RNZ National. 2016-06-21. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

21 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 Hidden Treasures (RNZ) 3:05 Paradise Cove by William Brandt (2 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 21 June 2016
BODY:
Little says Key has not made case for longer Iraq deployment;Brownlee details reasons for new Iraq commitment;Partial transcript of Orlando shooter released by FBI;Trump fires campaign manager as talk of dumping him gathers pace;Maori leaders unhappy with US website selling historic Maori portraits;Tiny Maori school goes international and thrives;Thousands of prison strip searches find virtually nothing;Indian students facing deportation for visa fraud.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 37'18"

06:15
UK leaving EU would end immigration checkpoints
BODY:
The decision whether or not Britain should leave the EU is still neck and neck.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Brexit
Duration: 5'26"

06:21
Early business news
BODY:
Exporters in ASB's latest Kiwi Dollar Barometer think it will get to about 65 US cents in a year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'39"

06:27
Morning Rural News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'32"

06:35
Prime Minister happy to take the flak for Iraq extension
BODY:
The Prime Minister says he's happy to take flak for a decision to extend New Zealand's military involvement in Iraq for another 18 months.
Topics: defence force, politics
Regions:
Tags: NZ military involvement, Iraq
Duration: 3'16"

06:43
Thousands of strip searches but virtually no weapons or drugs
BODY:
Prison guards are conducting thousands of strip searches of inmates but finding virtually no weapons or drugs.
Topics: crime, law, life and society
Regions:
Tags: strip searches, prison inmates
Duration: 3'01"

06:49
Exporters expect kiwi to drop to 65 cents in a year
BODY:
The currency is expected to dip to somewhere around 65 cents against its US counterpart.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'14"

06:51
Low rates may prove blessing and curse for consumers
BODY:
The latest look at consumer sentiment has shown confidence feeling the impact of not just weak dairy prices but also betraying a few nerves about housing affordability and rising debt levels.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'28"

06:55
Manufacturers urged to import what they need to meet demand
BODY:
There's a warning that the economy could be on the cusp of experiencing capacity constraints if the manufacturing and services sectors continue to expand at a strong pace.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'42"

06:58
Australian business news with Jim Parker
BODY:
Across the Tasman, and the Reserve Bank of Australia continues to worry about China's economic fortunes, or more to the point, China's fading economic fortunes.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 54"

06:59
Morning markets
BODY:
A look at the morning markets.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'26"

07:06
Sports News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
The latest sports news from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

07:14
Little says Key has not made case for longer Iraq deployment
BODY:
The Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says he expects Islamic State will step up attacks like the suicide bombing yesterday at the gates of Camp Taji where New Zealand troops are stationed.
Topics: politics, defence force
Regions:
Tags: NZ troops in Iraq
Duration: 6'18"

07:18
Partial transcript of Orlando shooter released by FBI
BODY:
A partial transcript of the calls between police negotiators and Omar Mateen during the three-hour siege in Orlando has been released by the FBI.
Topics: crime, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Orlando massacre
Duration: 5'04"

07:23
Trump fires campaign manager
BODY:
Donald Trump has fired his controversial campaign manager Corey Lewandowski.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US elections
Duration: 3'28"

07:27
Brownlee details reasons for new Iraq commitment
BODY:
Back to the Government's decision to extend the deployment of New Zealand troops to Iraq.
Topics: defence force, politics
Regions:
Tags: NZ troops in Iraq
Duration: 8'10"

07:35
Maori leaders unhappy with US website
BODY:
An American online store is being condemned for selling Gottfried Lindauer portraits of Maori as shower curtains.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society, technology
Regions:
Tags: US websites, Gottfried Lindauer, shower curtains
Duration: 2'45"

07:38
Thousands of prison strip searches find virtually nothing
BODY:
Prison guards are conducting thousands of strip searches on the grounds they have 'reasonable cause' to suspect inmates are hiding drugs or weapons - but are finding virtually nothing.
Topics: crime, law, life and society
Regions:
Tags: strip searches, prison inmates
Duration: 3'48"

07:45
Indian students facing deportation for visa fraud
BODY:
Immigration officials have been finding hundreds of cases of fraud in student visa applications from India and now they're catching up with people who slipped through the net and got to New Zealand.
Topics: crime, education
Regions:
Tags: fraudulent student visa applications, deportations
Duration: 3'08"

07:50
McClay picks trade trouble for NZ in post-Brexit Britain
BODY:
Britons go to the polls on Thursday to decide whether to stick with the European Union or go their own way.
Topics: politics, economy, business
Regions:
Tags: EU polls, Brexit, Bremain
Duration: 5'21"

07:56
Tiny Maori school goes international and thrives
BODY:
A tiny Northland school that was teetering on the brink of closure is now so popular it has an enrolment scheme.
Topics: rural, education
Regions: Northland
Tags: Te Tii Primary School, International Baccalaureate Programme
Duration: 4'00"

08:06
Sports News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'26"

08:10
Analysts say risk comes with expanded role for NZ troops
BODY:
The Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says he stands by the government decision to extend New Zealand's troop deployment in Iraq.
Topics: defence force, politics
Regions:
Tags: NZ troops in Iraq
Duration: 2'59"

08:15
Council admits it made South Dunedin floods 20cm worse
BODY:
The Dunedin city council has admitted it made last year's South Dunedin flood 20 centimetres worse.
Topics: weather, environment, politics, life and society
Regions: Otago
Tags: South Dunedin flood, Dunedin City Council
Duration: 3'37"

08:17
Scientists defend data over anecdotes
BODY:
Scientists say they're alarmed the Prime Minister is more willing to believe stories he's been told than research based on analysis of figures.
Topics: science, politics, law
Regions:
Tags: employment law, reports, employment
Duration: 3'28"

08:22
Children dying from malnutrition due to Cyclone Pam
BODY:
Children are dying because of malnutrition in parts of Vanuatu more than a year after Cyclone Pam devastated crops and livelihoods across the pacific island chain.
Topics: environment, weather, health, international aid and development, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Cyclone Pam, malnutrition, deaths
Duration: 3'36"

08:25
Record breaking temperatures expected for Winter Solstice
BODY:
Today is the shortest day of the year, and Niwa is expecting it to be marked by record breaking temperatures.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags: Winter Solstice, shortest day
Duration: 4'02"

08:29
Markets Update for 21 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 57"

08:35
UNHCR shows refugee numbers at their highest ever levels
BODY:
The United Nation's refugee agency says the number of people displaced by conflict is at its highest ever level.
Topics: conflict, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Unhcr, refugees, asylum seekers
Duration: 3'21"

08:42
Barbaric conditions for those detained on Nauru, Manus
BODY:
A psychologist says the Australian government is deliberately inflicting the worst trauma he has ever seen on asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island.
Topics: conflict, refugees and migrants, identity, inequality, health, crime
Regions:
Tags: Manus Island, Australia, Nauru, asylum seekers, detention centres
Duration: 5'31"

08:45
Supervision order failed to stop sex offender
BODY:
A repeat sex offender who preyed on mentally disabled men was able to offend again - despite being directly monitored by authorities under a court-ordered Extended Supervision order.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: sex offenders
Duration: 2'38"

08:47
Prison programme gets Arohata inmates off drugs
BODY:
Six prisoners hoping to stay off drugs outside of prison have just graduated from Arohata Prisons drug treatment unit in Wellington.
Topics: education, health, life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Arohata Prison, drug treatment units, rehabilitation
Duration: 3'18"

08:58
Athletic history goes under the hammer
BODY:
The black singlet Sir Peter Snell wore during his gold medal runs at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics goes under the hammer this morning.
Topics: sport, history
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Cordy's Auctions, black singlets
Duration: 3'51"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Small Windows on Big Stories. The first in a special series of stories marking World Refugee Day.

=AUDIO=

09:10
Fishing & hunting guides say cowboy foreigners costing them
BODY:
The organisations representing fishing and hunting guides say they're missing out on business due to unregulated foreign guiding operations. They're pushing for a licensing system for official guides which would only be available to New Zealand citizens or residents. The Chairman of the New Zealand Game Animal Council is Don Hammond and Kevin Payne is President of the New Zealand Professional Fishing Guides Association.
Topics: sport, environment, economy, business
Regions:
Tags: hunting and fishing guides, licensing systems
Duration: 19'33"

09:25
Genetic study finds underlying cause of migraines
BODY:
A huge genetic study of migraine sufferers has revealed dozens of new genes associated with the debilitating condition and could open up new opportunities for treatment.
EXTENDED BODY:
A huge genetic study of migraine sufferers has revealed dozens of new genes associated with the debilitating condition and could open up new opportunities for treatment.
It's estimated about one in five people suffer from migraines which can come in a bewildering variety of forms and severities.
A long-running argument among clinicians is whether the disease is primarily caused by problems in the brain, or whether it also involves misfunctioning circulatory systems.
That question appears to have been answered by a study of 60,000 migraine patients which found 38 areas of DNA associated with migraines, 28 of which had never been identified before.
The location of those genes suggest the vascular problems in migraine sufferers occur independently of the neurological problems.
One of the authors of the study is Associate Professor Dale Nyholt from Queensland University of Technology.
He talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: migraines, headaches, genetic research
Duration: 9'54"

09:35
Smart manufacturing, the 4th revolution will be digitised
BODY:
Described as the fourth industrial revolution, 'Industry 4.0' is the fusion of the digital world and the world of industry, championed by the German government as the future of manufacturing. But what does it mean for New Zealand manufacturers and how should they be preparing for a new way of working? Dr Frank Wagner from the Queensland University of Technology, is looking at specific sector opportunities for manufacturing SME's in Australia and New Zealand.
Topics: technology, business
Regions:
Tags: manufacturing, smart manufacturing, smart technology
Duration: 8'42"

09:50
US correspondent Susan Milligan
BODY:
US correspondent Susan Milligan discusses US politics and gun laws.
Topics: media, politics
Regions:
Tags: US elections, US gun laws
Duration: 12'14"

10:10
Yassmin Abdel-Magied: breaking stereotypes about Muslim women
BODY:
Yassmin Abdel-Magied is a young Australian Muslim woman who loves breaking stereotypes. The 25 year old is a mechanical engineer who works on an oil rig. She trained as a boxer for five years, is a self-confessed petrol head who designed a race car. At age 16, Yassmin founded an organisation called Youth Without Borders, which aims to empower young people to work together for positive change within their communities.
EXTENDED BODY:
25 year old Australian woman Yassmin Abdel-Magied is breaking stereotypes every which way.
She is a mechanial engineer who works on an oil rig and a self-confessed petrolhead, she designed a race car and trained as a boxer for five years. Yassmin is also a Muslim on a mission to promote diversity.
At 16 Yassmin founded Youth Without Borders - an organisation that aims to empower young people to work together for positive change within their communities. Last year she published a memoir and was named Queensland Young Australian of the Year.
Interview highlights
Yassmin Abdel-Magied: I like to think of my life as a bit of a movie sometimes. So when the really tough times happen, I’m like ‘Righto, every movie, every story, needs to have some really difficult moments because nobody wants to hear that your life went perfectly if you’re going to tell a good story’.
I don’t necessarily go out wanting to do things because they break stereotypes. I do what I want and they just happen to break the stereotypes that people have.
For my parents as long as I followed the rules of faith – which were generally the rules of any faith, be a good person – everything else was negotiable.
I’m not going to pretend there weren’t moments were I thought ‘Nobody else here is doing this. Should I continue?’ We take in all the signals around us and all the expectations from our parents, our schools, television and other media about what we should and shouldn’t be doing and what is right and not right. Particularly around gender – this is what young boys do and this is what young girls do, and this is the behaviour that’s accepted and rewarded and this is the behaviour that you will be punished or ostracised for.
If you can imagine every day of your life that you remember – as a young person in particular – an image of who you are is being built, when all of a sudden you are demonised. You are demonised for a faith that gives you direction and purpose. For me what happened during 9/11 was I went from being a kid who wore funny clothing to the face of all that is evil.
What do you expect people to do if you say to them ‘You don’t belong here’? They will look for somewhere to belong to. They will look for somewhere to pin their identity. And there are people out there who are saying ‘Come join us, you’ll be welcome here’. And that is dangerous. It’s dangerous because you’re feeding into the very thing that you’re trying to fight.
This is probably one of my favourite stories: I had met this bloke on the rig, he was reading a motorcycle magazine and we started chatting about Ducatis. I chatted to him for a couple of weeks. I dind’t really talk about Islam that much, but a friend of mine messaged me on Facebook a few months later and said ‘Do you know so-and-so?’ I was like ‘Yes, how do you know him?’ She was like ‘His sister came up to me today and was talking about how this guy met some Muslim chick on a rig and went from being some racist redneck to someone who defends Muslim people all the time – and I don’t know what she did to him'. My friend was like ‘That sounds like Yassmin’.
Human connection can really erode so many of the stereotypes and so many of the lenses in which we see the world.
You might think ‘That’s too big. How am I going to change what people think?’ But ultimately at the individual level we all have the capacity to influence those around us.
Topics: spiritual practices, books, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Youth Without Borders, Yassmin's Story, Muslims, Queensland Young Australian of the Year
Duration: 30'39"

10:40
Book Review - End of Watch
BODY:
End of Watch by Stephen King, published by Hachette NZ, and reviewed by Quentin Johnson.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Stephen King, End of Watch
Duration: 4'12"

11:05
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Business commentator Rod Oram discusses the 90 day employment trial.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'00"

11:30
Mothers' Darlings
BODY:
Some two million American servicemen spent time on Pacific Islands between 1942 - 1945/1946 - and it's estimated that about two thousand babies were born as a result of relationships with local women.
EXTENDED BODY:
Some two million American servicemen spent time on Pacific Islands between 1942 - 1945/1946 - and it's estimated that about 2000 babies were born as a result of relationships with local women.
The US military prevented marriage in some the cases by applying US immigration law, preventing marriage "across the colour line".
Otago University history professor Judith Bennett is one of the authors of a new book which explores the stories of the children who were left behind, and journeys to discovering their full identities.
Mother's Darlings also features the story of Arthur Beren - who was born in the Cook Islands - to a US serviceman.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: US servicemen in the Pacific
Duration: 20'20"

11:45
Media commentator - Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Native advertising, or sponsored content in media speak, is creeping further up websites and news apps.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: advertising
Duration: 13'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Fishing & hunting guides say cowboy foreigners costing them
[image:66309:half] no metadata
The organisations representing fishing and hunting guides say they're missing out on business due to unregulated foreign guiding operations.They're pushing for a licensing system for official guides which would only be available to New Zealand citizens or residents. Chairman of the New Zealand Game Animal Council Don Hammond and Kevin Payne, President New Zealand Professional Fishing Guides Association
09:20 Genetic study finds underlying cause of migraines
A huge genetic study of migraine sufferers has revealed dozens of new genes associated with the debilitating condition and could open up new opportunities for treatment. Kathryn Ryan speaks with one of the authors Associate Professor Dale Nyholt from Queensland University of Technology.
09:30 Smart manufacturing, the 4th revolution will be digitised
Described as the fourth industrial revolution, 'Industry 4.0' is the fusion of the digital world and the world of industry, championed by the German government as the future of manufacturing. But what does it mean for New Zealand manufacturers and how should they be preparing for a new way of working? Dr Frank Wagner from the Queensland University of Technology, is looking at specific sector opportunities for manufacturing SME's in Australia and New Zealand.
09:45 US correspondent Susan Milligan
10:05 Yassmin Abdel-Magied: breaking stereotypes about Muslim women
[image:71767:half] no metadata
Yassmin Abdel-Magied is a young Australian Muslim woman who loves breaking stereotypes. The 25 year old is a mechanical engineer who works on an oil rig. She trained as a boxer for five years, is a self confessed petrol head, who designed a race car. Age 16, Yassmin founded an organisation called Youth Without Borders, which aims to empower young people to work together for positive change within their communities. It now operates in three states in Australia. Last year she published a memoir, and was named Queensland Young Australian of the Year. Yassmin talks to Kathryn about her mission to promote diversity throughout society.
10:35 Book review - End of Watch by Stephen King
reviewed by Quentin Johnson, published by Hachette NZ
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
11:30 Mothers' Darlings - the children of WW2 US servicemen in the Pacific
Some two million American servicemen spent time on Pacific Islands between 1942 - 1945/1946 - and it's estimated that about two thousand babies were born as a result of relationships with local women. The US military prevented marriage in some the cases by applying US immigration law, preventing marriage 'across the colour line'. Otago University history professor Judith Bennett is one of the authors of a new book which explores the stories of the children who were left behind, and journeys to discovering their full identities. Mothers Darlings also features the story of Arthur Beren - who was born in the Cook Islands - to a US serviceman.
[gallery:2142]
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Native advertising, or sponsored content in media speak, is creeping further up websites and news apps. It may feature on the opening screen, which is the equivalent of putting paid content on the front page and two major reports (from the Pew Research Centre in the United States and the Reuters Institute on the United Kingdom) confirm that social media is now the dominant way news is consumed but neither report has the answer to a fundamental question: how do the producers of that news - traditional news media - share in the financial rewards.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Breaks Co-op
Song: Home
Composer: Lovegrove/Clarke
Album: Sounds Familiar
Label: Warner
Played at: 10.42

Artist: Tiny Ruins
Song: Tread Softly
Composer: Fullbrook
Album: Hurtling Through EP
Label: Flying Nunn
Played at: 11.21

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
A teachers union is alarmed by plans to change the way teachers' salaries are funded and a man is about to appear in a US court for a planned attack on Donald Trump.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'39"

12:17
Tegel full-year financial result ahead of forecast
BODY:
The poultry producer, Tegel, has delivered a full-year financial result ahead of forecast, reflecting strong local sales and record export earnings.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tegel
Duration: 1'46"

12:19
Vital announces capital raising
BODY:
The property investor and developer, Vital Healthcare Property Trust, plans to raise about 160 million dollars of new capital to help pay down debt after acquisitions.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Vital Healthcare Property
Duration: 1'32"

12:21
New evidence in financial advisor test case
BODY:
To our correspondent in Sydney, Jim Parker. He says a test case against financial advisors is turning a spotlight on the industry.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 1'04"

12:23
Midday Markets for 21 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Brad Gordon at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'32"

12:26
Business briefs
BODY:
Health software company Orion Health has made another sale in the United States.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 45"

12:27
Midday Sports News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
The England rugby coach Eddie Jones believes they're on track to challenge the All Blacks long time dominance of the game.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 21 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:14
'Holy Grail' of Breast Cancer Prevention
BODY:
It's been described as the 'holy grail' of breast cancer prevention. A New Zealander has teamed up with Australian researchers, and they have announced today, the discovery that an existing medication could have promise in preventing breast cancer. Emma Nolan is a Kiwi working with the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne.
EXTENDED BODY:
It's been described as the 'holy grail' of breast cancer prevention.
Australian and New Zealand researchers have discovered that an existing medication could have promise in preventing breast cancer in women carrying a faulty BRCA1 gene.
People who have that gene are at high risk of developing aggressive breast cancer. Currently many in that situation choose surgical removal of their breast tissue and ovaries to reduce their chance of developing breast and ovarian cancer.
Researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, including New Zealander Emma Nolan, say the drug denosumab might have potential to prevent breast cancer from developing.
If confirmed in clinical studies, this would provide a non-surgical option to prevent breast cancer in women with elevated genetic risk.
Emma Nolan tells Jon Bridges about the breakthrough and its significance.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: health, breast cancer
Duration: 7'14"

13:23
Could parasitic worms be good for us?
BODY:
The idea of having parasitic worms is pretty disgusting. But scientists are increasingly realising that some of these worms do us more good than harm. Some have gone so far as to introduce certain parasites into people's systems. Immunologist Joel Weinstock of Tufts University in Boston says the medical profession has spent years trying to work out what was causing people to suffer from inflammatory bowel disease like Crohns. He wondered if the issue was in fact caused by the lack of something in the gut, in particular certain parasites no longer found in western countries, where such immune condtions and allergies are far more common.
EXTENDED BODY:
The idea of having parasitic worms is pretty disgusting. But scientists are increasingly realising that some of these worms do us more good than harm.
Some have gone so far as to introduce certain parasites into people's systems.
Immunologist Joel Weinstock of Tufts University in Boston says the medical profession has spent years trying to work out what was causing people to suffer from inflammatory bowel disease like Crohns.
He wondered if the issue was in fact caused by the lack of something in the gut, in particular certain parasites no longer found in western countries, where such immune conditions and allergies are far more common.
He talks to Jesse Mulligan.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: health, parasites, worms
Duration: 9'53"

13:31
NZ International Film Festival
BODY:
The New Zealand International Film Festival programme launched last night, and RNZ's film guru Dan Slevin has had a sneak peak of what is on offer this year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: International Film Festival
Duration: 9'54"

13:43
Favourite album
BODY:
'She's So Unusual' by Cyndi Lauper, chosen by Lyndee-Jane Rutherford.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'10"

14:07
Book Review with Vanda Symon
BODY:
Dunedin based cime fiction writer Vanda Symon is dragging her self away from her studies to tell us about an as yet unreleased novel.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'55"

14:16
The Great New Zealand Album
BODY:
Today's Great New Zealand Album is 'Hello Sailor' by Hello Sailor - the classic debut from one for our most successful and ground-breaking bands. Their 1977 release chartered new territory in Kiwi Music and, coupled with a unique promotional concept, helped to make Hello Sailor and it's individual members household names in this country. An attempt to crack the American Market came oh so close, but paved the way for many Kiwi acts to follow. It is unfortunate and most regrettable that we have, now, a limited number of Hello Sailor band members to talk to with following the untimely deaths of both Dave McArtney in April 2013 and Graham Brazier less than 18 months later. But, joining us in the studio today is fellow founding member Harry Lyon.
EXTENDED BODY:
Today's Great New Zealand Album is the classic debut from one for our most successful and ground-breaking bands. Their 1977 release chartered new territory in Kiwi Music and, coupled with a unique promotional concept, helped to make Hello Sailor and it's individual members household names in this country. An attempt to crack the American Market came oh so close, but paved the way for many Kiwi acts to follow.
It is unfortunate and most regrettable that we have, now, a limited number of Hello Sailor band members to talk to with following the untimely deaths of both Dave McArtney in April 2013 and Graham Brazier less than 18 months later.
founding member Harry Lyon talks to Jon Bridges about making that album.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Hello Sailor
Duration: 44'03"

15:10
The Life and Music of James Taylor
BODY:
Singer-songwriter James Taylor turned his own battles with depression and insecurity into the soundtrack to the 1970's. Music historian Mark Ribowsky traces his rise from heroin addict to superstar in the new book, Sweet Dreams and Flying Machines: The Life and Music of James Taylor.
EXTENDED BODY:
Singer-songwriter James Taylor turned his own battles with depression and insecurity into the soundtrack to the 1970's..
Music historian, Mark Ribowsky traces his rise from heroin addict to superstar in the new book, Sweet Dreams and Flying Machines: The Life and Music of James Taylor.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: James Taylor
Duration: 23'44"

15:42
The Panel pre-show for 21 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'53"

21:34
Synchrotron science: from cancer drugs to sheep skin leather
BODY:
Veronika Meduna meets Kiwi scientist Tom Caradoc-Davies to find out how he uses the Australian synchrotron to work out the 3D structure of proteins to make cancer drugs more specific.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Australian Synchrotron, the largest particle accelerator in the Southern Hemisphere, is helping scientists from all corners of the world, including more than 350 New Zealand researchers, to study everything from food technology to arts forgery, from brain function to fundamental physics, from climate change to cancer research.
From the outside, the synchrotron, in Melbourne's southeast, looks like a giant cake tin. Inside, however, is a giant electron microscope that produces a powerful beam of light a million times brighter than the sun.
The process begins with an electron gun. It shoots bunches of electrons at just under 99% of the speed of light into a huge ring, where they are sped up by strong magnets.
This produces a consistent, tightly focused beam of light that is deflected and harnessed towards tangents that run off the main ring. These end points, or beam lines, are where scientists probe their samples.
Kiwi scientist Tom Caradoc-Davies is using one such end point that produces X-rays to decipher the 3D structure of proteins in a quest to improve the efficacy of cancer drugs. He left New Zealand a decade ago to work at the synchrotron.
“My job is like being a scientific midwife. We have all these projects that are pregnant with promise. It takes years or decades for people to understand the cell biology to get proteins to grow crystals, and then they come to us to look at the structure … and it’s a very exciting step in the process, we’re the last stop before you get the Eureka moment.”
Proteins are the molecular machines of life, essential in all physiological processes, including disease. But they are tiny, smaller than the wavelengths of visible light, and can’t be investigated under a microscope.
Dr Caradoc-Davies uses the synchrotron’s X-ray beam to analyse the precise structure of protein crystals. In a recent example, his team’s focus was on a protein known as BCL-2, which is present in many cancers. Thousands of cells become cancerous, but their out-of-control growth usually triggers a process known as apoptosis, or programed cell death. It is only if this process is broken that a cancerous cell can continue to proliferate and grow into a tumour.
BCL-2 plays an important role in cells where this programmed cell suicide no longer works, and medical researchers have developed a drug that targets this protein. But Dr Caradoc-Davies says the drug also interacts with a very similar protein, which leads to dangerous side effects and meant that it couldn’t be used. It was only once the team determined the precise 3D structure of both proteins that a new drug could be developed, which has since undergone clinical trials on patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
Synchrotron science
More than 350 New Zealand scientists are using the Australian synchrotron, and the New Zealand government, alongside the New Zealand research sector, has allocated AU$4.5 million to support the facility and to secure preferential access for Kiwi scientists. They work on many research projects, including the following examples:
Truly biodegradable plastic
Researchers from Waitako University are turning dried bloodmeal from red meat processing into a compostable plastic that breaks down without harmful byproducts. The new plastic, called Novatein, is an alternative to petrochemical-based plastics, and will be used in products such as pots, trays, containers and clips used in the horticultural industry. The researchers used the Australian Synchrotron to demonstrate the strength of the moulded plastic, and will again use it to help fine-tune their processes to develop a clear and extrudable product appropriate for thin-film plastics.
Harnessing bacterial toxins for bioinsecticides and medicine
Researchers from AgResearch and the University of Auckland found a new way in which bacteria store and release toxins, and their discovery may be harnessed to develop new bioinsecticides for crop pests and even new medicines. The team studied how the bacterium Yersinia entomophaga kills crop pests including grubs, moths and caterpillars; they discovered, in the process, a new way in which the bacterium packages its insect-killing toxin in a hollow protein shell.
Building corrosion-resistant pipelines
Researchers from the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology and Callaghan Innovation used the Australian Synchrotron to understand corrosion within oil and gas pipelines. The observations interpret the pace and structure of the earliest phases of corrosion in unprecedented detail.
Sheep leather: from waste product to resource
Massey university scientists are using the synchrotron to make sheep skin leather as strong as cowhide so that it can be used by the footwear industry. The team uses an X-ray scattering beam line to investigate the nanoscale basis for the difference in strength between cow and sheep leather and to relate this to how easily the leather can tear.
Veronika Meduna visited Australia as part of an international science media delegation looking at research and innovation, hosted by the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
Topics: science, economy
Regions:
Tags: synchrotron, cancer drugs, protein crystallogrpahy
Duration: 10'00"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 'Holy Grail' of Breast Cancer Prevention
It's been described as the 'holy grail' of breast cancer prevention. A New Zealander has teamed up with Australian researchers, and they have announced today, the discovery that an existing medication could have promise in preventing breast cancer.
Emma Nolan is a Kiwi working with the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne.
1:20 Could parasitic worms be good for us?
The idea of having parasitic worms is pretty disgusting. But scientists are increasingly realising that some of these worms do us more good than harm.
Some have gone so far as to introduce certain parasites into people's systems.
Immunologist Joel Weinstock of Tufts University in Boston says the medical profession has spent years trying to work out what was causing people to suffer from inflammatory bowel disease like Crohns ..
He wondered if the issue was in fact caused by the lack of something in the gut... in particular certain parasites no longer found in western countries, where such immune condtions and allergies are far more common.
[gallery:2159]
2:20 The Great New Zealand Album: Hello Sailor (1977) by Hello Sailor
[image:72069:full]
Today's Great New Zealand Album is the classic debut from one for our most successful and ground-breaking bands. Their 1977 release chartered new territory in Kiwi Music and, coupled with a unique promotional concept, helped to make Hello Sailor and it's individual members household names in this country. An attempt to crack the American Market came oh so close, but paved the way for many Kiwi acts to follow.
It is unfortunate and most regrettable that we have, now, a limited number of Hello Sailor band members to talk to with following the untimely deaths of both Dave McArtney in April 2013 and Graham Brazier less than 18 months later.
But, joining us in the studio today is fellow founding member Harry Lyon.
3:10 The Life and Music of James Taylor
Singer-songwriter James Taylor turned his own battles with depression and insecurity into the soundtrack to the 1970;s. Music historian Mark Ribowsky traces his rise from heroin addict to superstar in the new book, Sweet Dreams and Flying Machines: The Life and Music of James Taylor.
[gallery:2161]
3:35 Voices
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JON BRIDGES for JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Tuesday 21st June
JON'S SONG:
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Fire and Rain
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: Sweet Baby James
LABEL: Warner
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Cyndi Lauper
TITLE: Girl's Just Want To Have Fun
COMP: Robert Hazard
ALBUM: She's So Unusual
LABEL: Portrait
ARTIST: Cyndi Lauper
TITLE: She Bop
COMP: Cyndi Lauper, Rick Chertoff, Gary Corbett
ALBUM: She's So Unusual
LABEL: Portrait
ARTIST: Cyndi Lauper
TITLE: Time After Time
COMP: Cyndi Lauper, Rob Hyman
ALBUM: She's So Unusual
LABEL: Portrait
THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM: Hello Sailor
ARTIST: Hello Sailor
TITLE: Sickness Benefit
COMP: Dave McArtney
ALBUM: The Sailor Story 1975-1996
LABEL: Festival
ARTIST: Hello Sailor
TITLE: Gutter Black
COMP: Dave McArtney
ALBUM: Hello Sailor
LABEL: Key
ARTIST: Hello Sailor
TITLE: Blue Lady
COMP: Graham Brazier
ALBUM: Hello Sailor
LABEL: Key
ARTIST: Hello Sailor
TITLE: Lyin' In The Sand
COMP: Harry Lyon
ALBUM: Hello Sailor
LABEL: Key
ARTIST: Hello Sailor
TITLE: Latin Lover
COMP: Harry Lyon
ALBUM: Hello Sailor
LABEL: Key
ADDITIONAL SONG:
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Carolina In My Mind
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: James Taylor
LABEL: Apple
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Sweet Baby James
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: Sweet Baby James
LABEL: Warner
ARTIST: James Taylor
TITLE: Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight
COMP: James Taylor
ALBUM: One Man Dog
LABEL: Warner
PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Mass Choir Spectacular
TITLE: Land of Hope and Glory
COMP: Edward Elgar, A.C. Benson
ALBUM: Massed Choirs Spectacular: Highlights From The Festivals Of Massed English
Male Voice Choirs, Royal Albert Hall 1983 & 1985
LABEL: Bandleader

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:42
The Panel pre-show for 21 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'53"

16:03
The Panel with Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay have been up to. Professor Al Gillespie discusses the New Zealand Defence Force's extended two-year deployment. People with uninhabited houses or rarely used holiday homes could be hit with a huge rates hikes. .We may want the right to party but have we enough Police to police the drinking?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'11"

16:05
The Panel with Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay (Part 2)
BODY:
The Brits are voting this week on whether to leave the EU. Ex-pat Daisy Postlethwaite talks about how young Brits see their relationship with Europe. Is the Trump election campaign about to change tack. What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay have been thinking about. All Blacks' coach Steve Hansen says there are mind games going on ahead of the on-pitch games between England and Australia. Some students from India are likely to be deported for using fake documents to get visas.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'25"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'14"

16:10
NZDF Iraq deployment
BODY:
Professor Al Gillespie discusses the New Zealand Defence Force's extended two-year deployment.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: defence force
Duration: 11'25"

16:22
Bach tax
BODY:
People with uninhabited houses or rarely used holiday homes could be hit with a huge rates hikes.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Bach tax
Duration: 5'57"

16:28
Do we have enough Police?
BODY:
We may want the right to party but have we enough Police to police the drinking?
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 5'07"

16:35
Brexit vote
BODY:
The Brits are voting this week on whether to leave the EU. Ex-pat Daisy Postlethwaite talks about how young Brits see their relationship with Europe.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, UK
Duration: 10'57"

16:47
Trump campaign
BODY:
Is the Trump election campaign about to change tack.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Trump
Duration: 2'38"

16:49
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Andrew Clay have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'02"

16:54
Battle of the rugby coaches
BODY:
All Blacks' coach Steve Hansen says there are mind games going on ahead of the on-pitch games between England and Australia..
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby
Duration: 3'46"

16:58
Student visas under false pretenses
BODY:
Some students from India are likely to be deported for using fake documents to get visas.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Indian students, education
Duration: 1'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 21 June 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here. It begins 5 minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
Akld road tolls seem likely
BODY:
The chances of Aucklanders paying road tolls has become more likely with the Government for the first time saying the move will come in time.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: transport, tolls
Duration: 7'21"

17:18
'Bulk funding' plan angers teachers, principals
BODY:
A government proposal is threatening to revive one of the most bitter disputes the education sector has seen in the past quarter of a century.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: education, bulk funding
Duration: 2'58"

17:21
'Disorder event' at Mt Eden prison
BODY:
Mt Eden Prison went into lockdown this afternoon after a group of prisoners refused to be locked up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Mt Eden prison
Duration: 3'28"

17:25
Peter Snell's singlet goes to auction
BODY:
The singlet celebrated runner Peter Snell wore at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics has sold at auction for well over $120,000.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Peter Snell
Duration: 1'30"

17:27
Peter Snell hears news of singlet sale
BODY:
Hearing of the news that his singlet had sold for $122,000, runner Peter Snell says he cannot remember when or under what circumstances he gave it away.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Peter Snell
Duration: 8'01"

17:37
Evening Business for 21 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'55"

17:45
White collar crime does pay- latest research
BODY:
Tax evasion costs the New Zealand economy thirty times more than benefit fraud.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: tax evasion
Duration: 3'47"

17:49
Christchurch City Council labelled naive for rates inquiries
BODY:
Christchurch council has asked its residents to tell it if earthquake repairs haven't been done so it can accurately assess their property's value.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch valuations
Duration: 3'29"

17:52
Team NZ launches precursor to America's Cup boat
BODY:
Team New Zealand has launched the boat which carries many of the secrets it hopes will win it the America's Cup next year - a 45 feet catamaran.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Team New Zealand
Duration: 4'15"

18:09
Road tolls increasingly likely for Akld
BODY:
Road tolls look more likely to become a reality in Auckland, following a report released by the Government and the Auckland Council.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: road tolls, transport
Duration: 4'34"

18:12
Public health crisis worsens in Pacific
BODY:
Non-Communicable Diseases, like diabetes and heart disease, "account for more than 80 percent of all deaths and 50% of premature deaths" in the Western part of the South Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: health, non-communicable diseases, NCD
Duration: 3'49"

18:19
Newspaper apologises for photo publication
BODY:
A Samoan newspaper, at the centre of a storm over its publication of an explicit photograph of an apparent suicide, has now printed a front page apology.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Samoa
Duration: 3'08"

18:23
Māori place names get overhaul on train announcements
BODY:
Wellington Council has commissioned new recordings for its train announcements, with more accurate pronunciation of Māori place names.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: language, pronunciation
Duration: 3'05"

18:26
Would you eat beef coated in chocolate?
BODY:
An AgResearch food scientist has come up with a new product: Waikato-farmed beef coated in chocolate produced by Auckland boutique chocolate maker Devonport Chocolates, with the consistency of Turkish delight.
Topics:
Regions: Waikato
Tags: meat, chocolate
Duration: 3'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - Contained
BODY:
Photographer Birgit Krippner has just returned home after hitching a ride on a container ship from New Zealand to North America.
EXTENDED BODY:
Photographer Birgit Krippner spent most of the month of May aboard a container ship travelling from New Zealand to the US. She talks with Bryan Crump about the experience.
Interview highlights
Bryan Crump: Why did you want to take a container ship?
Birgit Krippner: It started when I was a teenager. I grew up in Austria and walked my dog along the Danube. I think that's when I started paying attention to container ships. There's something beautiful how quietly they move, these monstrous ships. Kind of mysterious.
Were you wondering where they're going or where have they come from?
Yes. I knew they'd come from a different country, most likely they will end up in a different country. At the time I didn't really travel a lot, so it took my mind away.
Was this the first time that you'd done this?
Yes, the first time.
Where did you leave from?
I left from Auckland and I sailed to Philadelphia via the Panama Canal. It took 26 days all together.
Could you walk from one end of the boat to another?
Yes, I walked just to engage my brain a little bit and see the ocean. I had pretty much free access on the ship, unless it was raining or it was dark.
Had you ever spent a long period of time at sea out of sight of land before? What was it like?
No, I hadn't. 16 days in a stretch. Bryan, when you ask me this question it brings me right there - and it's one of the most beautiful things I've ever experienced.
Was it beautiful during the day more than the night?
I like transition - so when day becomes night and when night becomes day. I got up a few times at four in the morning and it was still very dark. Then around 5:30 the sun started as a really thin line dividing the ocean from the sky. Then the thin line becomes more prominent, stars disappear, the sun comes up - if there's a sun. Very beautiful, very peaceful and so stimulating at the same time.
Is it completely silent?
From the first moment when I set foot on the ship there is this very quiet vibrating sound, and this sound is on all the time. It’s the engine and it’s the refrigerated containers on the ship. But this sound did not really interfere with me. It was not loud, very quiet. It did not bother me.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: travel
Duration: 20'13"

20:12
Nights' Pundit - Right Thinking
BODY:
The rationales of individual freedom and personal responsibility with Eric Crampton, head of research at The New Zealand Initiative.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: individual freedom, personal responsibility
Duration: 15'34"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Contained
Photographer Birgit Krippner has just returned home after hitching a ride on a container ship from New Zealand to North America.
[gallery:2158]
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
Stranger To Stranger by Paul Simon
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples a new rhythm-based set from Paul Simon.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples a new rhythm-based set from Paul Simon.
Paul Simon is a fool for rhythm.
Listen to ‘The Werewolf’, the track that opens his new album.
It’s a great opener, his best since ‘The Boy In The Bubble’ kick-started Graceland thirty years ago. It’s got jokes, albeit black ones (‘Milwaulkee man led a fairly decent life, had a fairly decent living, fairly decent wife/ she killed him/sushi knife…’) It has musical metaphors: that strange stringed sound that starts the song – an Indian instrument called a gopichand - does make a noise something like the howl of a Hollywood werewolf. It has unexpected digressions: by the second verse he’s talking about the income gap, but keeps circling back to the image of the werewolf that will get us all, rich and poor alike. But the clincher is the rhythm: a rolling percussive groove with a West African kick, which spoke to my feet while Simon was speaking his mind.
Simon’s pursuit of rhythm distinguishes him from the singer-songwriter school of the 60s that established the idea of the lone figure with an acoustic guitar and asensitive soul, of which he was once the epitome. It’s what took him to Jamaica for ‘Mother and Child Reunion’, Soweto for Graceland and Brazil for Rhythm of the Saints. And it’s the rhythmic foundations of his new songs that give Simon the freedom to mess around with the song form, often quite radically.
He’s written some great melodies in his time, and still does. But more than ever he slides in an out of a kind of rhythmic song-speak that resembles conversation, with all of its digressions, interruptions and non-sequiturs. A measure of how far he’s come since his Simon and Garfunkel days is to try and imagine Art Garfunkel singing harmony to any of these songs. It’s virtually impossible.
Though rhythms remain integral throughout the album, they do relax a bit – and the guitar comes out - when Simon starts to reflect on the two concerns that have increasingly dominated his writing: love and mortality. In ‘The Riverbank’ he appears to reference the Sandy Hook school massacre, which took place in his native Connecticut.
Elsewhere it is his own mortality that under consideration, resulting in the album’s most traditional songs: the one he calls ‘Proof Of Love’, or the closing ‘Insomniac’s Lullaby’ – tunes you could almost imagine on a Simon and Garfunkel album. This is classic Simon songwriting, every note and syllable burnished to perfection.
At times I wonder if the whole thing might be a bit overworked. Still he’s a long way from the days when songs like ‘The Dangling Conversation’ dripped with self-conscious poetics and name-dropped actual poets. In ‘Insomniac’s Lullaby’ he tips things gently but nicely off balance with the microtonal bells of the late composer/inventor Harry Partch.
At 74, Paul Simon is still exploring new ways of using language, both musical and lyrical. His compositional tools are words and melodies, but also rhythms and sounds, to which he applies his perfectionism.
Everything here – from the single-stringed gopichan to the Partch-invented zoomoozophone – has been placed, like a dot on a pointillist painting.
That said, there is an element of what you might generously call ‘creative appropriation’ in Simon’s approach. He’s never been shy of borrowing an idea and taking the credit – whether it’s Martin Carthy’s arrangement of ‘Scarborough Fair’, a beat from Soweto or a melody from Bach. And he’s still doing it here, liberally sampling flamenco, samba and the Golden Gate Quartet. Not that it comes out sounding like any of those. More than ever, Simon’s instincts are like those of a hip-hop artist, fashioning his found materials into something uniquely his own. And no one else is going to make a record like this one.
Songs featured: The Werewolf, Wristband, Street Angel, In A Parade, Cool Papa Bell, The Riverbank, Insomniac’s Lullaby.
Stranger To Stranger is available on Universal.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Paul Simon, Simon & Garfunkel, music, music review
Duration: 13'09"

19:30
Midwest Farmer’s Daughter by Margo Price
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price.
Margo Price released her first album this year, on Jack White’s Third Man Records. But you only have to hear a few verses to realise that the road to her so-called debut has been long and rocky.
Take ‘Weekender’, a tale told in timeless honky-tonk style, of a woman trying to catch herself before she tumbles over the edge. As she admitted in an NPR interview in March, the story of a woman imprisoned for a weekend is essentially true. Price’s weekend in jail followed a long period of depression and drinking, triggered by a series of personal tragedies – which she chronicles in ‘Hands Of Time’, another of her straight-talking, unflinchingly personal songs.
In the song she tells how her father loses his business in the American farm crisis, and how she hits the city, joins a band, hits the bottle, takes up with a married man and loses her first child. Yet as the album unfolds, the picture that emerges is one of triumph over adversity, and this record’s existence is surely proof of that.
Price is not the kind to compromise; her lyrics make that clear, and so does her music, which makes no concessions to contemporary Nashville pop. Instead she draws convincingly on sounds that have defined Nashville in the past, and which clearly appealed to Jack White’s retro sensibilities. There are countrypolitan ballads, honky-tonk drinking songs, and lots of tough-talking, twanging tunes.
Songs featured: Hands Of Time, This Town Gets Around, Weekender, Hurtin’ On The Bottle, Tennessee Song, About To Find Out.
Midwest Farmer’s Daughter is available on Third Man Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Margo Price, Jack White, music, music review
Duration: 7'56"

19:30
Good Times! by The Monkees
BODY:
Nick Bollinger marks the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger marks the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
Before Milli Vanilli were disgraced for the sin of lip-syncing to records they had not actually sung on, the most popular example of manufactured stardom was The Monkees.
The Monkees were the corporate-created phenomenon of 60s American pop, and this album opens with a song straight out of that plastic era – though this one has been languishing unheard for almost half a century. It was written by the late Harry Nilsson (who the Monkees’ creators turned to for material on more than one occasion); you can actually hear Nilsson singing and playing piano on this recording, which was made but never released in 1968. It has been resurrected as the opening track – and title song – of Good Times!, an album of mostly ‘new’ material, put together to mark The Monkees’ 50th anniversary. And guess what? It’s all right.
There are several other tracks here leftover from the same era, performed, like most of the recordings the Monkees made, by assorted session legends (though the voices are those of actual Monkees, Mickey Dolenz and Michael Nesmith.)
For the most part, though, Good Times is made up of more recent recordings, featuring the three surviving Monkees (Davy Jones having died in 2012.) As usual, the Monkees are relegated mostly to vocals, and, just like back in the day, they have called on some pretty reputable writers for custom-made material – like ‘You Bring The Summer’, a great sunny pop song from XTC’s Andy Partridge.
There are other customised contributions here from Weezer’s Rivers Cuomo, Death Cab For Cutie’s Ben Gibbard, Noel Gallagher and Paul Weller – all of whom seem happy to become part of the great tradition of Monkees’ writers that includes Nilsson, Carole King and Neil Diamond, among others. Most of the new tracks were produced by Adam Schlesinger of New York power-pop merchants Fountains Of Wayne, and he’s in his element, crafting ephemeral yet surprisingly entertaining pop.
I remember as a young kid in the late 60s watching the Monkees on our family’s recently purchased television, and realising even then that their antics were a copy of the Beatles movies I’d loved, and wondering if copying was allowed in pop music, because it was certainly frowned upon in school. If it was apparent to me at age ten, then it was obvious to everyone that the Monkees weren’t entirely kosher. And yet their records always sounded sunny and good, maybe even better than they had to be. And strangely, fifty years later that’s still the case.
Songs featured: Good Times, Gotta Give It Time, Wasn’t Born To Follow, You Bring The Summer, Birth Of An Accidental Hipster.
Good Times! is available on Rhino Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Monkees, music, music review
Duration: 7'27"

19:30
The Sampler for 21 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a rhythm-based set from Paul Simon; the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price; and the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a rhythm-based set from Paul Simon; the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price; and the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Paul Simon, Margo Price, The Monkees, music, music review
Duration: 28'25"

7:30 The Sampler
This week Nick Bollinger reviews a rhythm-based set from Paul Simon; the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price; and the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Right Thinking
The rationales of individual freedom and personal responsibility with Eric Crampton, head of research at The New Zealand Initiative.
8:30 Window on the World
Iranian Gay - In Iran homosexuality is severely punished. Many people also deny homosexuality or know very little about it. So how does one family cope when they realise their daughter is gay? Leyla Khodabakhshi takes us through this family's journey to show the suffering of both sides - for the daughter and the rest of the family.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Terror & Technology - Twenty years ago the FBI ended their longest-running domestic terrorism investigation with the arrest of the Unabomber, a notorious serial killer obsessed with technology. As we continue to debate the relationship between technology and security, our feature today revisits the extraordinary story of the Unabomber, considering how a reclusive maths prodigy terrorised America and how the media amplified his cause.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Global Village highlights African, Afro-Cuban and Afro-Peruvian sounds including Guinean 'cool groove' saxophonist Mamadou Barry; Cuban doo-wop group Los Zafiros; the AfroCubism album and Afro-Peruvian champion Susana Baca.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
Stranger To Stranger by Paul Simon
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples a new rhythm-based set from Paul Simon.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples a new rhythm-based set from Paul Simon.
Paul Simon is a fool for rhythm.
Listen to ‘The Werewolf’, the track that opens his new album.
It’s a great opener, his best since ‘The Boy In The Bubble’ kick-started Graceland thirty years ago. It’s got jokes, albeit black ones (‘Milwaulkee man led a fairly decent life, had a fairly decent living, fairly decent wife/ she killed him/sushi knife…’) It has musical metaphors: that strange stringed sound that starts the song – an Indian instrument called a gopichand - does make a noise something like the howl of a Hollywood werewolf. It has unexpected digressions: by the second verse he’s talking about the income gap, but keeps circling back to the image of the werewolf that will get us all, rich and poor alike. But the clincher is the rhythm: a rolling percussive groove with a West African kick, which spoke to my feet while Simon was speaking his mind.
Simon’s pursuit of rhythm distinguishes him from the singer-songwriter school of the 60s that established the idea of the lone figure with an acoustic guitar and asensitive soul, of which he was once the epitome. It’s what took him to Jamaica for ‘Mother and Child Reunion’, Soweto for Graceland and Brazil for Rhythm of the Saints. And it’s the rhythmic foundations of his new songs that give Simon the freedom to mess around with the song form, often quite radically.
He’s written some great melodies in his time, and still does. But more than ever he slides in an out of a kind of rhythmic song-speak that resembles conversation, with all of its digressions, interruptions and non-sequiturs. A measure of how far he’s come since his Simon and Garfunkel days is to try and imagine Art Garfunkel singing harmony to any of these songs. It’s virtually impossible.
Though rhythms remain integral throughout the album, they do relax a bit – and the guitar comes out - when Simon starts to reflect on the two concerns that have increasingly dominated his writing: love and mortality. In ‘The Riverbank’ he appears to reference the Sandy Hook school massacre, which took place in his native Connecticut.
Elsewhere it is his own mortality that under consideration, resulting in the album’s most traditional songs: the one he calls ‘Proof Of Love’, or the closing ‘Insomniac’s Lullaby’ – tunes you could almost imagine on a Simon and Garfunkel album. This is classic Simon songwriting, every note and syllable burnished to perfection.
At times I wonder if the whole thing might be a bit overworked. Still he’s a long way from the days when songs like ‘The Dangling Conversation’ dripped with self-conscious poetics and name-dropped actual poets. In ‘Insomniac’s Lullaby’ he tips things gently but nicely off balance with the microtonal bells of the late composer/inventor Harry Partch.
At 74, Paul Simon is still exploring new ways of using language, both musical and lyrical. His compositional tools are words and melodies, but also rhythms and sounds, to which he applies his perfectionism.
Everything here – from the single-stringed gopichan to the Partch-invented zoomoozophone – has been placed, like a dot on a pointillist painting.
That said, there is an element of what you might generously call ‘creative appropriation’ in Simon’s approach. He’s never been shy of borrowing an idea and taking the credit – whether it’s Martin Carthy’s arrangement of ‘Scarborough Fair’, a beat from Soweto or a melody from Bach. And he’s still doing it here, liberally sampling flamenco, samba and the Golden Gate Quartet. Not that it comes out sounding like any of those. More than ever, Simon’s instincts are like those of a hip-hop artist, fashioning his found materials into something uniquely his own. And no one else is going to make a record like this one.
Songs featured: The Werewolf, Wristband, Street Angel, In A Parade, Cool Papa Bell, The Riverbank, Insomniac’s Lullaby.
Stranger To Stranger is available on Universal.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Paul Simon, Simon & Garfunkel, music, music review
Duration: 13'09"

19:30
Midwest Farmer’s Daughter by Margo Price
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price.
Margo Price released her first album this year, on Jack White’s Third Man Records. But you only have to hear a few verses to realise that the road to her so-called debut has been long and rocky.
Take ‘Weekender’, a tale told in timeless honky-tonk style, of a woman trying to catch herself before she tumbles over the edge. As she admitted in an NPR interview in March, the story of a woman imprisoned for a weekend is essentially true. Price’s weekend in jail followed a long period of depression and drinking, triggered by a series of personal tragedies – which she chronicles in ‘Hands Of Time’, another of her straight-talking, unflinchingly personal songs.
In the song she tells how her father loses his business in the American farm crisis, and how she hits the city, joins a band, hits the bottle, takes up with a married man and loses her first child. Yet as the album unfolds, the picture that emerges is one of triumph over adversity, and this record’s existence is surely proof of that.
Price is not the kind to compromise; her lyrics make that clear, and so does her music, which makes no concessions to contemporary Nashville pop. Instead she draws convincingly on sounds that have defined Nashville in the past, and which clearly appealed to Jack White’s retro sensibilities. There are countrypolitan ballads, honky-tonk drinking songs, and lots of tough-talking, twanging tunes.
Songs featured: Hands Of Time, This Town Gets Around, Weekender, Hurtin’ On The Bottle, Tennessee Song, About To Find Out.
Midwest Farmer’s Daughter is available on Third Man Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Margo Price, Jack White, music, music review
Duration: 7'56"

19:30
Good Times! by The Monkees
BODY:
Nick Bollinger marks the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
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Nick Bollinger marks the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
Before Milli Vanilli were disgraced for the sin of lip-syncing to records they had not actually sung on, the most popular example of manufactured stardom was The Monkees.
The Monkees were the corporate-created phenomenon of 60s American pop, and this album opens with a song straight out of that plastic era – though this one has been languishing unheard for almost half a century. It was written by the late Harry Nilsson (who the Monkees’ creators turned to for material on more than one occasion); you can actually hear Nilsson singing and playing piano on this recording, which was made but never released in 1968. It has been resurrected as the opening track – and title song – of Good Times!, an album of mostly ‘new’ material, put together to mark The Monkees’ 50th anniversary. And guess what? It’s all right.
There are several other tracks here leftover from the same era, performed, like most of the recordings the Monkees made, by assorted session legends (though the voices are those of actual Monkees, Mickey Dolenz and Michael Nesmith.)
For the most part, though, Good Times is made up of more recent recordings, featuring the three surviving Monkees (Davy Jones having died in 2012.) As usual, the Monkees are relegated mostly to vocals, and, just like back in the day, they have called on some pretty reputable writers for custom-made material – like ‘You Bring The Summer’, a great sunny pop song from XTC’s Andy Partridge.
There are other customised contributions here from Weezer’s Rivers Cuomo, Death Cab For Cutie’s Ben Gibbard, Noel Gallagher and Paul Weller – all of whom seem happy to become part of the great tradition of Monkees’ writers that includes Nilsson, Carole King and Neil Diamond, among others. Most of the new tracks were produced by Adam Schlesinger of New York power-pop merchants Fountains Of Wayne, and he’s in his element, crafting ephemeral yet surprisingly entertaining pop.
I remember as a young kid in the late 60s watching the Monkees on our family’s recently purchased television, and realising even then that their antics were a copy of the Beatles movies I’d loved, and wondering if copying was allowed in pop music, because it was certainly frowned upon in school. If it was apparent to me at age ten, then it was obvious to everyone that the Monkees weren’t entirely kosher. And yet their records always sounded sunny and good, maybe even better than they had to be. And strangely, fifty years later that’s still the case.
Songs featured: Good Times, Gotta Give It Time, Wasn’t Born To Follow, You Bring The Summer, Birth Of An Accidental Hipster.
Good Times! is available on Rhino Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Monkees, music, music review
Duration: 7'27"

19:30
The Sampler for 21 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a rhythm-based set from Paul Simon; the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price; and the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a rhythm-based set from Paul Simon; the tough and twangy debut of Nashville newcomer Margo Price; and the return of prefabricated pop stars The Monkees.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Paul Simon, Margo Price, The Monkees, music, music review
Duration: 28'25"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (KMUW)

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Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288255

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 21 Jun 2016

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