:12
Tourism boost for the regions
BODY:
The government has set aside 12 million dollars to help regions improve tourism related facilities to cope with a boom in visitor numbers. We spoke yesterday to Tony Kokshoorn, the mayor of the Grey District, who said the tourism boom was putting huge pressure on the region, and that government help was urgently needed. We go back to him today to ask if this funding boost is enough.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: tourism, regions
Duration: 8'11"

13:25
Who 'Owns' our Water?
BODY:
The debate over water, and who owns it, is heating up throughout the country as the government undertakes a consultation process on water reforms. It maintains the line that 'no one owns the water'. But that's something that Hawke's Bay regional councillor, Peter Beaven, disagrees with.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: water
Duration: 11'35"

13:35
Critter of the week
BODY:
DOC's threatened species ambassador, Nicola Toki talks about the New Zealand praying mantis (Orthodera novaezealandiae).
EXTENDED BODY:
The New Zealand praying mantis (Orthodera novaezealandiae) with DOC's threatened species ambassador Nicola Toki.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: praying mantis
Duration: 11'01"

13:45
Favourite album - Suedehead
BODY:
Suedehead: The Very best of Morrisey.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'54"

14:15
NZ Live - Tom Cunliffe
BODY:
Tom Cunliffe describes himself as a story teller of moonlit folk songs. He's another in a long list of local musicians who have made the pilgrimage to the Sitting Room Studio in Lyttleton. What he's come up with is an album of 12 distinctly different, catchy folk songs with a rough rock edge. He calls it music for midnight drunks and the broken-hearted. Tom Cunliffe and his merry band play tracks from his debut album "Howl and Whisper".
EXTENDED BODY:
Tom Cunliffe describes himself as a story teller of moonlit folk songs.
He's another in a long list of local musicians who have made the pilgrimage to the Sitting Room Studio in Lyttleton.
What he's come up with is an album of 12 distinctly different, catchy folk songs with a rough rock edge. He calls it music for midnight drunks and the broken-hearted.
Tom Cunliffe and his merry band play tracks from his debut album "Howl and Whisper" in RNZ's Auckland studio.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 37'42"

15:10
Food with David Griffiths
BODY:
David Griffiths from Napier restaurant Mister D joins Jesse in RNZ's Napier studio, and shares a recipe for winter roots soup.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'49"

15:15
Wine with Gordon Russell
BODY:
Gordon Russell, chair of The Gimblett Gravels Winegrowers Association talks local wines.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: wine
Duration: 6'15"

15:25
Film review with Richard Swainson
BODY:
Richard Swainson reviews the new films The Man Who Knew Infinity and Bad Neighbours 2.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 10'13"

15:35
Music with Yadana Saw
BODY:
Yadana Saw from Music 101 talks about what's coming up on the show tomorrow afternoon.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'13"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 27 May 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'27"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Tourism boost for the regions
The government has set aside 12 million dollars to help regions improve tourism related facilities to cope with a boom in visitor numbers. We spoke yesterday to Tony Kokshoorn, the mayor of the Grey District, who said the tourism boom was putting huge pressure on the region, and that government help was urgently needed. We go back to him today to ask if this funding boost is enough.
1:25 Who 'Owns' our Water?
[image:64343:half]
The debate over water, and who owns it, is heating up throughout the country as the government undertakes a consultation process on water reforms. It maintains the line that 'no one owns the water'.
But that's something that Hawke's Bay regional councillor, Peter Beaven, disagrees with, with two bottling plants selling local aquifer water to China. At a public forum in Hawke's Bay this week, he called on the government to address the issue of water ownership.
1:35 Critter of the week
DOC's threatened species ambassador, Nicola Toki talks about the New Zealand praying mantis (Orthodera novaezealandiae)
[gallery:2065]
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 NZ Live; Tom Cunliffe
On New Zealand Live today, a singer who describes himself as a story teller of moonlit folk songs. He's another in a long list of local musicians who have made the pilgrimage to the Sitting Room Studio in Lyttleton. What he's come up with is an album of 12 distinctly different, catchy folk songs with a rough rock edge. He calls it music for midnight drunks and the broken-hearted.
[image:69699:full]
Today Tom Cunliffe and his merry band play tracks from his debut album "Howl and Whisper."
2:20 New Zealand Society
Tales of life in Aotearoa.
3:10 Food, Wine and Movies
David Griffiths from Napier restaurant Mister D joins Jesse in RNZ's Napier studio, and shares a recipe for winter roots soup.
[image:69537:half] no metadata
And Gordon Russell, chair of The Gimblett Gravels Winegrowers Association talks local wines.
Then Richard Swainson reviews the new films The Man Who Knew Infinity and Bad Neighbours 2
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
The answers to your One Quick Questions
And Zara Potts joins Jesse and Jim Mora to discuss what the world's been talking about.

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Friday May 27th
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Jakob
TITLE: Emergent
COMP: Jeff Boyle, Maurice Beckett, Jason Johnston
ALBUM: Sines
LABEL: Shootthefreak
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Morrissey
TITLE: Suedehead
COMP: Morrissey
ALBUM: Suedehead; The Best of Morrissey
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Morrissey
TITLE: Everyday Is Like Sunday
COMP: Morrissey, Stephen Street
ALBUM: Suedehead; The Best of Morrissey
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Morrissey
TITLE: The Last of The Famous International Playboys
COMP: Morrissey, Stephen Street
ALBUM: Suedehead; The Best of Morrissey
LABEL: EMI
NEW ZEALAND LIVE:
ARTIST: Tom Cunliffe
TITLE: There's Your Lord
COMP: Tom Cunliffe
ALBUM: Howl and Whisper
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
ARTIST: Tom Cunliffe
TITLE: Just Kids
COMP: Tom Cunliffe
ALBUM: Howl and Whisper
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
ARTIST: Tom Cunliffe
TITLE: Time To Cry
COMP: Tom Cunliffe
ALBUM: Howl and Whisper
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
ARTIST: Tom Cunliffe
TITLE: A Park In Barcelona
COMP: Tom Cunliffe
ALBUM: Howl and Whisper
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
THE PANEL HALF-TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Bruno Mars
TITLE: The Lazy Song
COMP: Bruno Mars, Philip Lawrence, Ari Levine, K'naan
ALBUM: Doo-Wops & Hooligans
LABEL: Elektra

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 27 May 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'27"

16:05
The Panel with Oscar Kightley and Sue Wells (Part 1)
BODY:
Topics - Tourism expert Dave Bamford talks about why a tourist tax is a good idea. Aviation commentator Peter Clark discusses the ever-changing story around the crash of flight M804. Are Councilors being reined-in too tightly?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'15"

16:06
The Panel with Oscar Kightley and Sue Wells (Part 2)
BODY:
Topics - What do you do with your spare time? Former Christchurch mayor Garry Moore talks about the not-for-profit Your Home trust which is providing houses for low-income families. Donald Trump has enough votes to win the Republican Party presidential nomination. Richie McCaw's star power is being used by Fonterra while contractors face non-payment by the dairy co-op.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'14"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Oscar Kightley and Sue Wells have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'39"

16:10
Tourist tax
BODY:
Tourism expert Dave Bamford talks about why a tourist tax is a good idea.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: tourism, tourist tax, Department of Conservation
Duration: 8'29"

16:20
EgyptAir crash developing story
BODY:
Aviation commentator Peter Clark discusses the ever-changing story around the crash of flight M804.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: aviation, flight M804, EgyptAir
Duration: 6'43"

16:27
Council control
BODY:
Are Councilors being reined-in too tightly?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'16"

16:33
Are people into hobbies anymore?
BODY:
What do you do with your spare time?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'19"

16:37
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Oscar Kightley and Sue Wells have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'46"

16:40
Gov Gen opens Trust house in ChCh
BODY:
Former Christchurch mayor Garry Moore talks about the not-for-profit Your Home trust which is providing houses for low-income families.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'35"

16:48
Trump win - against the odds
BODY:
Donald Trump has enough votes to win the Republican Party presidential nomination. Who would've thought?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA, Donald Trump
Duration: 7'37"

16:55
Richie and Fonterra
BODY:
Richie McCaw's star power is being used by Fonterra while contractors face non-payment by the dairy co-op.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'16"

16:58
Bye bye Hilary Barry
BODY:
TV3 stalwart Hilary Barry will read her last 6pm news bulletin tonight.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Friday 27th May 2016
BODY:
Watch Friday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
Double murderer sentenced to 27 years
BODY:
The man who murdererd two women at the Ashburton WINZ office, Russell John Tully, has been sentenced to 27 years in prison. Reporter Sally Murphy was at the sentencing.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Ashburton WINZ shooting, John Tully
Duration: 3'53"

17:12
Duckmanton family yell, lunge at murder accused in court
BODY:
A police officer was left with a bloody hand in the Christchurch District Court this morning, when the family of Renee Duckmanton yelled abuse and lunged at the man accused of her murder. Belinda McCammon was at the hearing.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Renee Duckmanton
Duration: 2'32"

17:16
Government ramps up rhetoric on Auckland Council
BODY:
The Prime Minister has ramped up the rhetoric over the Auckland Council's role in the city's housing shortage, saying a new National Policy Statement will ultimately dictate how much housing land there will be. Auckland Correspondent, Todd Niall, reports.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Renee Duckmanton
Duration: 3'46"

17:20
Salvation Army asked to help beneficiaries pay rental costs
BODY:
The Salvation Army has dipped into its reserves to help people struggling to pay their bonds for rental housing for the first time. Mohamed Hassan reports.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Salvation Army
Duration: 3'15"

17:24
Steven Adams still one win away from NBA finals
BODY:
The Golden State Warriors have won game five of the Western Conference NBA playoffs, beating Steven Adams' Oklahoma City Thunder 120-111. Fox Sports anchor Sam Gannon watched the match.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Steven Adams
Duration: 4'55"

17:30
Councillors told to go dumpster diving
BODY:
Wellington city councillors have been told to go dumpster diving if they want to retrieve personal documents thrown out by staff. Michael Cropp reports.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Wellington City Council
Duration: 2'47"

17:35
Evening business for 27 May 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'41"

17:38
Tax cuts "election bribe"
BODY:
A day after Budget 2016, debate has turned to whether the government will embark on a major programme of tax cuts in an election year. Mei Heron reports.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Budget 2016, tax, tax cuts
Duration: 2'51"

17:41
Minister says education funding will be anonymous
BODY:
Hekia Parata has revealed schools will not know which of their students are attracting the new targetted education funding, the government unveiled to target children of long-term beneficiaries.
Topics: education, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

17:44
Trump has delegates to clinch Republican nomination
BODY:
Donald Trump, who has been derided, dismissed, scoffed at and written off, now formally has the number of delegates required to be be the Republican candidate in November's US Presidential elections. Simon Marks has the details from Washington.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Donald Trump, USA
Duration: 6'51"

17:50
Driver: low pay and long hours lead to log truck crashes
BODY:
A veteran Whangarei truck driver says low pay and long hours on the road are the real reasons log truck drivers keep rolling their rigs in Northland. Lois Williams reports.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: truck drivers, log truck drivers, driving
Duration: 3'41"

17:54
Widow of truck driver who died after crash in Patea speaks out
BODY:
The widow of a the truck driver who survived a horrendous crash earlier this year but later died has spoken about her happy life with her husband who she described as a true gent. Reporter Robin Martin spoke with Chrissie Fairclough.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: truck drivers, log truck drivers, driving
Duration: 3'47"

17:57
Man changes name to Guinness after obsession with records
BODY:
An Indian man is so obsessed with setting Guinness world records he's changed his name to Guiness.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'23"

18:10
Government says no plans to stop state house sell-off
BODY:
The Government says it's committed to continue selling off state houses, despite revelations on Checkpoint that a shortage of state homes has people borrowing money from WINZ for temporary hotel accommodation. Demelza Leslie reports.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: temporary hotel accommodation, temporary accommodation, emergency housing
Duration: 3'02"

18:14
PM puts onus on Auckland Council to create land supply
BODY:
The Prime Minister, John Key, has put the onus on the Auckland Council to supply land for some much needed houses. He spoke to John Campbell.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'36"

18:18
Remains from 60 Maori and Moriori returned to New Zealand
BODY:
The remains of 60 Maori and Moriori were welcomed home from the United States this afternoon in a moving ceremony at Te Papa in Wellington.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: ancestral human remains
Duration: 4'01"

18:24
Aucklanders to turn to turbans this weekend
BODY:
Aucklanders will have the chance to try out wearing a turban this weekend, in an event organised by the local Sikh community. Medical student, Jaspreet Singh, explained - and showed - what the turban symbolises.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 6'06"

18:40
Focus on Politics for 27 May 2016
BODY:
The Finance Minister, Bill English, has delivered his eight Budget which he says delivers money to sectors under pressure - health, education and housing. But critics say the Budget has failed to provide basic levels of funding for schools and hospitals, and to address the Auckland housing crisis. With Deputy Political Editor, Chris Bramwell.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'28"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:43 PM. | Focus on Politics===
=DESCRIPTION=

Analysis of significant political issues presented by RNZ's parliamentary reporting team (RNZ)

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information 7:42 The Why Factor (BBC)

=AUDIO=

20:15
Nights' Sport - Twin Peaks
BODY:
Invercargill-based Tashi and Nungshi Malik scaled Mount Everest in 2013, becoming the first twin sisters in the world to do so. Post Everest, they successfully completed #mission2for7, conquering the tallest peak in each of the seven continents for the cause of the Indian Girl Child. They set up the NungshiTashi Foundation to advance the lives of Indian girls and women through outdoors, adventure sports and mountaineering.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: mountaineering, Everest
Duration: 20'49"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:07 Sonic Tonic
A musical trip through and around an idea. Tonight we explore "The Man".
7:50 Witness
Kia Ora - We return to May 1984 when an Auckland telephone operator became famous for promoting her Maori language. Dina Newman spoke to Naida Glavish about her one-woman protest to raise awareness of indigenous rights in the country.
[image:69722:full]
8:12 Nights' Sport - Twin Peaks
Invercargill based Tashi and Nungshi Malik scaled Mount Everest in In 2013, becoming the first twin sisters in the world to do so. Post Everest, they successfully completed #mission2for7, conquering the tallest peak in each of the seven continents for the cause of the Indian Girl Child. They've also managed to fit in a ski trip to the North Pole. They set up the NungshiTashi Foundation to advance the lives of Indian girls and women through outdoors, adventure sports and mountaineering.

8:30 Spotlight
In this week's episode of Stomping Grounds, in which much loved New Zealand musicians take us back to the places they grew up, we're heading south to Otautahi with Ladi6.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgNAKLx8EtA
9:07 Country Life
We meet Anthea Yule, who, following a marriage break up, is farming what was initially her in-laws farm, on her own account .. with a lot of help from her four children.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 The Friday Finale
For NZ Music Month, Music101 invited guests to compile a C60 of local sounds, and talk us through their selections. This week David Benge, the man behind Vice New Zealand, Drunken Piano Touring and Speak and Spell Group. As well as performing in bands like D Super, David has also managed the likes of Fur Patrol, Cut Off Your Hands and Aldous Harding.

=PLAYLIST=

Sonic Tonic playlist - "The Man"

ARTIST Boys Don't Cry
SONG I Wanna Be a Cowboy
ARTIST Elvis Presley
SONG Guitar Man
ARTIST Miles Davis
SONG Blue Is Green
ARTIST Steely Dan
SONG Kid Charlemagne
ARTIST Sister Sledge
SONG He's the Greatest Dancer
ARTIST Michael Jackson
SONG Man In The Mirror
ARTIST Frank Sinatra
SONG The Single Man
ARTIST Johnny Cash
SONG The Man Comes Around

===9:06 PM. | Country Life===
=DESCRIPTION=

Memorable scenes, people and places in rural New Zealand (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

21:05
Ahuwhenua Young Maori Famer of the year
BODY:
Jack Rahahruhi manages a Landcorp farm at Cape Foulwind and last week was named Young Maori Farmer of the Year.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jack Rahahruhi manages an 1100 cow Landcorp farm at Cape Foulwind and last week was named Young Maori Farmer of the Year

Topics: rural, farming
Regions: West Coast
Tags: Ahuwenua Young Maori Farmer, dairy farming, Landcorp
Duration: 3'48"

21:09
Regional Wrap
BODY:
It's been thundery and wet in the North Island . In the South cattle are on a winter rotation of swedes, kale, chowmolia and fodderbeet.
EXTENDED BODY:
It's been thundery and wet in the North Island . In the South cattle are on a winter rotation of swedes, kale, chowmolia and fodderbeet.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'55"

21:15
Young Maori Farmer of Year Finalist Ash-Leigh Campbell
BODY:
Ash-Leigh Campbell is studying at Lincoln University. She has plans to work her way into farm ownership and would love to become a leader in the dairy industry.
EXTENDED BODY:
Ash-Leigh Campbell is studying at Lincoln University. She has plans to work her way into farm ownership and aims to become a leader in the dairy industry.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags: dairy farming, Ngai Tahu farms, Whenua Kura Scholarship, Ahuwenua Young Maori Farmer
Duration: 3'18"

21:19
Replanting the Hoteo
BODY:
John and Geraldine Taylor, who have farmed their North Auckland land for 50 years, have raised cash through crowd funding to bring back native bush along the banks of a river running through their property. The Hoteo is Auckland's longest river and eventually flows into the Kaipara Harbour. The replanting is part of a long term goal to save snapper breeding grounds in the harbour waters.
EXTENDED BODY:
A North Auckland couple, who’ve farmed their land for fifty years, have raised cash through crowd funding to bring back native bush along the banks of their farm river. The Hoteo is Auckland’s longest river and eventually flows into the Kaipara Harbour. The replanting is part of a long term goal to save the important snapper breeding grounds in the harbour waters.
So far John and Geraldine Taylor have raised twenty thousand dollars through the Million Metres Stream project. Replanting work’s about to start, the middle of next month, so David Steemson paid a call on the Taylors at their sheep and dairy grazing property in Tomarata.
Up on the heights of John Taylor’s farm, the stream is little more than a trickle, coming out of the Te Arai Scenic Reserve land. As the crow flies it’s only a kilometre or two from the Pacific Ocean on the east coast of the North Island. But the Hoteo River actually runs 28 kilometres to the west, depositing itself into the Kaipara. On its way down the river collects a lot of sediment, half washed off pasture, and the river gouges the rest from its banks.
The Taylors began fencing off the waterways on their property ten years ago, initially just to help with stock control.
“I have lost so many new born lambs over the years from drowning”, says John, “and during a big thunder storm a whole herd of cows took fright and ended up in the flooded river. One animal got washed downstream, but survived”.
Soon the Taylors learned of the benefits of replanting river margins, and did their first partly funded replanting, along a short bit of the riverbank three years ago.
Encouraged by the result, they plan to do a lot more, helped on by the Million Metres Stream project. This crowd funding platform is the brainchild of the Sustainable Business Network which is funded by New Zealand business, to help industry become more environmentally sustainable.
A Million metres Streams wants to help fund the replanting of one-thousand kilometres of riverbanks… one kilometre at a time.
“It’s ironic,” says John, “ in the first few years of farming I cleared away all the scrub along the river banks… actually good native manuka and cabbage trees. We just blitzed everything”.
Now he potentially has to raise 400-thousand dollars to put back all the native plants over all twelve hectares of river bank land he set aside.
He says if New Zealand wants to have clean water and plentiful snapper stocks, it’s got to be a joint effort, through such things as crowd funding.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: snapper, Hoteo, native bush, conservation
Duration: 13'37"

21:35
Ahuwhenua Finalist Harepaora Ngaheu
BODY:
Farming has turned 24 year old Harepaora Ngaheu's life around. Harepaora lives at Te Teko near Whakatane and is proud to be a role model for other young Maori.
EXTENDED BODY:
Farming has turned 24 year old Harepaora Ngaheu's life around. Harepaora lives at Te Teko near Whakatane and is proud to be a role model for other young Maori.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags: dairy farming, Ahuwenua Young Maori Farmer, Ngati Awa
Duration: 3'33"

21:39
Anthea Yule... Farming is a Privilege
BODY:
Anthea Yule started her farming life married to Lawrence Yule, who is now the mayor of Hastings. In the late 1980's they started farming his parent's property near the Ngaruroro River in Hawkes Bay. Anthea says if you'd asked her fifteen years ago, what she expected to be doing now, she'd say; some relief teaching, a bit of golf, volunteer work. But, her life's taken another turn all together, a turn's that's forced her to dig deep to cope. The marriage broke up and now she runs the property on her own account. She's transformed some of Paranui using irrigation and has a lamb finishing business which sees her sending lambs off farm nearly every week of the year. The Yules have four children and they're all heavily involved in the farm and its business direction.
EXTENDED BODY:
It's nothing for Anthea Yule to get up at 5am and spend the day drenching and weighing 2000 lambs to see which ones are ready for the meatworks.
In fact every week she's weighing lambs because every week some are sent to Napier processor Fresh Meats.
The 51-year-old farmer says this isn't how she thought her life would turn out.
If you'd asked her 15 years ago what she thought she'd be doing now, she'd have said "a little bit of teaching, a little bit of sport, maybe golf lessons still, but all that stopped ... volunteer work. Life changed."
The change, which has seen her have to dig very deep at times to cope, was the break up of her marriage to Lawrence Yule, current mayor of Hastings.
Now she runs the property, near the Ngaruroro River in Hawkes Bay, on her own account. There was a business to keep going, she says, and it never entered her head that she wouldn't do that.
But, as all farmers know, it can be very tough. "You can work all year for no money sometimes."
Getting a water right a couple of years ago has completely changed the way the farm runs, and has added some certainty of income.
"I guess the best thing I've done in my time here is get a water right - and there's no more - so we're now irrigating 80 hectares."
The water lets her grow more specialist grasses and crops so she can produce lambs week in week out that are good killing weights.
Land that used to be "the dunny of the farm", down near the Ngaruroro River, now supports thousands of lambs, and the cattle that used to graze here are pushed into tougher country.
Anthea says she can only keep farming because of the huge support she gets from neighbours - and her four children who come home in the holidays to help out. All have different interests and skills on the farm and they are determined to keep it going.
"They want inter-generational succession of some sort. They all cut their teeth here and worked very hard."
That work has included planting a lot of trees for their beauty and for stock food. According to Anthea, "you must plant as if you're going to be there forever".
"The fencers thought I was crazy," she says," but I went back and looked at how things would look from a distance ... I've tried to plant as though it's naturally been done like that."
Despite all these achievements, Anthea says, of all the things she's done in her life "the thing I'm most proud of is being a mother. I love being called Mum."
Topics: rural, farming
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: romney, irrigation
Duration: 20'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Musical guests compile a C60, and talk us through their selections

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288230

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 27 May 2016

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