RNZ National. 2016-07-11. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

11 July 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Dan Slevin (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 The Conductor by Sarah Quigley read by Peter Bland (6 of 15) (RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 11 July 2016
BODY:
Labour pledges to build thousands of new houses, and to curb property speculation. We'll hear from Andrew Little shortly and the acting Prime Minister Bill English before 8. We talk to the Northland dairy owner who saw four would-be robbers out the door with sheer fury and a broom and AA wants slow drivers penalised by police.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 32'00"

06:06
Sports News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'56"

06:09
Hosts France face Portugal aiming for third European title
BODY:
Euro 2016 final about to kick off in Paris, with France looking to extend an unbeaten run against Portugal that goes back to 1978. Martin Lipton from The Sun previews the match.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Euro 2016
Duration: 3'27"

06:17
Powerball winners deserving of $13.3 million prize
BODY:
Dunedin Lotto shop owner Julie Moyle says Powerball winners are deserving of their $13.3 million prize. She tells reporter Catherine Hutton the whole experience of selling a winning ticket was surreal.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lotto
Duration: 2'25"

06:19
Early Business News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'50"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'18"

06:38
Labour's housing plan dismissed as "underwhelming"
BODY:
The government is dismissing Labour's new housing plan as 'underwhelming', saying it's basically what the government itself intends to do, with a few tweaks. The plan includes the building of 100,000 affordable homes over 10 years, an extension to the bright line test, and a new Affordable Housing Agency. Our political editor, Jane Patterson reports.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 3'05"

06:44
NZ MPs mentor Pacific counterparts to boost women in Parliament
BODY:
Women MPs from New Zealand are helping boost women's representation in the Pacific through a new mentoring programme. Sally Round reports.
Topics: Pacific, politics
Regions:
Tags: females, MP's
Duration: 3'27"

06:50
Small business confidence strong, wage pressures increase
BODY:
Small business confidence is at the highest level this year, although growth expectations could be constrained by a lack of skilled staff.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: confidence
Duration: 2'04"

06:52
Rrising dollar will dominate the Reserve Bank's thinking
BODY:
The BNZ says the rising dollar will have to dominate the Reserve Bank's thinking on interest rates if it wants to meet its inflation target.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 2'38"

06:55
FAB Group looking to strengthen and expand
BODY:
A well established skincare products and treatment company, FAB Group -- better known for its Caci clinics -- is looking to strengthen and expand ahead of a likely sharemarket listing.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: FAB Group
Duration: 2'06"

06:58
Morning markets for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Wall Street rose strongly after the jobs' data.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 50"

06:59
Week ahead for July 11-15
BODY:
Looking ahead to this week's business agenda.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18"

07:07
Sports News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'46"

07:10
Property investors attack Labour's housing plan
BODY:
Property investors criticise Labour's promise to build affordable homes while Auckland Council say they'd be worried if the party's housing policy means decisions on Auckland land are going to be made in Wellington.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 3'06"

07:13
Labour launches reheated 2013 policy
BODY:
Labour says it's new Kiwibuild policy to commit 2 billion dollars to build 100 thousand affordable houses will reduce housing inflation to CPI levels. We speak to Labour leader Andrew Little..
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 8'32"

07:22
Dairy owner chased away robbers with broom
BODY:
A Dairy owner in Hikurangi, north of Whangarei has chased away robbers with broom. The men left empty handed and police are investgating. But he told our reporter Max Towle he's not putting up with burglars.
Topics: crime
Regions: Northland
Tags: Hikurangi
Duration: 2'13"

07:35
Teachers' biases questioned over Maori students
BODY:
Teachers say they want more help to overcome ``unconscious bias'' or low expectations for maori students.
Topics: education, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Maori Students, Unconscious bias
Duration: 3'12"

07:38
AA wants slow drivers penalised by police
BODY:
Police issued a record number of tickets to slow drivers last year. But that's not enough for the AA - its members want tickets to be issued to drivers who hold at least 4 cars up behind them.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: slow drivers
Duration: 4'24"

07:43
Turnbull clinches victory in Australian election
BODY:
Australia has a government after the latest vote count puts the Liberals back in the Treasury benches. Bernard Keane, the political editor from the independent on-line news site Crikey tells us despite the result the political situation is far from stable.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 5'22"

07:50
Leadsom suggests motherhood sets her apart from rival May
BODY:
Row breaks out in Britain after Conservative Party leadership hopeful Andrea Leadsome says she has more stake in the country's future than rival Theresa May because unlike Mrs May, she has children.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 4'33"

07:56
Govt responds to Labour's affordable housing plan
BODY:
As Labour introduces its 2 billion dollar solution to the housing crisis, we find out what the acting Prime Minister Bill English thinks about the plan.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: National
Duration: 4'06"

08:07
Sports News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'00"

08:10
Will Labour's housing plan change anything?
BODY:
Labour says its housing policy will slow rapidly rising home prices but the Government says it will achieve nothing. RNZ political editor Jane Patterson and Auckland Issues Correspondent Todd Niall discuss the issues.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: house prices
Duration: 7'56"

08:18
Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull keeps his job
BODY:
Malcolm Turnbull has declared victory more than a week after Australians voted in a close election. Michelle Grattan from The Conversation discusses the prospects for stable government.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 4'10"

08:23
Lucrative Indian enrolments in danger
BODY:
Tertiary insitutions say New Zealand's lucrative education trade with India is being endangered by accusations of fraud and high visa refusal rates. John gerritsen has the details.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: India
Duration: 3'20"

08:26
Awaroa beach handed over to the people
BODY:
Hundreds of people who made a pilgrimage to Awaroa to take part in the gifting of a beach were welcomed by local iwi. The site, in the northern Abel Tasman National Park, now belongs to all New Zealanders, after a crowdfunding campaign raised more than two million dollars to buy it. Our Nelson reporter Tracy Neal was at yesterday's handover.
Topics: rural
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: Awaroa Beach
Duration: 3'54"

08:29
Markets Update for 11 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'08"

08:35
Several whare closed at "deathtrap" marae
BODY:
A Wellington urban marae built by homeless youth, ex-cons, and gang members is struggling financially after the closure of several of its buildings by the Wellington City Council. The Council says it's a death trap. Our reporter Daniela Maoate-Cox visited the marae to find out more.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Tapu te Ranga marae
Duration: 3'54"

08:39
Homosexual Law Reform act celebrates its anniversary
BODY:
Thirty years ago homosexual acts between men were decriminalised. Labour MP Fran Wilde's Homosexual Law Reform Bill ignited tumultuous public and political debate but was passed into law 49 votes to 44. But the queer community says there's still more to be achieved.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'35"

08:42
Controversial Ashburton water sale is put on hold
BODY:
Ashburton Council abandons the controversial sale of a land lot that included rights to extract 45 litres a second from the town's aquifers. Jen Branje, who led community opposition to the plan, is delighted.
Topics: environment, politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: water, Lot 9
Duration: 3'36"

08:47
Best young brains in building battle it out
BODY:
Top students in architecture, engineering and construction battle it out in a contest to come up with new ideas for affordable housing.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: architecture, affordable housing
Duration: 3'01"

08:50
Industry leaders call for better digital technology education
BODY:
Orion Health's chief executive says the Government needs to overhaul the way children are taught digital technology. He says subjects with poor job potential are given more attention.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: digital technology
Duration: 4'12"

08:57
Andy Murray wins second Wimbledon title
BODY:
Andy Murray wins second Wimbledon title defeating Canadian Milos Raonic in straight sets. Tennis correspondent Dave Luddy tells us it's an astonishing win for the Scot.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon
Duration: 2'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: When We Wake, by Karen Healy. Sixteen-year-old Tegan is happiest when playing the guitar, she's falling in love for the first time, and she's protesting the wrongs of the world. (Part 1 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Canterbury farmers on notice
BODY:
The Canterbury Regional Council has put farmers on notice they have ten days to comply with laws requiring them to install water monitors. The rule came into effect in November 2014 but the council says 437 consent holders have still failed to install the meters or prove they have a plan to do so. Nine to Noon speaks to representatives from the council and Forest and Bird.
Topics: farming, environment, business, politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: irrigation, dairy, water
Duration: 12'21"

09:21
How long should appliances last?
BODY:
Do manufacturers increasingly make household products with a more limited life span than they once did? Why are repairs so costly, if possible at all? Engineer Paul Smith is head of testing with Consumer New Zealand.
EXTENDED BODY:
Is it true that manufacturers increasingly make household products with a more limited life span than they once did? What should consumers look for when buying new appliances and what can we do to extend their lives?
Paul Smith – head of testing with Consumer New Zealand – has some answers.
Edited interview highlights
Paul Smith: That old adage of ‘you get what you pay for’ – I think you do to a certain extent. We find that generally the more expensive brands tend to last a little bit longer and are more repairable, as well.
Dishwashers have a really hard life, because they get filled with gunk and grease. We tend to run dishwashers on pretty cold cycles now. We put them on eco-cycles which means they use less water. And we don’t clean them out. Pumps get clogged, filters get clogged, and eventually they pack in.
[To clean a dishwasher] put it on a hot cycle, put it on the ‘pots and pans’ cycle a couple of times. Put some dishwasher cleaner or even just Rinse Aid through it on an empty cycle. Manufacturers could be better at prompting us to do that.
If you’re paying 500 bucks for a dishwasher that you know isn’t a high-end brand, reasonably you wouldn’t expect that to last as long as something that you’ve paid $2000 for.
Ovens and cooktops are things that you really don’t want to go wrong… Consumers are pretty clear there. They expect an oven to last 15+ years. Manufacturers are roughly in that range still, maybe a little bit less, but they still expect them to last a fairly long time. With an oven, the thing that really goes wrong that you can’t replace is the fan. That’s when it starts to become quite costly ‘cause that’s a rebuild of the oven in a lot of cases – to put a new fan in. But most things on an oven can be repaired.
Fridges [you can expect to last] about 10 years again. The manufacturers will say 9 to 15.
[New Zealand] is really lucky because we’ve got the Consumer Guarantees Act. The warrantee is nice, but the reasonable expectations are covered by law... It all comes down to the definition of what a reasonable consumer would expect. If you expect something to last seven or eight years, and you are reasonable, then you can go back to the retailer. If you’ve got a major fault say "This hasn’t lasted. It’s up to you to either replace it, refund it…" You can give them the option to repair, as well, but it’s up to you what you want to do with it.
Extended warrantees will be sold as a benefit [to the extent that replacement] is not an issue for the consumer. They’ll say they’ll replace it and they’ll replace it. Whereas with the CGA [Consumer Guarantees Act], it really comes down to you arguing your case. If it comes to it, you go to the disputes tribunal.
We find smaller appliances are reasonably reliable, but not that repairable. Toasters, kettles…
Manufacturers and consumers both say TVs should last about 5 to 8 years. The problem with TVs is not that they break down anymore, because we’ve lost that big cathode ray tube, so they’re incredibly reliable.
Definitely some [brands] are better than others. We find the same names come out – Mieles and Bosch always tend to appear at the top of the reliability charts. A good tip is to ask a repairer "Which brands don’t you have to repair very often? And if you do, which ones can you get the parts for easily?"
Topics: business, life and society
Regions:
Tags: appliances, reliability
Duration: 13'17"

09:35
Social media 'better than bombs to defeat ISIS'
BODY:
Dr. Anne Speckhard is a trauma psycholgist at Georgetown University who's conducted in-depth interviews with 38 defectors from ISIS in the past year. Dr. Speckhard and her colleague Dr Ahment Yayla are now editing these videotaped interviews into short clips to launch an ISIS counter-offensive where the terrorist group most successfully radicalizes and recruits: on the Internet. They have also written a book about their truth project called, ISIS Defectors: Inside Stories of the Terrorist Caliphate.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Syria, Turkey, ISIS, terror
Duration: 15'27"

09:54
Europe correspondent Seamus Kearney
BODY:
Seaumus Kearney talks about the Euro 2016 football final in Paris amid heavy security gives Europeans a chance to take their minds off their worries, EU leaders continue to grapple with the implications of a Brexit and a top Spanish bull fighter is killed live on television.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Europe
Duration: 5'29"

10:06
Stand-up comedian Billy Crystal
BODY:
Award-winning comic, turned movie star, Billy Crystal talks to Kathryn Ryan about his career in show business and his first time performing in New Zealand. Billy Crystal heads to the Auckland 's ASB Theatre on Thursday 21 and Friday 22 July for what's being billed as a spontaneous, funny and unpredictable show with the Australian interviewer, Andrew Denton.
EXTENDED BODY:
After four decades of acting, producing, writing and stand-up comedy, Billy Crystal is no stranger to show business.
He starred in the blockbusters When Harry Met Sally, City Slickers and Analyze This and recently voiced the little green cyclops in the animated hit Monsters. He has also the hosted the Academy Awards nine times, an achievement topped only by Bob Hope.
Billy Crystal performs two intimate shows in Auckland on 21 July and 22 July, with Australian interviewer and comedian Andrew Denton.
He tells Kathryn Ryan that while this will be his first time performing in New Zealand, it isn’t his first visit.
Edited interview highlights
I had a great vacation there in March 2007. It was fantastic. We drove from Blanket Bay all the way to Auckland. It was truly memorable. The people were fantastic, the country, of course, is stunning.
If you find [honesty and truth] in a joke, that’s the best kind of comedy to me. When people sit there and they hit their forehead and go “Oh, my god. I do that, too. That’s me. That’s what I think”. It can enlighten them into a different point of view about things, too. But to me it always has to be rooted in some sort of honesty otherwise you’re just dealing in farce – which of course can be funny, but to me it’s not what I’m about.
The life source of my creativity is talking about things that amuse me or upset me or move me. It’s always been my ability to get up in front of people from the time that I was a little boy. Always the juice of it is really from the stand-up.
I’ve been blessed with a fearlessness… to go with the moment and say what’s on my mind and also know when not to say something. I’ve been in situations where I’ve had to think quick on my feet on stage or off. To me that’s always been a blessing that I can think quickly.
That’s the exhausting thing about stand-up comedy, all these exhausting things that are going on at the same time – you’re looking to the audience like you love being there (at the same time you may not love being there, you may not like he audience). You’re thinking ahead, you’re saying the joke, you’re timing the joke, you’re hearing the response. And inside your mind is editing. “Don’t do this, cut to this. Don’t do that, cut to this. Go here. Say this. Here’s a new line! Do that one!”
It’s like there’s a big staff of people in my brain, in all comedian’s brains, while they’re doing it. That’s what’s exhilarating about stand-up and also exhausting. When you’ve done an hour or whatever it is onstage you come off and you go ‘whoa’. Your brain needs to just compress for a second because every part of it has been working in some way to make it look easy.
It’s almost like a control centre landing an airplane – all those people help you guide it till you land, that’s what doing a show is. You take off at high speed, then you cruise then you have to land the show – so someone’s got to help guide you through the timing of it. All you’ve got is your brain at that point.
[Muhammad Ali] was my friend. I’m always in awe of the fact that we knew each other and were indeed friends. It wasn’t a celebrity friendship – we were really good friends and helped each other and each other’s causes and charities and were family friends. He meant to me such a great deal because he stood up against the Vietnam War, which a great part of my generation did not believe in. He stood up and said "No, I’m not doing this. This is not part of my religion". And for those of us that were frightened we were going to be pulled into this war machine, by doing that, with Martin Luther King gone and Bobby Kennedy gone and John Kennedy gone… we had five years of terrible assassinations… he became the voice for my generation. I looked up to him as somebody who had the courage to do that.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Billy Crystal
Duration: 22'06"

10:29
Black Lives Matter protests in the USA
BODY:
Protests are being held across the United States today in response to the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota at the hands of police officers. Nine to Noon speaks to Jonathan Bachman, a photojournalist who's at the protest Baton Rouge.

In Baton Rouge, a woman protesting the killing of Alton Sterling faces cops in riot gear. (Jonathan Bachman/Reuters) pic.twitter.com/Z7cxZUwDDB— Laila Lalami (@LailaLalami) July 10, 2016

Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, police, protests
Duration: 10'29"

10:39
Book review - Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler
BODY:
Reviewed by Gina Rogers.published by Penguin Random House
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'11"

11:06
Political commentators Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills
BODY:
Labour's housing policy and reaction to it, Labour celebrates 100 years and the Australian election result.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'08"

11:35
Kiwi Kai - MAKSA and spicy mussel soup
BODY:
Reni Wereta-Gargiulo runs Kiwi Kai, specialising in kaimoana. She makes and sells her 'Maksa' - a Maori seafood laksa at farmers markets in Nelson. Reni shares her Maksa recipe, and one for a Spicy Mussel Soup.
EXTENDED BODY:
Reni Wereta-Gargiulo runs Kiwi Kai in Nelson, which specialises in kaimoana. She makes and sells her 'MAKSA' - a Māori seafood laksa - at local farmers markets.
Reni shares her Maksa recipe and one for a Spicy Mussel Soup.
Topics: food
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: Maksa, Kiwi Kai
Duration: 10'23"

11:47
Urbanist Tommy Honey
BODY:
After the Brexit result in the UK, the most popular destination for people fleeing the UK (at least on Twitter) was Canada. Tommy Honey takes a look at issues facing Canada's cities and how they're dealing with them.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: urban, cities
Duration: 12'46"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Canterbury farmers on notice
The Canterbury Regional Council has put farmers on notice they have ten days to comply with laws requiring them to install water monitors. The rule came into effect in November 2014 but the council says 437 consent holders have still failed to install the meters or prove they have a plan to do so. Nine to Noon speaks to representatives from the council and Forest and Bird.
09:20 Social media 'better than bombs to defeat ISIS'
[gallery:2236]
Dr. Anne Speckhard is a trauma psycholgist at Georgetown University who's conducted in-depth interviews with 38 defectors from ISIS in the past year. Dr. Speckhard and her colleague Dr Ahment Yayla are now editing these videotaped interviews into short clips to launch an ISIS counter-offensive where the terrorist group most successfully radicalizes and recruits: on the Internet. They have also written a book about their truth project called, ISIS Defectors: Inside Stories of the Terrorist Caliphate.
09:30 Why don't appliances last?
[image:73928:full] no metadata
Do manufacturers increasingly make household products with a more limited life span than they once did? Why are repairs so costly, if possible at all? Engineer Paul Smith is head of testing with Consumer New Zealand.
09:45 Europe correspondent Seamus Kearney
Seaumus Kearney talks about the Euro 2016 football final in Paris amid heavy security gives Europeans a chance to take their minds off their worries, EU leaders continue to grapple with the implications of a Brexit and a top Spanish bull fighter is killed live on television.
[image:73383:half]
10:05 Stand-up legend Billy Crystal not afraid to sit down on occasion
Award-winning comic, turned movie star, Billy Crystal talks to Kathryn Ryan about his career in show business and his first time performing in New Zealand. Billy Crystal heads to the Auckland 's ASB Theatre on Thursday 21 and Friday 22 July for what's being billed as a spontaneous, funny and unpredictable show with the Australian interviewer, Andrew Denton.
10.30 Black Lives Matter protests in the USA
Protests are being held across the United States today in response to the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota at the hands of police officers. Nine to Noon speaks to Jonathan Bachman, a photojournalist who's at the protest Baton Rouge.

This photo made by Jonathan Bachman of Reuters from the protests in Baton Rouge is incredible. pic.twitter.com/E6JtoIEusr
— Ryan Parker (@TheRyanParker) July 10, 2016

10:35 Book review - Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler
reviewed by Gina Rogers.published by Penguin Random House
10:45 The Reading
When We Wake by Karen Healy, read by Francesca Emms (Part 1 of 12)
11:05 Political commentators Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills
Labour's housing policy and reaction to it, Labour celebrates 100 years and the Australian election result.
11:30 Food: Kiwi Kai - the Maksa
[image:74047:third]
Reni Wereta-Gargiulo runs Kiwi Kai, specialising in kaimoana. She makes and sells her 'Maksa' - a Maori seafood laksa at farmers markets in Nelson.Reni shares her Maksa recipe, and one for a Spicy Mussel Soup.
11:45 Urbanist Tommy Honey
After the Brexit result in the UK, the most popular destination for people fleeing the UK (at least on Twitter) was Canada. Tommy Honey takes a look at issues facing Canada's cities and how they're dealing with them.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Labour accuses the Government of policy on the hoof after an apparent housing u-turn, Environment Canterbury gets tough with farmers who break its water rules.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'26"

12:17
Minor shareholders sell out of TGG to Chinese
BODY:
Two small but substantial shareholders in produce exporter, T&G Global, the former Turners and Growers, are selling to a Chinese company.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: T&G Global
Duration: 1'15"

12:19
Retail spending rises
BODY:
Spending using electronic cards has risen and is expected to hold up in the short- to medium-term .
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: electronic cards, credit cards, debit cards
Duration: 1'33"

12:20
Small business survey points to emerging wage pressures
BODY:
A recent survey of small business confidence points to emerging wage pressures as the economy is expected to continue to expand.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: small businesses
Duration: 1'46"

12:20
Copy of FAB Group looks to expand
BODY:
Skincare products and treatment company, FAB Group, is looking to increase its local footprint and expand overseas as it lays the groundwork for a sharemarket listing in a couple of years.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: FAB Group, Caci clinics
Duration: 1'44"

12:22
Midday Markets for 11 July 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Brad Gordon at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'38"

12:25
Midday Sports News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Portugal have claimed the European Football Championship despite their star striker and captain, Christiano Ronaldo, off in the 25th minute with a knee injury. Lydia Ko has gone from leading the US Open after eight holes on the final round to finishing in a share of third.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'53"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 11 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Hep C Buyers Club
BODY:
Hazel Heal has suffered from Hepatitis C for about 30 years, and she set up the FixHepC Buyers Club to help patients import new medications at a fraction of the cost.
EXTENDED BODY:
A group set up to help Hepatitis C sufferers access breakthrough new drugs says despite Pharmac now funding the treatment, thousands are still missing out. Hazel Heal has suffered from Hepatitis C for about 30 years, and she set up the FixHepC Buyers Club to help patients import new medications at a fraction of the cost. As of this month Pharmac is now funding two of those drugs, but Hazel Heal says half of patients are still not able to access them.
Topics: health, money
Regions:
Tags: medications, Pharmac, Hep C, Hepatitis C
Duration: 8'28"

13:25
Young Farmer of the Year
BODY:
Over two intense days a group of young people compete in tasks like milking a cow, building a shed and planning an on-line heifer grazing system.
EXTENDED BODY:
After two intense days of competition which included hand-milking a cow on the back of a truck, constructing a garden shed from a pile of planks and developing an online heifer grazing system...
the 2016 Young Farmer of the Year is Athol New.
Edited interview highlights
Jesse Mulligan: Talk me through the practical tests you had to do.
Athol New: The practical was about an eight-hour day comprising a lot of physical exertion. It’s probably three days’ worth of full-time farming packed into eight hours… From fencing to pruning pine trees to setting up irrigators to driving a big drill. There’s plenty on and plenty to do. Nah, it was a good day.
Jesse Mulligan: Were there any women this year?
Athol New: No, there were no women unfortunately. It would be good to see [a woman] get to the grand final and win it one day, that’d be great.
Jesse Mulligan: Were you socialising with the other blokes or was it pretty competitive?
Athol New: No-one was really that ultra competitive in terms of trying to play mind games with each other. Everyone got along really, really well.
Jesse Mulligan: Where are you based?
Athol New: I’m based in Dunsandel these days, about half an hour south of Christchurch. I’m originally from Northland. I went to Kamo High then Lincoln University. I liked Canterbury and stayed in the region ever since.
Jesse Mulligan: So do you think of yourself as a Canterbury boy these days or more of a Northland guy?
Athol New: Probably 50/50. Depends who is playing rugby and who we want to wind up who’s watching it.
Jesse Mulligan: I understand you had to hand-milk a cow.
Athol New: That’s not a normal task for a dairy farmer these days, especially when they’re on the back of truck, either, with a big crowd cheering away. The cows were a little bit nervous, as were all of the contestants doing it, I think.
Jesse Mulligan: Tell me about this building challenge – the garden shed.
Athol New: I don’t think anyone turned into a garden shed – maybe a few walls of a garden shed. It was very challenging, it was a bit of a jigsaw puzzle. By the time we worked out what we were actually trying to build we were pretty pushed for time. It was pretty entertaining for the crowd to watch that.
Jesse Mulligan: Did you have an instruction sheet, though?
Athol New: Nope, no instructions, just bits of wood pre-cut in a big pile. They told us we were building a shed and they had a prototype wrapped up in a tarp. Then about halfway through, after we’d all done enough work that we couldn’t pull them apart again, they released the prototype. There were some odd-looking sheds there, but most of them were still upright.
Jesse Mulligan: Did you have to build a chainsaw, as well?
Athol New: They supplied us with a chainsaw but they supplied it in pieces… That was one of the first tasks. If you didn’t build the chainsaw it would have been a long day.
Jesse Mulligan: Did you have people giving you advice from the sidelines?
Athol New: Fortunately not advice, because if you get advice you lost a few points… I spent most of the day in ear muffs, to be fair, just so you can stay in the zone of competing.
Jesse Mulligan: Were you always going to be a farmer?
Athol New: I probably was. Staying on farms I fell in love with cows from about the age of ten, I really enjoyed working with animals. So I just had to work out a path of what I wanted to do. Once I had that worked I’ve really enjoyed my career so far being a dairy farmer.
Jesse Mulligan: In your speech there was an old ag teacher from Kamo High.
Athol New: I did have an ag teacher who convinced me if I wanted to make a career out of farming I needed to go to university ‘cause farming these days, especially the scale I’m operating at now, is multi-million dollar business so you need some background in financial management and business management to be able to do those roles. So I’m glad I did that and glad I went to Lincoln – it got me to where I am now.
Jesse Mulligan: Tough times for dairy farmers. What do you think the future holds?
Athol New: The pay-out is challenging currently for dairy farmers and share-milkers and contract milkers and the like. But every good crisis has opportunities. It’s just trying to find those opportunities in an industry that is struggling. There are opportunities for young guys like myself to progress and move up. It’s been a great industry for New Zealand and I think it will continue to be. It’s in a bit of a slump at the moment, but it’s a cyclical industry as are all commodity prices. At some stage it will start to lift. It’s just [getting] in a position to catch those opportunities when they do come around.
Jesse Mulligan: Do you have any obligations for young farmer?
Athol New: I’m not sure 100% on the obligations… I’m looking forward to trying to convince more city boys like myself to give farming a go ‘cause it is a challenging career that needs smart, intelligent people to make the industry succeed. Trying to convince those people that it’s a viable career path with good rewards is my next year, I hope.
Jesse Mulligan: Did they give you a… sash?
Athol New: Oh, no, you get a big Cloak of Knowledge. It’s pretty amazing to have that. That’s sort of the one thing any New Zealand Young Farmer who competes wants - that gown. It’s only been been worn by 47 other people in the south. It’s a pretty elite club to get into so it’s pretty cool to be part of that now.
Topics: farming, rural
Regions:
Tags: Young Farmer of the Year, Young Farmer of the Year Competition
Duration: 10'43"

13:30
Takaka group fights to save historic grandstand
BODY:
A group of Golden Bay locals is fighting to save its historic roofed grandstand - which the council plans to demolish to make room for a carpark. The barrel vaulted roofed stand is one of just two of its kind left in the country - it was built in 1899. Takaka based author Gerard Hindmarsh is one of those trying to save the grandstand.
EXTENDED BODY:
A group of Golden Bay locals is fighting to save its historic roofed grandstand - which the council plans to demolish to make room for a carpark.
The barrel vaulted roofed stand is one of just two of its kind left in the country - it was built in 1899.
Takaka based author Gerard Hindmarsh is one of those trying to save the grandstand.
The Tasman District Council has given us this statement on the grandstand
The Council has been working with local community representatives to provide a new community recreation facility in Golden Bay for approximately seven years.
Whenever the Golden Bay Community Recreation Facility is discussed it is always as a complete development - the building, the netball courts and the car parking required for those using the amenity and the associated sports fields. The development has a limited amount of land in which to provide this community amenity.
The community representatives and the Council have consulted on the plans for the new development on several occasions over the years. The proposed plans have always shown the grandstand would not be retained.
The fate of the grandstand will soon be in the hands on Heritage NZ. While it is not on any heritage lists, because it may have been built prior to 1900 they have jurisdiction (Sec 42 Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014). Its date of construction will be part of their determination as will its heritage value in its current state.
If its determined the grandstand has to stay or has to be moved somewhere else, then the Council will actively work with the Save The Grandstand group or anyone else to achieve that.
There was a meeting between Save The Grandstand (STG) and council representatives in Takaka on 28th June where it was agreed that the parties would respect the differences of opinion and now focus on the issues ahead rather than the past. The Council is committed to that agreement.

Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Golden Bay, Takaka, Golden Bay grandstand, historic buildings
Duration: 7'57"

13:44
Favourite album - Moby Grape
BODY:
The self titled album by Moby Grape.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Golden Bay, Takaka, Golden Bay grandstand
Duration: 16'22"

14:10
Television Critic - Melenie Parkes
BODY:
Melenie Parkes reviews "Roots", Suited", and Beauty & The Beach.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television, TV
Duration: 8'07"

14:20
Exploring synesthesia
BODY:
Synesthesia is a neurological phenomenon where some people perceive the world in a multi-sensory way. For some it involves hearing colours in music, or visualising letters and numbers in different colours. It's a field that fascinates Dr Patrick Shepherd, from Canterbury University's school of teacher education, who is also a composer, conductor, and performer.
EXTENDED BODY:
Synesthesia is a neurological phenomenon where some people perceive the world in a multi-sensory way. For some, it involves hearing colours in music, or visualising letters and numbers in different colours.
For others, it is more spatial, where number sequences or the days of the week are perceived in locations in space.
It's a field that fascinates Dr Patrick Shepherd, from Canterbury University's school of teacher education, who is also a composer, conductor and performer.
He says the condition harks back to the Ancient Greeks and has had a “chequered career” because of the believability of it, but since the 1990s and the age of MRI scanning, it has more of a clinical and medical validity than it did before that.
Dr Shepherd says that while it does sound "nuts", for people with synesthesia, it’s a very real way of perceiving the world.
He talks to Jesse about what we do and don't yet understand about synesthesia, and answers questions from listeners.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
JM: Can you give me a couple of other examples of how synesthesia might manifest itself?
PS: One of the big ones is gustatory synethsasia which is to do with taste. So somebody might say “that chicken tastes a little bit spiky”. And we might interpret that as being spicy perhaps, or that is has a sharp acidic taste, but that’s actually not what they mean at all. They’re actually sensing that piece of chicken as a sort of a sharp spike.
There’s also spatial synethsasia. One of the clients I worked with who has spatial synethsasia was a mountaineer, so he saw the world very differently. Whereas we might look at it as a chasm between two mountains with fear, that’s how he saw the whole thing in terms of the space – as solid objects with the gap in between them. And he wanted to live his life in space, because that’s how he perceived the world.
But there are lots of different types of synethsasia – relating colours to numbers, letters to colours and linking to sound to colour. But there are many cross modalities here, and you end up with maybe 80 different types of synethsasia.
It’s always developing and you’re always finding out new and different things.
JM: Is it something that hinders you in the everyday world?
PS: It’s both a curse and a blessing, I think. And from the people that I’ve talked to – some of them use it [like] the musicians, I’ve talked to,use it. I’ve talked to various people in New Zealand who have volunteered to be part of [my] project... Some of the musicians might use synethsasia as part of their every day and some don't. When you look at some of the famous artists across the world who have synethsasia like David Hockney and Billy Joel, [and Lady Gaga], many of them talk about it but it doesn’t necessarily alter the way they work. If you're a fan of Billy Joel, can you name any of his songs that mention anything about colour? I mean I'm a fan of his music and I'm struggling to.
JM: When is it mostly discovered for the first time?
PS: Evidence is beginning to show that generally kids have it and then they grow out of it…. It would seem to be that the real area of discovery is actually going to be talking to children. But the problem with talking to children is that idea it is freakish, and they don't want to be singled out as being different. And if you say something like “only three colours to go until Friday,” people will say “what?”
It often goes hand-in-hand with dyslexia. I talked to one of my students at the University of Canterbury and she said, “I’ve got it”. And I said: “You’ve got dyslexia?” and she said “yes”.
She was 21, and I said: “and you didn’t realise up until now?”
And she said: “No, I just thought that the other children just hadn’t had that lesson.”
I was amazed.
That signalled a lot of the experiences that the people I’ve talked to have had. Which is that they don’t discover it until a later time. They don’t discover it until their teens perhaps because they’ve assumed that everyone had it, or in the case of the person I talked to, that it is learned behaviour...And when you get to your teens you become very self-aware and how you relate to the world. And you add it up and realise that not everybody is wired the same way that I am.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: synesthesia, neurology, neuroscience
Duration: 38'49"

15:10
US political commentator Jeff Greenfield
BODY:
With Donald Trump as the presumptive Republican nominee, there is a sense that anything can happen. As the Republicans start their convention this week, and the Democrats follow, next week, Jeff Greenfield talks about Trump, Hillary Clinton and the official start to the race for the White House.
EXTENDED BODY:
When the Republican and Democratic parties meet at their conventions to officially nominate their candidates for President, they are usually ho hum affairs, heavily scripted, with few surprises.
But not this year says veteran political analyst Jeff Greenfield. With Donald Trump as the presumptive Republican nominee, there is a sense that anything can happen.
As the Republicans start their convention this week, and the Democrats follow, next week, Jeff Greenfield talks to Jesse Mulligan about Trump, Hillary Clinton and the official start to the race for the White House.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA Elections, USA, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton
Duration: 28'38"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Hep C Buyers Club
A group set up to help Hepatitis C sufferers access breakthrough new drugs says despite Pharmac now funding the treatment, thousands are still missing out. Hazel Heal has suffered from Hepatitis C for about 30 years, and she set up the FixHepC Buyers Club to help patients import new medications at a fraction of the cost. As of this month Pharmac is now funding two of those drugs, but Hazel Heal says half of patients are still not able to access them.
1:25 Young Farmer of the Year
[image:74124:full]
It's a competition like no other. Over two intense days a group of young people compete in practical tasks like milking a cow, gruelling physical challenges, and complex planning such as developing an on-line heifer grazing system, as well as delivering a speech.
At the weekend, the winner was crowned. We speak to Athol New - the 2016 Young Farmer of the Year
1:30 Takaka group fights to save historic grandstand
A group of Golden Bay locals is fighting to save its historic roofed grandstand - which the council plans to demolish to make room for a carpark. The barrel vaulted roofed stand is one of just two of its kind left in the country - it was built in 1899. Takaka based author Gerard Hindmarsh is one of those trying to save the grandstand.
[gallery:2225]
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Television Critic: Melenie Parkes
2:20 Exploring synthesia
[image:74097:half] no metadata
Synesthesia is a neurological phenomenen where some people perceive the world in a multi sensory way. For some it involves hearing colours in music, or visualising letters and numbers in different colours. For others, it is more spatial, where number sequences or the days of the week are perceived in locations in space.
It's a field that fascinates Dr Patrick Shepherd, from Canterbury University's school of teacher education, who is also a composer, conductor and performer.
3:10 US political commentator Jeff Greenfield
[image:74096:half] no metadata
When the Republican and Democratic parties meet at their conventions to officially nominate their candidates for President, they are usually ho hum affairs, heavily scripted, with few surprises. But not this year says veteran political analyst Jeff Greenfield. With Donald Trump as the presumptive Republican nominee, there is a sense that anything can happen. As the Republicans start their convention this week, and the Democrats follow, next week, Jeff Greenfield talks about Trump, Hillary Clinton and the official start to the race for the White House.
3:35 Voices
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS & THE PANEL 1 - 5pm
Monday 11h July
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Cass McCombs
TITLE: Run Sister Run
COMP: Cass McCombs
ALBUM: Mangy Love
LABEL: Domino Records
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Moby Grape
TITLE: Fall On You
COMP: Peter Lewis
ALBUM: Moby Grape
LABEL: Columbia
ARTIST: Moby Grape
TITLE: Ain't No Use
COMP: Jerry Miller, Don Stevenson
ALBUM: Moby Grape
LABEL: Columbia
ARTIST: Moby Grape
TITLE: Someday
COMP: Jerry Miller, Don Stevenson, Skip Spence
ALBUM: Moby Grape
LABEL: Columbia
ARTIST: Moby Grape
TITLE: Naked If I Want To
COMP: Jerry Miller
ALBUM: Moby Grape
LABEL: Columbia
ADDITIONAL MUSIC:
ARTIST: Jan Hellriegel
TITLE: Melusine
COMP: Jan Hellriegal
ALBUM: Non Albim Single
LABEL: NZOA
ARTIST: Modest Mouse
TITLE: Lampshades On Fire
COMP: Isaac Brock, Jeremiah Green
ALBUM: Stranger To Ourselves
LABEL: Sony
THE PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Cat Stevens
TITLE: Wild World
COMP: Cat Stevens.
ALBUM: Tea For The Tillerman
LIVE: Island

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'58"

16:05
The Panel with John Barnett and Selwyn Manning (Part 1)
BODY:
Topics - Leroy Beckett of Generation Zero with his views on the Labour Party's newly-announced housing policy. Former Christchurch mayor Garry Moore talks about a new promotional video for Christchurch. And are it's residents anti-intellectual?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'12"

16:06
The Panel with John Barnett and Selwyn Manning (Part 2)
BODY:
Topics - There are more young people on earth than there has ever been. What of the future for them? Pokemon Go player Reuben Tilley talks about his lifelong love of Pokemon and explains what Go is all about. Are Auckland CBD streets paved with gold - you'd think so with the new parking rates. Is there any harm in a Noah's Ark display. Displayed in an educational way?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'23"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists John Barnett and Selwyn Manning have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'16"

16:10
Labour's housing policy
BODY:
Leroy Beckett of Generation Zero with his views on the Labour Party's newly-announced housing policy.
Topics: housing, politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: house prices, housing policy
Duration: 10'14"

16:24
Chch - the best place to be a kiwi
BODY:
Former Christchurch mayor Garry Moore talks about a new promotional video for Christchurch. And are it's residents anti-intellectual?
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch
Duration: 7'40"

16:34
A young world
BODY:
There are more young people on earth than there has ever been. What of the future for them?
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: youth, age, developing world
Duration: 5'22"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists John Barnett and Selwyn Manning hav been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'23"

16:43
Pokemon Go
BODY:
Pokemon Go player Reuben Tilley talks about his lifelong love of Pokemon and explains what Go is all about.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Pokemon Go, Pokemon, pop culture, games
Duration: 5'56"

16:50
Facebook - an accidental news source
BODY:
Does Facebook need to take it's role as news provider more seriously?
Topics: internet, technology
Regions:
Tags: Facebook, social media, news
Duration: 4'52"

16:56
Massive car parking hike in Auckland
BODY:
Are Auckland CBD streets paved with gold - you'd think so with the new parking rates.
Topics: money
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: parking, parking fees
Duration: 2'29"

16:57
Kentucky's Ark Encounter
BODY:
Is there any harm in a Noah's Ark display. Displayed in an educational way?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Christian theme park, Ark Encounter
Duration: 3'08"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Monday 11th July 2016
BODY:
Watch Monday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
Questions raised about timing of dividend announcement
BODY:
National and Labour are at loggerheads over housing, with Andrew Little announcing over the weekend that Labour would turn Housing NZ into a public service department - and National's response.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Housing NZ, Labour Party, National Party
Duration: 3'29"

17:14
Matakana Island locals fight possible development
BODY:
Some residents of Matakana Island in Tauranga Harbour are threatening to take the law into their own hands and burn down houses to stop any new housing development there.
Topics: housing, environment
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Matakana Island, housing developments
Duration: 3'55"

17:17
Claim Aus has beaten AIDS 'alarming', say NZ researchers
BODY:
Australia's claims that it has successfully beaten AIDS and put an end to the disease are being labelled dangerous and misleading by AIDS researchers and organisations on this side of the Tasman.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Aids, Australia
Duration: 3'10"

17:20
Race-related US police protests intensify
BODY:
Civil rights protests have erupted across the United States over the weekend, following the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and the subsequent murders of five police officers in Dallas.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Dallas, USA, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Micah Johnson
Duration: 4'51"

17:24
On the street in the Baton Rouge protests
BODY:
Dozens of protesters were arrested in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during a street demonstration against the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philandro Castile. Local resident Bria joins Checkpoint from the marches.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Baton Rouge, USA, Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, race relations
Duration: 3'51"

17:36
Evening Business for 11 July 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'05"

17:38
2.7m tickets sold for $40m powerball jacket
BODY:
New Zealanders spent $40 million on tickets for Saturday night's record $40 million powerball jackpot, with three winners across the country winning $13.3m apiece.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lotto
Duration: 2'48"

17:41
Turnbull wins election, but will he remain Prime Minsiter?
BODY:
After a marathon eight days of vote counting, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday declared victory in the tough-fought Federal election, after Labor leader Bill Shorten finally conceded defeat.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian elections, Malcolm Turnbull
Duration: 3'26"

17:47
Aklder heads to Court over ballooning ground rent
BODY:
A woman who abandoned her leasehold home on the edge of Auckland's Cornwall Park has won the right to go to the Supreme Court in November after her rent increased from $8300 to $73,000 p.a.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Yong Xin Chen
Duration: 5'14"

17:53
Crown holds up bloodied broken beer bottle in murder trial
BODY:
The Crown prosecutor has held up the bloodied broken beer bottle to a High Court jury which he says was used by a teenager to murder a promising young rugby league player in a Grey Lynn street brawl.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Vincent Skeen, Luke Tipene
Duration: 3'00"

17:57
Pokemon Go craze hits New Zealand
BODY:
New mobile game Pokemon Go has the police warning players to watch out for real-world hazards after being released last week and shooting to the top of the charts.
Topics: media, technology
Regions:
Tags: Pokemon Go
Duration: 3'23"

18:09
Ashburton group still wants council water consent dropped
BODY:
The group fighting the sale of council land to create a water bottling plant in Ashburton says the next battle will be to get the council to dump the water consent.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Ashburton, water bottling plant
Duration: 2'57"

18:12
Miramar residents maintain fight against airport parkers
BODY:
Residents in the Wellington suburb of Miramar will have to continue using home-grown techniques to protect their grassy verges, with a permanent airport parking solution still months away.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Miramar, parking
Duration: 3'27"

18:16
Whanau Ora reports strong results
BODY:
After a rocky start six years ago, Whanau Ora, the Maori social service approach for Maori by Maori, is reporting strong results at the North Island Commissioning conference held in Auckland today.
Topics: politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Whanau Ora
Duration: 4'14"

18:22
Kayakers paddle out in search of Pokemon creatures
BODY:
Players of PokemonGo are getting serious about how to catch the creatures from the franchise and top the leaderboard - with some even taking to their kayaks to catch the virtual minibeasts.
Topics: media, technology
Regions:
Tags: PokemonGo, Pokemon
Duration: 5'22"

18:25
Building apprentice heads to Duck Calling Champs
BODY:
17-year-old building apprentice Hunter Morrows, from Luggate, is on his way to the U.S. for the world championships of duck calling.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: duck calling
Duration: 4'28"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Who Needs Maths Anyway?

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:08
Living Wage
BODY:
Deborah Littman was a leader in the London Living wage campaign, which successfully convinced the greater London authority to become a Living Wage employer. Here in NZ, the movement, which bridges unions, faith based organisations and community groups, has encouraged 58 employers to pay staff a minimum of $19.80 per hour, with the Wellington City council working towards accreditation.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'33"

20:08
Nights' Science -Teeth
BODY:
Prof. Murray Thomson from University of Otago examines the results of the world first New Zealand national survey of oral health in rest homes.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'32"

21:08
Bicycle Festival of Lights & Motion
BODY:
We talk to organiser Kelvin Aris about the Lucid Dream Bicycle Laboratory, which is currently building 7 beautiful bicycle floats on the Wellington waterfront in preparation for a series of night bicycle parades on the 15th and 16th of July. The video below shows their previous interactive bicycle performance experience, which won "Most Innovative Work" at the 2016 Wellington Fringe Festival.
EXTENDED BODY:
We talk to organiser Kelvin Aris about the Lucid Dream Bicycle Laboratory, which is currently building seven beautiful bicycle floats on the Wellington waterfront in preparation for a series of night bicycle parades on the 15th and 16th of July.
The video below shows their previous interactive bicycle performance experience, which won "Most Innovative Work" at the 2016 Wellington Fringe Festival.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'50"

22:15
Late Edition for 11 July 2016
BODY:
Observers say voting on Nauru at the weekend was free, fair and transparent. Long term trauma care is still needed in Fiji after cyclone Winston. Tongan local body elections have given hope for more women lawmakers in parliament and entrepreneurs from New Zealand's Pasifika community get inspiration from an award winning duo...
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 42'28"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:74129:full]
7:12 Living Wage
Deborah Littman was a leader in the London Living wage campaign, which successfully convinced the greater London authority to become a Living Wage employer. Here in NZ, the movement, which bridges unions, faith based organisations and community groups, has encouraged 58 employers to pay staff a minimum of $19.80 per hour, with the Wellington City council working towards accreditation.
7:35 Upbeat
Pianist Albert Tiu, described as "an artist of uncommon abilities" is in New Zealand to judge the country's leading piano competitions. He's just spent time in Kerikeri and Auckland judging the best young New Zealand pianists. The Associate professor of Piano at Yong Siew Thon Conservatory of Music in Singapore give us an insight into striking the winning key.
8:12 Nights' Science -Teeth
Prof. Murray Thomson from University of Otago examines the results of the world first New Zealand national survey of oral health in rest homes.
[image:74130:full] no metadata
8:30 Window on the World
Ocean waste - More than five million tonnes of plastic waste ends up in the oceans every year. The abandoned fishing gear and bags and bottles left on beaches can smother birds and sea life. Now there is also evidence that the small particles created as the plastics are eroded by the waves and sunlight are eaten by all kinds of marine species. Roland Pease is on a beach in Devon in south-west England with professor Richard Thompson of Plymouth University finding the plastic debris before it gets into the sea
9:10 Bicycle Festival of Lights & Motion
We talk to organiser Kelvin Aris about the Lucid Dream Bicycle Laboratory, which is currently building 7 beautiful bicycle floats on the Wellington waterfront in preparation for a series of night bicycle parades on the 15th and 16th of July. The video below shows their previous interactive bicycle performance experience, which won “Most Innovative Work” at the 2016 Wellington Fringe Festival.
[embed] https://vimeo.com/155766776
9.20 ROTN
In the week's "right-on-the-night" serial, the crew reports back from 14th Century AD Easter Island. Apparently the Rapa Nui are struggling with an intergenerational divide. The question is, how easy is it to get ahead? You can be a part of the audible audience for the live recording of ROTN on Monday nights. But it's a become a very popular gig so you need to sign up. Just email RightOnTheNight@radionz.co.nz.

9:30 Insight
RNZ's education correspondent, John Gerritsen, explores allegations New Zealand's international education market is being rorted.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Tonight in Folk Alley, an exclusive in-studio session featuring the Winnipeg duo of Cara Luft and JD Edwards, known as The Small Glories; we remember bluegrass legend, Ralph Stanley; plus a new music from Robby Hecht & Caroline Spence, Sam Bush, Ana Egge & The Sentimentals; Kaia Kater: and more!

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
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International public radio features and documentaries

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Monday 11 July - Cleaning Up the Oceans
More than five million tonnes of plastic waste ends up in the oceans every year. The abandoned fishing gear and bags and bottles left on beaches can smother birds and sea life. Now there is also evidence that the small particles created as the plastics are eroded by the waves and sunlight are eaten by all kinds of marine species. Roland Pease is on a beach in Devon in south-west England with professor Richard Thompson of Plymouth University finding the plastic debris before it gets into the sea.

Tuesday 12 July - Dust Bowl Ballads
A fierce drought in Oklahoma’s ‘No Man’s Land’ – a region that was the heart of the 1930s Dust Bowl – stirs up dust storms, memories and myths. In this parched terrain of ghost towns and abandoned ranches, the wells are running dry, but the stories continue to flow. Storytelling spins out of the landscape itself. Millard Fowler (who has sadly died since being recorded) was 102 years old, and remembers the ‘Dirty Thirties’, when relentless winds scooped up the topsoil and rolled it through the town in billowing black clouds, turning day to night.

Wednesday 13 July - The City Giving Wine to Alcoholics
The conventional treatment for chronic alcoholics is abstinence. Not in Ottawa. At the Oaks, a residence for those who were once homeless, occupants are given a measure of white wine at hourly intervals throughout the day. The ‘Managed Alcohol Program’ has improved the health of its participants, reduced their alcohol intake, and in some cases enabled them to stop drinking altogether. It’s also saved the city of Ottawa millions of dollars in public services – one man was hospitalised 191 times in the six months before joining the programme.

Thursday 14 July - Mighty Real: Sylvester James
David McAlmont travels to San Francisco to tell the glittering and sad tale of gay black diva Sylvester James, famed for his disco hit Mighty Real. Sylvester's short life says much about US civil rights movements, the politics of the American music business and the devastating effects of Aids.

===9:30 PM. | Insight===
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An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 11 July 2016
Observers say voting on Nauru at the weekend was free, fair and transparent. Long term trauma care is still needed in Fiji after cyclone Winston. Tongan local body elections have given hope for more women lawmakers in parliament and entrepreneurs from New Zealand's Pasifika community get inspiration from an award winning duo...

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RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
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Elena See presents a selection of traditional and contemporary folk, Americana and roots music from classic and new releases, as well as in-studio and live concert recordings. (PRX)

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Year 2016

Reference number 288275

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 11 Jul 2016