RNZ National. 2016-05-31. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

31 May 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (BBC); 2:05 New Jazz Archive (PRX) 3:05 Grievous Bodily by Craig Harrison read by John O'Leary (13 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 31 May 2016
BODY:
Error means tens of thousands of beneficiaries underpaid. Plain packaging for cigarettes to be unveiled. New Zealand photographer snatched by croc in Queensland. Law firm Cone Marshall linked to disgraced Brazilian politician. Labour's solution to the Auckland housing crisis. Proposal to extend HPV vaccine to boys 'will save lives'.
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Duration: 33'15"

06:08
Sports News for 31 May 2016
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An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
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Duration: 2'04"

06:12
Panama Papers: Kazakhstan has a history of corruption cases
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Yesterday on Morning Report, we revealed the link in the Panama Papers between an exiled Kazakhstan prime minister and a New Zealand-based company helping his family hide their assets.
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Duration: 3'38"

06:19
Early Business News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags: markets
Duration: 2'56"

06:23
Confusion over barring of West Papuan to enter PNG
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There's disquiet within Melanesia over denial of entry to Papua New Guinea for a West Papuan leader. PNG is this week hosting a summit of the European Union's African, Carribean and Pacific Group.
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Duration: 3'24"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 31 May 2016
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News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
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Duration: 4'03"

06:40
Tens of thousands of beneficiaries underpaid by millions
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Almost 90-thousand beneficiaries have been paid incorrectly, totalling millions of dollars, because of an automatic payment mistake at the Ministry of Social Development.
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Duration: 3'06"

06:43
Air New Zealand to cut flights between Whanganui and Auckland
BODY:
Air New Zealand will cut all flights between Whanganui and Auckland, and Blenheim and Christchurch, at the end of July. It is just the latest in a series of cutbacks to regional services, which began in April last year -- with services cut to Kaitaia, Westport and Whakatane.
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Duration: 2'24"

06:46
Internal Trump University documents to be released this week
BODY:
A judge overseeing the lawsuit over the failed Trump University has ordered internal documents from the alleged scam be made public this week. The Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has criticised U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel's handling of the case, calling him a 'hater'.
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Duration: 3'15"

06:50
Questions raised about Tiwai Point future
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An electricity analyst says the Tiwai Point Aluminium Smelter in Southland still faces big hurdles that leaves its future up in the air.
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Duration: 1'57"

06:53
Stride Property's big plans to grow
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The commercial office, retail and industrial properties, Stride Property, is making plans to substantially expand its business, once it splits the company in two.
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Duration: 1'53"

06:54
Moa Group cuts full-year losses on improving sales
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The craft beer brewer, Moa Group, has reported a smaller full year loss on higher sales, and is not looking for a tie up with any of the brewing big boys.
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Duration: 1'39"

06:55
From a drinking passion to a business
BODY:
What started as a passion for a quality drink has turned into a new business venture. Chris Reid and his brother are big gin fans and while trying a few overseas in 2013, realised there wasn't a big craft distilling market in New Zealand.
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Duration: 2'26"

06:59
Morning markets
BODY:
Wall Street closed for a public holiday ... as has been London, consequently markets have been quiet but positive in Asia yesterday and in Europe overnight.
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Duration: 59"

07:07
Sports News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
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Duration: 2'11"

07:11
Error means tens of thousands of beneficiaries underpaid
BODY:
Tens of thousands of beneficiaries have been severely underpaid, or overpaid, in a bureaucratic debacle stretching back more than 20 years, because of an automatic payment error at the Ministry of Social Development.
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Duration: 3'54"

07:15
Plain packaging for cigarettes to be unveiled
BODY:
Plain packaging for cigarettes is set to be unveiled today but one key coalition partner says the government is on the wrong track with its moves on tobacco control. Instead of increasing tax on smokers and taking logos off packs - ACT leader David Seymour says e-cigarettes should be made legal.
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Duration: 4'53"

07:20
New Zealand photographer snatched by croc in Queensland
BODY:
The search for a New Zealand woman who was attacked by a crocodile in Australia will continue today. Cindy Waldron, a 46-year-old photographer who was based in New South Wales, was snatched while wading with her friend, Leeann Mitchell, at Thornton Beach in the Daintree National Park in Far North Queensland on Sunday night.
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Duration: 4'35"

07:29
Law firm Cone Marshall linked to disgraced Brazilian politician
BODY:
The New Zealand law firm Cone Marshall has been involved with yet another case that's been revealed by the Panama Papers - this time its a disgraced prominent Brazilian politician.
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Tags: Panama Papers
Duration: 5'19"

07:38
Labour's solution to the Auckland housing crisis
BODY:
As we've heard over the last few days, the government is basically blaming the Auckland Council for the housing crisis, and says it will turn up the pressure this week with the release of a National Policy Statement, which will force the Council to open up more land for housing.
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Duration: 6'18"

07:43
Proposal to extend HPV vaccine to boys 'will save lives'
BODY:
Doctors say Pharmac's proposal to extend an anti-cancer vaccine to boys will save lives. The drug buying agency wants to offer boys the human papillomavirus vaccine, known as Gardasil, and say it is now much more affordable - after renegotiating a series of deals with drug companies.
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Duration: 3'05"

07:46
Social workers go to marae for help
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A south Auckland marae that opened its doors to the homeless has not only been inundated by those desperate for a bed, but also social services who want help with their clients.
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Duration: 4'33"

07:51
Expert questions killing of gorilla at Cincinatti Zoo
BODY:
An animal behaviour expert is questioning why a popular zoo in the United States shot and killed a gorilla after a four-year-old boy fell into the enclosure. Cincinatti Zoo says it did everything possible to avoid having to shoot 17-year-old Harambe.
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Duration: 3'36"

07:55
New Zealand spending millions to setup embassy in Colombia
BODY:
It's emerged New Zealand is spending millions setting up and running an embassy in Colombia - a country which is only a minor trading partner. The Foreign Minister, Murray McCully, says with a booming population and solid growth, there are good educational and investment opportunities for New Zealand businesses in Colombia.
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Duration: 2'46"

07:58
Steven Adams to face crucial decider in NBA playoffs
BODY:
Rising NBA star Steven Adams will play the most crucial game of his career when the Oklahoma City Thunder take on defending champions, the Golden State Warriors later today.
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Duration: 2'14"

08:07
Sports News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
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Duration: 2'32"

08:12
Plain packaging for tobacco products to be introduced
BODY:
The Government is poised to introduce plain packaging legislation for tobacco products. The Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga is expected to announce the move this morning.
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Duration: 4'50"

08:18
Overhaul of disability services in Australia
BODY:
New Zealanders in Australia fear they are about to fall foul of a huge overhaul of disability services. One mother in Melbourne has gone so far as to seek damages, alleging discrimination by state authorities and a federally-funded agency in Victoria.
Topics: disability
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Duration: 4'11"

08:20
Children's Commissioner reflects on 5 years in the job.
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Dr Russell Wills' five year stint as Children's Commissioner is about to come to an end. The pediatrician made the issue of child poverty a priority during his tenure.
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Duration: 5'03"

08:29
More tolerance called for in New Zealand sport
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The captain of a gay rugby team says New Zealand sport still has some big hurdles to jump if it wants to be more inclusive. The country's largest sports codes are banding together in an effort to make sport more diverse and tolerant.
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Duration: 3'40"

08:30
Markets Update for 31 May 2016
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A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
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Duration: 46"

08:35
Company works to resolve safety issues after helicopter crash
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The company behind a helicopter crash on Fox Glacier last year that killed seven people says it's working to resolve safety concerns. The Civil Aviation Authority yesterday suspended the licence of Alpine Adventures, which has a fleet of 19 helicopters.
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Duration: 5'30"

08:40
DHBs next in line for fluoridation challenge
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Extending water fluoridation to an extra one and a half million New Zealanders could save more than 600 million dollars over two decades. That's among the advice given to the Government before its recent call to switch decision-making from local councils to health boards.
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Duration: 3'53"

08:44
Fish and Game wade into trout debate
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Fish and Game says the current trout poaching debate is selective and ignores the fact that trout are not covered by customary rights. Yesterday, we covered the story of two men who were sent to prison for stealing trout from a protected fishing area near Rotoiti in the Bay of Plenty two years ago.
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Duration: 3'04"

08:48
Air NZ never gave the route a chance, say Whanganui's leaders
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Whanganui's leaders say Air New Zealand never gave the town the chance to build capacity on the route to Auckland. The national carrier yesterday announced it will kill its loss-making 50-seat flights to Auckland from the end of July.
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Duration: 3'09"

08:52
Collection of Pacific treasures to be displayed in Auckland
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One of the world's largest collections of historic Pacific treasures will be displayed in a new project launched by the Auckland War Memorial Museum.
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Duration: 2'58"

08:57
Debut of brand new Top Gear described as a flop
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The revamped BBC motoring show Top Gear has been relaunched without Jeremy Clarkson - and without an awful lot of its regular viewers. While many fans of the old show took to social media to criticise the new programme and its host Chris Evans, hundreds of thousands didn't even bother tuning in.
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Duration: 2'28"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Fitz - The colonial adventures of James Edward Fitzgerald by Jenifer Roberts (7 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Plain packaging of tobacco returns to political agenda
BODY:
Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga is poised to unveil the new packaging, expected to look very similar to cigarette and tobacco packets in Australia. Draft regulations will then go out for public consultation before the second reading of the legislation comes back to Parliament sometime in the next couple of weeks. The law change has been on hold since since tobacco companies tried to sue the Australian government, which introduced plain packaging in 2012 - but last year one of two legal challenge failed. Dame Tariana Turia is the former Associate Health Minister who was the driver behind the legislation.
Topics: health, politics, law
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Duration: 14'43"

09:25
Top brass warns NATO on course for war with Russia
BODY:
General Sir Richard Shirreff is a high ranking retired British military General. He warns that nuclear war with Russia could happen within a year, if NATO doesn't beef up its defence presence in the Baltic states.
Topics: author interview
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Tags: General Sir Richard Shirreff, NATO, Russia, war, nuclear war, Vladimir Putin
Duration: 20'35"

09:50
USA Correspondent Steve Almond
BODY:
Donald Trump seals the Republican Nomination while Clinton sinks in the polls; Beyonce's "Lemonade": will major bands now start to release albums as both musical artifacts and cinematic ones? Plus pressure is mounting on the North Carolina Governor over a public bathrooms law.
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Duration: 9'32"

10:05
UK Rock writer Mick Wall on Lemmy
BODY:
Mick Wall talks about his frank biography of Motörhead frontman and friend, Lemmy, 'the only rock n' roller never to sell his soul for silver and gold'.
EXTENDED BODY:
UK rock writer Mick Wall has just written Motörhead frontman and friend Lemmy Kilmister's strange but true life story.
The pair were friends for 35 years and the book is based on Mick's original interviews with Lemmy conducted over numerous years.
Lemmy: The Definitive Biography is a brutally frank and funny book.
As Lemmy once said of Mick Wall, "Mick Wall is one of the few rock writers in the world who can actually write and seems to know anything about rock music. I can and do talk to him for hours – poor bastard."
Lemmy died four days after his 70th birthday on 28 December 2015 at his home in Los Angeles from cancer.
Mick Wall talks to Kathryn Ryan about "the only rock n' roller never to sell his soul for silver and gold".
Topics: music
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Tags: Motörhead, rock
Duration: 34'24"

10:45
Book Review - Katherine of Aragon
BODY:
Written by Alison Weir, published by Hachette and reviewed by Lisa Finucane.
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Duration: 3'57"

11:10
Business with Rod Oram
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The economic forecasts in last week's budget, and how they might affect government; and the state of the Australian economy and how it will impact ours.
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Duration: 9'18"

11:20
Media with Gavin Ellis
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Gavin discusses Hilary Barry's replacement at TV3, what the application to the Commerce Commission for a merger of NZME and Fairfax NZ has revealed, and Mark Jenning's plans for a new website.
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Duration: 20'37"

11:46
Rawiri Paratene on weaving his stage magic in Te Reo Māori
BODY:
Rawiri Paratene returns from a world tour with Hamlet to play the lead in Purapurawhetu by Briar Grace-Smith. For the first time ever, the classic award-winning Māori play will be presented in full Te Reo for two seasons at Te Pou Theatre and at the Herald Theatre as part of the 2016 Matariki celebrations.
EXTENDED BODY:
After nearly two years touring the world with the Globe Theatre’s Hamlet, acclaimed actor Rawiri Paratene is back in Aotearoa with a new challenge. Paratene is playing the lead in the classic play Purapurawhetu – in full te reo Māori.
An extract from the interview:
On Purapurawhetu
‘Purapurawhetu’ is a very well-known pattern for tuku tuku panels. Briar Grace-Smith has woven an intriguing story into this play, which is now a classic. It’s close to 30 years old, mid-90s. It has been translated into te reo Māori and this is the first production of the translation. It’s a stunning role and a stunning play.
The play is set in a village that’s on its arse, really, as a lot of villages where and a lot of villages still are. The role that I play, he’s this old guy who hangs around the foreshore and looks at the rocks, and he’s a few kumara short of a hangi… He’s not taken seriously until this old woman arrives and she has a former relationship with Hohepa. And the story of their life together and their child together is told. So I’ve got to be a convincing young man, as well. The old guy I think I’ve got down now. I don’t have to croak up my voice anymore, I just talk normal.
On his grandchildren
My granddaughter is eight, my grandson is six and I have one coming up now who is two – they have never spoken English to me. Māori is the language in their home. They address me as if I should be speaking Māori to them. That’s a big challenge. The eight year old I can’t understand. Her level of language is so fantastic.
On performing internationally
[The Globe] performed in English in Russia. And I had no idea how we were doing because the audience just felt so cold and so unresponsive. I was backstage thinking ‘I think they really, really hate us. Let’s just push through to the end and see what happens’. The Globe tradition is to end with a jig, and then the jig started. We concluded and it was an incredible reaction. So we couldn’t read those audiences at all, whereas in the Caribbean… If I had favourite audiences, my favourite would have been those in the Carribean. The Pacific audiences, again, were spontaneous and delightful.
Purapurawhetū will be presented in full te reo Māori for two seasons at Te Pou Theatre from 6-9 July and at The Herald Theatre from 13 -16 July. In addition to the te reo Māori translation there will also be two English performances Wednesday 6th July at Te Pou Theatre and Wednesday 13th July at The Herald Theatre.
Topics: te ao Maori, media, life and society
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Tags: theatre
Duration: 16'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Plain packaging of tobacco returns to political agenda
The Government is set to unveil its plan for plain packaging later this morning. The law change has been on hold since since tobacco companies tried to sue the Australian government, which introduced plain packaging in 2012. Last year, one of two legal challenges failed. Dame Tariana Turia is the former Associate Health Minister who was the driver behind the New Zealand legislation.
09:20 Top brass warns NATO on course for war with Russia
[image:69252:full] no metadata
General Sir Richard Shirreff is a high ranking retired British military General. He warns that nuclear war with Russia could happen within a year, if NATO doesn't beef up its defence presence in the Baltic states.
09:45 USA Correspondent Steve Almond
Donald Trump seals the Republican Nomination while Clinton sinks in the polls; Beyonce's "Lemonade": will major bands now start to release albums as both musical artifacts and cinematic ones? Plus pressure is mounting on the North Carolina Governor over a public bathrooms law.
[image:68289:half] no metadata
10:05 UK Rock writer Mick Wall on Lemmy
Mick Wall talks about his frank biography of Motörhead frontman and friend, Lemmy, 'the only rock n' roller never to sell his soul for silver and gold'.
10:35 Book review - Katherine of Aragon by Alison Weir
reviewed by Lisa Finucane, published by Hachette
10:45 The Reading
Fitz by Jenifer Roberts, read by Owen Scott. Part 7 of 10.
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
The economic forecasts in last week’s budget, and how they might affect government; and the state of the Australian economy and how it will impact ours.
11:30 Rawiri Paratene on weaving his stage magic in Te Reo
Rawiri Paratene returns from a globe to globe tour of Hamlet to play the lead in Purapurawhetu by Briar Grace-Smith. For the first time ever, the classic award-winning Māori play will be presented in full Te Reo for two seasons at Te Pou Theatre and at the Herald Theatre as part of the 2016 Matariki celebrations.
[image:69899:half] no metadata
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Gavin discusses the application to the Commerce Commission for a merger of NZME and Fairfax NZ has revealed, and Mark Jenning's plans for a new website.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Sonny Day and the Sundowners
Song: Nitty Gritty
Composer: Chase
Album: Sonny Day: The Collection (Compilation)
Label: Ode
Played at: 9.23

Artist: Anna Coddington
Song: The Runner
Composer: Coddington
Album: Kiwi Hit Disc 1
Label: NZONAIR
Played at: 9:45

Artist: Lemmy
Song: Bomber
Composer: Fast" Eddie Clarke / Lemmy / Phil "Philthy Animal" Taylor
Album: Bomber
Label: Sanctuary
Played at: 10:05

Artist: Sam Gopal/Lemmy
Song: Midsummer Night's Dream
Composer: Gopal
Album: Cries From The Midnight Circus:Ladbrooke Grove 1967-1978
Label: Castle
Played at: 10:30

Artist: Motorhead
Song: Till the End
Composer: Motörhead
Album: XXXX: Bad Magic
Label: UNIVERSAL
Played at: 10:39

Artist: Thomas Oliver
Song: If I Move to Mars
Composer: Oliver
Album: Water for Gold
Label: Aston Road
Played at: 11:20

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

06:19
Early Business News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
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Duration: 2'56"

12:00
Midday News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
Government makes moves to introudce tobacco plain packaging and the Panama papers prompts date for a full rollout of anti-money laundering legislation.
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Duration: 15'11"

12:17
China's Hainan Aviation takes stake in Virgin Australia
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Air New Zealand's exit from Virgin Australia appears to be close with news that the Hainan Aviation Group, the biggest private airline operator in China, is to take a stake in the Australian carrier.
Topics: business
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Tags: Air New Zealand
Duration: 1'37"

12:19
Building consents rebound
BODY:
As you may have heard in the news, building consents rebounded in April, though growth continues to ease due to fewer permits for apartments in Auckland.
Topics: business
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Tags: building consents
Duration: 1'33"

12:20
Health insurer gets US backing
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The life and health insurer, Partners Life, has secured 200 million dollars of investment from the global asset manager, Blackstone.
Topics: business
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Tags: Partners Life
Duration: 1'36"

12:22
Earnings news
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The finance software company, Finzsoft Solutions, has seen a sharp fall in net profit, as new business opportunities in Asian markets have failed to materialise, while development costs increased.
Topics: business
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Tags: Finzsoft Solutions, G3 Group, TruScreen
Duration: 57"

12:23
Midday Markets for 31 May 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Bryan Shepherd at Macquarie Private Wealth
Topics: business, economy
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Tags: markets
Duration: 2'07"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The cervical cancer screening firm, TruScreen, says its technology has been selected for a public screening programme in northern China, involving some 160-thousand women over the next 18 months.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'21"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
Steven Adams' dream of making the NBA Finals will be decided this afternoon as his Oklahoma City Thunder play the Golden State Warriors in a deciding game seven of the Western Conference Finals in Oakland.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 2'31"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 31 May 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
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Duration: 8'55"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:13
Crocodile Mick on the kiwi attacked by a crocodile
BODY:
The search continues for former Hamilton woman, Cindy Waldron, who's feared dead after a crocodile attack. The 46-year-old photographer was snatched while swimming with her friend, Leeann Mitchell, at Thornton Beach in the Daintree National Park in Far North Queensland on Sunday night. But just how dangerous is it to swim in those parts? Mick Putman, also known as Crocodile Mick, has more than thirty seven years experience hunting saltwater crocodiles.
Topics:
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Tags: Crocodiles, Australia
Duration: 9'46"

13:23
Love the one you're near
BODY:
These days meeting a romantic partner can be more about who is nearby - rather than who is compatable. An AUT study is looking how technology is changing the way we meet romantic partners. It's called Love The One You're Near, and is the brainchild of Dr Pani Farvid, Senior Psychology lecturer at AUT.
EXTENDED BODY:
These days meeting a romantic partner can be a question of proximity. How is technology changing the way we find love?
A recent AUT study called ‘Love The One You're Near’ is the brainchild of senior psychology lecturer Dr Pani Farvid.
An edited snapshot of the conversation:
For those in our audience who are not out there in the dating pool - what is Tinder and how does it work?
Pani Farvid: Tinder is social networking app that is marked as a dating app, that is used to connect individuals who are already on Facebook. You can set up a profile very speedily. Once you set it up you have a picture of yourself, the opportunity to provide a few words about who you are, and you can set your criteria for the kind of individuals you’re looking to meet, whether you’re looking for friends, relationships or casual sex. You set your criteria for the gender you are and the gender you’re looking for, the age range that you’re after and the proximity you want the person to be in – anything from 1km to 50, 60km. The point of it is to meet people who are nearby.
Isn’t Tinder just a bit of a shortcut?
Pani Farvid: Typically the way in which we create intimate connections with others requires some kind of proximity. When the internet came along, suddenly you were able to make connections with others who weren’t so close – someone in a different country, in a different city… Now with dating apps which are location-aware, using GPS technology, it’s a swing back to emphasis on location.
Tinder gets dismissed as a hook-up app and people say it makes people more shallow. I had a bit of a go at [online dating] when I was in London and you start focusing more on the looks of the people. ‘No, no, no, no…’
Pani Farvid: Some of the piloting that we’ve done with young people shows there is a different way that online dating is perceived in contrast to mobile dating. There’s a lot of effort which goes into setting up an online dating profile, whereas with Tinder all you need is a Facebook profile. Then you download the app and it populates your profile with pictures from facebook and your details from Facebook.
You spoke to a lot of young women about their experience of internet dating. Are they largely positive? Has it been a good experience for young women?
Pani Farvid: When it came to Tinder, the young people that we talked to saw it as a very useful multi-purpose tool to do lots of different htings – meet new friends, get over an ex, explore their sexuality, look for casual sex when they were feeling that way inclined. But at the same time there were some drawbacks and difficulties. For example, safety is always the number one issue at the back of women’s minds because of the social context that we live in where women are often victimised in the dating world.
[Our research showed that] men are not worried about the safety aspect at all. They’re aware that women may be thinking about the safety issue, so they will try and make the woman feel comfortable and make sure she realises they’re not a mass murderer or rapist. The biggest issue for women is safety, the biggest issue for men is whether the person is being honest abot how they look or what they’re like.
Is it increasing the amount of casual sex people are having?
Pani Farvid: We haven’t got enough data to answer that definitively, but I think it is certainly helping us make connections more quickly.
Is it making it easier or harder to meet someone you fall in love with?
Pani Farvid: Tinder is portrayed as a hook-up app but it does work on multiple layers. People do use it quite openly. The purpose is to always meet in person.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: relationships
Duration: 13'47"

13:37
From Refugees to Kiwis
BODY:
"I never had an ethnic background until I moved here, you see: that is just a matter of reference." One of the quotes from former refugees who have made their home in Auckland, for a new photography exhibition, New Zealanders Now: From Refugees to Kiwis, which opens tonight at Ponsonby Central. Photographer, Nando Azevedo took portraits of people who originally came here as refugees, and has accompanied his images with quotes from his subjects which give some insight into their lives and attitudes. Among those photographed was Adorate Mizero who came to New Zealand from Burundi in East Africa as a three year old with her parents and brother
EXTENDED BODY:
"I never had an ethnic background until I moved here, you see: that is just a matter of reference"

That's one of the quotes from former refugees who have made their home in Auckland - for a new photography exhibition, called New Zealanders Now: From Refugees to Kiwis, which opens tonight at Ponsonby Central.
Photographer, Nando Azevedo took portraits of people who originally came here as refugees, and has accompanied his images with quotes from his subjects which give some insight into their lives and attitudes.
Adorate Mizero, who came to New Zealand from Burundi in East Africa as a three-year-old with her parents and brother, was featured in the exhibition.
Initially, she says she agreed to be part of the exhibition because she wanted to see more people like her in the media.
"It was just me talking about it, like saying ‘why aren’t there people like me on TV, or [in] films?'
"[And] instead of just complaining about it I should probably do something about it."
She talks to Jesse Mulligan about being part of the exhibition and her family's story.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'44"

13:43
Favourite album
BODY:
'Time is Not Much' by Ladi 6
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'19"

14:10
Why some music gives us goosebumps
BODY:
It's that feeling when you hear a certain passage of music, when a shiver runs up your spine, or you get goosebumps all over your arms and legs. The experience is called frisson, which is French for "aesthetic chills". Jesse speaks Mitchell Colver is a doctoral student in Education at Utah State University, who has researched why some people respond so physically to music, while others do not.
Topics: music, science
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'56"

14:24
Great New Zealand Album: The General Electric - Shihad
BODY:
Today's Great New Zealand album features a band which shares the title for most number one albums for any New Zealand artist with Hayley Westenra. They have five each. And this band has had more Top 40 chart singles any anyone else in New Zealand (25), three of which made the top ten. They also have three of their songs listed among the top 100 Kiwi songs of all time. They are Shihad, and talking to us from Melbourne this afternoon are founding members Tom Larkin and Jon Toogood
EXTENDED BODY:
Today's Great New Zealand album features a band which shares the title for most number one albums for any New Zealand artist with Hayley Westenra. They have five each. And this band has had more Top 40 chart singles any anyone else in New Zealand (25), three of which made the top ten. They also have three of their songs listed among the top 100 Kiwi songs of all time.
They are Shihad, and talking to us from Melbourne this afternoon are founding members Tom Larkin and Jon Toogood
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Shihad
Duration: 35'13"

15:07
The Myth and Magic of Woodstock
BODY:
Janis Joplin's agent took her to a place in up-state New York to try and get her off heroin. Jimi Hendrix followed Bob Dylan there for the chance to meet his idol. There's more to Woodstock than a music festival in 1969. British Rock Critic Barney Hoskyns explores the music scene that became the centre of 1960's idealism. His new book is called Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wile Years of Woodstock.
Topics: music, history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'55"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 31 May 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'39"

21:34
Acid test for coastal seas
BODY:
The ocean is becoming more acidic, and this change is most pronounced in coastal seas. Marine scientists have received $4.9 million to work out what is going on and how this affects marine life along the coast.
EXTENDED BODY:
The oceans around the world are becoming more acidic, and this change is most pronounced in coastal waters. A team of marine scientists received $4.9 million to work out how coastal ocean acidification is affecting marine life such as snapper, paua and greenshell mussels.
Ocean acidification is often described as the evil twin of climate change. So far the oceans have taken up more than a third of the carbon dioxide we’ve been pumping into the air, and as a result their chemistry is changing. The water is becoming more acidic.
This change is already clearly measurable in all parts of the ocean, but it is happening even faster in coastal waters. The sea along some parts of New Zealand's coast, such as the Firth of Thames, already shows acidity levels that are projected for the open ocean for the end of this century.
The reason for this is that there are additional processes going on along the coast that speed up the change in pH, says Cliff Law, a marine biogeochemist at NIWA who leads a four-year, $4.9 million project called CARIM (short for Coastal Acidification Rates, Impacts and Management).
“In the open ocean we’re worried about the carbon dioxide that we’re releasing from the burning of fossil fuels, whereas in the coastal ocean there are other factors that are affecting the pH. They include things like the organic matter that’s running downstream into the water, and also the nutrients … that cause phytoplankton to grow and when bacteria break this down they produce more CO2.”
It is in these coastal waters that you’d find many of the fish and shellfish that are important for both recreational and commercial fisheries. The CARIM project has chosen three species – paua, snapper and greenshell mussels – to study in more detail under different levels of acidity.
In a laboratory at NIWA, marine ecologist Vonda Cummings keeps 24 tanks that she has set up as an acidification experiment. In each, she can set the pH and temperature at different levels, from those observed today to those projected for the end of the century. In each tank she keeps some paua.
The paua will be spawned in a few months, and she will monitor their fertility rates and the survival of the young. For molluscs – that’s clams and snails – she says the shell-forming stage is critical.
“If they can't form a shell or if it's formed but malformed or damaged, then it affects their ability to survive.”
Another interesting question she hopes to answer is whether coastal marine life, which has adapted to larger fluctuations of pH, is more or less resilient to ongoing acidification.
Meanwhile Cliff Law has set up large-scale containers with 4000 litres of seawater each to monitor what happens to phytoplankton, on which every other creature in the ocean feeds, under projected levels of acidity.
“Phytoplankton are just like plants in your garden. They photosynthesis, so you might imagine that an increase in carbon dioxide would benefit them but … what we see in the open ocean doesn’t necessarily bear that out.”
He says studies overseas have shown a decrease in the size of phytoplankton groups in coastal waters.
Apart from the experimental systems, the CARIM project team also monitors pH and other ocean parameters at three coastal sites across the country to keep track of changes and impacts on plankton, the marine food web and the three specific species.
Cliff Law says the end result should allow the team to “not only forecast how pH will change in coastal waters but also better understand what it will mean for these important species, as well as providing some tools for regional councils and the aquaculture industry on how they can address coastal acidification.”
The Acid Test is an earlier Our Changing World feature on ocean acidification.
Topics: science, environment, climate
Regions:
Tags: ocean acidification, CARIM, carbon dioxide, shellfish, paua, snapper
Duration: 14'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Crocodile Mick on the kiwi attacked by a crocodile
The search continues for former Hamilton woman, Cindy Waldron, who's feared dead after a crocodile attack.
The 46-year-old photographer was snatched while swimming with her friend, Leeann Mitchell, at Thornton Beach in the Daintree National Park in Far North Queensland on Sunday night.
But just how dangerous is it to swim in those parts?
Mick Putman, also known as Crocodile Mick, has more than thirty seven years experience hunting saltwater crocodiles.
[image:69998:full]
[image:69997:half]
1:25 Love the one you're near
These days meeting a romantic partner can be more about who is nearby - rather than who is compatable.
An AUT study is looking how technology is changing the way we meet romantic partners.
It's called Love The One You're Near, and is the brainchild of Dr Pani Farvid, Senior Psychology lecturer at AUT.
1:35 From Refugees to Kiwis
"I never had an ethnic background until I moved here, you see: that is just a matter of reference."
One of the quotes from former refugees who have made their home in Auckland, for a new photography exhibition, New Zealanders Now: From Refugees to Kiwis, which opens tonight at Ponsonby Central.
Photographer, Nando Azevedo took portraits of people who originally came here as refugees, and has accompanied his images with quotes from his subjects which give some insight into their lives and attitudes.
Among those photographed was Adorate Mizero who came to New Zealand from Burundi in East Africa as a three year old with her parents and brother
[gallery:2076]
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Why some music gives us goosebumps
It's that feeling when you hear a certain passage of music, when a shiver runs up your spine, or you get goosebumps all over your arms and legs. The experience is called frisson, which is French for "aesthetic chills".
Jesse speaks Mitchell Colver is a doctoral student in Education at Utah State University, who has researched why some people respond so physically to music, while others do not.
2:20 Great New Zealand Album: The General Electric - Shihad
[image:69929:full]
Today's Great New Zealand album features a band which shares the title for most number one albums for any New Zealand artist with Hayley Westenra. They have five each. And this band has had more Top 40 chart singles any anyone else in New Zealand (25), three of which made the top ten. They also have three of their songs listed among the top 100 Kiwi songs of all time.
They are Shihad, and talking to us from Melbourne this afternoon are founding members Tom Larkin and Jon Toogood
3:10 The Myth and Magic of Woodstock
Janis Joplin's agent took her to a place in up-state New York to try and get her off heroin. Jimi Hendrix followed Bob Dylan there for the chance to meet his idol. There's more to Woodstock than a music festival in 1969.
British Rock Critic Barney Hoskyns explores the music scene that became the centre of 1960's idealism. His new book is called Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, The Band, Van Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Friends in the Wile Years of Woodstock.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Tuesday 31st
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: Paperback Writer
COMP: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
ALBUM: The Beatles 1962-1966
LABEL: Parlophone
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Ladi 6
TITLE: Dark Brown
COMP: Karoline Tamiti, Brent Park
ALBUM: Time Is Not Much
LABEL: Download
ARTIST: Ladi 6
TITLE: Walk Right Up
COMP: Karoline Tamiti, Brent Park
ALBUM: Time Is Not Much
LABEL: Download
ARTIST: Ladi 6
TITLE: So Far
COMP: Karoline Tamiti, Brent Park
ALBUM: Time Is Not Much
LABEL: Download
THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM:
ARTIST: Shihad
TITLE: The General Electric
COMP: Tom Larkin, Karl Kippenberger, Phil Knight, Jon Toogood
ALBUM: The General Electric
LABEL: WEA
ARTIST: Shihad
TITLE: Pacifier
COMP: Tom Larkin, Karl Kippenberger, Phil Knight, Jon Toogood
ALBUM: The General Electric
LABEL: WEA
ARTIST: Shihad
TITLE: My Mind's Sedate
COMP: Tom Larkin, Karl Kippenberger, Phil Knight, Jon Toogood
ALBUM: The General Electric
LABEL: WEA
ADDITIONAL SONG:
ARTIST: Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young
TITLE: Woodstock
COMP: Joni Mitchell
ALBUM: Deja Vu
LABEL: Atlantic
THE PANEL HALF-TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Lady Gaga
TITLE: Bad Romance
COMP: Stefani Germanotta, Nadir Khayat
ALBUM: The Fame Monster
LABEL: Interscope

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 31 May 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'39"

16:03
The Panel with Penny Ashton and Julia Hartley (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Penny Ashton and Julia Hartley-Moore have been up to. Labour, Greens to work together to stop National at next election. Cafe owner Darlene Woodhead discusses the Palmerston North City Council's move to discourage smoking at outdoor cafe tables. Is it ok for tobacco money to fund cancer researchers' pensions? An already "fragile" community is worried about having another liquor outlet in Murupara. The mother of a child who fell into a Cincinnati zoo enclosure defends her parenting skills.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'39"

16:05
The Panel with Penny Ashton and Julia Hartley (Part 2)
BODY:
Most people marry the wrong person. What the Panelists Pennt Ashton and Julia Hartley-Moore have been thinking about. Journalism lecturer Jim Tully thinks that the ethnicities of car crash drivers should be revealed - contrary to a Police recommendation. Are married couples preferable as parents to unmarried. Harsh judgment handed down after a woman by killed by a crocodile while swimming in Queensland. Are there fewer zebra crossings than there used to be? A listener wants to know. There are certain words that rub us up the wrong way.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'58"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Penny Ashton and Julia Hartley-Moore have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'45"

16:11
Labour and Greens sign agreement to change govt
BODY:
Labour, Greens to work together to stop National at next election
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'13"

16:12
Palmerston North stubbs outdoor smoking
BODY:
Cafe owner Darlene Woodhead discusses the Palmerston North City Council's move to discourage smoking at outdoor cafe tables.
Topics:
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: smoking
Duration: 8'58"

16:20
Tobacco money funds cancer researchers' pensions
BODY:
Is it ok for tobacco money to fund cancer researchers' pensions?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: smoking, UK
Duration: 1'28"

16:22
Murupara residents against bottle shop
BODY:
An already "fragile" community is worried about having another liquor outlet in Murupara.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: smoking, UK
Duration: 3'09"

16:27
Mother responds over gorilla child grab
BODY:
The mother of a child who fell into a Cincinnati zoo enclosure defends her parenting skills.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: smoking, UK
Duration: 3'46"

16:33
Marrying Mr or Ms Wrong
BODY:
Most people marry the wrong person,
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'05"

16:38
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Pennt Ashton and Julia Hartley-Moore have been thinking about.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

16:42
Naming ethnicities
BODY:
Journalism lecturer Jim Tully thinks that the ethnicities of car crash drivers should be revealed - contrary to a Police recommendation.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'18"

16:47
Are married parents better for children?
BODY:
Are married couples preferable as parents to unmarried ones?.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'18"

16:52
Woman killed by croc
BODY:
Harsh judgment handed down after a woman by killed by a crocodile while swimming in Queensland.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: crocodile
Duration: 1'57"

16:54
Pedestrian crossings
BODY:
Are there fewer zebra crossings than there used to be? A listener wants to know.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: zebra crossings
Duration: 3'02"

16:57
Words we hate
BODY:
There are certain words that rub us up the wrong way.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: words
Duration: 2'36"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 31st May 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
Labour and Greens announce formal deal
BODY:
The Labour and Green Parties have announced an historic agreement to work together to change the Government, signing a Memorandum of Understanding to formalise their relationship.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 2'28"

17:12
Review reveals dozens of problems at MSD
BODY:
Payment problems at the Ministry of Social Development could be much bigger than initially thought, after a review found more than 30 examples where it was not complying with the law.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Payments
Duration: 3'05"

17:15
Govt unveils plain cigarette packaging plans
BODY:
Taking advantage of World Smokefree Day, the government today unveiled plans to pass a law enforcing plain packaging, which may come into effect before the end of the year.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: smoking
Duration: 3'48"

17:18
Hare Krishnas speak out about 'rogue group'
BODY:
The Christchurch Hare Krishna Centre have spoken out against a 'rogue group' operating near Nelson, which include a former member and volunteer at the Nelson Hare Krishna Society.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Hare Krishna
Duration: 4'09"

17:23
No sign of NZ woman missing in Queensland
BODY:
Family of a New Zealand woman feared dead after being taken by a crocodile are heading to Far North Queensland as the search for any sign of her continues.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: crocodile, Australia
Duration: 3'25"

17:27
Adams still a hero to Rotorua fan
BODY:
Steven Adams may not be going to the NBA finals - but he's still a hero in the eyes of his former Rotorua school teacher 'Auntie Bea' Yates, who watched the game at home.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Steven Adams
Duration: 4'34"

17:33
Evening Business for 31 May 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'03"

17:36
Whānau urged to boycott after-hours clinic
BODY:
An urban Māori authority in West Auckland is urging its whānau to boycott an after-hours clinic because it's too expensive, and advising them to go straight to Waitakere Hospital for treatment instead.
Topics: health
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'46"

17:39
Invercargill state tenants left in lurch
BODY:
An advocate for state house tenants in Invercargill says they are facing an uncertain future after the sole bidder pulled the plug on plans to buy the properties.
Topics: housing
Regions: Southland
Tags: state housing
Duration: 3'44"

17:42
Life can be easier for gay players, says ex-All Black
BODY:
Former All Black Keven Mealamu is among other athletes and industry figures pledging to make life easier for gay players and combat homophobia in sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: homophobia
Duration: 3'24"

17:46
Four more years' wait for Wgtn Town Hall
BODY:
It will be at least another four years until the Wellington Town Hall reopens its doors - the heritage listed building was closed for earthquake strengthening in 2013.
Topics: arts
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Town Hall
Duration: 2'49"

17:49
270,000 sign 'Justice for Harambe' petition
BODY:
After a gorilla was shot when a child crawled into his enclosure in Cincinnati, over 270,000 people have signed a petition calling for the parents to be held responsible. Founder Sheila Hurt joins Checkpoint.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 5'24"

17:54
Mum's Taxi gets on the road
BODY:
Single mother of four George McEncroe is crowdfunding for an all-female taxi company called Mum's Taxi, which she hopes to roll out in Sydney by the end of the year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Taxi
Duration: 4'41"

18:09
Businesswoman banned in HK is an NZ director
BODY:
The latest Panama Papers investigation shows a business woman banned from working in the financial industry in Hong Kong for a decade is now a director of a New Zealand company. That's raised questions about why should someone banned from working in the finance industry overseas be allowed to operate here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Hong Kong, Panama Papers
Duration: 2'35"

18:11
Minister says Govt may need to pay out more money
BODY:
A review of the Ministry of Social Development has found more than 30 examples where it was not complying with the law, and some of those could mean the Government needs to fork out more money for mispayments.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Payments
Duration: 2'57"

18:14
Bung the Bore hosts public meeting
BODY:
A group opposing water consents attached to a piece of land in Ashburton are hosting a public meeting tonight to try and educate the public.
Topics: environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: water
Duration: 3'12"

18:17
Pets at risk from second-hand smoke
BODY:
The Auckland SPCA is urging pet owners to reduce the health impacts of second-hand smoke on cats, fish, dogs, and other pets.
Topics: environment
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: smoking
Duration: 4'48"

18:25
'They just scored no points'
BODY:
New Zealand basketballer Steven Adams will not be going to the NBA finals, after his team Oklahoma City Thunder was beaten by Golden State Warriors. His manager Kenny McFadden joins Checkpoint.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Steven Adams
Duration: 2'13"

18:28
Whānau urged to boycott after-hours clinic
BODY:
Te Whānau O Waipareira Trust says people with after-hours illnesses should go to the hospital's Accident and Emergency Department.
Topics: health
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 58"

18:54
Today In Parliament for 31 May 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Government MPs help Finance Minister, Bill English, defend his Budget by lobbing up patsy questions. Prime Minister, John Key, faces more difficult questions from Opposition leader, Andrew Little. New Zealand First leader, Winston Peters, tackles Associate Health Minister, Peseta Sam Lotu Iinga over the Budget's tax hike on tobacco products, and is joined by ACT MP David Seymour. Building and Housing Minister, Nick Smith, gives as good as he got in questions from his Labour shadow, Phil Twyford.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - Kevin Biggar
BODY:
Adventurer Kevin Biggar and his friend Jamie Fitzgerald trekked 1200kms, pulling 160 kgs, battling -40C temperatures, unsupported, from the Antarctic coast to the South Pole, then turned around and went back. We'll ask him what on earth motivated him.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel
Duration: 17'14"

20:12
Kai-A-Miro: Te Puea Marae
BODY:
Te Puea Marae in Mangere has stepped up and opened its doors to people unable to find any other housing. Shannon Haunui-Thompson from RNZ's Te Manu Korihi team updates us on their efforts and the scale of the problem.
EXTENDED BODY:
Te Puea Marae in South Auckland has stepped up and opened its doors to help people unable to find housing – including social agencies desperate to help their clients.
Shannon Haunui-Thompson from RNZ's Te Manu Korihi team looks at the scale of the problem and what's going on at the marae.
Shannon Haunui-Thompson's written story about Te Puea Marae (30.05.16)
'Kai-A-Miro' (Eating the berry) comes from the proverb 'Ko te Manu kai Ana I te Miro nona te Ao' (the Bird that eats the Berry owns the World). This encapsulates the idea of a seed that when eaten gives insight to the one who consumes it.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Maori
Duration: 18'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Kevin Biggar - South Pole
Adventurer Kevin Biggar and his friend Jamie Fitzgerald trekked 1200kms, pulling 160 kgs, battling -40C temperatures, unsupported, from the Antarctic coast to the South Pole, then turned around and went back. We'll ask him what on earth motivated him.
[embed] https://youtu.be/eyOOrkdL7Ac
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 31 May
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger wraps up New Zealand Music Month with a handful of local releases, including the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific, introspective electronica of Pacific Heights, globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood, and the reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger wraps up New Zealand Music Month with a handful of local releases, including the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific, introspective electronica of Pacific Heights, globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood, and the reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Unity Pacific, Tom Cunliffe, Will Wood, 3 Voices, Pacific Heights
Duration: 30'00"

19:30
3 Voices by 3 Voices
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
These days, local releases are so thick on the ground it is practically impossible to keep track of them all. Back in the early 80s, it was a different story. Home studios were unheard of, and the few professional facilities were available only to those who could afford the eighty-odd dollars an hour they would typically charge. Which makes it remarkable that this record exists at all.
I first heard 3 Voices in 1983 and their sole self-titled album sounds as extraordinary to me now as it did then. The name might refer to the gentle humming that recurs through the deconstructed waltz of the same name, or to three instruments – the guitar, drums and bass – that move in increasingly abstract patterns around the melody.
Though there are actually more than three vocalists on the record, and a lot more than three instrumentalists, the group seems to have been an alliance between three players in particular: Rob Sinclair and Dave Bowater of the recently dissolved Schtung, and drummer Steve Garden, who after stints with Rockinghorse and Sharon O’Neill was beginning to be drawn in more experimental directions, like the ones the former Schutng-sters were exploring in compositions like these.
A number of the tracks capture a spiky, kinetic funk, slightly reminiscent of things the Gang Of Four or Talking Heads were doing around that time, though no one in those groups ever went quite as nuts on a synthesiser as somebody does in the song they call ‘Pest Control’.
But Bowater’s saxophones brought another ingredient again; one that had traces of New York avant-garde about it, and make me think of other early 80s phenomena such as James Chance’s Contortions or Lester Bowie’s Defunkt.
Though there’s an element of improvisation and jazziness about it all, the eleven tracks are actually all songs of roughly pop-length, mostly with words and sometimes even choruses – like the mis-shapen reggae of ‘Listen, Don’t Cry’.
3 Voices may touch base with several types of music that were in the popular realm at the time, but the combination was so idiosyncratic that the record sounded quite individual then and still does now. It also sounds a bit better now. Though the performances haven’t changed, the album has recently been remixed by Dave Bowater, and while I don’t have an original copy to compare it to, it seems somehow brighter and more dimensional than I remember.
3 Voices is a feast of quirky invention, underpinned by some serious musical chops. Steve Garden’s drumming, in particular, is marvellous: the rhythmic architecture on which the whole thing hangs. But the album is full of surprises, as ear-opening today as when this record was first released more than three decades ago. It’s available as a download, you can stream it, or you might even find an old vinyl copy if you look hard.
Songs featured: 3 Voices, Pest Control, No Story, Listen Don’t Cry, My Own One, Delighted Tonight.
3 Voices is available on OHO Recording.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: 3 Voices, music, music review, David Bowater
Duration: 10'03"

19:30
NZ troubadours: Tom Cunliffe & Will Wood
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews releases from globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews releases from globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood.
It sometimes feels as though all the singer-songwriters in this country might just be part of the same big band. That’s a thought that passed through my head listening to the debut of Tom Cunliffe and second album by Will Wood.
Cunliffe and Wood are part of a loose affiliation of local troubadours that seem to gather around particular hotspots, Auckland’s Wine Cellar being one. It was after a Wine Cellar show that Cunliffe’s friend and fellow singer-songwriter Wood persuaded him to go with him to Lyttelton, where he was planning to make an album at Ben Edwards’ studio, another neo-folkies’ gathering place. The result was two records - one by each of the troubadours - utilising the same producer and a few of the same players. Notably, there’s multi-instrumentalist Dave Khan, whose skill on anything with strings or keys contributes greatly to the colour.
As a songwriter, Cunliffe stays light on his feet, shifting between raucous stompers with a hint of Pogues or Waterboys, and gentler, more reflective things. It’s easy to hear the influence of Blood On The Tracks-era Dylan in the quieter tracks, but there’s also a touch of almost-Brill Building songcraft, like the Bacharach horn in the opening song, ‘Old Moon’ - or ‘Just Kids’, which reminds me of something Jimmy Webb and Glen Campbell might have come up with in their collaborative prime. But one of the best is ‘They Dug It All Way’, a ballad in the classic folk tradition; an iron-town tale with a tragic ending.
Laying down the drums on Cunliffe’s album is Wood, whose Magpie Brain and Other Stories came out of sessions around the same time.
Wood’s songs form a loose travelogue and, as one quickly discovers, the frustrated romantic encounter is universal, whether it takes place in New York or Paris.
A strong musical feature of Wood’s album is the lap steel guitar of Tom Landon-Lane. Some of that can be found on Cunliffe’s record as well, but it sweeps its way right through Magpie Brain like a Pacific island breeze.
With the exception of a rough-and-ready rollick through the old American folk song ‘John Henry’, Wood’s stories are his own and they can be disarmingly personal, from the accounts of short-lived relationships to a raw and detailed ode to his own father (‘For the Old Man’.)
Of the two troubadours, Cunliffe’s songs are the more sophisticated, while Wood’s might be the more soul-baring. Both are worth a listen.
Tom Cunliffe - Howl and Whisper & Will Wood - Magpie Brain and Other Stories are both available on Lyttelton Records.
Related stories
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Tom Cunliffe, Will Wood, music, music review, Lyttelton Records, The Sitting Room
Duration: 9'27"

19:30
Blackbirder Dread by Unity Pacific
BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific.
It’s a long time since the Caribbean rhythms of reggae embedded themselves in this country; something I was reminded of listening to the latest album by one of this music’s earliest local adopters.
Unity Pacific is an Auckland-based group led by Niuean New Zealander Tigilau Ness. Ness is the father of Che Fu, who wrote ‘Rock Away’, the album’s opening song. Father and son sing the song in duet, and as they slip between Niuean and English over the familiar beat it is as though the reggae one-drop were as indigenous to the Pacific as the pate or the haka. It is a meeting of music and messages from islands in different oceans that runs right through the album.
Tigi Ness has been fronting Unity Pacific since 2002, but his musical roots go much deeper. He already fronted a band called Unity in the 70s, long before Bob Marley’s defining visit, and even earlier - as a schoolboy in the 60s - had been a singer and acoustic guitarist. Back then, his repertoire consisted mostly of folk and country, and a bit of Elvis; ‘Four Strong Winds’ was a favourite. And I still hear traces of that folk-country flavour today in a beautiful, heartfelt love song like ‘Hold Me Close’. The way the sweet melody wraps itself in the skanking rhythm is typical of the easy fusions that run through this lovely album. Tigi Ness has a terrific band, too, who play in a kind of pre-dub style, like one of the great rhythm sections out of Kingston in the 70s.
When Tigi praises Rastafari, as he does in several songs, Bob Marley comparisons are almost inevitable. But political protest is as crucial as praise to Tigi’s world-view. There’s also a powerful song in honour of the Palestinian people (one of the few tracks here he didn’t write.)
Mostly, though, the history he honours is closer to home, and one of the most moving odes here is ‘Girl I Never Knew’, composed in memory of Joannee (Jo-Annie) Hawke, the five-year-old who died in a fire during the Bastion Point occupation of the 70s.
Then there’s the song from which the album takes its name, ‘Blackbirder Dread’. Again it casts a light on a historic struggle; in this case, the rarely-mentioned history of blackbirding - or slave-taking – that occurred in the Pacific. It’s the album’s longest track, and perhaps the one where Unity Pacific carves the deepest groove.
Unity Pacific’s Blackbirder Dread is not as innovative as the early Herbs or as experimental as Fat Freddy’s Drop, nor does it replicate the classic Marley sound as faithfully as Katchafire, yet it’s as great as any of these groups at their best. Passionate, poetic, Pacifican.
Songs featured: Girl I Never Knew, Hold Me Close, Praising Rastafari, Give The People, Rock Away, Blackbirder Dread.
Blackbirder Dread is available on A Moving Production.
Related stories
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Unity Pacific, music, music review, Tigilau Ness, Polynesian Panthers, Blackbirding, reggae, Che Fu
Duration: 9'05"

19:30
The Stillness by Pacific Heights
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the introspective electronica of Pacific Heights.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the introspective electronica of Pacific Heights.
Pacific Heights is essentially the solo project of Devin Abrams. A founder member of drum-and-bass band Shapeshifter, the Wellington musician left the group in 2014 to devote his energies to the solo offshoot he had launched twelve years earlier, just as Shapeshifter were taking off internationally. Though he found time to release one Pacific Heights album, 2008’s In A Quiet Storm, Shapeshifter’s heavy schedule has meant that it has been eight years between instalments.
But in many ways this new album is a natural continuation of the first. Even the titles suggest a connection: after all, what follows a storm? He’s called this new one The Stillness.
In the world of electronica, Shapeshifter stood out for being more than just a couple of guys with laptops. They were a fully-fledged live band, which gave them energy and an edge, both on stage and on disc. But as a solo project Pacific Heights was always more introspective, and that quality pervades this latest set.
There are instrumental passages where Abrams drifts towards ambient-new age territory. At other times he steps to the mic and nebulous atmospheres solidify into songs, though his fragile-sounding voice is almost just another of the delicately overlaid textures.
But Pacific Heights is no longer entirely a one-man-band. And what gives The Stillness much of its shape and form are cameo performances by a number of vocalists, all more distinctive than Abrams. Most recognisable of them is Wellington soul-on-sleeve singer Louis Baker who features on the weighty ‘Buried By the Burden’.
The Stillness introduces some lesser-known talents as well, in particular Wellington’s Deanne Kreig - a lovely, airy singer who fronts three of the tracks, of which the appropriately-titled ‘Airborne’ is a standout.
The Stillness is a refined piece of work by an electronic artist who has been honing his craft for a long time. The production is as shiny as a circuit-board, and even the voices become, at times, digital instruments. But if this is computer music, there’s a human heart that beats through it, not far below its digital surface.
Songs featured: Hana, Ibanaka, Field Of Shadows, Buried By the Burden, Airborne, Zoos.
The Stillness is available on Warner Music.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Pacific Heights, Devin Abrams, Shapeshifter, music, music review
Duration: 7'18"

7:30 The Sampler
Nick Bollinger wraps up New Zealand Music Month with a handful of local releases, including the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific, introspective electronica of Pacific Heights, globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood, and the reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from Three Voices
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Kai-A-Miro
Te Puea Marae in Mangere has stepped and opened its doors to people unable to find any other housing. Shannon Haunui-Thompson from Radio New Zealand's Te Manu Korihi team updates us on their efforts and the scale of the problem.
[gallery:2084]
8:30 Window on the World
Shea Gold - Journalist and BBC Focus on Africa presenter Akwasi Sarpong heads to Ghana to hear the stories of rural women at the bottom of the pyramid of a multi-million dollar confectionery, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry relying on shea butter from Africa. The United Nations Development Programme estimates that an average of three million women work directly, or indirectly, with shea butter. Exports account for 90 million to 200 million dollars a year. Shea butter has become a preferred commodity for makers of skin products because of its natural healing properties and by confectioners as a cocoa butter substitute. But while we slap on body creams, bathe with soaps and enjoy sweets with shea butter extracts, how many of us know where the butter comes from and what life is like for the women who make it for income to support their families?
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Gene Genie #4 This week's focus is on Genetics and Disease.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Global Village features music from African women from across the continent - including Nigeria's The Lijadu Sisters, Western Sahara's Aziza Brahim, Mauritania's noura mint seymali, Les Amazones de Guinee, and "Mama Africa" herself - South Africa's Miriam Makeba.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 31 May
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger wraps up New Zealand Music Month with a handful of local releases, including the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific, introspective electronica of Pacific Heights, globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood, and the reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger wraps up New Zealand Music Month with a handful of local releases, including the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific, introspective electronica of Pacific Heights, globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood, and the reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Unity Pacific, Tom Cunliffe, Will Wood, 3 Voices, Pacific Heights
Duration: 30'00"

19:30
3 Voices by 3 Voices
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a reissue of a lost jazz-punk classic from 3 Voices.
These days, local releases are so thick on the ground it is practically impossible to keep track of them all. Back in the early 80s, it was a different story. Home studios were unheard of, and the few professional facilities were available only to those who could afford the eighty-odd dollars an hour they would typically charge. Which makes it remarkable that this record exists at all.
I first heard 3 Voices in 1983 and their sole self-titled album sounds as extraordinary to me now as it did then. The name might refer to the gentle humming that recurs through the deconstructed waltz of the same name, or to three instruments – the guitar, drums and bass – that move in increasingly abstract patterns around the melody.
Though there are actually more than three vocalists on the record, and a lot more than three instrumentalists, the group seems to have been an alliance between three players in particular: Rob Sinclair and Dave Bowater of the recently dissolved Schtung, and drummer Steve Garden, who after stints with Rockinghorse and Sharon O’Neill was beginning to be drawn in more experimental directions, like the ones the former Schutng-sters were exploring in compositions like these.
A number of the tracks capture a spiky, kinetic funk, slightly reminiscent of things the Gang Of Four or Talking Heads were doing around that time, though no one in those groups ever went quite as nuts on a synthesiser as somebody does in the song they call ‘Pest Control’.
But Bowater’s saxophones brought another ingredient again; one that had traces of New York avant-garde about it, and make me think of other early 80s phenomena such as James Chance’s Contortions or Lester Bowie’s Defunkt.
Though there’s an element of improvisation and jazziness about it all, the eleven tracks are actually all songs of roughly pop-length, mostly with words and sometimes even choruses – like the mis-shapen reggae of ‘Listen, Don’t Cry’.
3 Voices may touch base with several types of music that were in the popular realm at the time, but the combination was so idiosyncratic that the record sounded quite individual then and still does now. It also sounds a bit better now. Though the performances haven’t changed, the album has recently been remixed by Dave Bowater, and while I don’t have an original copy to compare it to, it seems somehow brighter and more dimensional than I remember.
3 Voices is a feast of quirky invention, underpinned by some serious musical chops. Steve Garden’s drumming, in particular, is marvellous: the rhythmic architecture on which the whole thing hangs. But the album is full of surprises, as ear-opening today as when this record was first released more than three decades ago. It’s available as a download, you can stream it, or you might even find an old vinyl copy if you look hard.
Songs featured: 3 Voices, Pest Control, No Story, Listen Don’t Cry, My Own One, Delighted Tonight.
3 Voices is available on OHO Recording.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: 3 Voices, music, music review, David Bowater
Duration: 10'03"

19:30
NZ troubadours: Tom Cunliffe & Will Wood
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews releases from globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews releases from globe-trotting troubadours Tom Cunliffe and Will Wood.
It sometimes feels as though all the singer-songwriters in this country might just be part of the same big band. That’s a thought that passed through my head listening to the debut of Tom Cunliffe and second album by Will Wood.
Cunliffe and Wood are part of a loose affiliation of local troubadours that seem to gather around particular hotspots, Auckland’s Wine Cellar being one. It was after a Wine Cellar show that Cunliffe’s friend and fellow singer-songwriter Wood persuaded him to go with him to Lyttelton, where he was planning to make an album at Ben Edwards’ studio, another neo-folkies’ gathering place. The result was two records - one by each of the troubadours - utilising the same producer and a few of the same players. Notably, there’s multi-instrumentalist Dave Khan, whose skill on anything with strings or keys contributes greatly to the colour.
As a songwriter, Cunliffe stays light on his feet, shifting between raucous stompers with a hint of Pogues or Waterboys, and gentler, more reflective things. It’s easy to hear the influence of Blood On The Tracks-era Dylan in the quieter tracks, but there’s also a touch of almost-Brill Building songcraft, like the Bacharach horn in the opening song, ‘Old Moon’ - or ‘Just Kids’, which reminds me of something Jimmy Webb and Glen Campbell might have come up with in their collaborative prime. But one of the best is ‘They Dug It All Way’, a ballad in the classic folk tradition; an iron-town tale with a tragic ending.
Laying down the drums on Cunliffe’s album is Wood, whose Magpie Brain and Other Stories came out of sessions around the same time.
Wood’s songs form a loose travelogue and, as one quickly discovers, the frustrated romantic encounter is universal, whether it takes place in New York or Paris.
A strong musical feature of Wood’s album is the lap steel guitar of Tom Landon-Lane. Some of that can be found on Cunliffe’s record as well, but it sweeps its way right through Magpie Brain like a Pacific island breeze.
With the exception of a rough-and-ready rollick through the old American folk song ‘John Henry’, Wood’s stories are his own and they can be disarmingly personal, from the accounts of short-lived relationships to a raw and detailed ode to his own father (‘For the Old Man’.)
Of the two troubadours, Cunliffe’s songs are the more sophisticated, while Wood’s might be the more soul-baring. Both are worth a listen.
Tom Cunliffe - Howl and Whisper & Will Wood - Magpie Brain and Other Stories are both available on Lyttelton Records.
Related stories
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Tom Cunliffe, Will Wood, music, music review, Lyttelton Records, The Sitting Room
Duration: 9'27"

19:30
Blackbirder Dread by Unity Pacific
BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the Polynesian reggae of Unity Pacific.
It’s a long time since the Caribbean rhythms of reggae embedded themselves in this country; something I was reminded of listening to the latest album by one of this music’s earliest local adopters.
Unity Pacific is an Auckland-based group led by Niuean New Zealander Tigilau Ness. Ness is the father of Che Fu, who wrote ‘Rock Away’, the album’s opening song. Father and son sing the song in duet, and as they slip between Niuean and English over the familiar beat it is as though the reggae one-drop were as indigenous to the Pacific as the pate or the haka. It is a meeting of music and messages from islands in different oceans that runs right through the album.
Tigi Ness has been fronting Unity Pacific since 2002, but his musical roots go much deeper. He already fronted a band called Unity in the 70s, long before Bob Marley’s defining visit, and even earlier - as a schoolboy in the 60s - had been a singer and acoustic guitarist. Back then, his repertoire consisted mostly of folk and country, and a bit of Elvis; ‘Four Strong Winds’ was a favourite. And I still hear traces of that folk-country flavour today in a beautiful, heartfelt love song like ‘Hold Me Close’. The way the sweet melody wraps itself in the skanking rhythm is typical of the easy fusions that run through this lovely album. Tigi Ness has a terrific band, too, who play in a kind of pre-dub style, like one of the great rhythm sections out of Kingston in the 70s.
When Tigi praises Rastafari, as he does in several songs, Bob Marley comparisons are almost inevitable. But political protest is as crucial as praise to Tigi’s world-view. There’s also a powerful song in honour of the Palestinian people (one of the few tracks here he didn’t write.)
Mostly, though, the history he honours is closer to home, and one of the most moving odes here is ‘Girl I Never Knew’, composed in memory of Joannee (Jo-Annie) Hawke, the five-year-old who died in a fire during the Bastion Point occupation of the 70s.
Then there’s the song from which the album takes its name, ‘Blackbirder Dread’. Again it casts a light on a historic struggle; in this case, the rarely-mentioned history of blackbirding - or slave-taking – that occurred in the Pacific. It’s the album’s longest track, and perhaps the one where Unity Pacific carves the deepest groove.
Unity Pacific’s Blackbirder Dread is not as innovative as the early Herbs or as experimental as Fat Freddy’s Drop, nor does it replicate the classic Marley sound as faithfully as Katchafire, yet it’s as great as any of these groups at their best. Passionate, poetic, Pacifican.
Songs featured: Girl I Never Knew, Hold Me Close, Praising Rastafari, Give The People, Rock Away, Blackbirder Dread.
Blackbirder Dread is available on A Moving Production.
Related stories
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Unity Pacific, music, music review, Tigilau Ness, Polynesian Panthers, Blackbirding, reggae, Che Fu
Duration: 9'05"

19:30
The Stillness by Pacific Heights
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the introspective electronica of Pacific Heights.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the introspective electronica of Pacific Heights.
Pacific Heights is essentially the solo project of Devin Abrams. A founder member of drum-and-bass band Shapeshifter, the Wellington musician left the group in 2014 to devote his energies to the solo offshoot he had launched twelve years earlier, just as Shapeshifter were taking off internationally. Though he found time to release one Pacific Heights album, 2008’s In A Quiet Storm, Shapeshifter’s heavy schedule has meant that it has been eight years between instalments.
But in many ways this new album is a natural continuation of the first. Even the titles suggest a connection: after all, what follows a storm? He’s called this new one The Stillness.
In the world of electronica, Shapeshifter stood out for being more than just a couple of guys with laptops. They were a fully-fledged live band, which gave them energy and an edge, both on stage and on disc. But as a solo project Pacific Heights was always more introspective, and that quality pervades this latest set.
There are instrumental passages where Abrams drifts towards ambient-new age territory. At other times he steps to the mic and nebulous atmospheres solidify into songs, though his fragile-sounding voice is almost just another of the delicately overlaid textures.
But Pacific Heights is no longer entirely a one-man-band. And what gives The Stillness much of its shape and form are cameo performances by a number of vocalists, all more distinctive than Abrams. Most recognisable of them is Wellington soul-on-sleeve singer Louis Baker who features on the weighty ‘Buried By the Burden’.
The Stillness introduces some lesser-known talents as well, in particular Wellington’s Deanne Kreig - a lovely, airy singer who fronts three of the tracks, of which the appropriately-titled ‘Airborne’ is a standout.
The Stillness is a refined piece of work by an electronic artist who has been honing his craft for a long time. The production is as shiny as a circuit-board, and even the voices become, at times, digital instruments. But if this is computer music, there’s a human heart that beats through it, not far below its digital surface.
Songs featured: Hana, Ibanaka, Field Of Shadows, Buried By the Burden, Airborne, Zoos.
The Stillness is available on Warner Music.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Pacific Heights, Devin Abrams, Shapeshifter, music, music review
Duration: 7'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Gene Genie - Genetics and Disease: In this discussion on the implications of genetic research, Dr Adam Rutherford discusses the genetics underlying disease with Professor Vicky Cameron, Professor Nigel French and Professor Parry Guilford. (4 of 5, RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (11 of 12, KMUW)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288234

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 31 May 2016

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