RNZ National. 2016-07-12. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

12 July 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 Hidden Treasures (RNZ) 3. The Conductor by Sarah Quigley read by Peter Bland (7 of 15) (RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 12 July 2016
BODY:
Britain will have a new Prime Minister by the end of the week. Theresa May will be David Cameron's successor after her only rival pulls out of the race. New Zealand helps dissident Nauru MP Roland Kun flee his country, granting him New Zealand citizenship and a passport and new research shows children in low-decile schools are two years behind their peers in better off areas.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30'41"

06:06
Sports News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

06:10
Cameron steps down to make way for Theresa May as new PM
BODY:
Theresa May will become Britain's new prime minister, and the first woman in the job since Margaret Thatcher, on Thursday. Her only rival in the race to replace David Cameron, Andrea Leadsom, pulled out saying she didn't have enough support from MPs. Our London correspondent Dan Whitehead has the details.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK, Brexit, Theresa May
Duration: 5'03"

06:15
Two-year learning gap between low and high decile schools
BODY:
The president of the Principals Federation Iain Taylor, who is principal of the decile one Manurewa Intermediate School, tells us why he's not surprised there's 2-year gap in academic achievement between rich and poor schools.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: primary schools, learning gap
Duration: 1'29"

06:19
Early Business News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'30"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'12"

06:42
New research underlines impact inequality has on education
BODY:
Research reveals a two year achievement gap between children in schools at either end of the decile system. Opposition parties say inequality such as low wages, poor housing and unemployment is to blame.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: learning gap, primary schools
Duration: 3'14"

06:45
Not everyone sold on Labour's housing policy
BODY:
A property researcher says Labour's bid to massively increase the supply of affordable homes is the first serious political bid to address the housing crisis.But, as Kate Newton reports, not everyone's sold on the policy.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 3'30"

06:50
TGG ownership change likely to fuel takeover speculation
BODY:
The sale of a couple of large blocks of shares in T&G Global is likely to fuel takeover speculation as the produce exporter, fomerly known as Turners & Growers, is now in the control of just two large foreign owners.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: T&G Global
Duration: 1'44"

06:52
Step-up online interaction - marketers
BODY:
Marketing experts say businesses need to step-up their online interaction with customers as more buying decisions are set to become computerised.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: computers, marketing
Duration: 3'04"

06:55
Election making the banks nervous
BODY:
Our correspondent in Sydney, Jim Parker.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 59"

06:57
Morning markets for 12 July 2016
BODY:
Wall Street having another strong session in the afteglow of the jobs' data.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'08"

06:58
Business briefs
BODY:
A new name for the Stock Exchange today, 'Investore', it's the retail offshoot of property investor, Stride .
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56"

07:07
Sports News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'05"

07:11
Theresa May will become Britain's next prime minister
BODY:
Theresa May will become Britain's prime minister on Thursday after her only rival in the race to replace David Cameron pulled out. Political commentator Julia Langdon has the details.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK, Brexit, Theresa May
Duration: 5'59"

07:17
Former Nauru MP Roland Kun flees to New Zealand
BODY:
A former opposition Nauru MP has slipped out of the Pacific Island where he's been stuck for a year having been stripped of his Nauru passport. Now he's been reunited with his New Zealand family after this country gave him citizenship and a passport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nauru, Roland Kun
Duration: 4'56"

07:22
Two-year education gap between rich and poor
BODY:
New research shows children in low-decile schools are two years behind children in high decile schools in reading and social studies. Our education correspondent, John Gerritsen, joins us to give us more details.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: primary schools, learning gap
Duration: 3'02"

07:25
Labour's Housing spokesperson on HNZ dividends
BODY:
Labour's housing spokesman Phil Twyford reacts to the Government's decision to forego taking a dividend from Housing New Zealand.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 4'25"

07:30
RNZ political editor analyses Housing NZ u-turn
BODY:
RNZ's political editor Jane Patterson with her take on the Government's surprise about turn over whether Housing New Zealand should pay an annual dividend.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 2'49"

07:37
Sir Peter Snell to donate medals to Te Papa
BODY:
Sir Peter Snell explains why he's decided his Olympic gold medals will find a permanent home at Te Papa.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Sir Peter Snell, Te Papa
Duration: 6'00"

07:42
No free trade deal with Britain until it sorts out its EU exit
BODY:
Trade Minister Todd McClay says New Zealand won't be able to negotiate a trade deal with Britain until Britain completes its withdrawal from the European Union. He says that's likely to take years but in the meantime he's been assured the trading relationship with Britain will continue unchanged.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: trade, UK
Duration: 2'53"

07:45
Australian tax insider comes out against 'Big Four' firms
BODY:
An Australian tax industry insider has blown the whistle on the world's biggest accounting firms, accusing them of the worst tax crimes in history. We talk to Australian business journalist Michael West who has revealed all the claims of the 32-year veteran of the tax industry, George Rozvany.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: tax, Australia, George Rozvany
Duration: 4'59"

07:51
Pokemon makes a comeback with new smartphone app
BODY:
The news editor of the gaming website, Kotaku, Jason Schreier talks to Phillippa Tolley about the smartphone game, Pokemon Go. Japanese gaming giant Nintendo's stock soared 25 percent on the back of the game's success
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: games, Pokemon
Duration: 3'59"

07:56
Ashburton cancels sale of water rights to NZ Pure Blue
BODY:
Ashburton's mayor, Angus McKay, tells Phillippa Tolley why his council has cancelled the sale of a piece of land to bottled water company NZ Pure Blue, which came with the right to extract water from the town's aquifer through to 2046.
Topics: politics, environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Ashburton, water, NZ Pure Blue
Duration: 3'09"

08:07
Sports News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'57"

08:10
Students in low decile shools two years behind
BODY:
The Ministry of Education responds to new research showing children at low decile schools are two years behind those at high decile schools.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: primary schools, learning gap
Duration: 3'56"

08:14
Key defends u turn on Housing NZ dividend
BODY:
John Key says the decision not to take a dividend from Housing New Zealand is not a u-turn. He says the change is because of reduced revenues at the state house provider rather than any political pressure.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 2'24"

08:17
English: Why Housing NZ will not pay govt dividend
BODY:
The Finance Minister Bill English says the decision not to take a dividend from Housing NZ, announced by Steven Joyce on twitter on Sunday is in fact not yet a done deal.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour
Duration: 8'03"

08:25
Transport Agency blocks efforts to investigate Huntly steel
BODY:
The Transport Agency cites commercial reasons for refusing to explain what went wrong with failed steel at four bridges on the Huntly Bypass.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: steel, OIA, Transport Agency
Duration: 3'29"

08:28
Grey Power chapter petitions for medical marijuana
BODY:
A bunch of retirees from Northland who've never taken illegal drugs in their lives have started a petition to legalise medical maruijuana. We talk to Beverley Aldridge who is the president of Otamatea Grey Power.
Topics: health
Regions: Northland
Tags: medical marijuana, grey power
Duration: 4'13"

08:33
Markets Update for 12 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 58"

08:38
Woman weeps as she tells court of cousin's death
BODY:
Court hears how a woman wept as she described seeing her cousin hold up his hands, telling his killer "that's enough" shortly before he collapsed on a Grey Lynn road.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'52"

08:41
Tribal Maori owe urban Maori says Tamihere
BODY:
The head of the agency charged with running Whanau Ora in the North Island, John Tamihere, says tribal Maori owe urban Maori a slice of the pie and if they don't loosen the purse strings they'll end up seeing them in court. He spoke to our Maori Issues Correspondent Mihingarangi Forbes.
Topics: te ao Maori, money
Regions:
Tags: tribes
Duration: 3'34"

08:44
NZ nervously eyes SE Asian dispute as decision nears
BODY:
New Zealand awaits an international ruling on a dispute between China and the Philippines over part of the South China Sea - China insists New Zealand's trade routes won't be affected.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: China
Duration: 3'24"

08:48
Diabetes-related amputations increasing in New Zealand
BODY:
Urgent action being called for as the number of amputations due to diabetes rises. We ask the chief executive of Diabetes New Zealand, Steve Crew, what needs to be done.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: diabetes, amputations
Duration: 3'34"

08:53
Matakana residents threaten to burn down future development
BODY:
Matakana Island residents and self described nimbies are eyeing a range of options including arson as they oppose a new residential development.
Topics: housing
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Matakana Island
Duration: 2'40"

08:56
Auckland University's Taniwha aims to defend World Title
BODY:
Auckland University's human-powered racing submarine, the Taniwha, has started defending its World Title in the UK overnight. We get the latest from the team's manager, Auckland University's Iain Anderson, who's in Gosport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Auckland University, Tean Taniwha
Duration: 2'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: When We Wake, by Karen Healy. Sixteen-year-old Tegan is happiest when playing the guitar, she's falling in love for the first time, and she's protesting the wrongs of the world. (Part 2 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Upskilling south Auckland job seekers
BODY:
The Southern Initiative is part of the Auckland Council's plan to make the city more liveable and aims to match high social need with employment opportunities Its director of Community and Social Innovation, Gael Surgenor says existing community networks are used to help people be job ready. Jenny Solomon from Solomon Group collaborates with the Southern Initiative to run vocational and training courses, resulting in some people who are on the breadline, ending up earning 60 thousand dollars a year.
Topics: education
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: jobs, employment, The Southern Iniative, youth skills, upskilling, low income workings, jobs initiative, Gael Surgenor, Jenny Solomon, Solomon Group, South Auckland
Duration: 20'25"

09:29
Inside an ISIS arms factory
BODY:
Marcus Wilson is the managing director of Conflict Armaments Research. The research group has been inside an ISIS arms factory in Fallujah and found evidence of coordinated manufacturing and a rudimentary research and development programme.
EXTENDED BODY:
Since Iraqi soldiers re-took Fallujah from the Islamic State or IS forces last week, researchers have been combing the city for clues as to how the group works.
One major find is a makeshift arms factory full of homemade rockets, complete with paperwork outlining the manufacturing process, distribution networks and even a rudimentary research and development programme.
Marcus Wilson is the managing director of Conflict Armaments Research. Kathryn Ryan speaks with him about what his team has found.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
How did you find this factory?
As we do with a lot of our documentation sites in the region, we work closely with local partners on the ground. In this case it was the Iraqi security forces, including the Iraqi counter-terrorism service and popular mobilisation forces. What we do is we embed with them and they will overrun a position and make that position secure and then our investigators go in and document the captured items and items remaining behind.
What have you found, then? At least one if not more arms factories?
That’s right. Our investigators a couple of weeks ago went and documented items in two workshops… we also found documentation to suggest there were seven workshops throughout the city of Fallujah that were being used to basically manufacture components that would then be put together to produce improvised bombs. They’re known as IRAMS. An IRAM is an Improvised Rocket Assisted Munitions, so essentially a rocket. These items are being produced across several different workshops in a really highly organised and what we call a quasi-industrial scale to supplement their existing military stockpiles.
What our investigators were able to stumble upon was – quite interestingly – the process and the bureaucracy behind it. So not only were they able to document the weapons, they were able to see documentation about how ISIS were producing these weapons.
Just looking at the rockets, they look pretty rudimentary… it doesn’t look like terribly sophisticated weaponry, what is it capable of?
No, they’re not, they’re not as sophisticated as the military-grade weapons that they do also have their hands on. But what these rockets are a larger calibre than the military stuff that they will have possession of. So essentially the ‘bang’ will be bigger. But because they are improvised, they are going to be less predictable, the range is going to be less, but they will still be incredibly devastating if detonated in the right location.
Do you have numbers? Do you know how many were made in that factory or other factories as well?
Well the documents that we recovered from this site said that since September 2015 this workshop alone has produced 2500. The scale of this is quite interesting, in that it suggests to us that they are struggling to get a hold of the military-grade weaponry that they require to fight the war. They’re having to build their own munitions to supplement those forces. So this industrial-scale theme that we’re seeing through these discoveries is interesting.
It’s not only the fact that they’re being built on a large scale, but also that they’re being organised at a really high level, so what does that tell us about the Islamic State Forces? It says that there are people there who know how to put a process in action. There are people there who in the past perhaps run working shops and run manufacturing scales. It shows that they have got very mundane day-to-day organisation, there are time sheets and there are testing processes.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: ISIS, Fallujah, terrorism, Iraq
Duration: 9'05"

09:38
Scooter Champs
BODY:
Ten-year-old Thor Larson came 4th at the Australasian Scooter Championship in Brisbane, attracting the attention of his idol, American four times scooter world champion Dakota Schuetz. Thanks to some intervention from Thor's mum Trish, Dakota has come to Napier to meet Thor, and run a scooter workshop at Napier's Sk8 Zone, which is about to be dismantled.
EXTENDED BODY:
A young scooter champs dreams are coming true these school holidays.
Not only did 10-year-old Thor Larson do really well in an Australasian Scooter competition, he's attracted the attention of his idol - American four times scooter world champion, Dakota Schuetz.
Thanks to some intervention from Thor's mum Trish Kearns, Dakota has ventured Downunder to meet Thor, do some scootering, and set up a workshop for Thor's Year 5 buddies...and anyone else who wants to join them at Marine Parade's Sk8 Zone.
All good so far, only there's a twist. Thor's skate park - which is a bit of an institution in Napier - is being dismantled this month.
The 61-year-old park is due to be replaced later this year with a new skating area on the former Marineland site.
Kathryn Ryan talks to Thor, Dakota and Trish (who also happens to be Napier Skating Club Secretary).

Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Scooters, Australasian Scooter Championship
Duration: 14'03"

09:52
US Correspondent Steve Almond
BODY:
The stories making the headlines in the US, including retaliatory attacks on police after the recent fatal shootings of black civilians by officers.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 7'44"

10:11
Shaping the doctors of the future
BODY:
Professor Tim Wilkinson is the head of training at Otago University's three medical schools, who has just been awarded Australasia's highest honour for medical education. He is a gerontologist who still practises, but over the past 20 years, teaching medical students has become his main focus. Professor Wilkinson talks with Kathryn Ryan about shaping the doctors of tomorrow.
EXTENDED BODY:
Professor Tim Wilkinson is the head of training at Otago University's three medical schools, who has just been awarded Australasia's highest honour for medical education.
He is a gerontologist who still practises, but over the past 20 years, teaching medical students has become his main focus.
Professor Wilkinson talks with Kathryn Ryan about shaping the doctors of tomorrow.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'53"

10:40
Book review - Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
BODY:
'Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging' by Sebastian Junger, reviewed by Stella Chrysostomou, published by HarperCollins.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'00"

11:07
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Rod Oram looks at the policies mooted to help solve the Auckland housing market crisis, and also examines the departure of Callaghan Innovation's chief executive.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'52"

11:25
Eve Armstrong's Trading Table
BODY:
Wellington artist Eve Armstrong's interactive work the Trading Table brings buyers and sellers together, but no money changes hands. Rather, people offer up an object or a commitment in return for something they want from the table. Eve Armstrong works with all participants to negotiate what an appropriate trade might be. She talks to Kathryn Ryan about the curious process of facilitating trades as diverse as an original musical composition, a vegan meal delivered to your door, or a psychotherapy session.
Topics: arts, life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'20"

11:46
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Gavin Ellis is looking at the influence Beijing has over New Zealand based Chinese language media and also on the news media falling for PR pitches about products.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'19"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Upskilling south Auckland job seekers and linking them with employers
[image:74213:full]
The Southern Initiative is part of the Auckland Council's plan to make the city more liveable and aims to match high social need with employment opportunities Its director of Community and Social Innovation, Gael Surgenor says existing community networks are used to help people be job ready. Jenny Solomon from Solomon Group collaborates with the Southern Initiative to run vocational and training courses, resulting in some people who are on the breadline, ending up earning 60 thousand dollars a year.
09:30 Inside an ISIS arms factory
Marcus Wilson is the managing director of Conflict Armaments Research. The research group has been inside an ISIS arms factory in Fallujah and found evidence of coordinated manufacturing and a rudimentary research and development programme.
[image:74123:full]
9.35: Scooter Champs
10 year old Thor Larson came 4th at the Australasian Scooter Championship in Brisbane, attracting the attention of his idol, American four times scooter world champion Dakota Schuetz. Thanks to some intervention from Thor's mum Trish, Dakota has come to Napier to meet Thor, and run a scooter workshop at Napier's Sk8 Zone, which is about to be dismantled.

09:45 US Correspondent Steve Almond
The stories making the headlines in the US, including retaliatory attacks on police after the recent fatal shootings of black civilians by officers.
10:05 Shaping the doctors of the future
[image:73617:half] no metadata
Professor Tim Wilkinson is the head of training at Otago University's three medical schools, who has just been awarded Australasia's highest honour for medical education. He is a gerontologist who still practises, but over the past 20 years, teaching medical students has become his main focus. Professor Wilkinson talks with Kathryn Ryan about shaping the doctors of tomorrow.
10:35 Book review - Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger
reviewed by Stella Chrysostomou, published by HarperCollins
10:45 The Reading
When We Wake by Karen Healy read by Francesca Emms (Part 2 of 12)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
Rod Oram looks at the policies mooted to help solve the Auckland housing market crisis, and also examines the departure of Callaghan Innovation's chief executive.

11:20 Eve Armstrong's Trading Table
[gallery:2253]
Wellington artist Eve Armstrong's interactive work the Trading Table brings buyers and sellers together, but no money changes hands. Rather, people offer up an object or a commitment in return for something they want from the table. Eve Armstrong works with all participants to negotiate what an appropriate trade might be. She talks to Kathryn Ryan about the curious process of facilitating trades as diverse as an original musical composition, a vegan meal delivered to your door, or a psychotherapy session.
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Gavin Ellis is looking at the influence Beijing has over New Zealand based Chinese language media and also on the news media falling for PR pitches about products.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Arctic Monkeys
Song: Arabella
Composer: Arctic Monkeys / Alex Turner
Album: AM
Label: Domino
Time: 9:42
Artist: Claude Rains
Song: You Say
Composer: Hewitt
Album: Claude Rains
Label: Private
Time: 10.06
Artist: Tyra Hammond
Song: Stop Messin' Round
Composer: Hammond/Roy
Album: Tyra Hammond EP
Label: FTC
Time: 10.36

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
Westpac clamps down further on home lending, the Sports Hall of Fame downplays chances of a Snell medal bidding war.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'03"

12:17
Investore begins trading on NZX at a premium to the list price
BODY:
The property investment firm, Investore Property, listed on the New Zealand sharemarket this morning at a more than 7% premium to its list price.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: NZ sharemarket, Investore Property, property
Duration: 2'07"

12:19
Westpac eyes property investors
BODY:
Westpac Bank is targeting property investors by clamping down further on home lending.
Topics: business, economy, housing
Regions:
Tags: home lending, Westpac bank, property investors
Duration: 1'45"

12:19
Trade Min hopes to make China FTA upgrade progress
BODY:
The upgrade of New Zealand's free trade agreement with China should get into gear later in the year, according to Trade Minister Todd McClay.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: China, trade, Trade Min
Duration: 1'22"

12:21
Telecommunications industry welcomes government's review
BODY:
The telecommunications industry is pleased with the government's efforts to improve the way it regulates communication services in the future.
Topics: business, economy, internet
Regions:
Tags: telecommunications, telco, Chorus, Spark
Duration: 52"

12:23
Midday Markets for 12 July 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Brad Gordon at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'03"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand golfer, Ryan Fox's Olympic fate now rests in the hands of the New Zealand Olympic Committee. Usain Bolt has been included in the Jamaican sprint team for the Olympics despite failing to qualify.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'11"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 12 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'46"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
New Zealand's forgotten Wimbledon Champion
BODY:
Anthony Wilding won 11 Grand Slams, including four consecutive Wimbledon titles. His great niece, Anna Wilding says because he was from the colonies, the British have not given him the recognition he deserves.
EXTENDED BODY:
He was born in New Zealand and won Wimbledon four times, so why isnt he more well known?
Anthony Wilding was born in Christchurch in 1883. He went on to win 11 Grand Slams, including four consecutive Wimbledon titles. He was world number 1 and the first and so far only player from New Zealand to have won a Grand Slam singles title.
Anthony Wilding was killed in action in France in 1915 - while fighting for the British army.
His great niece, Anna Wilding is a White House correspondent and says because he was from the colonies, the British have not given him the recognition he deserves.
Topics: sport, history
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon, tennis, Anthony Wilding
Duration: 11'10"

13:25
Inconceivable - Dr Andrew Murray
BODY:
Inconceivable is a six-part documentary series, that follows the hopes and struggles of eight couples, who are trying to conceive, by IVF. Dr Andrew Murray from Fertility Associates in Wellington discusses infertility and its possible causes.
EXTENDED BODY:
Inconceivable is a six-part documentary series, that follows the hopes and struggles of eight couples, who are trying to conceive, by IVF.
Figures from Statistics New Zealand, show fertility and live birth rates have dropped significantly in New Zealand since the 1970's.
Dr Andrew Murray from Fertility Associates in Wellington discusses infertility and its possible causes.
Topics: science, health, media
Regions:
Tags: fertility, infertility, IVF
Duration: 11'45"

13:35
Dan Slevin on the films based on Roald Dahl books
BODY:
Dan Slevin from RNZ's widescreen joins the show to talk about the movies based on Roald Dahl books, with the latest offering the BFG on the big screen at the moment.
Topics: books, movies
Regions:
Tags: Roald Dahl
Duration: 11'01"

13:45
Favourite album - Echoes of the Dreamtime
BODY:
Miranda Lee Richards' "Echoes of the Dreamtime".
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'43"

14:10
Book Critic - Pip Adam
BODY:
Pip Adam reviews Redeye By Ann Shelton, and a zine called Permanent vacation by Kerry Ann Lee.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'12"

14:20
Great New Zealand Album - Burning Rain
BODY:
From humble beginnings as the only Fender Stratocaster guitar owner in the North Island, this blues aficionado has taken his music to many corners of the globe and encouraged a number of high profile musicians to visit these shores. Today's album under the spot light is "Burning Rain" by Midge Marsden.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Midge Marsden, blues, Burning Rain
Duration: 40'22"

15:10
Sylvia Patterson: I'm not with the band
BODY:
Sylvia Patterson reflects on her own life, feminism in rock and roll and the demise of music journalism in her book, I'm Not with the Band: A Writer's Life Lost in Music.
EXTENDED BODY:
In 1986, the Pet shop Boys, Madonna and Billy Ocean had number one singles on the Charts, Queen released 'A Kind of Magic', and a 20 year old woman, left Scotland for London to write for on one of the most popular pop music magazines of the time. As a writer for Smash Hits, Sylvia Patterson interviewed Amy Winehouse, shared a plum with Johnny Cash, was threatened by Eminem and watched the music industry as she knew it completely change.
30 years later, Sylvia Patterson reflects on her own life, feminism in rock and roll and the demise of music journalism in her book, I'm Not with the Band: A Writer's Life Lost in Music.
Bono:
Bono was… at that time, I think it was the year 2000, Bono was in for a great deal of ridicule. Even though in those days the music wasn’t particularly important in terms of being in their glory years, but they were still the biggest band in the world at that time. The thing about Bono is that he really loved the fact that I would pull his leg in a very gentle way. "Bono, is there anything you would like to apologise for? What about some of those specs, for example? Or some of those haircuts?" I remember he got up from the table and he walks around the table and says "I’m getting a tongue-lashing here!" As he put it in his Irish way. He actually loved that. He actually really loved the idea that someone wouldn’t take him so seriously. You find that the ones who were actually really huge, didn’t want to be taken so seriously. After the conversation, he invited me out for dinner with the rest of the band because he was up for even more of a tongue-lashing!
Madonna:
It was a very clinical environment as you can imagine. She was in the Clarige’s Hotel in London – very formal. I was perched in a very swanky suite of the hotel and she walks through the door. I was very much expecting Madonna to walk in basically straight from the Vogue video of 1990 and have some fabulous dancers behind her. Perhaps a fabulous suit, perhaps a conical bra. She walked in the door with no makeup on whatsoever. She said to me, "You’ll have to excuse me, I’m wearing my blanket." And she was wearing a ream of cloth. She looked like a hippy from the 1970s, she had long, centre-parted, greasy hair and plaits on either side and she was very much in her “Earth Mother” phase. And to me, an imposter had walked in the room! Where is the fabulous Madonna? But again it was, ‘What am I doing, this person from a small town in Scotland, here is the most fabulous female popstar who has ever existed and I am going to have to keep a straight face and try to get through the next 45 minutes with this person.’
Amy Winehouse:
I think that fame certainly contributed to [her death] to a significant degree. It was 2007 when I met Amy Winehouse. Back to Black was not yet #1 across the planet and she was not yet involved in any serious drugs, she was not yet back with Blake. She was 23, she was a very boisterous person. She was very young even for her 23 years at that time. She had no death wish. She drank too much. She was very obsessed with calories, she was very of her generation in that she was very, very obsessed with being slim. She said it was for health, but it just wasn’t. She hated being chubby, as she thought she was. She actually said to me at one point: “I would rather drink than eat. I’ll save all of my calories for alcohol.” That obviously is not a very healthy mind set to be in.
But I don’t think that she was on some fast track to a Kurt Cobain situation. I just think she was not robust enough to cope with fame and I think that the way that fame had become even 10 years ago, fame had become very frightening and all-encompassing…
Even Adele said last year that fame had become toxic and frightening and I think Amy’s life at that point was going to become the first year when that was apparent. Everything was incredibly tabloid. She did have 40 photographers outside of her door for every day of her life for two years. She was a music person before she was anyone else. The drugs, she wasn’t strong enough to take them and in the end… she just didn’t eat enough. I really do think that is the truth. I think she did not eat enough. She was a tiny money. It was a combination of being unable to cope with fame and just being physically weak. Dreadful, really.
Topics: music, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Sylvia Patterson, music journalism
Duration: 26'32"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 12 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 11'07"

21:06
Exactly where is sea level? Gravity can tell us
BODY:
After two years of measuring gravity from a plane, LINZ has just released a new vertical datum for New Zealand and its coastal seas. This allows the accurate measurement of sea level.
EXTENDED BODY:
The summit of Aoraki / Mount Cook is 3,724 metres above sea level, which begs the question: where exactly is sea level?
Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has just released a new vertical datum which defines exactly where sea level is, right across New Zealand and its coastal seas.
LINZ says that understanding the height of our land is important for understanding how water will flow during a flood or storm. People commonly talk about metres above sea level as a way of describing heights, but sea level can vary at different points around the country. To give scientists and researchers consistency, LINZ has developed a new vertical datum, a reference system based on gravity.
This has been four years in the making and has involved flying the length and breadth of the country with a specially equipped plane for gathering gravity measurements, as gravity can vary from place to place.
The new vertical datum, based on these gravity measurements, is accurate to 3cm. This enables, for example, scientists to reliably measure changes in sea level, engineers to consistently locate underground services and surveyors to efficiently define three-dimensional property boundaries.
Graeme Blick and Rachelle Winefield from LINZ have been responsible for collecting the gravity data and creating the vertical datum.
Geologists say they use the gravity data to investigate rocks and the structure of the earth beneath the surface, where they can't see..
In this earlier Our Changing World story, Graeme Blick explains geodesy, the science of knowing where you are.
The Deepwave project visited New Zealand to measure gravity waves in the atmosphere.
Gary Wilson from the University of Otago was recorded in Antarctica, measuring gravity with a very sensitive meter.

Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: sea level, gravity, vertical datum, LINZ, geology, geophysics, GPS
Duration: 16'06"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 New Zealand's forgotten Wimbledon Champion
He was born in New Zealand and won Wimbledon four times, so why isnt he more well known?
Anthony Wilding was born in Christchurch in 1883. He went on to win 11 Grand Slams, including four consecutive Wimbledon titles. He was world number 1 and the first and so far only player from New Zealand to have won a Grand Slam singles title.
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Anthony Wilding was killed in action in France in 1915 - while fighting for the British army.
His great niece, Anna Wilding is a White House correspondent and says because he was from the colonies, the British have not given him the recognition he deserves.
1:25 Inconceivable - Dr Andrew Murray
Inconceivable is a six-part documentary series, that follows the hopes and struggles of eight couples, who are trying to conceive, by IVF.
Figures from Statistics New Zealand, show fertility and live birth rates have dropped significantly in New Zealand since the 1970's.
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Dr Andrew Murray from Fertility Associates in Wellington discusses infertility and its possible causes.
1:30 Dan Slevin on the films based on Roald Dahl books
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Book Critic - Pip Adam
2:20 Great New Zealand Album
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This week's Great New Zealand Album, is the biggest in the career of a man who has entertained Kiwi's across five decades. He's a former entertainer of the year and has been recognised for his contribution to music with a New Zealand Order of Merit and an honorary masters degree from Waikato University. From humble, beginnings as the only Fender Stratocaster guitar owner in the North Island, this blues aficionado has taken his music to many corners of the globe and encouraged a number of high profile musicians to visit these shores.
Today's album under the spot light is "Burning Rain" by Midge Marsden.
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3:10 Sylvia Patterson: I'm not with the band
In 1986, the Pet shop Boys, Madonna and Billy Ocean had number one singles on the Charts, Queen released A Kind of Magic, and a 20 year old woman, left Scotland for London to write for on one of the most popular pop music magazines of the time. As a writer for Smash Hits, Sylvia Patterson interviewed Amy Winehouse, shared a plum with Johnny Cash, was threatened by Eminem and watched the music industry as she knew it completely change.
30 years later, Sylvia Patterson reflects on her own life, feminism in rock and roll and the demise of music journalism in her book, I'm Not with the Band: A Writer's Life Lost in Music.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS & THE PANEL 1 - 5pm
Tuesday 12th July
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Lawrence Arabia
TITLE: Another Century
COMP: James Milne
ALBUM: Absolute Truth
LABEL: iTunes
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Miranda Lee Richards
TITLE: Tokyo's Dancing
COMP: Miranda Lee Richards
ALBUM: Echoes of Dreamtime
LABEL: iTunes
ARTIST: Miranda Lee Richards
TITLE: First Light of Winter
COMP: Miranda Lee Richards
ALBUM: Echoes of Dreamtime
LABEL: iTunes
ARTIST: Miranda Lee Richards
TITLE: Colour So Fine
COMP: Miranda Lee Richards
ALBUM: Echoes of Dreamtime
LABEL: iTunes
THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM: BURNING RAIN
ARTIST: Midge Marsden
TITLE: Burning Rain
COMP: Mike Farrell
ALBUM: Unreleased version
LIVE: Demo

ARTIST: Midge Marsden
TITLE: Struck Down By The Blues
COMP: Midge Marsden, Mike Farrell
ALBUM: Burning Rain
LABEL: Jay Rem
ARTIST: Midge Marsden
TITLE: Little Ray
COMP: Mike Farrell
ALBUM: Burning Rain
LABEL: Jay Rem
ARTIST: Midge Marsden
TITLE: Burning Rain (Acoustic Version)
COMP: Mike Farrell
ALBUM: Travel In Time
LIVE: Jay Rem
FEATURE STORY:
ARTIST: Amy Winehouse
TITLE: Back To Black
COMP: Mark Ronson, Amy Winehouse
ALBUM: Back To Black
LIVE: Island
THE PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: The Pixies
TITLE: Snakes
COMP: Black Francis
ALBUM: Indie Cindy
LIVE: Pixiesmusic, PIAS

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 12 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'07"

16:05
The Panel with Ella Henry and Ben Thomas (Part 1)
BODY:
Topics - ACC is defending it's joint venture with SERCO despite the comapny being on a banned list. The tax director of Chartered Accountants Australia New Zealand Peter Vial on accusations against the big four accountancy firms. Theresa May will take up residence at 10 Downing St this week. Is being Prime Minister during Brexit a poison chalice?
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Duration: 23'48"

16:06
The Panel with Ella Henry and Ben Thomas (Part 2)
BODY:
Topics - 9/11 conspiracy theorist David Icke is on his way to NZ. Do you have any doubts around the accepted circumstances of the events? The US Republican Party wants pornography to be called a "public menace". There's a parallel being drawn with the gun debate. Ciminologist Greg Newbold talks about our 17,000k's of coastline - perfect for drug smugglers. Most wokers loathe performance reviews but researchers say don't ditch them completely.
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Duration: 27'12"

16:09
Panel intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Ella Henry and Ben Thomas have been up to
Topics:
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Duration: 5'06"

16:11
ACC investment in SERCO company
BODY:
ACC is defending it's joint venture with SERCO despite the comapny being on a banned list.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: tax, ACC, Serco
Duration: 6'06"

16:20
Masterminds of tax avoidance
BODY:
The tax director of Chartered Accountants Australia New Zealand Peter Vial on accusations against the big four accountancy firms.
Topics:
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Tags: CAANZ, tax, tax avoidance, accountancy firms
Duration: 7'24"

16:27
The UKs new PM
BODY:
Theresa May will take up residence at 10 Downing St this week. Is being Prime Minister during Brexit a poison chalice?
Topics:
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Tags: Theresa May, UK, British Prrime Minister
Duration: 5'01"

16:34
Conspiracy theories
BODY:
9/11 conspiracy theorist David Icke is on his way to NZ. Do you have any doubts around the accepted circumstances of the events?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: conspiracies, David Icke
Duration: 4'16"

16:37
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Ella Henry and Ben Thomas have been thinking about.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 5'58"

16:45
US: porn and guns - both public health crises?
BODY:
The US Republican Party wants pornography to be called a "public menace". There's a parallel being drawn with the gun debate.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US Republican Party, USA, pornography
Duration: 3'35"

16:47
NZ coast open to drug smugglers
BODY:
Ciminologist Greg Newbold talks about our 17,000k's of coastline - perfect for drug smugglers.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: drugs, drug smuggling, NZ coastline, borders, Customs
Duration: 6'55"

16:54
Performance reviews
BODY:
Most wokers loathe performance reviews but researchers say don't ditch them completely.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: performance reviews, appraisals, worker productivity
Duration: 6'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 12th July 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
No dividend from Housing NZ, say Nats
BODY:
Steven Joyce's surprise announcement that the Government will not receive a Housing NZ dividend has sparked questions and controversy. Paula Bennett joins Checkpoint to discuss the dividend.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Housing NZ dividend, emergency housing, Housing NZ
Duration: 5'12"

17:14
Modular housing plan announced
BODY:
Paula Bennett today announced more details on a plan to use modular housing - temporary pop-up homes - as a response to NZ's housing shortage.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Housing NZ dividend, emergency housing, Housing NZ
Duration: 2'33"

17:16
Real estate company partners govt for motel buy-out
BODY:
The government is using the real estate company Colliers International to find motels for homeless people to stay in.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Housing NZ dividend, emergency housing, Housing NZ, Colliers International
Duration: 2'57"

17:20
Controversy over ACC-Serco prison venture
BODY:
Questions have been raised about why ACC invested in a joint venture with Serco to build and run Wiri prison, after it banned all investment in the British-based company over ethical concerns.
Topics: politics, business
Regions:
Tags: ACC, Serco
Duration: 3'29"

17:29
No bidding war over Snell memorabilia
BODY:
The Sports Hall of Fame says it won't enter a bidding war with national museum Te Papa for Sir Peter Snell's Olympic memorabilia.
Topics: sport, history
Regions:
Tags: Te Papa, Sports Hall of Fame, Peter Snell
Duration: 2'32"

17:33
Evening Business for 12 July 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags:
Duration: 1'50"

17:36
Westpac clamps down further on home lending
BODY:
Westpac Bank is clamping down on property investors, cutting its interest-only lending term from 15 years to a maximum of five years.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags: Westpac bank, interest, property investors. lending
Duration: 2'52"

17:39
ACC to fund injury prevention programmes
BODY:
A multi-million-dollar campaign has been launched to help prevent older people from falling over and injuring themselves.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: age, injury, DHBs, eldrely, ACC
Duration: 2'44"

17:43
Witness changes evidence at murder trials
BODY:
A key Crown witness has denied she was under pressure in the trial over Luke Tipene's death - despite changing her evidence about seeing her cousin being fatally stabbed outside a Grey Lynn Halloween party.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Luke Tipene, Grey Lynn
Duration: 3'58"

17:55
Study shows link between thumb sucking, allergies
BODY:
An Otago University study has found that children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails are much less likely to get allergies in later life.
Topics: health
Regions: Otago
Tags: Otago University, allergies
Duration: 3'21"

17:57
Cats go missing in Timaru
BODY:
Fifty cats, many of them the stay-at-home type, have vanished in Timaru without trace in the past year - and local residents are up in arms.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 3'30"

18:12
Wind turbines North of Dunedin rejected
BODY:
Plans to build three wind turbines to generate electricity for a small rural community north of Dunedin have been rejected due to claims they ruined the beauty of the area.
Topics: energy
Regions: Otago
Tags: Dunedin, wind turbines
Duration: 2'54"

18:14
Former Police Commissioner gives evidence at hearing
BODY:
A former Police Commissioner has told a Court that the Ministry of Social Development took all the practicable steps it could to protect employees and could not have foreseen a shooting at its Ashburton office.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: MSD, Ashburton shooting, health and safety, OSH
Duration: 2'49"

18:18
Do gang members have a positive role to play in prison?
BODY:
After Corrections Minister Judith Collins' comments that the only place for gang members in prison was behind bars, Mongrel Mob member Harry Tam is speaking out about his experience working as a policy adviser.
Topics: politics, crime, law
Regions:
Tags: Corrections, gangs, gang members, prison
Duration: 4'40"

18:23
Waihi community steps up to help Fiji
BODY:
A Waihi man who rallied support from his community to send a container of aid to Fiji following Cyclone Winston says six months on, some villages are still without electricity and adequate housing.
Topics: Pacific, aid and development
Regions:
Tags: Cyclone Winston, cyclones, Fiji
Duration: 6'49"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Darrin Hodgetts on 'welfare with a big stick'
Tariana Turia backs Tikanga Maori in prisons

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:07
Our Own Odysseys - Ping Pong Diplomacy
BODY:
NZ Table Tennis Champion Yvonne Fogarty visited China in the 1970s during the Cultural Revolution, and this fascinating tale allowed her writer husband Tony Eyre to recently win them an all expenses trip to Shanghai.
Topics: sport, life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20'22"

20:09
Nights' Pundit - Mathematics
BODY:
Making the numbers add up is Dr. Dillon Mayhew from Victoria University's School of Mathematics, Statistics and Operations Research. Tonight he's looking at a recent discovery based on the game SET.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:74241:full]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Ping Pong Diplomacy
NZ Table Tennis Champion Yvonne Fogarty visited China in the 1970s during the Cultural Revolution, and this fascinating tale allowed her writer husband Tony Eyre to recently win them an all expenses trip to Shanghai.
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 12 July
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange; inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player; and investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange; inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player; and investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, blood orange, The Winebox Inquiry, Oyawa
Duration: 28'57"

19:30
Freetown Sound by Blood Orange
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange.
It’s been a year in which black social movements like the Black Lives Matter campaign have reached such critical mass that it would be surprising if there weren’t traces of it in the music. Even Beyonce – an artist who always seemed to exist in an airtight megastar bubble of her own – used her work this year to make political statements (see both her Lemonade video album and Superbowl performance.)
Here’s another album I think will stand as one of the year’s major black music releases. And it has plenty to say, politically, personally – and musically.
Freetown Sound is the third and latest album by Blood Orange: recording name of black, New York-based Englishman Devonte Hynes. And perhaps the only problem with labelling this a political record is singling out which particular cause it represents, as it seems to touch on so many. In the opening track – more an overture than an actual song – you’ll hear Hynes ruminating on his own identity, as an immigrant’s son, followed by slam-poet Ashlee Haze in her articulate address on the subject of black female representation.
And that’s just the beginning, as other tracks on this dense 17-song album acknowledge such topical concerns as police violence against black youth and queer and transgender rights. And yet the first thing that strikes me about this record is not its politics at all, but rather it’s mature musicality.
With subtly crafted songs, which remind me of Prince but also have some of the melodic generosity of Stevie Wonder, Freetown Sound is like the mixtape of Hynes’s mind, or - to borrow a metaphor from a friend of Hynes’ quoted in Pitchfork - a browser with 50 tabs open. Those tabs aren’t just musical bookmarks, but might also be pieces of poetry, oratory, interviews, movies, the music of the streets or the pulpit.
Found fragments are collaged into the song sequence, like notes in a margin, some of which recur as themes in the songs. You’ll hear the voice of Venus Xtravaganza, the late transgender performer, or the journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates, with his sobering remarks on the life-and-death choices a black person might be making just in the way they dress. Sometimes several themes run together, as in ‘Hands Up’: a deceptively upbeat dance jam that seems at first to be about personal identity and discovering who you are, until the line ‘keep your hood off when you’re walking’ flashes us back to the Trayvon Martin killing, and reminds us that for some, personal identity might be a death sentence.
It’s not surprising that, as a US resident, Hynes’ reflects on black American issues, but Freetown Sound casts itself wider than that. The Freetown of the title refers to the capital city of Sierra Leone, where Hynes’ father originally came from. And there are times where he seems to be singing back to Africa.
But as dense a collage as Freetown Sound is, it is also full of moments where Hynes just lets the music speak; where a piano might wander meditatively like an Erik Satie miniature, or a saxophone take flight in the manner of a Dolphy or Coleman; or where Hynes simply seduces us with a beautiful melody. And beauty is as much a concern of Hynes’ as any of the other 50 tabs he has open on Freetown Sound. In a time of prejudice and violence, it is that pursuit of beauty that makes Blood Orange’s Freetown Sound stand out like nothing else.
Songs featured: Augustine, By Ourselves, E.V.P., Hadron Collider, With Him, Hands Up, Juicy, Thank You.
Freetown Sound is available on Domino Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, blood orange
Duration: 11'16"

19:30
The Winebox Inquiry Sets Sail! by Winebox Enquiry
BODY:
Nick Bollinger inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player.
The Winebox Inquiry - has any band ever had a more New Zealand name? I’m not sure how it might be interpreted in other parts of the world; perhaps they will assume it is just a band of inebriates. In fact, this project - named after Winston Peters’ famous probing of local tax fraud – is not so much a band as the personal mission of Wellington-based musician William Daymond. And unlike Winston, whose winebox was full of incriminating documents, Daymond’s must be filled with old vinyl, because his album is like a tour of someone’s record collection.
There are jingly-jangly pop songs like ‘What A Day’, the album’s glorious opener, which reminds me of those days in the early 80s when bands like R.E.M and the Dbs were reclaiming the best bits of 60s California pop. Then there are whimsical things like ‘Sleeping In The Summer’ that make me wonder if I’ve just dusted off an old Donovan record and discovered a hidden track.
And what else is to be found in this cardboard crate? Well, about a third of the way in you hit punk rock. Short and distorted, ‘Lighter Thief!’ suggests a kinship with Ty Segall, or perhaps just shows that Daymond and Segall have some of the same favourites in their respective collections.
But while he’s clearly a fan of all kinds of largely American pop and punk, there is something intrinsically New Zealand about this music. And most of it all it gravitates towards the sound of the early Flying Nun era. With its wonderful organ hook, ‘If The Feeling Is Good’ could almost be a lost Chills classic.
Songs featured: What A Day, Sleeping in the Summer, Lighter Thief!, If The Feeling Is Good, It’s So Simple That It Hurts.
The Winebox Inquiry Sets Sail! is available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Winebox Enquiry
Duration: 6'44"

19:30
Won't Even Try To Scale It by Oyawa
BODY:
Nick Bollinger investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
A few years ago the Australian writer and musician Robert Forster wrote a series of proclamations he called The Ten Rules Of Rock and Roll. Loosely modelled on the Ten Commandments, it was as provocative as it was profound, and included such edicts as: ‘The second to last song on every album is the weakest’ and ‘great bands don’t have members making solo albums’. Weighing in at number ten was the rule: ‘The three piece band is the purest form of rock and roll expression’ – which, if he’s right, puts this band right up there.
They call themselves Oyawa – a word I’m unable to find in any dictionary, but they come from Waiheke Island where I’m told it just means ‘three piece band’. And as far as rock’n’roll expression goes, they have got it in dangerous quantities. Though all three members contribute equally to the triumvirate, the focal point is singer and guitarist Nikki Ngatai. She comes on with power chords blazing and an attitude that doesn’t just smoulder so much as combusts.
Oyawa’s debut is a six-song EP they have titled Won’t Even Try To Scale It – an oblique statement that seems to capture the combination of defiance and resignation that pervades these songs. Ngatai often seems to be singing from the inside of a volatile relationship. In the opening song she offers the metaphors of ‘sipping from a cocktail, climbing up a mountain cliff’, while her band (augmented on this track by additional guitarist Willem Van Der Plas) create the appropriate sense of tension and trepidation.
A trio can work in a lot of different ways. It can be three blazing virtuosos, like Cream, or three neo-primitives, which was good enough for Joey Ramone. Oyawa take a different approach again. They are all skilled musicians - especially drummer Miles Gillett, who plays with a jazzer’s authority - but their focus isn’t on individual displays so much as working as a unit to build an atmosphere. Their songs frequently rest on drones, which build ominously, with the effect of a burning fuse.
Anger, as John Lydon is fond of saying, is an energy, and it’s anger that provides much of the energy on Oyawa’s debut, though there are also moments that seem to be propelled by something you might call love, particularly the gorgeous final track, with Ngatai’s multiple voices floating in dreamy layers over a pulsing, hypnotic drone.
The group has plenty of firepower but can apply restraint just where they need it. And at just under half an hour in length, Oyawa’s debut EP makes few demands and offers no shortage of rewards.
Songs featured: Take You There, Don’t Wait For Me, Heads On Fire, Do We Interfere?, Hit A Wall.
Won’t Even Try To Scale It is available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Oyawa
Duration: 10'56"

7:30 The Sampler
This week Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange; inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player; and investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Mathematics
Making the numbers add up is Dr. Dillon Mayhew from Victoria University's School of Mathematics, Statistics and Operations Research. Tonight he's looking at a recent discovery based on the game SET.
8:30 Window on the World
No Man's Land - A fierce drought in Oklahoma's 'No Man's Land' - a region that was the heart of the 1930s Dust Bowl - stirs up dust storms, memories and myths. In this parched terrain of ghost towns and abandoned ranches, the wells are running dry, but the stories continue to flow. Storytelling spins out of the landscape itself. Millard Fowler (who has sadly died since being recorded) was 102 years old, and remembers the 'Dirty Thirties', when relentless winds scooped up the topsoil and rolled it through the town in billowing black clouds, turning day to night.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
20 Years Out - Our Tuesday Feature recalls the passage of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill in New Zealand 30 years ago, with a rich collection of rare archival material and personal reflection. More than just affecting the gay community, the debate quickly broadened into the issue of human rights in New Zealand, the fight for equality and the struggle against discrimination.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 WOMAD 2016
Episode 2: St Germain - Tonight's concert recorded at WOMAD features a live performance from French musician and producer Ludovic Navarre aka St Germain. Although he has played in New Zealand before, this is the first time he has played Womad. Navarre has brought with him a band that features 2 Malian musicians performing on the West African 21 stringed harp called the Kora and also the N'goni, the precurser to the American banjo. The concert features music from St Germain's new self titled album as well as compositions from his previous million seller 'Tourist'.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 12 July
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange; inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player; and investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange; inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player; and investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, blood orange, The Winebox Inquiry, Oyawa
Duration: 28'57"

19:30
Freetown Sound by Blood Orange
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a musically and socially astute new album from black British New Yorker Devonte Hynes, who records as Blood Orange.
It’s been a year in which black social movements like the Black Lives Matter campaign have reached such critical mass that it would be surprising if there weren’t traces of it in the music. Even Beyonce – an artist who always seemed to exist in an airtight megastar bubble of her own – used her work this year to make political statements (see both her Lemonade video album and Superbowl performance.)
Here’s another album I think will stand as one of the year’s major black music releases. And it has plenty to say, politically, personally – and musically.
Freetown Sound is the third and latest album by Blood Orange: recording name of black, New York-based Englishman Devonte Hynes. And perhaps the only problem with labelling this a political record is singling out which particular cause it represents, as it seems to touch on so many. In the opening track – more an overture than an actual song – you’ll hear Hynes ruminating on his own identity, as an immigrant’s son, followed by slam-poet Ashlee Haze in her articulate address on the subject of black female representation.
And that’s just the beginning, as other tracks on this dense 17-song album acknowledge such topical concerns as police violence against black youth and queer and transgender rights. And yet the first thing that strikes me about this record is not its politics at all, but rather it’s mature musicality.
With subtly crafted songs, which remind me of Prince but also have some of the melodic generosity of Stevie Wonder, Freetown Sound is like the mixtape of Hynes’s mind, or - to borrow a metaphor from a friend of Hynes’ quoted in Pitchfork - a browser with 50 tabs open. Those tabs aren’t just musical bookmarks, but might also be pieces of poetry, oratory, interviews, movies, the music of the streets or the pulpit.
Found fragments are collaged into the song sequence, like notes in a margin, some of which recur as themes in the songs. You’ll hear the voice of Venus Xtravaganza, the late transgender performer, or the journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates, with his sobering remarks on the life-and-death choices a black person might be making just in the way they dress. Sometimes several themes run together, as in ‘Hands Up’: a deceptively upbeat dance jam that seems at first to be about personal identity and discovering who you are, until the line ‘keep your hood off when you’re walking’ flashes us back to the Trayvon Martin killing, and reminds us that for some, personal identity might be a death sentence.
It’s not surprising that, as a US resident, Hynes’ reflects on black American issues, but Freetown Sound casts itself wider than that. The Freetown of the title refers to the capital city of Sierra Leone, where Hynes’ father originally came from. And there are times where he seems to be singing back to Africa.
But as dense a collage as Freetown Sound is, it is also full of moments where Hynes just lets the music speak; where a piano might wander meditatively like an Erik Satie miniature, or a saxophone take flight in the manner of a Dolphy or Coleman; or where Hynes simply seduces us with a beautiful melody. And beauty is as much a concern of Hynes’ as any of the other 50 tabs he has open on Freetown Sound. In a time of prejudice and violence, it is that pursuit of beauty that makes Blood Orange’s Freetown Sound stand out like nothing else.
Songs featured: Augustine, By Ourselves, E.V.P., Hadron Collider, With Him, Hands Up, Juicy, Thank You.
Freetown Sound is available on Domino Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, blood orange
Duration: 11'16"

19:30
The Winebox Inquiry Sets Sail! by Winebox Enquiry
BODY:
Nick Bollinger inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger inspects the contents of The Winebox Inquiry's first long-player.
The Winebox Inquiry - has any band ever had a more New Zealand name? I’m not sure how it might be interpreted in other parts of the world; perhaps they will assume it is just a band of inebriates. In fact, this project - named after Winston Peters’ famous probing of local tax fraud – is not so much a band as the personal mission of Wellington-based musician William Daymond. And unlike Winston, whose winebox was full of incriminating documents, Daymond’s must be filled with old vinyl, because his album is like a tour of someone’s record collection.
There are jingly-jangly pop songs like ‘What A Day’, the album’s glorious opener, which reminds me of those days in the early 80s when bands like R.E.M and the Dbs were reclaiming the best bits of 60s California pop. Then there are whimsical things like ‘Sleeping In The Summer’ that make me wonder if I’ve just dusted off an old Donovan record and discovered a hidden track.
And what else is to be found in this cardboard crate? Well, about a third of the way in you hit punk rock. Short and distorted, ‘Lighter Thief!’ suggests a kinship with Ty Segall, or perhaps just shows that Daymond and Segall have some of the same favourites in their respective collections.
But while he’s clearly a fan of all kinds of largely American pop and punk, there is something intrinsically New Zealand about this music. And most of it all it gravitates towards the sound of the early Flying Nun era. With its wonderful organ hook, ‘If The Feeling Is Good’ could almost be a lost Chills classic.
Songs featured: What A Day, Sleeping in the Summer, Lighter Thief!, If The Feeling Is Good, It’s So Simple That It Hurts.
The Winebox Inquiry Sets Sail! is available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Winebox Enquiry
Duration: 6'44"

19:30
Won't Even Try To Scale It by Oyawa
BODY:
Nick Bollinger investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger investigates the debut of Waiheke Island-based power trio Oyawa.
A few years ago the Australian writer and musician Robert Forster wrote a series of proclamations he called The Ten Rules Of Rock and Roll. Loosely modelled on the Ten Commandments, it was as provocative as it was profound, and included such edicts as: ‘The second to last song on every album is the weakest’ and ‘great bands don’t have members making solo albums’. Weighing in at number ten was the rule: ‘The three piece band is the purest form of rock and roll expression’ – which, if he’s right, puts this band right up there.
They call themselves Oyawa – a word I’m unable to find in any dictionary, but they come from Waiheke Island where I’m told it just means ‘three piece band’. And as far as rock’n’roll expression goes, they have got it in dangerous quantities. Though all three members contribute equally to the triumvirate, the focal point is singer and guitarist Nikki Ngatai. She comes on with power chords blazing and an attitude that doesn’t just smoulder so much as combusts.
Oyawa’s debut is a six-song EP they have titled Won’t Even Try To Scale It – an oblique statement that seems to capture the combination of defiance and resignation that pervades these songs. Ngatai often seems to be singing from the inside of a volatile relationship. In the opening song she offers the metaphors of ‘sipping from a cocktail, climbing up a mountain cliff’, while her band (augmented on this track by additional guitarist Willem Van Der Plas) create the appropriate sense of tension and trepidation.
A trio can work in a lot of different ways. It can be three blazing virtuosos, like Cream, or three neo-primitives, which was good enough for Joey Ramone. Oyawa take a different approach again. They are all skilled musicians - especially drummer Miles Gillett, who plays with a jazzer’s authority - but their focus isn’t on individual displays so much as working as a unit to build an atmosphere. Their songs frequently rest on drones, which build ominously, with the effect of a burning fuse.
Anger, as John Lydon is fond of saying, is an energy, and it’s anger that provides much of the energy on Oyawa’s debut, though there are also moments that seem to be propelled by something you might call love, particularly the gorgeous final track, with Ngatai’s multiple voices floating in dreamy layers over a pulsing, hypnotic drone.
The group has plenty of firepower but can apply restraint just where they need it. And at just under half an hour in length, Oyawa’s debut EP makes few demands and offers no shortage of rewards.
Songs featured: Take You There, Don’t Wait For Me, Heads On Fire, Do We Interfere?, Hit A Wall.
Won’t Even Try To Scale It is available on Bandcamp.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Oyawa
Duration: 10'56"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 12 July 2016
One of Nauru's ousted opposition MPs complains of dirty tricks during election campaigning. New Zealand's Pacifika community fares poorly in a study on deaths from heart disease. Revelations of so-called ghost companies in Solomon Islands receiving public money and a new platform's been launched for Pacific island storytellers.

=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Coverage from the world music festival (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288276

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 12 Jul 2016

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