RNZ National. 2016-07-14. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

14 July 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Discovery (BBC); 1:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 2:05 The Cultural Frontline; 3:05 The Conductor by Sarah Quigley read by Peter Bland (9 of 15) (RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ) 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 14 July 2016
BODY:
David Cameron hands in his resignation to the Queen, Theresa May takes the reins and immediately rings the changes. We talk to BBC political correspondent Rob Watson. We take another, closer look at yesterday's televised debate between candidates for the United Nations' top job, including Helen Clark's performance.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17"

06:06
Sports News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

06:14
David Cameron's last moments as Prime Minister
BODY:
The Telegraph's political correspondent Michael Wilkinson reflects on David Cameron's legacy.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, prime minister
Duration: 3'06"

06:21
Early Business News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'30"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'12"

06:43
Weather warnings blanket much of the country
BODY:
Weather commentator Richard Green say the cold snap set to continue and snow is likely to low levels in the days ahead.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'41"

06:50
NZX will leave companies to flag material info to the market
BODY:
The NZX is proposing to discontinue a practice of flagging announcements that may contain price sensitive information, leaving it up to the listed companies to make the call.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'37"

06:51
Brexit buzz fades and now focus on Bank of England
BODY:
As the market volatility triggered by Brexit starts to fade, the focus is now on the Bank of England - and odds are for a rate cut later today.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Brexit
Duration: 1'59"

06:53
China growth prospects sustainable - professor
BODY:
A visiting Chinese academic says that country's growth prospects are sustainable and will help create jobs.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: China, growth
Duration: 1'05"

06:54
Vinomofo to export New Zealand wines as part of expansion
BODY:
A niche Australian online wine retailer says it will offer New Zealand wines to the world as part of its international market expansion.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: wine, Vinomofo
Duration: 1'31"

06:56
Morning markets for 14 July 2016
BODY:
Wall Street is more sedate as a fall in oil prices has slowed things down.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'10"

06:57
Business briefs
BODY:
A new chief executive has been appointed for the New Zealand arm of rural lender Rabobank -- he's Australian banking executive Daryl Johnson, who takes ovcer from the interim chief executive Crawford Taylor.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Rabobank, Dick Smith
Duration: 1'44"

07:06
Sports News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'21"

07:10
Britain has a new Prime Minister
BODY:
David Cameron hands in his resignation to the Queen, Theresa May takes the reins and immediately rings the changes. We talk to BBC political correspondent Rob Watson.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, prime minister, government
Duration: 11'34"

07:22
Helen Clark draws on NZ experience in UN debate
BODY:
We take another, closer look at yesterday's televised debate between candidates for the United Nations' top job, including Helen Clark's performance.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN, Secretary General, Debate
Duration: 5'59"

07:29
Calls for police to wear body cameras
BODY:
There are calls for police to start wearing body cameras in the wake of the fatal shooting of Nick Marshall in Frankton on Tuesday. Kate Gudsell reports.
Topics: crime
Regions: Waikato
Tags: police, body cameras, shooting
Duration: 3'04"

07:38
NZ soliders to march in France's Bastille Day parade
BODY:
New Zealand soldiers will march today in France's Bastille Day parade as guests of honour. We talk to the Lieutenant Colonel Eugene Whakahoehoe who will be leading them along the Champs-Elysees.
Topics: defence force, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Bastille Day, parade
Duration: 2'57"

07:42
New Zealanders double Internet data usage in just a year
BODY:
New Zealanders have doubled their use use of data in just a year. And as Eric Fykberg reports the Internet community is actually patting itself on the back about how this huge demand is being handled.
Topics: business, technology, internet
Regions:
Tags: Data Usage, telecommunications
Duration: 3'25"

07:45
Govt to adopt recommendations to clear up foreign trust laws
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key officially adopts recommendations to overhaul foreign tax rules after a tax specialist's report finds disclosure rules are not fit for purpose.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trust laws
Duration: 4'52"

07:50
Modular housing the way forward, says company
BODY:
Kitset homes are being touted as one of the answers to the country's housing shortage, but opinions differ on whether they'll last the distance.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Modular Houses, Kitset, PrefabNZ
Duration: 5'21"

07:56
'Poi E' film premiere tonight - 32 years after song's release
BODY:
Three decades after Patea Maori Club shot to fame with 'Poi E' the story behind the joyful hit song has been turned into a film. The world premiere is in Auckland tonight and director Tearepa Kahi will be there.
Topics: arts, music, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Poi E, Patea Maori Club, film
Duration: 3'48"

08:06
Sports News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'06"

08:10
Boris Johnson named UK Foreign Secretary
BODY:
There is shock in Britain after Boris Johnson is named Foreign Secretary in the new Theresa May government. Our London Correspondent Catherine Drew has the details.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, government
Duration: 6'00"

08:16
Dementia vaccine may be just years away
BODY:
A vaccine which would prevent and even reverse the early stages of Alzheimer's and dementia should be ready for human testing within the next two to three years. We talk to Maurice Curtis from the Neurological Foundation's Human Brain Bank.
Topics: health, science
Regions:
Tags: alzheimers, dementia, vaccine
Duration: 4'16"

08:22
Helen Clark identifies UN shortcomings in bid for the top job
BODY:
The host of the global affairs blog UN Dispatch, Mark Leon Goldbert, reviews Helen Clark's performance in the secretary-general candidates debate.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN, Debate, Secretary General
Duration: 3'22"

08:26
The decile debate: How to bridge the achievement gap
BODY:
Principals say a two year achievement gap between students at high decile and low decile schools starts even before they turn five. Jan Tinetti from Merivale School in Tauranga and Brian Gower from the principal of Beachlands School in Auckland.
Topics: education, inequality
Regions:
Tags: decile system
Duration: 6'11"

08:31
Markets Update for 14 July 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'08"

08:38
Golf stars missing from Rio Olympics next month
BODY:
Golf is looking like being a fizzer on its long-awaited return to the Olympics - while the world's best women are keen, many of the top men say they're not interested. We talk to Ron Sirak from Golf Digest.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: golf, Olympics
Duration: 5'04"

08:43
Mother of NZer who died in detention angry at lack of detail
BODY:
The mother of a New Zealander who died in detention in Australia says she's not surprised an official report into the death has been published but with almost all its content blacked out.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags: Australia, detention centres
Duration: 4'11"

08:51
Broadband networks bearing up in face of growing traffic
BODY:
Independent network analyst John Butt tells Morning Report that internet service providers and network companys are coping well with burgeoning demand driven by video services.
Topics: internet, technology
Regions:
Tags: Data Usage, Internet Connection
Duration: 3'00"

08:54
New Zealand's first hatchery-raised scampi turns one
BODY:
Efforts to establish a lucrative export trade in live scampi have achieved a world first. Scientists at Cawthron's research plant in Nelson have managed to keep a hatchery-raised New Zealand scampi alive for a year. Tracy Neal reports.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: scampi
Duration: 3'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading When We Wake, by Karen Healy. Sixteen-year-old Tegan is happiest when playing the guitar, she's falling in love for the first time, and she's protesting the wrongs of the world. (Part 4 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Christchurch container crackdown
BODY:
Many Christchurch residents have used shipping containers and other temporary structures to store belongings in while repairs were carried out after the earthquakes. But the Christchurch City Council says it's had an increase in complaints from residents about containers and other temporary structures obscuring neighbours' views or obstructing council berms. Chairman of the council's regulation and consents committee David East says if earthquake repairs are completed, the container may have to go.
EXTENDED BODY:

Sensible discretion will be applied to unconsented tiny homes and other structures erected since the earthquakes, Christchurch Council says.
Many residents have used shipping containers to store their belongings while repairs are made to their damaged homes.
But the council has received a number of complaints about unsightly containers blocking views or obstructing council berms.
Chair of the council's regulation and consents committee David East told Nine to Noon that Christchurch probably had more shipping containers and road cones than anywhere else in the world.
He believed that once work on a property was completed, the containers were usually removed.
But he acknowledged there were still a number that were causing problems for some neighbours.
"We are experiencing a number of complaints from residents, adjacent residents, about these sorts of facilities that have lingered on."
He said if uncompliant structures remained on a property, people would be given a notice to fix them before the council would take any action.
Mr East said each complaint would be reviewed on a case by case basis and they would apply discretion.
The same approach by council would also apply to tiny homes, that are cheap to build and can be moved easily on trailers.
Mr East said if a tiny home was connected to the sewer or other services, it would require a consent.
But he said no single case had set a precedence and the council would look at each case as it cropped up.

Topics: politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch earthquake, housing
Duration: 8'10"

09:17
What next for the South China Sea?
BODY:
China's ambitions for the South China Sea took a serious blow this week with a landmark (seamark?) ruling rejecting many of the China's claims to the strategically vital waterway. Bill Hayton is a journalist and author of The South China Sea: the struggle for power in Asia
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: China, international relations
Duration: 12'06"

09:29
Battling WINZ to stop overpayments
BODY:
A Rotorua beneficiary who has been overpaid by Work and Income says it will take him five years to repay the extra money.
EXTENDED BODY:
A Rotorua beneficiary who has been overpaid by Work and Income says it will take him five years to repay the extra money.
Bryce Sinclair says his fluctuating weekend work means he continues to be overpaid.
As reported recently by RNZ, Work and Income is owed $1.28 billion, and $672 million of that is due to unintentional overpayments.
Mr Sinclair has been on a Work and Income benefit for about nine months.
He told Nine to Noon he also had two part-time jobs that he loved, but his fluctuating hours of work meant the amount he was paid by Work and Income was often incorrect to the point where he and his wife now owed $2800.
"There are people out there who are suffering, they're tortured because of this injustice.
"I go online, they have a couple of online portals where I can enter our income and they require that I declare my income for the current working week for Monday through to Sunday, and they require that that declaration be completed by Friday.
"Now, the nature of my work is such that I work sometimes on weekends and sometimes I don't, so WINZ [Work and Income] says to me - basically they're going to ask me to lie to generate a figure of what I think I'll be working on the weekend."
He said the overpayments were not accidental but rather they were occurring, and continuing to occur, because Work and Income was using a faulty system to estimate his income.
Despite trying to declare his income accurately, he had been overpaid 14 times this year, he said.
"I go to WINZ for help, I want help, and what I end up getting is that help but dumped on top of that is their system which allows errors to be made.
"How does that help me, WINZ is not helping me by creating these overpayments and there are a lot of other people who are suffering the same as well."
Ministry of Social Development Associate National Commissioner Te Rehia Papesch said income was considered for the period it was earned and it was simplistic to view the issue as a system issue.
She said the vast majority of overpayments were incurred due to clients not informing Work and Income "in a timely manner of any change to their income and other circumstances that affect their entitlement".
She said that was the law, and Work and Income had to be committed to administering the system consistently.
"In Mr Sinclair's case, we've suggested ways he can avoid incurring overpayments," she said.
"We have met with him on three occasions last month to explain our requirements, and the options available to him including providing us with estimates that can be confirmed or corrected on receipt of a payslip.

"Mr Sinclair has not been receptive to these suggestions."
"Given clients are best placed to know when their circumstances change, we've made it easier to declare income online as soon as they earn it, or estimate their income to avoid or reduce the incorrect benefit being paid.
"Their income can be amended and confirmed, and their benefit payment adjusted accordingly."
Mr Sinclair said while the agency presented the income declarations system as providing estimates rather than concrete numbers, it had a real effect and the debt worried him.
"There are some dire consequences mentioned about what could happen if I have underdeclared and they end up overpaying me. So I have pretty bad feelings about that."
He said he had approached Work and Income managers about the debt but said he was getting no direct feedback and all that happened was that $5 was taken from his ongoing payments.
He had recently bought a house with his wife and because of that it would be very difficult for him to repay the money quickly, he said, but Work and Income managers had told him not to worry about the debt.
"What sort of attitude is that? That's just extravagance, it's a waste of taxpayers' money."
"WINZ needs to find out why they're making these overpayments, how can they put procedures in place to stop them."
"Their system is defaulting to producing far too many overpayments, it is a design fault."
Ms Papesch said that with 280,000 beneficiaries, it was not possible for Work and Income to tailor the system on an individual basis.
"It is not accurate to describe Mr Sinclair's situation as typical of people incurring overpayments - people incur overpayments for a range of reasons, including not declaring income, and not updating us in a timely manner of a change to their circumstances which may impact their eligibility."
"Of course we would welcome anyone looking to pay off their debt in full, and would encourage people to get in touch to arrange full repayment of any outstanding debt."
Related

Topics: business, economy, politics
Regions:
Tags: WINZ, Work and Income New Zealand, Ministry of Social Development, welfare, beneficiaires
Duration: 12'53"

09:45
UK correspondent Kate Adie
BODY:
UK correspondent Kate Adie discusses changes to the UK government
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 12'06"

10:08
Who's ruining the internet?
BODY:
Cory Doctorow is a world famous digital activist, science fiction author and co-editor of the website Boing Boing. He stands among those who'd like to see big changes in how we use the web.
EXTENDED BODY:
World-famous digital activist Cory Doctorow wants to see big changes in how we use the internet.
When the World Wide Web was still in its infancy it was driven, in part, by egalitarian ideals that it could be a place where everyone's voice could be heard - eliminating the power of gatekeepers to decide what information the public could access.
But according to Doctorow, who is a science fiction author and co-editor of the website Boing Boing, things have changed dramatically.
He says that while the intentions of those who were “inspired by and excited about the possibilities for directly connecting people with one another” were to keep the internet open, constant compromises meant that over time it became less egalitarian, a less competitive, and eventually less free.
“You know [that] kind of self-delusion that many of us make along the way in terms of our own morals and ethics.
“You can see it playing out until we arrive at a place where people who should have known better, have millimetre-by-millimetre, put themselves into a position where they effectively have digital monopolies.”
Websites like Facebook (which Doctorow describes as a “massive face-hugging vampire squid that is devouring the web”), Flickr and YouTube make their billions sweeping up huge amounts of original content developed by their users and selling advertising around it - and selling users personal information too.
And increasingly, those companies are using algorithms to decide what content users see, bringing accusations of censorship and psychological manipulation.
Meanwhile, governments have also passed legislation extending the powers of copyright on the web and enabling mass surveillance of online activities, including our government in New Zealand.
Doctorow says that one of the “most shameful incidents in internet policy” is Section 92A of the Copyright (New Technologies) Amendment Act here in New Zealand.
“This bill was rammed through and considered at the time to be so disproportionate that people rose up there were street demonstrations, there were mass movements against it and eventually your government rescinded the law.”
He says the fact that it was eventually reattached shows that “someone was exerting huge influence over your democratic process” in terms of internet policy.
“In the wake the Christchurch earthquake you had a parliamentarian who refused allow the emergency legislation to dig out of the rubble to go through unless your Bill 92A was reattached and made back into law.”
Doctorow talks to Kathryn Ryan about current issues with the internet and how he thinks it should change.
Topics: internet
Regions:
Tags: internet, privacy, social media, surveillance
Duration: 33'49"

11:07
Book Review - Hera Lindsay Bird by Hera Lindsay Bird
BODY:
Reviewed by Tim Upperton. Published by Victoria University Press.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: poetry
Duration: 5'18"

11:12
New technology with Mark Pesce
BODY:
Mark Pesce continues discussion on Decentralized Autonomous Organisations (DAOs) after one allowed the draining of $US 60 million ... and the Pokemon Go craze.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: DAO, Pokemon Go
Duration: 9'19"

11:25
Neuroplasticity and healing childrens' brains
BODY:
Nathan Mikaere Wallis is founder of X Factor Education in Christchurch. He was formerly with the Brain Wave Trust and has been a lecturer at the Christchurch College of Education, lecturing in human development, brain development, language and communication and risk and resilience.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nathan Mikaere Wallis is founder of X Factor Education in Christchurch. He was formerly with the Brain Wave Trust and has been a lecturer at the Christchurch College of Education, lecturing in human development, brain development, language and communication and risk and resilience.
Read an edited excerpt from the interview below:
Remind us of what is so important in the first three years of a child’s life. What are the developmental occurrences in that time that make them so important?
Essentially it’s because your brain number four, the brain that you’ve got that a dog doesn’t have, the one that’s going to contain all of your cleverness, is relationship dependant. It doesn’t just grow because of genes, it doesn’t just grow because Einstein’s your dad. It grows in response to that environment.
It needs stimulus, and we’ve talked about empathy, for example it won’t develop unless it is stimulated.
Empathy is up in that brain number four, along with your ability to focus your attention. Attachment is another. Understand consequences. Just control your emotional response. All of us have a brain like a two-year-old, where to reach out and hit someone does not require much control. That’s because it’s brain number three, a two-year-old does it. It’s the wanting to hit someone and not doing it, that requires a frontal cortex. That’s the part that is optional. It’s about those first three years of life that is largely the determinant of whether you’ve got that frontal cortex or not.
What are some of the things that can go wrong, either by absence or occurrence that your or UK psychologist Oliver James talk about can be healed or at least mitigated to some extent. What kinds of interventions are we talking about?
He’s just talking about going back and that the brain is developmental. That you can meet its needs at any age. If you are dealing with a 15-year-old who has spent 15 years in an orphanage, it doesn’t mean it’s too late, it means we’ve got to go back and give his brain what it didn’t get as a newborn baby. You could simplify that down to say that brain number one needs a solid dyadic relationship with one other person and having the attachment relationship and that could be seen as what brain number one needs. So whether you’re bringing the child home from the hospital or you’re adopting a 15-year-old from an orphanage, they both have a need in brain number one to start off with a dyadic relationship.
They both have a need in brain number two to have a rhythmic pattern. If you gave your baby a pattern by rocking them. If the kid’s lying in an orphanage and that hasn’t happened, the needs of brain number two haven’t been met. If you get him at 15, you still need to do that. You might not be rocking him, but you might put him in a swing or a rocking chair or a hammock or something. But you’ve got to do something to put that rhythmic programming in for brain number two.
I’m simplifying this obviously, it’s way more complex than that and you’ve got whole practitioners working just in that area. But the way to heal it and what Norman is talking about is very in line with people like Bruce Perry, who are saying that you can fix those things, you just have to do them in the developmental order that they should have been done in the first place.
Topics: health, science, education
Regions:
Tags: neuroplasticity, brains, children
Duration: 18'58"

11:45
Viewing with Duncan Grieve
BODY:
Duncan discusses This is Piki, a new Maori TV teen drama and the dumping of Sex Box by TV2 after a public outcry.
Topics: media, internet
Regions:
Tags: This is Piki, Comments
Duration: 13'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:74449:half]
09:05 What next for the South China Sea?
China's ambitions for the South China Sea took a serious blow this week with a landmark (seamark?) ruling rejecting many of the China's claims to the strategically vital waterway. Bill Hayton is a journalist and author of The South China Sea: the struggle for power in Asia
09:20 Battling WINZ to stop overpayments
Work and Income figures on beneficiary debt show that $672 million is owed by people who were overpaid by accident, and have to pay it back. Rotorua beneficiary Bryce Sinclair has two part time jobs and his hours of work fluctuate from week to week, and therefore his income. Bryce declares this income to WINZ, but because of the way the system works, he's found himself overpaid, and he and his wife now owe nearly 2 thousand 8 hundred dollars. He tells Kathryn Ryan that despite his best efforts, the debt has mounted, which he finds very stressful.
09:45 UK correspondent Kate Adie
[image_crop:12848:half] no metadata
10:05 Who is ruining the internet?
When the World Wide Web was still in it's infancy it was driven in part by egalitarian ideals that it could be a place where everyone's voice could be heard - eliminating the power of gatekeepers to decide what information the public could access. But these days websites like Facebook, Flickr and YouTube make their billions sweeping up huge amounts of original content developed by their users and selling advertising around it - and selling users personal information too.
Cory Doctorow is a world famous digital activist, science fiction author and co-editor of the website Boing Boing. He stands among those who'd like to see big changes in how we use the web.
10:35 Book review - Lindsay Hera Bird by Lindsay Hera Bird
reviewed by Tim Upperton, published by Victoria University Press
10:45 The Reading
When We Wake by Karen Healy read by Francesca Emms (Part 4 of 12)
11:05 New technology with Mark Pesce
Mark Pesce continues discussion on Decentralized Autonomous Organisations (DAOs) after one allowed the draining of $US 60 million ... and the Pokemon Go craze.

11:25 Nathan Mikaere Wallis on neuroplasticity and healing childrens' brains
Nathan Mikaere Wallis is founder of X Factor Education in Christchurch. He was formerly with the Brain Wave Trust and has been a lecturer at the Christchurch College of Education, lecturing in human development, brain development, language and communication and risk and resilience.
11:45 Viewing with Duncan Grieve
Duncan discusses This is Piki, a new Maori TV teen drama and the dumping of Sex Box by TV2 after a public outcry.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Paolo Nutini
Song: Let Me Down Easy
Composer: Nutini/Holloway
Album: Caustic Love
Label: Atlantic
Time: 9.42
Artist: Bond Street Bridge
Song: Birds
Composer: Prebble
Album: Spring Summer Awesome Winter
Label: Monkey
Time: 11.22

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
It's all change at Westminster as a new PM takes power and criticism for the post-quake reshuffle of Canterbury schools.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'09"

12:17
Goodman Property sells Auckland office buildings
BODY:
The industrial property developer, Goodman Property Trust, says it's made a deal to sell three Auckland office properties for 206 million dollars.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Goodman Property Trust
Duration: 1'30"

12:19
Commerce Commission aims Vodafone/Sky decision by November
BODY:
The Commerce Commission says it's aiming to make a decision on the proposed merger between Vodafone and Sky Television, by early November.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Vodafone, Sky Television
Duration: 1'02"

12:20
Manufacturing activity holds up
BODY:
Activity in the manufacturing sector is holding up, with a strong run on new orders.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: manufacturing sector
Duration: 1'29"

12:21
Shareholders oppose plan to change handling of market notices
BODY:
A proposal to change the way the stock exchange flags price sensitive notices to the market isn't sitting well with the Shareholders Association, concerned it will disadvantage small companies and retail shareholders.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Shareholders Association
Duration: 1'27"

12:23
NZX welcomes proposed changes to financial advisor rules
BODY:
The head of the stock exchange company NZX says planned changes to the rules covering financial advisors should prove a plus for small investors.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: NZX
Duration: 1'12"

12:24
Midday Markets for 14 July 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by James Grigor Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'30"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
The Hurricanes flanker Ardie Savea has joined a small group of All Blacks to have committed to New Zealand rugby beyond next year's British and Irish Lions tour.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'33"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 14 July 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:13
Part Stingray, Part Robot
BODY:
It's part robot, part stingray. A bioengineered robot that mimicks the movement of a living stingray using living cells and synthetic materials.

EXTENDED BODY:
Yesterday on the show we spoke with Submarine designer, Lucy Collins, and one of the questions she was asked was whether submarine design has ever tried to emulate the flexi-torso techniques used by sea creatures to displace water more effectively.
Professor Kit Parker of Harvard University is doing just this. He looks to the natural world for engineering inspiration, and has built a robotic stingray, which imitates the movement of a living stingray.
He talks to Jesse Mulligan about using living cells and synthetic materials to create a kind of hybrid robotic creature.
Topics: technology, science
Regions:
Tags: robotic stingray, robots
Duration: 18'08"

13:32
Poet, Hera Lindsay Bird
BODY:
Hera Lindsay Bird's poetry is making waves both in New Zealand and overseas. She talks about her eponymous debut collection of poetry.
EXTENDED BODY:
Hera Lindsay Bird's self-titled debut book of poetry was released today by Victoria University Press.
She graduated from the International Institute of Modern Letters and won the 2011 Adam Prize for best folio.
After spending the last couple years living in Dunedin, she has returned to Wellington - and joined Jesse in the studio to talk about her book, and read us one of her poems.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: poetry
Duration: 13'07"

13:45
Favourite album
BODY:
'The Black Light' by Calexico, chones by John Dean.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'36"

14:07
Theatre Critic: Dione Joseph
BODY:
Badjelly The Witch - at The Pumphouse, Takapuna, until 23rd July. Purapurawhetu - at The Herald Theatre until 16th July.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre
Duration: 7'30"

14:15
Geoffonomics: The price of clean, green electricity
BODY:
Can we have clean, green electricity without blowing the power bills?
EXTENDED BODY:
We're now into the coldest time of the year, the time when we fire up Huntly power station and everyone's power bills go through the roof. We are supposed to be weaning ourselves off fossil fuels by the 2nd half of this century but can we do it without the lights going out and our power bills exploding?
Economist Geoff Simmons from the Morgan Foundation discusses the economics of renewable energy.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: renewable energy
Duration: 15'24"

14:35
The history of New Zealand comedy
BODY:
Victoria University law historian, Grant Morris looks at the beginnings of New Zealand comedy.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'58"

15:08
Masterpieces with Jeff Thomson
BODY:
Jeff Thomson is one of New Zealand's most highly regarded sculptors. He's exhibiting in this year's Sculpture on the Gulf, which he's been a part of since its inception. He's here for Masterpieces, to tell us about his favourite New Zealand sculpture.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: sculpture
Duration: 14'05"

15:22
The Expats: Helen Simmons in Oslo
BODY:
Helen Simmons has lived in the Norwegian capital for 12 years, and loves the changing seasons, but the very short winter days can take their toll.
EXTENDED BODY:
Helen Simmons has lived in the Norwegian capital for 12 years, and loves the changing seasons, but the very short winter days can take their toll.
Helen Simmons says Oslo is getting increasingly crowded and housing is a growing problem. She says there isn't really a tradition of going flatting, everyone wants their own place and not to share it with strangers.
"In general Norwegians are very reserved with strangers, and appreciate their privacy and peace and quiet. Once you get to know people better, they are friendly and warm and like to do things together - eating, going for walks. But you need to get past that initial reserve, and take the initiative to make friends"
She says one thing she particularly enjoys is the focus on the changing seasons. She says there are traditional activities for each season, like picking berries and mushrooms in autumn, cross-country skiing in winter.
"At the moment it's summer, which means walks in the forest, picnics, swimming in the sea and in lakes, and staying up all night because it doesn't really get properly dark at night in July. I love summer in Norway, closely followed by autumn when all the leaves turn orange."
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: expats
Duration: 9'01"

15:46
The Panel pre-show for 14 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'22"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
[image:74486:half]
1:15 Part Stingray, Part Robot
Yesterday on the show we spoke with Submarine designer, Lucy Collins, and one of the questions she was asked was whether submarine design has ever tried to emulate the flexi-torso techniques used by sea creatures to displace water more effectively.
Our next guest works on exactly this kind of thing. Professor Kit Parker of Harvard University looks to the natural world for engineering inspiration... and has built a robotic stingray, which imitates the movement of a living stingray.
[embed] https://youtu.be/-D_XrRo0h20
1:35 Poet, Hera Lindsay Bird
Hera Lindsay Bird's poetry is making waves both in New Zealand and overseas. She talks about her eponymous debut collection of poetry.
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Theatre Critic: Dione Joseph
Badjelly The Witch - at The Pumphouse, Takapuna, until 23rd Jul
Purapurawhetu - at The Herald Theatre until 16th Jul
2:20 Geoffonomics: The price of clean, green electricity
Can we have clean, green electricity without blowing the power bills?
We are supposed to be weaning ourselves off fossil fuels by the 2nd half of this century but can we do it without the lights going out and our power bills exploding?
Economist Geoff Simmons from the Morgan Foundation discusses the economics of renewable energy.
2:30 The history of New Zealand comedy
Victoria University law historian, Grant Morris looks at the beginnings of New Zealand comedy.
[image:74507:half]
2:45 The Reading
3:10 Masterpieces with Jeff Thomson
Jeff Thomson is one of New Zealand's most highly regarded sculptors. He's exhibiting in this year's Sculpture on the Gulf, which he's been a part of since its inception. He's here for Masterpieces, to tell us about his favourite New Zealand sculpture.
3:25 The Expats: Helen Simmons in Oslo
Helen Simmons has lived in the Norwegian capital for 12 years, and loves the changing seasons, but the very short winter days can take their toll.
[image:74454:full]
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS & THE PANEL 1 - 5pm
Thursday 14th July
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Che Fu
TITLE: Waka
COMP: Che Fu Ness
ALBUM: 2b S.Pacific
LABEL: BMG
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Calexico
TITLE: The Black Light
COMP: Joey Burns, John Convertino
ALBUM: The Black Light
LABEL: Quarterstick
ARTIST: Calexico
TITLE: Minas De Cobre (For Better Metal)
COMP: Joey Burns
ALBUM: The Black Light
LABEL: Quarterstick
ARTIST: Calexico
TITLE: Missing
COMP: Joey Burns
ALBUM: The Black Light
LABEL: Quarterstick
ADDITIONAL SONG:
ARTIST: Vashti Bunyan
TITLE: Diamond Day
COMP: Vashti Bunyan
ALBUM: Just Another Diamond Day
LABEL: Philips
THE PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Chainsmokers
TITLE: #Selfies
COMP: Andrew Taggart
ALBUM: Digital Single
LABEL: Dim Mak

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:46
The Panel pre-show for 14 July 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'22"

16:03
The Panel with Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker have been up to. Dr Tim Malloy of the Royal College of General Practitioners talks about attracting doctors to small towns. The Dunedin Council isn't keen on making a Warrant of Fitness for rental properties mandatory. The Christchurch City Council is going to crack down on shipping containers and other structures being used as homes.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'19"

16:05
The Panel with Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker (Part 2)
BODY:
Fatal falls from a great height or drowning are the the main causes of selfie-related deaths. What the Panelists Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker have been thinking about. The AAs Mark Stockdale talks wheel clamping and why he wants to see an end it it. Will Boris Johnson find the diplomat in him as British Foreign Secretary? Donald Trump's becoming evermore relient on a smaller group of white voters for the 2016 US Presidential election. Actress Jennifer Aniston has spoken out for the first time about being the constant fodder of the gossip media.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'24"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'23"

16:13
Lack of community GPs critical
BODY:
Dr Tim Malloy of the Royal College of General Practitioners talks about attracting doctors to small towns.
Topics: rural, health
Regions:
Tags: rural doctors
Duration: 9'03"

16:22
Rental WOFs
BODY:
The Dunedin Council isn't keen on making a Warrant of Fitness for rental properties mandatory.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: rentals, WOF
Duration: 5'17"

16:27
Crack down on container homes
BODY:
The Christchurch City Council is going to crack down on shipping containers and other structures being used as homes.
Topics: housing, law, politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: containers
Duration: 2'35"

16:32
Selfie-related calamities
BODY:
Fatal falls from a great height or drowning are the the main causes of selfie-related deaths.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: selfie, deaths
Duration: 2'29"

16:35
Panel says
BODY:
What the Panelists Finlay MacDonald and Michael Deaker have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'35"

16:40
AA calls for wheel clamping ban
BODY:
The AAs Mark Stockdale talks wheel clamping and why he wants to see an end it it.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: wheel clamping
Duration: 5'58"

16:47
Boris Johnson as UK Foreign Secretary
BODY:
Will Boris Johnson find the diplomat in him as British Foreign Secretary?
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Boris Johnson, UK
Duration: 4'40"

16:51
Donald Trump and the white vote
BODY:
Donald Trump's becoming evermore relient on a smaller group of white voters for the 2016 US Presidential election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Trump, US
Duration: 4'33"

16:56
Jennifer Aniston adresses gossip
BODY:
Actress Jennifer Aniston has spoken out for the first time about being the constant fodder of the gossip media.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Jennifer Aniston, US
Duration: 3'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Thursday 14th July 2016
BODY:
Watch Thursday's full programme here. It begins 5 minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
Rotorua man hospitalised after being shot by police
BODY:
A man is in a serious condition after being shot by the police in Rotorua - the second police shooting in less than 48 hours.
Topics:
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: shooting, police
Duration: 2'22"

17:11
Quitline charity under legal spotlight
BODY:
The Government has called in lawyers for advice over a charity that is holding onto millions of dollars in public funds and continued paying its trustees several months after it stopped operating.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Quit Group, charity
Duration: 3'40"

17:14
Akld families under pressure in house-hunt
BODY:
In Auckland, young families searching for affordable housing in special housing areas say it's proving Mission Impossible.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: affordable housing
Duration: 5'02"

17:19
What is Hobsonville Point's affordable housing?
BODY:
In Auckland, young families searching for affordable housing in special housing areas say it's proving Mission Impossible.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: affordable housing, Hobsonville Point
Duration: 6'32"

17:26
Live from Rotorua Police news conference
BODY:
We go back to the Rotorua Police station now where a police conference has just begun following the the shooting of a man near a shopping centre earlier today.
Topics: crime
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: shooting, police
Duration: 4'45"

17:34
Evening Business for 14 July 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'27"

17:36
Large fire in central Christchurch
BODY:
Our reporter Conan Young joins us from Christchurch.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: fire
Duration: 1'43"

17:38
Theresa May appoints new cabinet in first day as PM
BODY:
New British Prime Minister Theresa May has just spent her first night at number 10 Downing Street after a day in which she picked her new Cabinet.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 4'25"

17:42
Grey Power internal stoush over cannabis
BODY:
Grey Power members wanting to plant marijuana between their broccoli and oregano are standing firm in the face of mounting opposition from within their own organisation.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
Tags: grey power, marijuana
Duration: 3'11"

17:45
Derelict HNZ properties a magnet for crime
BODY:
Residents of a New Plymouth suburb filled with dozens of derelict Housing New Zealand properties say they feel increasingly unsafe in their own homes.
Topics: housing
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: derelict houses, Housing New Zealand
Duration: 4'18"

17:49
Horton Media opposes Fairfaz-NZME merger
BODY:
The Commerce Commission has many of the submssions they've received on the NZME-Fairfax merger public, including one from Horton Media - related to the family who owned the NZ Herald.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Fairfax, NZME
Duration: 5'42"

17:55
Pokemon fan quits job to catch virtual monsters
BODY:
A 24-year-old Aucklander hooked on Pokemon Go has recently quit his job and booked twenty buses up and down the country to try to catch 'em all.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Pokemon Go
Duration: 4'12"

18:08
Man shot by police in Rotorua in a critical condition.
BODY:
The police say the man was wielding a slasher knife and heading towards a shopping centre when they fired at him on Te Ngae Road, at about one o'clock this afternoon.
Topics:
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: shooting, police
Duration: 5'15"

18:14
Christchurch school closures harmed communities
BODY:
A new report has heavily criticised how the Ministry of Education handled the post-earthquake Christchurch school reshuffle nearly four years ago.
Topics: education
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: schools, closures
Duration: 3'14"

18:18
AA says clamping should be banned amidst growing complaints.
BODY:
The AA is calling for a ban on wheel clamping amidst growing complaints against the practice.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: AA, wheel clamping
Duration: 3'13"

18:20
Billy Apple exhibition opens in Christchurch
BODY:
John Britten's record-setting motorbike was unveiled at the Christchurch Art Gallery today at the launch of a new exhibition by acclaimed artist Billy Apple which officially opens this weekend.
Topics: arts
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Billy Apple
Duration: 7'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Nick Pope - Official UFO investigator
BODY:
Nick Pope spent 21 years working for the British Ministry of Defence and headed their official UFO Project in the 1990s.
Topics: history, technology
Regions:
Tags: British Ministry of Defence, UFOs, UK
Duration: 21'18"

20:12
Augmented Reality - Paul Spain
BODY:
Why has Pokemon Go been so instantly successful? Technology Commentator Paul Spain explains why augmented reality's time has come.
Topics: technology, life and society, media
Regions:
Tags: Pokemon Go, gaming, mobile phones, cellphones, augmented reality, video games, computer games
Duration: 18'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Nick Pope - Official UFO investigator
Nick Pope spent 21 years working for the British Ministry of Defence and headed their official UFO Project in the 1990s.

7:35 At the Movies
Simon Morris looks at The BFG, based on the Roald Dahl children's favourite and directed by Steven Spielberg and Sing Street, set in a Dublin boys school in the early Eighties. He also talks animation and Incredibly Strange movies with the Film Festival's Malcolm Turner and Ant Timpson.

8:12 Augmented Reality - Paul Spain
Why has Pokemon Go been so instantly successful? Technology Commentator Paul Spain explains why augmented reality's time has come.

8:30 Window on the World
Mighty Real: Sylvester James - David McAlmont travels to San Francisco to tell the glittering and sad tale of gay black diva Sylvester James, famed for his disco hit Mighty Real. Sylvester's short life says much about US civil rights movements, the politics of the American music business and the devastating effects of Aids.

9:07 Our Changing World
How gravity can accurately define sea level, marine science round-up that features fish eggs and mussel beds, and Veronika Meduna looks back on a long career of telling science stories on the radio.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 Music 101 pocket edition
Trevor Reekie talks to Ramones founding producer Craig Leon, Yadana Saw teams up with turntablist DJ Spell ahead of his tilt at the DMC World Championships and Sam Wicks bounces with beatmaking pioneer DJ Shadow about his latest album "The Mountain Will Fall".

===7:30 PM. | At The Movies===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly topical magazine about current film releases and film related topics

=AUDIO=

19:31
At The Movies - BFG Review
BODY:
Steven Spielberg's first full-on fairy tale, based on a book by Roald Dahl, and starring Spielberg favourite Mark Rylance.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 5'29"

19:32
At The Movies - Sing Street review
BODY:
Following the interview with director John Carney a few weeks ago, we look at Eighties school-band movie itself.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 4'51"

19:33
At The Movies - NZ International Film Festival
BODY:
The unruly side-bars to the Festival proper - Animation and Incredibly Strange - are unveiled by curators Malcolm Turner and Ant Timpson.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 9'16"

19:39
At The Movies 647
BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris looks at The BFG, based on the Roald Dahl children's favourite and directed by Steven Spielberg… and Sing Street, set in a Dublin boys school in the early Eighties. He also talks animation and Incredibly Strange movies with the Film Festival's Malcolm Turner and Ant Timpson.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 23'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

Featured this week – The BFG, from the children’s book by Roald Dahl, directed by Steven Spielberg.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvvQ9oy3pjs
Sing Street is set in Dublin’s Synge Street School, where a group of boys form a band to rival Duran Duran.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8VtbULzJTU
And Ant Timpson and Malcolm Turner offer some highlights from, respectively, the Incredibly Strange and Animation sections of the Film Festival. Featuring the bizarre Swiss army man…
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrK1f4TsQfM

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | Our Changing World===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlights from the world of science and the environment, with Alison Ballance and Veronika Meduna

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===

Late Edition for 14 July 2016
The beneficiary debt trap, a young poet in hate, and in Dateline Pacific; island nations prepare for the rio olympics.

=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on New Zealand/Aotearoa (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288278

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 14 Jul 2016

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