RNZ National. 2016-07-05. 00:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

05 July 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 Hidden Treasures 3:05 Maxident Waiting to Happen by Robin McFarland read by Brian Sergent (RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 5 July 2016
BODY:
Nigel Farage, resigns as the leader of UKIP - saying he's achieved his life's ambition. The Taxi Federation is demanding the Government crack down on the alternative taxi service Uber with the full force of the law.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'21"

06:06
Sports News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

06:16
Fight for French compensation over nuke tests wages
BODY:
Workers affected by the nuclear tests in French Polynesia say they will continue to hold the French Government accountable over the impact. RNZ International's Lucy Smith reports.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: nuclear tests
Duration: 3'09"

06:20
Early Business News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'09"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'12"

06:40
Business concerned land acquistion could affect property rights
BODY:
Business leaders say they're worried by suggestions the Government might give councils the power to force owners to sell idle land that could be used for housing. But others say tough measures are needed if more homes are to be built sooner rather than later.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'07"

06:51
Container company looks at future options
BODY:
An Auckland based container manufacturer and depot operator, Container Co, is looking at options to fund its expansion and future growth.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Container Co
Duration: 1'34"

06:52
Deadline looms for Nuplex shareholders on Allnex takeover
BODY:
The resins manufacturer, Nuplex Industries, is making a last ditch bid to get shareholders out to vote on the proposed billion dollar takover by Belgium's Allnex.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Nuplex Industries
Duration: 1'20"

06:53
China Construction will help Hawkins with supply chain
BODY:
A large private construction company, Hawkins Group, says working with China Construction will help it manage its supply chain and free it up to meet growing demand in Auckland.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Hawkins Group
Duration: 1'53"

06:57
Treasury sees little impact on NZ from Brexit, but uncertainty
BODY:
The Treasury says it does not expect much impact from Brexit on New Zealand for the time being at least.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 55"

06:58
Morning markets for 5 July 2016
BODY:
Wall Street closed for the Independence Day.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 51"

06:59
Business briefs
BODY:
The number of new vehicle registrations continues to rise beyond expectations, with sales up more than 5 percent in June, over the year earlier.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17"

07:07
Sports News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'18"

07:14
Nigel Farage steps down as leader of UKIP
BODY:
Nigel Farage, the man who pushed for a European Union referendum in Britain, has stood down as leader of the UK Independence Party, and says his long-held ambition of leaving the EU has now been realised.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, UK
Duration: 4'10"

07:23
Taxi Federation demands tighter regulations for Uber
BODY:
The taxi alternative service Uber is rapidly growing in popularity but taxi drivers say they're being put out of business by an illegal operation. They're demanding the Transport Authority crack down hard.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Taxi Federation, Uber
Duration: 4'05"

07:27
NZTA will 'ramp up' enforcement of Uber drivers
BODY:
The Transport Agency responds to the Taxi Federation claims. We talk to the National Operations Manager at the Transport Agency, Kate Styles.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Taxi Federation, Uber
Duration: 5'28"

07:37
Government responds to land banking issue
BODY:
Business leaders are worried about the government's proposal to buy up unused land. We put those concerns to the Building and Housing Minister, Nick Smith. He says it's a work in progress.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: unused land
Duration: 6'09"

07:43
Labour poised to announce housing policies
BODY:
Labour's set to announce its housing policies this week. Its leader Andrew Little calls National's policies a hotch-potch, and promises a comprehensive approach.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: unused land
Duration: 5'34"

07:48
St John asking for shake up of air ambulance disptach
BODY:
Air ambulances are being sent to emergencies when they're not needed and not being sent when they ARE wanted under a system that's being called ineffective, random and a risk to patients.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Air ambulances
Duration: 3'31"

07:51
Mihingarangi Forbes answers listeners questions on Te Reo Maori
BODY:
It's the second day - Rātū - of Te Wiki o te reo Māori. Mihingarangi Forbes joins us to answer more of your questions about the Māori language.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: te reo Maori
Duration: 3'46"

07:55
Grey Power to present AT HOP card petition to Winston Peters
BODY:
Pensioners in Auckland are hopping mad about changes to the AT Hop cards used on public transport. Only about half of them have signed up to the new system that gives them free travel. Greypower's been collecting signatures on a petititon that will be presented to Parliament today.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Supergold cardholders
Duration: 4'17"

08:07
Sports News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

08:11
Airport security workers to strike in Auckland, Wellinton
BODY:
Airport security staff reject an wage offer and for the first time in three decades give notice they'll walk off the job. Kelvin Ellis from the E Tu union explains why they're prepared to strike.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: aviation security, .
Duration: 5'17"

08:17
Aust election uncertainty helps NZ holidaymakers
BODY:
Business leaders say as if the high value of the Kiwi against the Australian dollars is not enough of a headache, the deadlocked Australian election is making matters worse. But for holidaymakers it's all good news. Patrick O'Meara reports.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 2'50"

08:20
Vote counting resumes in Australia
BODY:
The counting of votes resumes in Australia's nail-biter election today, with no certainty that either of the main parties will emerge with a parliamentary majority. Michelle Grattan from The Conversation looks at the possible outcomes.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 3'40"

08:28
Markets Update for 5 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 48"

08:36
Act weighs in on landbanking debate
BODY:
The Act Party weighs in on the landbanking debate. Its leader, David Seymour, says the compulsory purchase of land should only be used for building roads, not for development. We ask him why.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: land banking
Duration: 4'38"

08:41
Decision to axe programme for at-risk families criticised
BODY:
The Government is cancelling more than a quarter of the 114 Strengthening Families contracts and moving the funding to the newly established Children's Teams. Critics say they're dumping a proven service for one that won't be as good.
Topics: health, politics
Regions:
Tags: Strengthening Families
Duration: 3'55"

08:45
Nigel Farage quits as leader of UKIP
BODY:
"I said I wanted my country back... now I want my life back." And with those words Nigel Farage, the head of UK Independence Party, announced he is stepping down. We talk to another UKIP politician, Margot Parker.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, UKIP
Duration: 4'41"

08:50
Taranaki wind farm opponents voice concern
BODY:
A 325-million dollar wind farm planned for Taranaki is causing alarm among environmentalists, who fear it will endanger migratory birds, and concern from residents who say their treasured mountain views will be ruined.
Topics:
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: Trustpower, wind farm
Duration: 3'43"

08:55
Historic artefacts found under Auckland's St James theatre
BODY:
The discovery of relics underneath the floorboards of Auckland's St James theatre is providing a glimpse into the business history of Queen Street.
Topics: history
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 4'14"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: My Father's Ears by Karen Goa, read by Michelle Amas (7 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Sideline abuse campaign enlists All Black
BODY:
Four Wellington rugby players, including All Black Victor Vito, have gone "undercover" in an effort to the highlight sideline and on field antics at children's rugby matches. Wellington's head of community rugby is Will Caccia-Birch. He reveals that the campaign also used actors.
Topics: sport
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: rugby
Duration: 8'00"

09:17
Financial watchdog cracks down on dodgy insurance agents
BODY:
The Financial Markets Authority is zeroing in on insurance agents who may be unnecessarily switching their clients to new policies - in pursuit of commissions, bonuses and overseas trips. It comes as cabinet yesterday considered a review of the Financial Advisors' Act, which will tackle the issue of regulation of commissions and other conflicts of interest. Rob Everett is the Chief Executive of the Financial Markets Authority.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Financial Markets Authority is looking at 200 insurance agents who may be switching their clients to new policies to gain commissions, bonuses and overseas trips.
New Zealanders spend nearly $2 billion a year on life insurance premiums.
A new report showed 200 of the 1100 advisers have a high turnover rate of insurance policies and some earn double the commission of other advisers, as well as perks such as overseas trips.
Chief executive of the FMA Rob Everett said in one case an adviser earned 10 overseas trips in four years.
"There you would really have to question whether those trips are influencing the behaviour of the adviser and whether they have been properly disclosed to clients when the adviser advises them to switch."
Mr Everett said there were good reasons sometimes for people changing insurance policy.
"The insurance business is constantly reinventing itself so you often see new features of policies, you see people's life circumstances change, you see challenger insurance providers coming in. So we are at pains to say that switching from one insurance provider to another is not in itself a bad thing but what we worry about is where that switch may be driven by these overseas trips, by the high commissions and we can't see an obvious benefit to the customer."
Mr Everett said when an adviser encourages a client to take life insurance the insurance company will pay up to 200 percent of the first year's premium to the adviser as an incentive. In addition, there were other incentives such as overseas trips.
The insurance market is not growing in New Zealand so most business comes from customers switching from one insurance company to another, he said.
If customers switch their insurance within two to three years advisers have to return their commission.
Mr Everett said after that so called "clawback" period there was an increase in the rates of policy replacement.
"That's what we call churn. There may not be an immediate harm but its hard to see the immediate benefit to a consumer of having their policy switched."
The FMA is now asking advisers specific questions about their replacement business and asking for proof that they are putting their customers first.
For misleading or deceptive conduct, advisers can be fined up to $100,000 and businesses up to $300,000.
The authority found that about 150 advisers earned at least $200,000 in 2014 from life insurance commissions, and 70 advisers earned at least $300,000.
One adviser earned more than $320,000 from commissions on 110 policies, 45 advisers replaced more than 20 percent of their policies in a single year, and nine replaced more than 30 percent.
The FMA also found that 1100 advisers had more than 100 active policies on their books. These advisers were considered "high-volume" advisers by the FMA.
Of the high-volume advisers, 200 had a particularly high estimated rate of replacement business. In June 2014, they accounted for 65,000 active policies, totalling $110 million in annual premiums.
Cabinet is considering a review of the Financial Advisors' Act to tackle the issue of regulation of commissions and other conflicts of interest.
The review is also expected to make information about a financial advisor's qualifications much clearer to consumers by moving away from the myriad of acronyms currently used.
Related story
Insurance agents investigated for policy 'churn'

Topics: business, economy, money
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'24"

09:34
Tipping point for home electricity production
BODY:
Malcolm McCulloch is a renewable energy expert from the UK who says we will soon be at the tipping point for home generated electricity. He is an electrical engineer and the head of Oxford University's Energy and Power Group and is currently in New Zealand and is a speaker at The Energy Cultures Conference in Wellington this week.
Topics: environment, technology
Regions:
Tags: solar, tipping point, Malcolm McCulloch, renewables, renewable electricity, battery, batteries, energy
Duration: 17'09"

09:51
US correspondent Susan Milligan
BODY:
Susan Milligan reports on Hilary Clinton's FBI interview about her private email server and how her husband Bill's tarmac tête-à-tête with the Attorney General, Loretta Lynch wasn't a good look.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: USA
Duration: 8'04"

10:07
Rana Foroohar: Makers and Takers
BODY:
Rana Foroohar is assistant managing editor at Time magazine and the former economic and foreign affairs editor for Newsweek. Her latest book, Makers and Takers, explores how modern financial institutions have turned away from ordinary business investment and towards speculation through vehicles so complex that their leaders can no longer track risk. The upshot, she says, is a world where businesses can't get the capital they need to grow, ordinary workers are saddled with increasing debt and the global economy occasionally melts down.
EXTENDED BODY:
Until the 1970s the job of a bank was relatively simple - take the money from individual and corporate savings and invest them in productive business.
But according to Rana Foroohar that's a thing of the past.
She is assistant managing editor at Time magazine and the former economic and foreign affairs editor for Newsweek.
Her latest book, Makers and Takers, explores how modern financial institutions have turned away from ordinary business investment and towards speculation through vehicles so complex that their leaders can no longer track risk.
The upshot, she says, is a world where businesses can't get the capital they need to grow, ordinary workers are saddled with increasing debt in the absence of pay rises and the global economy occasionally melts down.
She talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Read an edited snapshot from their conversation
KR: The GFC brought this so much into sharp focus didn’t it? When we all found out just how complicated the old idea of taking the money off someone, clipping the ticket and lending it to someone else had got.
RF: Absolutely. 2008 was really a turning point, not only in the US but globally too. But…this is a process that has been going on now for about 40 years so it began, I would say in the late 1970s in the US - what I call the financialisation of the economy, which is the growth in power and size of the financial sector – but also the change in the business model of what finance does. So finance used to be sort of a help meet to business. Financial institutions would take out money and lend them out to businesses which would then create jobs and grow, that’s sort of how modern capitalism works as Adam Smith would have envisioned it. But the killer stat in my book is that today, only 15 percent of all the financial flows coming out of US institutions are actually going to business investment. So what’s the rest of the money doing? What’s the other 85 percent doing? It’s existing in this closed loop of trust of creating of the buying and selling of existing assets which tends to benefit the top ten percent of the population and the majority that owns the assets. And while I’m giving you US stats this is broadly true for most developed economies who are on the same trend line. The US and the UK are the most financialised, but everyone is going in this direction.
KR: What’s the story with how General Electric (GE), which used to be one of the United States’ great productive companies and how it makes money now?
RF: Well GE was the original American innovator that was invented by Thomas Albert Edison and it used to make all kinds of amazing products, and still does to an extent. But in the 1970s and the 1980s a change beginning to happen. GE got less interested in actually making products and more interested in financial services and up until quite recently it was actually a-too-big-to-fail financial institution. It had moved so much into the financial market that it had stopped being and innovator and started acting much like a bank. And what’s so interesting is that is part of a larger shift, if you look back from 1980 until today every American business across every industry – tech, airline, retail – the businesses themselves make about five times as much from financial services as they do from creating the goods and services of their initial business. And I’m actually arguing that this creates a lot of volatility and fragility in these firms. So another great example would be airline firms. Airline firms regularly now are regularly in the business of hedging oil prices and trading – buying and selling of oil futures. Often they make more money doing this than they do selling coach fees. But if they trade wrong they can lose billions and billions of dollars. So this move towards financialisation actually takes companies away from their core business and towards the financial markets and towards the volatility and towards a decreasing value, I would argue, for the long term.

Topics: business, economy, politics, author interview
Regions:
Tags: finance, banking, stockmarket, wall st
Duration: 29'24"

10:39
Book review - War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans
BODY:
Reviewed by Rachel O'Neill, published by Text Publishing
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'40"

11:07
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
The recommendations of the Shewan Report on offshore trusts and while the financial markets have recovered most of their sharp falls after the Brexit referendum there are still plenty of worries about the UK's economic performance.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'26"

11:24
The problem with concrete
BODY:
At nearly 19 hundred years old the Pantheon in Rome is the world's oldest concrete structure, and there's no sign of it falling down any time soon - why then do modern buildings have lifespans measured in decades? Guy Keulemans, an Associate Lecturer in Art & Design Research at the University of New South Wales, says the problem is steel reinforcement.
EXTENDED BODY:
At nearly 1900 years old the Pantheon in Rome is the world's oldest concrete structure, and there's no sign of it falling down any time soon - why then do modern buildings have lifespans measured in decades?
The answer according to Guy Keulemans is rebar: The steel reinforcement which lends concrete extra strength, allowing it to be poured into thinner, stronger slabs - saving time and money.
Keulemans is a Associate Lecturer in Art & Design Research at the University of New South Wales.
He says the problem is that rebar rusts, sometimes it sets in within as little as ten years and can cost colossal amounts of money to repair.
And we need to change the way we think of concrete from a solid, permanent structure to an active, vibrant material, he says.
Guy Keulemans talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Topics: science, business, economy
Regions:
Tags: concrete, rebar, infrastructure
Duration: 15'13"

11:44
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
How media startup website the Spinoff is filling a gap by attracting an impressive list of contributors, and New York fashion photographer Bill Cunningham's passing led to a legion of tributes that may have overshadowed the death of another great journalist - Michael Herr, whose New Journalism style put coverage of the Vietnam war in a raw light.
Topics: media, technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Top Wellington rugby players highlight sideline antics
Four Wellington rugby players, including All Black Victor Vito, have gone undercover in an effort to the highlight sideline and on field antics at children's rugby matches. Wellington’s head of community rugby is Will Caccia-Birch.
09:15 Financial watchdog cracks down on dodgy insurance agents
The Financial Markets Authority is zeroing in on insurance agents who may be unnecessarily switching their clients to new policies - in pursuit of commissions, bonuses and overseas trips. It comes as cabinet yesterday considered a review of the Financial Advisors' Act, which will tackle the issue of regulation of commissions and other conflicts of interest. Rob Everett is the Chief Executive of the Financial Markets Authority.
09:30 Tipping point for home electricity production
[image:64798:third] no metadata
Malcolm McCulloch is a renewable energy expert from the UK who says we will soon be at the tipping point for home generated electricity. He is an electrical engineer and the head of Oxford University's Energy and Power Group and is currently in New Zealand and is a speaker at The Energy Cultures Conference in Wellington this week.
09:45 US correspondent Susan Milligan
Susan Milligan reports on Hilary Clinton's FBI interview about her private email server and how her husband Bill's tarmac tête-à-tête with the Attorney General, Loretta Lynch wasn't a good look.
[image:46135:half] no metadata
10:05 Rana Foroohar: Makers and Takers
Rana Foroohar is assistant managing editor at Time magazine and the former economic and foreign affairs editor for Newsweek. Her latest book, Makers and Takers, explores how modern financial institutions have turned away from ordinary business investment and towards speculation through vehicles so complex that their leaders can no longer track risk. The upshot, she says, is a world where businesses can't get the capital they need to grow, ordinary workers are saddled with increasing debt and the global economy occasionally melts down.
10:35 Book review - War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans
reviewed by Rachel O'Neill, published by Text Publishing
10:45 The Reading
My Father's Ears, by Karen Goa read by Michele Amas (Part 7 of 10)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
The recommendations of the Shewan Report on offshore trusts and while the financial markets have recovered most of their sharp falls after the Brexit referendum there are still plenty of worries about the UK's economic performance.
11:30 The problem with concrete
At nearly 19 hundred years old the Pantheon in Rome is the world's oldest concrete structure, and there's no sign of it falling down any time soon - why then do modern buildings have lifespans measured in decades? Guy Keulemans, an Associate Lecturer in Art & Design Research at the University of New South Wales, says the problem is steel reinforcement.
[image:73448:full]
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
How media startup website the Spinoff is filling a gap by attracting an impressive list of contributors, and New York fashion photographer Bill Cunningham’s passing led to a legion of tributes that may have overshadowed the death of another great journalist - Michael Herr, whose New Journalism style put coverage of the Vietnam war in a raw light.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Elbow
Song: One Day Like This
Composer: Elbow
Album: The Seldom Seen Kid
Label: Fiction
Time: 9:32

Artist: Great North
Song: I was Gold
Composer: Great North
Album: Up in Smoke
Label: Private
Time: 10:41

Artist: The Avalanches
Song: Since I Left You
Composer: Charter/Diblasi/Drennen/McQuilte
Album: Since I Left You
Label: Modular
Time: 11.20
Artist: Patea Maori Club
Song: Aku Raukura
Composer: Pewhairangi/Prime
Album: Aku Raukura
Label: Maui
Time: 11.39

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
Police and customs may be called in to cover airport strikes, a man gets four years jail for a drink-drive fatality.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'24"

12:17
Business confidence rebounds in Q2
BODY:
The Institute of Economic Research's survey of business opinion for the June quarter shows a seasonally adjusted net 18% of firms expect the economy to improve over the rest of the year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'51"

12:19
Property prices continue to rise
BODY:
Property prices show no signs of slowing down, rising at their fastest pace in 12 years.
Topics: business, economy, housing
Regions:
Tags: property
Duration: 1'12"

12:20
Auckland prices rise in June
BODY:
One of Auckland's largest real estate brokers, says the residential property market edged up again in June.
Topics: business, economy, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland property market
Duration: 44"

12:23
Midday Markets for 5 July 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'58"

12:23
Midday Sports News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand women's football team for next month's Olympics has been named, coach Tony Readings is confident his side can win a medal in Rio.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'55"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 5 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:10
Hawkes Bay Rapper hits big time
BODY:
He's only been rapping for a year, and he's already topping the iTune's charts. Hawke's Bay musician, Tom Francis, hadn't even played an instrument a year ago. But the 21-year-old already has his own Hollywood success story.
EXTENDED BODY:
He's only been rapping for a year, and he's already topping the iTune's charts. Hawke's Bay musician, Tom Francis, hadn't even played an instrument a year ago. Now he's knocking global superstar Drake off the number one spot, and it all came from a chance recording session in Hollywood.
His debut album Underestimated launched several weeks ago under the label Black Market Enterprises.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Tom Francis, rap
Duration: 13'48"

13:15
Kaitangata Goes Global
BODY:
The small Otago town of Kaitangata has been inundated with thousands of overseas enquiries, coming in to bid for the land-and-house deal on offer. The Kaitangata Promotions public relations facilitator, Evan Dick tells Jesse about the town's stratospheric popularity boom.
Topics: business, housing
Regions: Otago
Tags: Kaitangata, land-and-house deal
Duration: 7'06"

13:20
Juno reaches Jupiter
BODY:
NASA's Juno spacecraft has arrived at Jupiter to study the solar system's largest planet. From a unique polar orbit, Juno will repeatedly dive between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation. Michelle Thaller is a planetary scientist with NASA.
EXTENDED BODY:
NASA's Juno spacecraft has arrived at Jupiter to study the solar system's largest planet. The satellite, which left Earth five years ago, had to fire a rocket engine to slow its approach to the planet and get caught by its gravity.
A sequence of tones transmitted from the spacecraft confirmed the braking manoeuvre had gone as planned.
From a unique polar orbit, Juno will repeatedly dive between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation.
Juno's primary goal is to improve understanding of Jupiter's formation and evolution. The spacecraft will investigate the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere.
The spacecraft was expected to arrive at Jupiter and execute a perfect braking manoeuvre to enter the orbit correctly, starting at 3.18pm New Zealand time, taking 35 minutes.
It will now remain in place for a 20-month-long dance around the planet.
Michelle Thaller is a planetary scientist with NASA.
Read an edited excerpt from their interview below:
There’s a belt around Jupiter isn’t there? But there seems to be a lot of rocks and asteroids in this ring. I am a bit worried that Juno is going to get hit...
Yes, well that would make two of us! There’s actually two major risks that we have to deal with. One is that we will be passing through the ring plane. Like Saturn, Jupiter has a ring. It is much, much smaller than Saturn’s ring (in fact it is not visible from Earth at all) but there are bits of rock, things that are like meteorites, bits of things and dust.
We don’t have the rings very well characterised, so we believe that we’re going to be passing over the planet underneath the ring, where there shouldn’t be much debris. We’ve had other orbiters that have gone fairly near Jupiter and they haven’t had problems with the ring, so we’re optimistic about that. But there is always the chance that there is a little rock at the wrong place at the wrong time and that could do serious damage to the spacecraft and there’s nothing we can do about that. That’s just something we’re going to have to cross our fingers for.
The other thing that we’ve tried our hardest to mitigate is - Jupiter has a belt. It has an intense belt of radiation. There are very, very high-energy particles. There are electrons travelling very close to the speed of light in orbit around Jupiter and we have to fly in on the inside of these radiation belts and we will end up crossing a bit of the radiation belts twice. Of course, we’ve made our spacecraft strong enough that we think it will handle that, hopefully easily, but there are always surprises.
Sorry for the stupid question, I thought a ring and a belt were the same thing. Are they in the same place or are they in different places?
Well, they’re both near the equator of Jupiter. The radiation belt actually extends like a giant donut around Jupiter. They actually cover most of the diameter of the planet. The ring is a very thin thing that goes around the equator of Jupiter. So the radiation belt is much bigger.
You’re powered by the sun, aren’t you?
That’s right, it’s a solar-powered mission. And this is the farthest away that we have ever had a solar-power-panelled mission. Juno itself doesn’t take a lot of energy to keep the instruments running. That’s by design. We have to be very, very stingy about the energy. It’s about the same amount of energy that would power a blender. But it’s running some of the most sophisticated science instruments ever built.
Jupiter almost has its own solar system doesn’t it?
The moons of Jupiter are massive things. The largest moon of Jupiter is Ganymede and we hope that Juno will be returning an image of Ganymede in the next couple of weeks. Ganymede is very close to the size of Mars and that is a big thing. Ganymede actually at the moment has the record for the most amount of liquid under an icy shell. We think that Ganymede has oceans that are 100km deep and that’s incredible, when you think about something the size of Mars with 100km-deep oceans.
What are you most excited to see, Michelle?
So many things. There are auroras on Jupiter that are far bigger than our planet, we’re going to be flying over the poles. I’m a scientist, I like squiggly lines. I’m looking forward to the readings that will tell us how much water is on Jupiter, which will give us clues about where Jupiter formed and how it changed over time. We think it may have moved in the solar system over time … we think it may have come into the orbit where Mars is now and moved back out again. I’m looking forward to the microwave radiometer, which is going to see 500 miles [more than 800km] down into the clouds. I want to see what the red spot is really based on, how deep does it go, how does it work. I am looking forward to so many things. I am looking forward to the best pictures we have ever taken of Jupiter coming out.
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: NASA, Juno, Jupiter, space
Duration: 10'43"

13:30
Dan Slevin on the movies of Prince
BODY:
RNZ's film guru, Dan Slevin of Widescreen, on the films of Prince who died in April.
Topics: music, arts, movies
Regions:
Tags: Prince, film, Purple Rain, Under the Cherry Moon, Graffiti Bridge
Duration: 6'55"

13:45
Favourite album - Cool And Steady And Easy
BODY:
Brooklyn Funk Essentials' "Cool And Steady And Easy".
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'41"

14:10
Books with Steph Soper
BODY:
Steph Soper is the Marketing Communications Manager at the New Zealand Book Council. She talks about crime writing and the Ngaio Marsh Award.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: fiction, crime writing, New Zealand crime writing
Duration: 6'44"

14:20
Sharon O'Neill on making Words
BODY:
In the early 80's it was impossible to pick up a music magazine, or a woman's publication with reading about or seeing a photo of Sharon O'Neill. Today we feature "Words", her 1980 album, and the former Nelsonian joins the show from Sydney.
EXTENDED BODY:
In the 1980's she was one of our most visible entertainers. There was much speculation, in the press, about just how much money was paid by CBS to sign her to their label, and how much legendary American producers Jay Lewis and John Boylan had been paid to make her albums.
This pint sized former Nelsonian had fronted bands in both Christchurch and Wellington before gaining Television exposure on "The Entertainers." She sang her own composition on this early TV talent show, and although she finished third in the contest, she had won the hearts of many New Zealanders.
Indeed, in the early 80's it was impossible to pick up a music magazine, or a woman's publication with reading about or seeing a photo of Sharon O'Neill
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Sharon O'neill
Duration: 40'27"

15:10
Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are?
BODY:
Animal intelligence has been underestimated for centuries according to world renowned biologist Frans de Waal. He challenges our assumptions about what animals are capable and wonders if we are just not clever enough to understand animals in his new book, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?
EXTENDED BODY:
Animal intelligence has been underestimated for centuries according to world renowned biologist Frans de Waal.
He says the human ego has gotten in the way of studying animal behaviour and we’ve underestimated animals, who often behavioural research, human intelligence is the touchstone and our belief that we are top dog on the evolutionary ladder.
Dr de Waal believes that a different approach will help us better understand animals and ourselves.
His new book is called Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?
He talks to Jesse Mulligan.
Read an edited excerpt from their interview below:
JM: Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are?
FD: I think over the last century we have not shown that intelligence. But I think in the last 20 years or so, we have. So I think in the pervious century animal intelligence could barely be mentioned. So animals would learn, and animals would have instincts, so intelligence was not a word we used in cognition. [It was] certainly not a word we used until maybe the 1980s when more scientists, than just myself, started talking about animal intelligence. And more recently we have developed much better tests, so we have animal intelligence tests that are much more sophisticated than what we used to have and as a result, there are all these new findings coming out, not just on apes, but on crows, on dolphins and dogs and all sorts of animals now.
JM: So 50 or 100 years ago, what would have been their reaction if a researcher declared that a monkey could think as well as just act out of instinct?
FD: Well we know what the reaction was because Wolfgang Köhler was a German scientist who 100 years ago set up these tests where he would hang a banana up high and he would give his chimpanzees boxes and sticks and the chimps would try to get them, but they would never get the banana and then he described that at some point they would sit down and look around and stare at these things for a couple of minutes. Then all of a sudden they would stack the boxes on top of each other, they would also put sticks inside each other to make them longer. And he said this was a thinking process. This was not trial and error learning, they were thinking it through and coming up with a solution. He said they were thinking beings. And all the scientific world went into a rage.
JM: You write that in our haste to prove that animals aren’t as smart as people we’ve forgotten that people aren’t animals. Can you explain that?
FD: That comes about because when you talk about animal intelligence they accuse you of anthropomorphism. And they say you should not compare animals with humans and that it’s not a good strategy because we are very different, humans are very different from animals and so they forget that humans are animals and for me, as biologist, I look at human intelligence as a form of animals intelligence. It’s not fundamentally different, it has a few extra elements and it’s more complicated but it’s not fundamentally different.
When people accuse you of anthropomorphism they forget that humans do have intentions, they do have desires, they can think about issues they can process these emotions.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: animal intelligence, animals, biology
Duration: 22'40"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 5 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'05"

21:46
Taniwha - the human-powered submarine
BODY:
Team Taniwha, from the University of Auckland, has designed and built a human-powered submarine, that has borrowed ideas from leather-jacket fish, and currently holds the world record for a non-propellor submarine.
EXTENDED BODY:
By day, Iain Anderson is a bioengineer at the University of Auckland, who works on artificial muscles, and Chris Walker is a bioengineering PhD student. By night, they are part of a small team developing and building a fish-inspired human-powered submarine.
Team Taniwha is one of 12 student teams - and the only one from the southern hemisphere - competing at the 2016 European International Submarine Races.
The basic rules of the sport are straightforward – each team designs, builds and races a flooded submarine. The sub is piloted and powered by a single scuba diver, who must be fully enclosed within the hull of the machine.
There are two categories of sub – propeller and non-propeller and it is in the latter, more difficult class, that Team Taniwha is competing.
This is the third year that the team have entered the competition, and in 2015 they won the 'Speed Award' for non-propeller drive, clocking a fast 3.65 knots.
Iain Anderson says that propeller technology is well advanced, but the non-propeller category requires much more inventive thinking. He says that while most teams use a tail that goes up and down, like a whale or dolphin tail, Taniwha uses fins, located on the top and bottom of the sub, that move rapidly back and forth.
Iain says their inspiration came from the leatherjacket fish, including an articulated tail that flexes left and right to turn the sub.
But he cautions that they haven’t been literal in how they have borrowed from nature.
Chris is the pilot, who has to endure the cramped interior of the small sub as he pedals and steers it.
For the 2016 race he has to be able to sprint for 100 metres, and then steer the sub through a slalom course to test its maneuverability.
Iain doesn’t see any immediate spin-offs from the submarine, except perhaps in the development of an underwater bicycle. Instead, he sees it as launch-pad
“It’s a bit like Formula One. You don’t expect to mass produce a Formula One racing car, but you can test different things out in it on the track which can eventually find use in ordinary cars.”
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: Submarine, underwater vessel, design, race
Duration: 12'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
[image:73526:third] no metadata
1:10 Hawkes Bay Rapper hits big time
He's only been rapping for a year, and he's already topping the iTune's charts. Hawke's Bay musician, Tom Francis, hadn't even played an instrument a year ago. Now he's knocking global superstar Drake off the number one spot, and it all came from a chance recording session in Hollywood.
His debut album Underestimated launched several weeks ago under the label Black Market Enterprises.
1:15 Kaitangata Goes Global
The eyes of the world have been on the small Otago town of Kaitangata. The Clutha Mayor has been inundated with thousands of overseas enquiries, coming in to bid for the land-and-house deal on offer. Major news outlets throughout the world have reported on the offer. And they haven't always got the facts right. The sale of further sections has been put on hold, and a meeting was held yesterday, to establish clearer criteria around the sales.
The Kaitangata Promotions public relations facilitator, Evan Dick tells Jesse about the town's stratospheric popularity boom.
1:20 Juno reaches Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft has arrived at Jupiter to study the solar system's largest planet. From a unique polar orbit, Juno will repeatedly dive between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation.
[gallery:2219]
Juno's primary goal is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's formation and evolution. The spacecraft will investigate the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere.
[embed] https://youtu.be/dKP28_VgMtU
Michelle Thaller is a planetary scientist with NASA.
1:30 Dan Slevin on the movies of Prince
1:40 Favourite album: Brooklyn Funk Essentials "Cool And Steady And Easy"
2:10 Books with Steph Soper
2:20 Great New Zealand Album: Words by Sharon O'Neill
[image:73458:full]
In the 1980's she was one of our most visible entertainers. There was much speculation, in the press, about just how much money was paid by CBS to sign her to their label, and how much legendary American producers Jay Lewis and John Boylan had been paid to make her albums.
This pint sized former Nelsonian had fronted bands in both Christchurch and Wellington before gaining Television exposure on "The Entertainers." She sang her own composition on this early TV talent show, and although she finished third in the contest, she had won the hearts of many New Zealanders.
Indeed, in the early 80's it was impossible to pick up a music magazine, or a woman's publication with reading about or seeing a photo of Sharon O'Neill
[embed] https://youtu.be/EgfgVIrCYWs
3:10 Are we Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals are?
Animal intelligence has been underestimated for centuries according to world renowned biologist Frans de Waal. He challenges our assumptions about what animals are capable and wonders if we are just not clever enough to understand animals in his new book, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?
[image:72239:full]
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1 - 4pm
Tuesday 5th July
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Tom Francis
TITLE: Who's Real
COMP: Tom Francis
ALBUM: Underestimated
LABEL: iTunes
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Brooklyn Funk Essentials
TITLE: Take The L Train
COMP: Brooklyn Funk Essentials
ALBUM: Cool And Steady And Easy
LABEL: Doublemoon
ARTIST: Brooklyn Funk Essentials
TITLE: The Creator Has A Master Plan
COMP: Brooklyn Funk Essentials
ALBUM: Cool And Steady And Easy
LABEL: Doublemoon
ADDITIONAL SONG:
ARTIST: Tha Feelstyle
TITLE: Su' Ga Ea'
COMP: Kutialo, Morton, Ngatae
ALBUM: Break It To Pieces
LABEL: FMR
THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM:
ARTIST: Sharon O'Neill
TITLE: Words
COMP: Sharon O'Neill
ALBUM: Words
LABEL: CBS
ARTIST: Sharon O'Neill
TITLE: Asian Paradise
COMP: Sharon O'Neill
ALBUM: Words
LABEL: CBS
ARTIST: Sharon O'Neill
TITLE: Don't Let Love Go (duet with Jon Stevens) EDIT
COMP: Brian & Brenda Russell
ALBUM: Non-album single
LABEL: CBS
ARTIST: Sharon O'Neill
TITLE: How Do You Talk to Boys?
COMP: Steve Kipner‎
ALBUM: Words
LABEL: CBS
FEATURE INTERVIEW:
ARTIST: DeLux Project
TITLE: Rona
COMP: Vince Harder, McCarthy
ALBUM: DeLuxe Project
LABEL: Warner

PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: The La de Das
TITLE: How Is The Air Up There
COMP: Artie Kornfeld, Steve Duboff
ALBUM: The La De Das
LABEL: Zodiac

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 5 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'05"

16:05
The Panel with Josie McNaught and Nevil Gibson (Part 1)
BODY:
Topics - Sue Chetwin from Consumer NZ talks about what you can do about dodgy cable laying. Uber seems to be making a dent in Christchurch with drivers from other companies reporting a loss in income. Nigel Farage has resigned after the Brexit vote. UK TV host has reversed from Top Gear. A proposal to make Wellington's Lambton Quay a pedestrian-only zone.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'15"

16:06
The Panel with Josie McNaught and Nevil Gibson (Part 2)
BODY:
Topics - Would different building design be the answer to air control. Sydney Morning Herald political correspondent David Wroe brings us an election update. Are New Zealand's (Australian-owned) banks in a vulnerable position. Hurricanes' player Victor Vito went undercover to witness bad sideline behaviour - by actors. A major survey of businesses found managers have concerns the Auckland traffic and housing difficulties are taking a toll on employees.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'46"

16:10
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the panelists Josie McNaught and Nevil Gibson have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'37"

16:12
Chorus of discontent over cables
BODY:
Sue Chetwin from Consumer NZ talks about what you can do about dodgy cable laying.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Consumer NZ, cables, faulty cables, fibre-optics, fibre-optic cables
Duration: 5'17"

16:17
Uber upsets ChCh taxi drivers
BODY:
Uber seems to be making a dent in Christchurch with local drivers from other companies reporting a loss in income.
Topics: business, money
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Uber, taxis
Duration: 4'12"

16:20
Politicans join the Brexit
BODY:
First David Cameron now Nigel Farage has resigned after the Brexit vote.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nigel Farage, UKIP, UK, EU, Brexit
Duration: 4'40"

16:27
Chris Evans Top Gear reverse
BODY:
It didn't last long - UK TV host has reversed from Top Gear.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Top Gear, UK, TV, Chris Evans
Duration: 1'13"

16:29
Lambton Quay for walkers
BODY:
A proposal to make Wellington's Lambton Quay a pedestrian-only zone.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Lambton Quay, pedestrian only
Duration: 3'06"

16:35
Is air con drying you out?
BODY:
Dry itcy skin? It could be the air con.
Topics: health, technology
Regions:
Tags: air conditioning
Duration: 4'12"

16:38
Panel Says
BODY:
What the panelists Josie McNaught and Nevil Gibson would like to talk about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'20"

16:42
Aussie election
BODY:
Sydney Morning Herald political correspondent David Wroe brings us an election update.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian politics, Australian elections
Duration: 10'24"

16:52
Banks on the brink
BODY:
Are New Zealands (Australain-owned) banks in a vulnerable position?
Topics: economy, business, money
Regions:
Tags: Australain-owned banks, New Zealands banks, banks, banking
Duration: 1'47"

16:53
Victor Vito's sideline acting debut
BODY:
Hurricanes' player Victor Vito went undercover to witness bad sideline behaviour - by actors.
Topics: sport, life and society
Regions:
Tags: referees, sideline behaviour
Duration: 1'52"

16:56
Employers concerned about Auckland workers
BODY:
A major survey of businesses found managers have concerns the Auckland traffic and housing difficulties are taking a toll on employees.
Topics: money, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Employees, workers, Auckland traffic, Auckland housing market
Duration: 4'06"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 5th July 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
House prices rise at fastest pace since 2004
BODY:
House prices have been rising at their fastest pace since 2004, with the average value in Auckland is now $975,000 and prices rising in Tauranga, Wellington and Hamilton.
Topics: housing, economy
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland housing market, house prices
Duration: 3'58"

17:12
PM forced to defend Government's housing plan
BODY:
The Prime Minister has been forced to defend the Government's plan to deal with the housing crisis, while continuing to deny that there is any such housing crisis.
Topics: housing, politics, economy, money
Regions:
Tags: housing crisis, housing market, house prices, John Key
Duration: 3'05"

17:16
Uber says it's not trying to replace taxis
BODY:
Uber says it's not trying to replace the taxi industry, despite calls from taxi drivers for the government to crack down on it for unfair practices. Mohamed Hassan reports.
Topics: business, law
Regions:
Tags: Uber, taxis, taxi industry
Duration: 4'05"

17:17
WINZ housing changes could force family into Te Puea marae
BODY:
WINZ's newest policy to help desperate families into emergency housing came into effect on July 1 - but one family says things have got worse, not better.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: WINZ, Te Puea marae, emergency housing
Duration: 4'18"

17:21
Unions agree to talks under threat of government intervention
BODY:
Unions representing aviation security staff in Auckland and Wellington have agreed to last minute talks over contract negotiations, with the threat of government intervention hanging over them.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: aviation unions, aviation security staff
Duration: 2'59"

17:27
Window washers target Remuera Intermediate students
BODY:
Police say arrests have been made after two incidents where Remuera Intermediate students were confronted and stolen from by window washers. Principal Tom Beckett joins Checkpoint.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Remuera Intermediate, window washers
Duration: 4'33"

17:33
Evening Business for 5 July 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'02"

17:36
Many challenges ahead for Australia's Linda Burney
BODY:
Almost 250 years after Captain James Cook landed in Botany Bay and declared Australia "Terra Nullius", the Australian House of Representatives has its first indigenous woman as an MP.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian politics, Linda Burney
Duration: 5'44"

17:41
Gang members in prison must stay behind bars, says Collins
BODY:
Corrections Minister Judith Collins won't allow any gang members to volunteer in prisons, saying the only place for them in prison is behind bars.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Judith Collins, Corrections, gang members, volunteering
Duration: 3'07"

17:50
Juno spacecraft to unlock Jupiter's secrets
BODY:
A NASA spacecraft has successfully entered the orbit of our solar system's largest planet, Jupiter. NASA scientist Jared Espley joins Checkpoint.
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: space, NASA, astronomy, Jupiter, Juno
Duration: 4'16"

17:53
Cambridge parrot te reo trio meet Andrew McRae
BODY:
Waikato reporter Andrew McRae thought he'd make an exception for Maori Language Week when he heard the intriguing tale of Wayne Morris and his 11 parrots in Cambridge.
Topics: language
Regions:
Tags: parrots, te reo Maori
Duration: 5'11"

17:58
Chip the pitbull puppy put down
BODY:
The pitbull puppy found abandoned in an Auckland rubbish bin has been put down by council staff because of his poor health.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Pitbulls, abandoned animals, Auckland Council
Duration: 1'54"

18:09
"We just can't carry on living in Auckland like this"
BODY:
New figures today showed house prices are rising at their fastest pace in 12 years as the Government comes under renewed pressure to defend its plan to deal with the housing crisis. With Auckland Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland housing market, house prices, housing market
Duration: 6'51"

18:20
Former Kaitangata resident heads home
BODY:
Dave Ferguson, who grew up in Kaitangata, is heading home after 17 years in Christchurch and Timaru.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: Kaitangata, land and house deal, Kaitangata Promotions
Duration: 4'28"

18:24
Te reo calls for Black Sticks in Rio
BODY:
The women's Black Sticks hockey team will be using Maori-only team calls at the Rio Olympics next month. Veteran player Kayla Whitelock joins Checkpoint to explain.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio Olympics 2016, Black Sticks, hockey
Duration: 4'53"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 5 July 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Maori Language Week in the House begins with the Speaker, David Carter, reading the daily prayer in te reo. While several MPs ask questions in te reo many are non-plussed when they can't find their headsets to hear the interpretation of the answers from the Minister for Maori Development, Te Ururoa Flavell. Seven of the daily dozen questions for oral answer by ministers are about housing. The government's insistence that it has a comprehensive plan to increase supply of housing attracts such loud ridicule from the Opposition benches that the Speaker has to intervene. Complaints in questions from Labour's Pacific Island Affairs spokesman, Su'a William Sio, about declining home ownership among Pacific peoples is in contrast to an announcement from the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment, Steven Joyce, of new centres for Asia/Pacific excellence.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Mike Carter - Brexit: Walking from Liverpool to London

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - Peter Kerr - China's Hidden Coast (pt 2)
BODY:
This week's Odyssey belongs to Peter Kerr, who a few weeks back told us about his cycling adventure down China's south east coast. Peter's back from Okaihau in Northland.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel
Duration: 17'56"

20:12
Nights' Pundit - Feminism
BODY:
Lipstick, waxing and heels - oppression or choice - equality for women with feminist blogger Deborah Russell.
Topics: life and society, media, history, identity
Regions:
Tags: feminism
Duration: 20'36"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:73545:full] no metadata
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Peter Kerr
Peter Kerr shares further tales from his cycling adventure down China's south east coast.
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 5 July
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson; a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams; and an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson; a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams; and an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Jay Clarkson, Andre Williams, Terry Reid, music, music review
Duration: 29'27"

19:30
Spur by Jay Clarkson
BODY:
Nick Bollinger digests a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger digests a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson.
Jay Clarkson isn’t part of the recent rash of guitar-wielding singer-songwriters, though there are moments when she could be mistaken for one of them. She has been making music since before most of the current crop were born, and will likely be making music after many of them have put their guitars up on Trade Me.
Her performing roots go back to Christchurch in the early 80s, where she fronted a succession of bands – The Playthings, They Were Expendable, Breathing Cage – reaching her highest profile in 1989 when the latter group won the coveted Rheineck Rock Award, a brewery-sponsored prize that gave the winner the budget to make an international-sized studio album. The result was Misericord, the biggest, most rhythm-driven treatment of any set of Clarkson songs so far. Perhaps it was timing, or perhaps the essentially inward nature of the material, but despite the big build-up the album never became more than a cult favourite, and after a tour or two the band split.
It would be nearly a decade before Clarkson released another album, 1999’s Kindle, released solely under her own name, and she’s maintained a low-key solo career ever since, with new collections arriving at regular if rather protracted intervals.
Spur is the latest of these, and it follows what seems to be a pattern, by being even more solo than the one that preceded it. It has been a constant process of stripping away; as though she’s testing the strength of her material by seeing how little reinforcement her performances need. And this time they require less than ever.
Solitude is, in a way, the theme of these songs. Listen to them in the order and they form a kind of narrative - if not quite a novel in musical form then a set of interlinked vignettes. The sequence begins with the protagonist (Clarkson refers to her only as ‘she’) behind the wheel of a car, heading for a destination as yet unknown. She has some history, she’s made some ‘bad calls’ in the past, but that was long ago. Anything could happen, good or bad.
Mostly Clarkson’s performances here are solo, or augmented by just one additional colour – a harmonica, a slide guitar or, in one case, a lovely unexpected string arrangement. But what is her travelling, disappearing protagonist looking for?
In ‘Everything’s Blue’ Clarkson introduces a second character – ‘he’, to match the ‘she’ of the first three tunes - and the song reveals a little of his blue frame of mind. What Clarkson does next is to cleverly engineer a meeting between the two characters.
There’s something not just very New Zealand but specifically Southland about these songs. Just listening to them, you can feel the frost in the air and on the ground under your feet. The lay of the land seems to speak to the mood of the characters, and yet Clarkson never tips over into gothic caricature; there’s warmth here too - veges cooking on the stove, a feeling of hopefulness, of possibility.
Does Clarkson’s song cycle have a happy ending? That’s for the listener to figure out. Clarkson concludes this mature, understated, beautifully controlled album not with a lyric but a beautiful instrumental - the album’s title track - that seems to have its own story to tell.
Songs featured: Luckies, She Disappears, Big Old House, Everything’s Blue, Walking Boots, Stay, Spur.
Spur is available on Zelle Records & from www.jayclarkson.com
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Jay Clarkson, music, music review
Duration: 12'19"

19:30
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City by Andre Williams
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams.
If opinions vary as to when and where rock’n’roll’s big bang took place, then the origins of rap are even more contentious. Andre Williams’s career goes back to the early days of rock’n’roll, but he just might have been the original rapper as well. He doesn’t sing so much as vocalise in rhyme: a kind of street-corner oratory that he pioneered in the 50s with hits like ‘The Greasy Chicken’ and ‘Jail Bait’. Groups like The Coasters took the style to more refined levels but Williams always kept it ‘street’, whether he was promoting a new dance step or offering words of sexual caution.
Fast-forward sixty years and Williams is still with us. It’s been a chequered career - a scattering of R&B classics interspersed with long spells of inactivity and, in the last decade or two, rediscovery. The Cramps led the way by covering ‘Jail Bait’ and Williams went on to record with groups like the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and The Dirtbombs.
It’s from this school of white R&B that the musicians on his latest record are drawn. Members of The Gories, Outrageous Cherry and the Dirty Three all play, and they default to a sludgy, psychedelic funk.
Williams attempts one or two melodies over the course of the album’s 35 minutes, though even these are usually prefaced by a monologue. Williams freestyles about whatever happens to be on his mind, whether it’s a former lover sent to the electric chair or his current absence from the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame.
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City also offers some commentary on the political fate of his adopted hometown. He calls himself ‘a Democrat with a Republican attitude’. His single ‘Blame It On Obama’ from a couple of years back was a lovely piece of pro-President satire, and with its primitive gospel piano felt almost like something he would have done back in the 50s.
The psych-rock settings of this album, on the other hand, feel more like someone else’s idea of what an Andre Williams record should sound like. Andre himself, though, sounds much the same as ever. Grizzled, grouchy, sometimes hilarious, sometimes scary.
Songs featured: I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City, Times, Mississippi Sue, Hall Of Fame, The Greasy Chicken, Jail Bait.
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City is available on Bloodshot Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Andre Williams
Duration: 8'43"

19:30
The Other Side Of The River by Terry Reid
BODY:
Nick Bollinger delights in an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger delights in an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
The story most often told about Terry Reid is that, back in 1968, he turned down an offer from Jimmy Page to join a new band he was putting together. That turned out to be Led Zeppelin, which paints Reid unfairly as a kind of Pete Best figure. It’s true, his career seems to have been dogged with poor choices and bad luck, but along the way he’s also made some great music. And a little more of it has just come to light.
The Other Side Of The River is essentially an album of outtakes from Reid’s 1973 album River, a record that - like just about everything he ever recorded - was a lot better than the sales suggested.
Mostly these are alternative versions of the River songs; bluesy, raw and often incomplete. But as well as showing what a great singer Reid could be, they also find him fronting perhaps the best band he ever had. At one point it included drummer Alan White – briefly suspended between Plastic Ono Band and Yes – and great American guitarist and electric violin player David Lindley, fresh from his 60s band Kaleidoscope and yet to join Jackson Browne, who he would eventually stay with for years. And you can hear them both playing up a riot on a loose, funky track like this the one that opens the set, ‘Let’s Go Down’.
If I had to offer a definitive example of Anglo soul, this would do fine. Reid’s singing shows the same immersion in black vocal styles that shaped so many of his British contemporaries – Steve Marriott, Paul Rodgers, Rod Stewart – and I’ve often thought he really does belong in that company.
Terry Reid has his followers. Jimmy Page clearly thought highly of him. Another record, 1976’s Seeds Of Memory was produced by his friend and admirer Graham Nash. More recently, Jack White covered his ‘Rich Kid Blues’ – virtually note for note – with the Raconteurs. Reid, now 66, still performs regularly, mostly around his adopted home of Los Angeles, and though it’s a long time since he’s made any new recordings, it sounds like those legendary lungs are still intact.
Meanwhile, archival releases like The Other Side Of The River continue to feed his cultish reputation. For those already convinced of Reid’s place in the pantheon, this latest album will be essential. For others who might need some persuasion, better to start with the original River album, or the great 1969 record simply titled Terry Reid.
Songs featured: Let’s Go Down, Avenue (F# Boogie), Listen With Eyes, Anyway.
The Other Side Of The River is available on Future Days Recordings.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Terry Reid
Duration: 8'27"

7:30 The Sampler
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson; a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams; and an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Feminism
Lipstick - a blessing or a curse on women? Feminist blogger Deborah Russell examines the costs of trying to achieve beauty ideals and, on the flipside, the costs of refusing to engage.
[image_crop:12450:full] no metadata
8:30 Window on the World
America's Independent Voters. America is in the middle of its most volatile presidential election season in half a century. The traditional political parties are being shaken to the core by voters who are not necessarily Democrats or Republicans, so called 'independent' voters. Michael Goldfarb travels to the key state of Ohio - a state that has voted for every presidential winner over the last 50 years - to meet with independent voters. He explores the anger that is motivating independents this year. He places their views in the deeper historical context of changes in American society - changes that have hit Ohio hard.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Don’t Be Evil: Technology and Power. Google famously said "don't be evil" in its mission statement. But what does this actually mean in practice for the internet giants like Google, Facebook and Amazon that have transformed our world ? Our Tuesday Feature tonight is a BBC discussion in which Owen Bennett Jones and guests consider the duty of large technology companies such as these to act responsibly and use this power wisely.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 WOMAD 2016
Tonight, the first in a series of concerts recorded at this year's WOMAD. It features a live performance from Te Whanau A Apanui, the 2015 Te Matatini Kapa Haka champions. From the East Coast of the North Island Te Whanau A Apanui are taking Kapa Haka and Te Reo to a global audience.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 5 July
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson; a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams; and an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson; a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams; and an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Jay Clarkson, Andre Williams, Terry Reid, music, music review
Duration: 29'27"

19:30
Spur by Jay Clarkson
BODY:
Nick Bollinger digests a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger digests a solitary song cycle from Southland singer-songwriter Jay Clarkson.
Jay Clarkson isn’t part of the recent rash of guitar-wielding singer-songwriters, though there are moments when she could be mistaken for one of them. She has been making music since before most of the current crop were born, and will likely be making music after many of them have put their guitars up on Trade Me.
Her performing roots go back to Christchurch in the early 80s, where she fronted a succession of bands – The Playthings, They Were Expendable, Breathing Cage – reaching her highest profile in 1989 when the latter group won the coveted Rheineck Rock Award, a brewery-sponsored prize that gave the winner the budget to make an international-sized studio album. The result was Misericord, the biggest, most rhythm-driven treatment of any set of Clarkson songs so far. Perhaps it was timing, or perhaps the essentially inward nature of the material, but despite the big build-up the album never became more than a cult favourite, and after a tour or two the band split.
It would be nearly a decade before Clarkson released another album, 1999’s Kindle, released solely under her own name, and she’s maintained a low-key solo career ever since, with new collections arriving at regular if rather protracted intervals.
Spur is the latest of these, and it follows what seems to be a pattern, by being even more solo than the one that preceded it. It has been a constant process of stripping away; as though she’s testing the strength of her material by seeing how little reinforcement her performances need. And this time they require less than ever.
Solitude is, in a way, the theme of these songs. Listen to them in the order and they form a kind of narrative - if not quite a novel in musical form then a set of interlinked vignettes. The sequence begins with the protagonist (Clarkson refers to her only as ‘she’) behind the wheel of a car, heading for a destination as yet unknown. She has some history, she’s made some ‘bad calls’ in the past, but that was long ago. Anything could happen, good or bad.
Mostly Clarkson’s performances here are solo, or augmented by just one additional colour – a harmonica, a slide guitar or, in one case, a lovely unexpected string arrangement. But what is her travelling, disappearing protagonist looking for?
In ‘Everything’s Blue’ Clarkson introduces a second character – ‘he’, to match the ‘she’ of the first three tunes - and the song reveals a little of his blue frame of mind. What Clarkson does next is to cleverly engineer a meeting between the two characters.
There’s something not just very New Zealand but specifically Southland about these songs. Just listening to them, you can feel the frost in the air and on the ground under your feet. The lay of the land seems to speak to the mood of the characters, and yet Clarkson never tips over into gothic caricature; there’s warmth here too - veges cooking on the stove, a feeling of hopefulness, of possibility.
Does Clarkson’s song cycle have a happy ending? That’s for the listener to figure out. Clarkson concludes this mature, understated, beautifully controlled album not with a lyric but a beautiful instrumental - the album’s title track - that seems to have its own story to tell.
Songs featured: Luckies, She Disappears, Big Old House, Everything’s Blue, Walking Boots, Stay, Spur.
Spur is available on Zelle Records & from www.jayclarkson.com
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Jay Clarkson, music, music review
Duration: 12'19"

19:30
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City by Andre Williams
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a terse, opinionated set from rock'n'roll original Andre Williams.
If opinions vary as to when and where rock’n’roll’s big bang took place, then the origins of rap are even more contentious. Andre Williams’s career goes back to the early days of rock’n’roll, but he just might have been the original rapper as well. He doesn’t sing so much as vocalise in rhyme: a kind of street-corner oratory that he pioneered in the 50s with hits like ‘The Greasy Chicken’ and ‘Jail Bait’. Groups like The Coasters took the style to more refined levels but Williams always kept it ‘street’, whether he was promoting a new dance step or offering words of sexual caution.
Fast-forward sixty years and Williams is still with us. It’s been a chequered career - a scattering of R&B classics interspersed with long spells of inactivity and, in the last decade or two, rediscovery. The Cramps led the way by covering ‘Jail Bait’ and Williams went on to record with groups like the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and The Dirtbombs.
It’s from this school of white R&B that the musicians on his latest record are drawn. Members of The Gories, Outrageous Cherry and the Dirty Three all play, and they default to a sludgy, psychedelic funk.
Williams attempts one or two melodies over the course of the album’s 35 minutes, though even these are usually prefaced by a monologue. Williams freestyles about whatever happens to be on his mind, whether it’s a former lover sent to the electric chair or his current absence from the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame.
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City also offers some commentary on the political fate of his adopted hometown. He calls himself ‘a Democrat with a Republican attitude’. His single ‘Blame It On Obama’ from a couple of years back was a lovely piece of pro-President satire, and with its primitive gospel piano felt almost like something he would have done back in the 50s.
The psych-rock settings of this album, on the other hand, feel more like someone else’s idea of what an Andre Williams record should sound like. Andre himself, though, sounds much the same as ever. Grizzled, grouchy, sometimes hilarious, sometimes scary.
Songs featured: I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City, Times, Mississippi Sue, Hall Of Fame, The Greasy Chicken, Jail Bait.
I Wanna Go Back To Detroit City is available on Bloodshot Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Andre Williams
Duration: 8'43"

19:30
The Other Side Of The River by Terry Reid
BODY:
Nick Bollinger delights in an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger delights in an archival release from big-voiced British cult figure Terry Reid.
The story most often told about Terry Reid is that, back in 1968, he turned down an offer from Jimmy Page to join a new band he was putting together. That turned out to be Led Zeppelin, which paints Reid unfairly as a kind of Pete Best figure. It’s true, his career seems to have been dogged with poor choices and bad luck, but along the way he’s also made some great music. And a little more of it has just come to light.
The Other Side Of The River is essentially an album of outtakes from Reid’s 1973 album River, a record that - like just about everything he ever recorded - was a lot better than the sales suggested.
Mostly these are alternative versions of the River songs; bluesy, raw and often incomplete. But as well as showing what a great singer Reid could be, they also find him fronting perhaps the best band he ever had. At one point it included drummer Alan White – briefly suspended between Plastic Ono Band and Yes – and great American guitarist and electric violin player David Lindley, fresh from his 60s band Kaleidoscope and yet to join Jackson Browne, who he would eventually stay with for years. And you can hear them both playing up a riot on a loose, funky track like this the one that opens the set, ‘Let’s Go Down’.
If I had to offer a definitive example of Anglo soul, this would do fine. Reid’s singing shows the same immersion in black vocal styles that shaped so many of his British contemporaries – Steve Marriott, Paul Rodgers, Rod Stewart – and I’ve often thought he really does belong in that company.
Terry Reid has his followers. Jimmy Page clearly thought highly of him. Another record, 1976’s Seeds Of Memory was produced by his friend and admirer Graham Nash. More recently, Jack White covered his ‘Rich Kid Blues’ – virtually note for note – with the Raconteurs. Reid, now 66, still performs regularly, mostly around his adopted home of Los Angeles, and though it’s a long time since he’s made any new recordings, it sounds like those legendary lungs are still intact.
Meanwhile, archival releases like The Other Side Of The River continue to feed his cultish reputation. For those already convinced of Reid’s place in the pantheon, this latest album will be essential. For others who might need some persuasion, better to start with the original River album, or the great 1969 record simply titled Terry Reid.
Songs featured: Let’s Go Down, Avenue (F# Boogie), Listen With Eyes, Anyway.
The Other Side Of The River is available on Future Days Recordings.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Terry Reid
Duration: 8'27"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 5 July 2016
Nine to noon tries to make sense of modern financial markets; Juno around Jupiter; and Dateline Pacific looks at job prospects for island woman.

=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288269

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 05 Jul 2016