RNZ National. 2016-08-09. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

09 August 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 The National Film Unit (2 of 2, RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 Hidden Treasures (RNZ) 3:05 Tall Half Backs by Graham Hutchins, read by Lloyd Scott (RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6:16 and 6:50 Business News
6:26 Rural News
6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 9 August 2016
BODY:
A roundup from the day in Rio; Rangitaiki locals to be updated on power restoration efforts; court hears first details of Crown's case in 'stop go' trial; Donald Trump lays out his economic plan for America; Labour-Greens closing the gap on National Party; Women's sevens team through to final after beating GB; Auckland councillors advised to reject parts of Unitary Plan; and was a NZ judge in charge of UK's child abuse inquiry sacked?
Topics:
Regions:
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Duration: 28'27"

06:07
Sports News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

06:26
Early Business News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'25"

06:27
Morning Rural News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'11"

06:39
Another medal confirmed for New Zealand
BODY:
Another medal is confirmed for New Zealand after the womens' rugby sevens team beat Great Britain 25-7 this morning. They play for silver or gold later this morning.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'43"

06:43
Work of restoring power in central North Island continues
BODY:
Four hundred homes in the Hawkes Bay and Taupo region are still without power.
Topics: energy, Civil Defence
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'24"

06:48
Problems with power a headache for dairy farmers
BODY:
Problems with power remain a problem for a number of dairy farmers in Northern Hawkes Bay.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'55"

06:51
Earnings season preview
BODY:
It's that time when the spotlight goes on listed companies with full-year earnings results coming out over the coming days and weeks.
Topics: money, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'22"

06:53
Visiting US economist sees little to cheer about
BODY:
A visiting American economist and academic sees little cause to smile in the curent economic and financial environment.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'21"

06:57
Michael Hill's Canada business boosted by competitor's closure
BODY:
The jewellery retailer, Michael Hill International, expects its Canadian expansion to accelerate following the closure of one of its major competitors.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Canada, Michael Hill
Duration: 1'15"

06:59
Markets update
BODY:
Wall Street is mixed, lifted by higher oil prices but dampened by weaker healthcare stocks.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'16"

07:10
Sports News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

07:12
Another medal on its way for New Zealand Olympics team
BODY:
Sports reporter Stephen Hewson with the latest from the Olympics.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'55"

07:16
A wider roundup from the day in Rio
BODY:
Correspondent John Bevir live from Rio.
Topics:
Regions:
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Duration: 2'33"

07:18
Rangitaiki locals to be updated on power restoration efforts
BODY:
Four hundred homes in Hawke's Bay and on the Taupo Plains remain without power this morning. Duncan Klaus is the publican at the Rangitaiki Tavern, where a community meeting onthe situation will be held.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'28"

07:25
Court hears first details of Crown's case in 'stop go' trial
BODY:
A High Court murder trial has heard the first details of what the crown says happened to road worker George Taiaroa who was shot and killed three years ago while operating a stop go sign. Our reporter Andrew McRae has been at court.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'31"

07:28
Suicide bomber in Pakistan kills at least 70
BODY:
A suicide bomber in Pakistan has killed at least 70 people and wounded more than a hundred in an attack on mourners gathered at a hospital in Quetta. We cross to our Pakistan for the latest.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'02"

07:34
Donald Trump lays out his economic plan for America
BODY:
Donald Trump has laid out his economic plan for America should he become President later this year. Our Washington correspondent Priscilla Huff was listening in.
Topics:
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Duration: 4'38"

07:39
Labour-Greens closing the gap on National Party
BODY:
The Labour leader Andrew Little talks to Susie Ferguson about the latest polls which show Labour and the Greens are closing the gap on National.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'28"

07:43
Women's sevens team through to final after beating GB
BODY:
The New Zealand Sevens women's team is through to the final after beating Great Britain 25 to 7. Portia Woodman scored a hat-trick of tries against the Brits. Her brother Baden was watching the game.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Rio
Duration: 2'03"

07:46
Auckland councillors advised to reject parts of Unitary Plan
BODY:
Controversial protections for thousands of sites of value to Maori could be re-instated in Auckand's unitary plan.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'09"

07:50
Was NZ judge in charge of UK's child abuse inquiry sacked?
BODY:
One of Britain's best known commentators on the law Joshua Rozenberg is suggesting the New Zealand judge who headed an independent inquiry into child sex abuse in Britain did not resign, but was sacked.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'51"

07:50
Was NZ judge in charge of UK's child abuse inquiry sacked?
BODY:
One of Britain's best known commentators on the law Joshua Rozenberg is suggesting the New Zealand judge who headed an independent inquiry into child sex abuse in Britain did not resign, but was sacked.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'46"

07:55
Tourist missing in Paparoa National Park found last night
BODY:
A British tourist who spent two nights lost in the Paparoa National Park is recovering in hospital. He tells us of his experience in the bush.
Topics:
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Duration: 4'32"

08:06
Sports News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ sport.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

08:12
New Zealand equestrian team edging towards Rio medal
BODY:
With just one day of competition to go the New Zealand equestrian team has jumped to second overall after the cross-country stage. Our reporter Gael Woods is at the equestrian centre at Deadoro.
Topics:
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Duration: 3'41"

08:17
US dominance in the pool on show again in Rio
BODY:
The US swimmer Michael Phelps has picked up his 19th Olympic Gold medal at Rio and his team mate Katie Ledecky.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio Olympics
Duration: 5'22"

08:21
Power switched back on in some homes after snowstorm
BODY:
400 hundred homes are still without power after Saturday's snowstorm, others are getting back on line as repair crews work their way across the region. Garth McVicar and Sue Maxwell are among those affected in Hawkes Bay.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'08"

08:27
UK child sex abuse inquiry "must not lose momentum"
BODY:
The former British minister for Children Tim Loughton says the resignation of the New Zealand Judge Lowell Goddard came as a huge surprise and is a blow for the victims. Lowell Goddard was heading the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse in the UK.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'58"

08:29
Markets Update for 9 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'04"

08:37
Man arrested after New Plymouth shooting
BODY:
The police in New Plymouth have arrested a man after a shooting yesterday evening. We hear from some locals who heard the shooting.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'38"

08:40
Waimate council plan to move info centre angers locals
BODY:
A plan to move Waimate's information centre from the main street has infuriated local business owners who say the move would rob them of much-needed foot traffic.
Topics: money, business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

08:45
Auckland writer big winner at Children's Book Awards
BODY:
A book about New Zealand soldiers serving during the World Wars took the top prize at the New Zealand Book awards for children and young adults at Wellington's Circa Theatre last night.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'38"

08:47
NASA research plane to fly over South Island
BODY:
A NASA research plane will swoop as low as 150 metres over the South Island later today on a mission to collect air samples and measure pollution levels.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: NASA, pollution
Duration: 3'15"

08:52
Antarctica takes on Hollywood in 48 Hour film festival
BODY:
Filmakers living in Antarctica are wrapping up filming of entries for their 48-hour film festival competition.
Topics: arts, environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

08:55
Fresh discovery at the seat of Arthurian legend.
BODY:
Archaeologists working in Cornwall have unearthed the remains of a Dark Age royal palace which is firing fresh interest in the legend of King Arthur. We're joined by Win Scutt of English Heritage.
Topics: history, environment, life and society
Regions:
Tags: King Arthur, Cornwall, archaeology
Duration: 4'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including:
10:45 The Reading: Soon, by Charlotte Grimshaw (Part--7), read by Michael Hurst. A satirical novel following the fortunes of National Party Prime Minister David Hallwright and his Auckland set (Part 7 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Police discredit stranger danger
BODY:
The police say schools are putting too much focus on "stranger danger" when the evidence shows children are most at risk from people they know.
EXTENDED BODY:
Teaching "stranger danger" to children confuses them and ignores abuse that can come from people they know, a police advisor says.
An Auckland University study found nearly 97.6 percent of reported cases of child abuse in New Zealand involved someone the child knew, and most involved someone within the family circle.
Roland Hermans, who helps put together educational programmes for the police, said older methods for teaching children about risks were outdated and didn't work.
Current school schemes had moved away from the "stranger danger" theme that was so prevalent in the 1980s and 1990s, he said.
"By honing in on stranger danger, it means that the non-stranger abuser has an easier job.
"They don't wear their raincoat, they haven't got the bristles, they're not mean and nasty."
Most abusive relationships started with the abuser acting nice, and that confused children, he said.
In another study, children were asked if they knew how to identify a stranger, and many answered "if I saw one, I'd recognise one".
"They're really thinking about this cartoon character," Mr Hermans said.
Keeping Ourselves Safe - a programme that has been running in schools for over 30 years - instead focuses on teaching children the types of behaviours to look out for.
"Learning about feelings, learning about different types of touch, no matter who it comes from," Mr Hermans said.
These tools allowed children to be alert to abuse, and encouraged to report it, even when it did come from someone they knew.
"What's important is they recognise that the behaviours can come from anyone, whether it's a person unknown or a person right up into that family situation."
In some situations, he said, abuse could begin with something that felt safe, and by the time the child realised something was wrong they were afraid of telling someone.
"By that stage often the child thinks 'if I tell someone I'm going to get into trouble'.
"These are the sort of situations that Keeping Ourselves Safe talks about, so that they are much more equipped to recognise those behaviours rather than focusing on people."
Those tools would also come in handy when dealing with a real "stranger danger" situation - as highlighted by a recent incident in Wellington.
In July, a primary school pupil from Ngaio School was walking home when a man attempted to grab them from a car.
The child struggled and broke free, only to be chased to a nearby railway station.
Ngaio School principal Liz Millar said the incident was a wake-up call.
"Our focus had been more on bullying and food safety."
She said, following the incident, parents were encouraged to have conversations with their children about sticking to safe routes while walking to and from school, and avoiding shortcuts and isolated areas.
Two weeks ago, a similar incident occurred, she said.
"A child wasn't actually grabbed, but felt hugely concerned walking to school and seeing a van parked in a bush area and reported that when they got to school."
Ms Millar said, by giving children the tools to identify danger and report it, it gave them and their parents more confidence about walking to school.
Related

Topics: education, crime, law, life and society
Regions:
Tags: stranger danger, children at risk
Duration: 16'30"

09:25
Councils urged to crack down on illegal rubbish dumping
BODY:
The charitable trust Keep New Zealand Beautiful says illegal dumping of household rubbish is a becoming a problem, and councils around the country need to do more.
Topics: crime, politics
Regions:
Tags: illegal rubbish dumping, domestic waste
Duration: 10'13"

09:40
From floral facelift to food forest
BODY:
Diana Moore, who along with her husband Richard have given the Northland township of Maungaturoto a floral facelift and with volunteers in tow they're are about to plant a community food forest.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Northland township of Maungaturoto has had a floral makeover and now, inspired by the success of that project, the community is pulling together to plant fruit trees to provide food for the locals.
Diana Moore and her husband Richard masterminded the initial sprucing up of the town, and now, with help from volunteers, they have a new project.
This Saturday the soil will be tilled at the Maungaturoto Country Club so that an orchard of 60 trees can be planted to provide locals with fruit.
The town has a population 837, according to the 2013 census, and is located close to the Otamatea River 45km south of Whangerei.
The Moores say when they first moved there from Kerikeri, Maungaturoto was a sad and shabby place, and they say it felt like a dying town.
So they decided to make a change.
They say the beautification idea had the blessing of council as long as it was self-funded. Richard drew up plans to transform most of the gardens in town. And through donated labour and money, the town started to bloom.
So successful was that community effort, the locals decided the next move would be a food forest.
They say the orchard will not only continue the process of beautifying the town, but also get families outdoors to forage for free fruit.
Topics: life and society, education, environment, identity, rural, science
Regions: Northland
Tags: Diana Moore, maungaturoto, beautifying a township, floral facelift, food forest
Duration: 10'19"

09:50
US correspondent, Steve Almond
BODY:
The apparent implosion of the Trump campaign, which has been in a free-fall for the past ten days. And the Zika has shown up in Florida.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags: USA, US elections, zika virus
Duration: 8'38"

10:08
Mike Durant: Black Hawk Down
BODY:
Nine to Noon speaks to Mike Durant, a former US army helicopter pilot, shot down over Mogadishu during the United States' disastrous, and short-lived intervention in Somalia in 1993.
EXTENDED BODY:

Nine to Noon speaks to Mike Durant, a former US army helicopter pilot, shot down over Mogadishu during the United States' disastrous, and short-lived intervention in Somalia in 1993.
The mission was called "Restore Hope" but the US quickly found itself battling local Somali warlords. Mike Durant's Black Hawk helicopter was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, all his crew died in the subsequent fire-fight, along with two others. He was held hostage for 11 days before returning to the United States to a clamour of interest from the media.
Mike Durant now lives in Alabama where he runs a company specializing in aviation training and hiring many veterans. He's the subject of a National Geographic documentary to screen here later this month.
Topics: history, politics, life and society, transport, defence force, media
Regions:
Tags: army helicopters, US Army, Black Hawke, documentaries
Duration: 29'23"

10:40
Book Review - The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry
BODY:
The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry, reviewed by Susanna Andrew and published by Profile Books. RRP $32.99.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: The Essex Serpent, Sarah Perry
Duration: 5'55"

11:07
2nd Olympic Silver
BODY:
Barry Guy reports for Nine to Noon from Rio where New Zealand has scored a 2nd Silver medal at the Olympic Rugby Sevens event, losing in the final to Australia 24-17.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio Olympics, Rugby Sevens, silver medal
Duration: 4'49"

11:12
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Rod Oram is looking at what the Reserve Bank might do later this week with the Official Cash Rate, and also he'll examine the temporary suspension of kiwifruit exports to China.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'06"

11:30
Treaty Settlement stories preserved
BODY:
New Zealanders who've been involved in negotiating treaty settlements, or whose lives have been affected by them, are sharing their stories for a national research project. The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is gathering material from as many Maori and pakeha as possible, to the full story of the various Treaty settlements. Te Taiwhakaea: Treaty Settlement Stories will produce a comprehensive account that the Ministry hopes will help New Zealanders understand the settlement process. Interviews are being recorded and stories are coming in since the Ministry launched the project earlier in the year. Leading it is the Ministry's Senior Maori Historian Dr Monty Soutar.
Topics: history, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: WW1, treaty settlements, Treaty of Waitangi
Duration: 12'25"

11:45
Media commentator, Gavin Ellis
BODY:
The NZME/Fairfax Olympics ban has seen both newspaper groups fully availing themselves of the "fair use" provision of the Copyright Act to access SkyTV video. And does the demise of Saatchi's Chairman Kevin Roberts show that society is no longer satisfied when dumb utterances get shot down in flames?
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: NZME, Fairfax Olympics ban
Duration: 13'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Stranger Danger
Are schools putting too much focus on "stranger danger" when the evidence shows children are most at risk from people they know.? Roland Hermans is a police adviser to schools. He says the focus on "stranger danger" can lead to a false sense of security both for children and parents. Liz Millar is Principal Ngaio School, where they have had a couple of suspicious incidents of this nature recently.
09:20 Councils urged to crack down on illegal rubbish dumping
The charitable trust Keep New Zealand Beautiful says illegal dumping of household rubbish is a becoming a problem, and councils around the country need to do more. The organisation says there are no effective deterrents for people who dump disused furniture and the like on footpaths. Lynn Freeman speaks to KNZB's General Manager Heather Saunderson and Alexandra Davids is the Chairperson of Keep Christchurch Beautiful.

09:30 From floral facelift to food forest
[gallery:2331]
The Northland township of Maungaturoto has had a floral makeover and now the community is pulling together to plant fruit trees to yield food for the local community. Diana Moore and her husband Richard have masterminded the sprucing up of the town, and with help from volunteers they will plant an orchard of fruit trees this weekend at the Maungaturoto Country Club.
09:45 US Correspondent
Steve Almond from the US with the apparent implosion of the Trump campaign, which has been in a free-fall for the past ten days, and the Zika has shown up in Florida.
10:05 Mike Durant: Black Hawk Down
[image:76867:half]
Nine to Noon speaks to Mike Durant, a former US army helicopter pilot, shot down over Mogadishu during the United States' disastrous, and short-lived intervention in Somalia in 1993. The mission was called "Restore Hope" but the US quickly found itself battling local Somali warlords. Mike Durant's Black Hawk helicopter was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, all his crew died in the subsequent fire-fight, along with two others. He was held hostage for 11 days before returning to the United States to a clamour of interest from the media. Mike Durant now lives in Alabama where he runs a company specializing in aviation training and hiring many veterans. He's the subject of a National Geographic documentary to screen here later this month.

10:35 Book review - The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry
Reviewed by Susanna Andrew, published by Profile Books
10:45 The Reading
Soon by Charlotte Grimshaw read by Michael Hurst. (Part 7 of 12)
11:05 2nd Olympic Silver
Barry Guy reports for Nine to Noon from Rio where New Zealand has scored a 2nd Silver medal at the Olympic Rugby Sevens event, losing in the final to Australia 24-17.
11.15 Business commentator Rod Oram
Rod Oram is looking at what the Reserve Bank might do later this week with the Official Cash Rate, and also he'll examine the temporary suspension of kiwifruit exports to China

11:20 Treaty Settlement Stories Preserved
[image:15614:full]
New Zealanders who've been involved in negotiating treaty settlements, or whose lives have been affected by them, are sharing their stories for a national research project. The Ministry for Culture and Heritage's Senior Maori Historian, Dr Monty Soutar is gathering material for Te Taiwhakaea: Treaty Settlement Stories, in the hope it will help understanding of the settlement process.
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
The NZME/Fairfax Olympics ban has seen both newspaper groups fully availing themselves of the "fair use" provision of the Copyright Act to access SkyTV video. And does the demise of Saatchi's Chairman Kevin Roberts show that society is no longer satisfied when dumb utterances get shot down in flames?

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Sami Sisters
Song: On This Day
Composer: M Sami
Album: Happy Heartbreaker
Label: Parot Diva Grump
Time: 9.25
Artist: VAmpire Weekend
Song: Everlasting Arms
Composer: Matmanlij/Koenig
Album: Modern Vampires of the City
Label: XL
Time: 9.38

Artist: Roberta Flack
Song: Killing Me Softly
Composer: Gimbel/Fox
Album: The Best of Roberta Flack
Label: Atlantic
Time: 10:48

Artist: Sarah Vaughan
Song: Cheek to Cheek
Composer: Berlin
Album: Compact Jazz
Label: Mercury
Time: 11:30

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand women's sevens team take silver in Rio; Slow progress for lines workers in the central North Island.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'50"

12:17
PGG Wrightson reports rise in profit
BODY:
The rural services company, PGG Wrightson, has lifted its profit by nearly a quarter, on gains from asset sales and a lower tax bill.
Topics: business, economy, rural
Regions:
Tags: PGG Wrightson
Duration: 1'48"

12:19
Property For Industry FY profit falls on lower valuations
BODY:
Specialised property investment company, Property for Industry, has reported a 38 percent fall in its half-year profit because of lower valuation gains.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'44"

12:22
Hallenstein Glasson expects 22 percent fall in FY profit
BODY:
The clothing retailer, Hallenstein Glasson, says its full year profit will be down about 22 percent on a year ago because of a warm start to winter, a lower dollar and ineffective management.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Hallenstein Glasson
Duration: 55"

12:24
Fairfax getting into broadband
BODY:
Media company Fairfax New Zealand is expanding into consumer broadband fibre services, offering what it says will be ultra fast speeds, unlimited data, and no fixed term contracts.
Topics: business, economy, media
Regions:
Tags: RNZ, Radio New Zealand, Fairfax New Zealand
Duration: 44"

12:25
Midday Markets
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'18"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
The Football Ferns captain's suspension is overturned.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: football, football ferns
Duration: 3'03"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 9 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Call for inquiry into forced adoptions
BODY:
Maggie Wilkinson has been fighting a 30-year battle for the government to investigate the forced adoption of babies born to unwed mothers from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s.
EXTENDED BODY:
Maggie Wilkinson has been fighting a 30-year battle for the government to investigate the forced adoption of babies born to unwed mothers from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s.
Her own daughter was taken from her in 1964 when she gave birth at St Mary's home for unwed mothers, which was run by the Anglican Church in Ōtāhuhu.
Maggie, who lives in Waihi, told Afternoons she wanted the government to hold an inquiry into forced adoptions.
Australia had a senate inquiry and made a formal apology to those similarly affected there.
The Anglican Church in New Zealand has offered to open its books for any inquiry that might be held - but the government has said no, and appears to believe it's a case of water under the bridge.
Maggie was 19 when she gave birth.
"I was in the home for approximately six months. It wasn't a kind place. When you speak to young women about this now they say 'oh that happened in Ireland didn't it?
"It was actually happening here in New Zealand and I feel it's a dark history, and it's women's history that has gone uninvestigated - it just disappeared."
Before she gave birth, Maggie told the matron at the home she wanted to keep her child but was betrayed, she said, when the institution deemed her as being unable to cope. After that she "went slightly mad", she said.
Her pregnancy was then brought on; she said she remembered being given medication.
"I was given drops in my nostrils, I'm not quite sure what the medication was. And I had my child, I pleaded with them not to take her away, this was in the delivery room... My child was taken directly from the womb really."
Maggie, who has since been reunited with her lost daughter, said she was determined to fight on for other young mothers - many of whose stories ended less happily.
"There are women I know who didn't cope and committed suicide. The grief is enormous and what I'm doing now is for those women."
Topics: history, identity, inequality, life and society
Regions:
Tags: forced adoptions
Duration: 10'08"

13:25
Winner of Margaret Mahy Children's Book of the Year Award.
BODY:
A tale of wartime heroes has taken out this year's Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award.
EXTENDED BODY:
A tale of wartime heroes has taken out this year's Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award.
Anzac Heroes, by Maria Gill, won both the non-fiction and best book categories.
Illustrated by Marco Ivancic, the story follows a group of Anzacs through World Wars I and II.
Maria Gill spent over a year researching the book including interviewing former soldiers. She also ensured she told the stories of some of the soliders who have been overlooked in the history books, in particular Aboriginal and Maori troops, and the women who played key roles in the war effort.
Maria Gill talked to Jim about how the book came about.
Topics: books, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award
Duration: 9'08"

13:35
Dad Goes to the Movies (1941)
BODY:
On 6 December 1941 a NZ serviceman named Les Tweedie, stationed in Alexandria, went to see James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner.
EXTENDED BODY:
On 6 December 1941 a NZ serviceman named Les Tweedie, stationed in Alexandria, went to see James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner.
How do we know this? Because Les was an avid film fan and wrote a diary and recorded, among many other things, every film he saw. Thanks to his daughter, writer Jaq Tweedie, this diary has just been published as Dad Goes to the Movies (1941), a lovingly transcribed version of his closely written pocket diary from that year.
Dan Slevin from RNZ Widescreen takes a look at the new book
Dan's links:
http://funeralsandsnakes.net
http://www.imdb.com/chart/top
http://letterboxd.com
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 10'45"

13:40
Favourite album: Alice Russell, My favourite letters
BODY:
Favourite album: Alice Russell, My favourite letters, chosen by Mark Graham.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'31"

14:07
Book Critic: Allan Drew
BODY:
This week Allan Drew, doctoral student in creative writing and English literature at Victoria University, goes in search of John Milton's 'Paradise Lost'.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Paradise Lost
Duration: 10'25"

14:20
Great New Zealand Album: Dave Dobbyn, Lament for the Numb
BODY:
Dave Dobbyn joined Jim Mora in the studio to talk about making his album, Lament for the Numb.
EXTENDED BODY:
The 'Great New Zealand Album' is usually chosen by us, based on record sales and/or chart performance. However, this week our guest artist is choosing his own. Dave Dobbyn has made 22 of them in a career spanning four decades, so there are plenty to choose from. He's picked his 1993 release Lament For the Numb to talk about with Jim Mora.
The album was recorded and mixed in Hollywood in 1993, but wasn't released for a year - Dobbyn recalls a beautiful day in LA, after the album was completed, sitting in a Denny's cafe with his wife, when album producer Mitchell Froom sat him down and said:
“Ah well, we heard back from the record company. Those guys... Australians... They say it's unreleasable!”

"So I had that feeling that you often get in LA, if you ever go there, you have the feeling that the world is going to end on a beautiful day... in LA," he said, laughing.
"So the dread, and the poison and bile that had been building up for years sort of manifested itself after that moment, and for the next year I was in an agony of… a bad space. Eventually we got it out.”
'Don't Hold Your Breath'
"I was very affected by Randy Newman as a songwriter and piano player, he basically taught me to play piano, although he doesn’t know me... I was always struck by a song like 'Short People', for instance, which, if you put that out now you’d have people coming down on you like a ton of bricks," he said.
"So I could just imagine him in the process writing a wish list of all the nasty things you could say about short people... And so when I wrote [Don’t Hold Your Breath], I just wrote a political wish list as a kind of act of folly, really."
Dobbyn is one of New Zealand's most decorated performers, nominated for 43 national music awards and winning 23 of them. He has won the coveted APRA Silver Scroll a record three times and, in 2001, was presented with a lifetime achievement award by the music industry. The following year, he was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit and, three years ago, became the lucky 13th inductee into the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame.
Related stories and music
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 35'20"

15:10
Bone Music: Soviet bootleg records on xrays
BODY:
It was the midst of the cold war, and state censors had banned western music, and even some Russian music was deemed "dangerous". But ingenious music lovers found a way to listen to the forbidden music, recording it onto old x-rays. It became known as bone music.
EXTENDED BODY:
It was the midst of the cold war, and state censors had banned western music, and even some Russian music was deemed "dangerous". But ingenious music lovers found a way to listen to the forbidden music, recording it onto old x-rays. It became known as bone music.
Stephan Coates, the lead singer of British band The Real Tuesday Weld, discovered the clandestine recordings several years ago when he was on tour in St Petersburg.
He was so fascinated, he made a documentary and wrote a book: X-Ray audio: the strange story of soviet music on the bone.

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: bone music, Russia
Duration: 22'13"

15:44
One Quick Question for 9 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'15"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 9 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'31"

21:06
'Milk on a disc'
BODY:
Shining a light on milk to reveal its secrets will allow 'point of cow diagnostics' about the quality of milk and the health of individual dairy cows.
EXTENDED BODY:
Canny consumers may soon be able to buy their milk the way they do their wine. A handy device being developed at the University of Auckland aims to give buyers full knowledge of the age, origin and flavour of their milk, as well as its nutritional content.
‘Milk-on-a-Disc’ is a project by Professor David Williams and Associate Professor Cather Simpson, who are both at the MacDiarmid Institute. It uses lasers, spinning transparent discs and a spectrometer to quickly and accurately analyse the properties of milk samples.
“We call it ‘value-added spectroscopy’,” says Simpson. “We use the spinning discs to move the fluids around, and use the spectroscopy to do the analysis.”
The transparent discs have channels and wells carved into them which mix the milk samples with various reagents. The discs are then spun at high speed to separate and measure different components within the milk.
“As far as the user is concerned,” says Williams, “It’s just like playing a CD on your music player.”
The discs allow the team to test the protein and fat content of milk, as well as the health and pregnancy status of each cow. When they need to run other kinds of tests, they simply swap discs.
“For us it’s like changing from Classical to Pop. You just change the disc in your reader.”

The eventual aim is for farmers to be able to individually test every cow in their herd at every milking and for the results to be available straight away. This information can then be used to adjust the care of the cow, as well as determine the best use of the milk, a process Simpson and Williams call ‘point of cow diagnostics’.
“Different types of milk are better for cheese or yoghurt or drinking or for turning into milk powder,” says Simpson. “So we’ll be looking at those things.”
The team can already identify milk from different parts of the country and also accurately distinguish our milk from that produced overseas. New Zealand cows are largely pasture-fed and as a result their milk has different qualities to barn-raised, grain-fed foreign cows. It’s hoped that Milk-on-a-Disc will be able to give very accurate information about those differences and so provide a marketable point of difference for our milk.
Consumers may also soon be able to choose their milk based upon where it came from by applying an almost terroir idea to dairy. One consumer might prefer the dryer, mineral quality of Canterbury milk to drink, while another chooses fattier, richer milk from, say, Taranaki or Southland to feed their baby.
The device could also help people concerned with food safety. As reported by RNZ, in 2008 four children in China died and at least 63,000 needed medical treatment for kidney complaints after drinking milk formula contaminated with melamine.
Melamine, a chemical compound used in the manufacture of plastics, was added to baby formula to artificially boost its protein levels. Sanlu, the dairy company responsible, was partly owned by Fonterra. By increasing the accuracy of the information available to consumers, Milk on a Disc will hopefully inspire greater confidence in our milk products.
There’s also, potentially, an environmental payoff. Better information on milk quality, animal health and best use of the milk should lead to an emphasis on quality over quantity when it comes to herd size, reducing the impact of dairy cows upon the land.
Using funding from central government, Simpson and Williams have formed a company called Orbis Diagnostics Limited to develop the project further. They expect to have a small, hand-held unit available for sale within a year.
Topics: science, technology, farming, food
Regions:
Tags: milk, lasers, Photon Factory, spectrometer, food quality
Duration: 8'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Call for Inquiry into forced adoptions
Maggie Wilkinson of Waihi has been fighting a 30 year battle for the government to investigate the forced adoption of babies born to unwed mothers in from the late 50's to the mid 70's
Her own daughter was taken from her in 1964, when she gave birth at St Mary's home for unwed mothers, run by the Anglican Church.
[image:77218:full]
The church has now offered to open its books for any inquiry - but the government has said no, even though the Australia held a senate inquiry and made a formal apology to those affected.
[image:77075:third]
1:25 Winner of Margaret Mahy Children's Book of the Year Award.
A tale of wartime heroes has taken out this year's Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award.
And it's gone to a first-time winner. Anzac Heroes, by Maria Gill, won both the non-fiction and best book categories.
She talks to Jim about how the book came about.
1:30 Dad Goes to the Movies (1941)
On 6 December 1941 a NZ serviceman named Les Tweedie, stationed in Alexandria, went to see James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner.
[image:77212:full]
How do we know this? Because Les was an avid film fan and wrote a diary and recorded, among many other things, every film he saw. Thanks to his daughter, writer Jaq Tweedie, this diary has just been published as Dad Goes to the Movies (1941), a lovingly transcribed version of his closely written pocket diary from that year.
Dan Slevin from RNZ Widescreen takes a look at the new book
Dan's links:
http://funeralsandsnakes.net
http://www.imdb.com/chart/top
http://letterboxd.com
1:40 Favourite album: Alice Russell, My favourite letters
2:10 Book Critic: Allan Drew
2:20 Great New Zealand Album: Dave Dobbyn, Lament for the Numb
[image:77248:full]
The Great New Zealand album is usually chosen by us, based on record sales and/or chart performance. This week, however, our guest artist is choosing his own, after all he's made 22 of them in a career spanning four decades, so there are plenty to choose from.
He's also one of our most decorated performers, nominated for 43 New Zealand music awards and winning 23 of them. He has won the coveted APRA Silver Scroll a record three times and, in 2001 was presented with a life-time achievement award by the music industry. The following year he was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit and three years ago became the lucky 13th inductee into the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame
3:10 Bone Music: Soviet bootleg records on xrays
[image:77175:full]
It was the midst of the cold war, and state censors had banned western music, and even some Russian music was deemed "dangerous". But ingenious music lovers found a way to listen to the forbidden music, recording it onto old x-rays. It became known as bone music.
Stephan Coates, the lead singer of British band The Real Tuesday Weld, discovered the clandestine recordings several years ago when he was on tour in St Petersburg.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:44
One Quick Question for 9 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'15"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 9 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'31"

16:00
The Panel with Chris Wikaira and Jonathan Krebs (Part 1)
BODY:
Panel intro;Survival in the snow;NZ's Rio results;Gap narrows between Nats and Labour-Greens;Labour MP Phil Goff is changing his colours;Mob doing the job of Police;Drowsiness as bad as drink driving.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'41"

16:08
Panel Intro
BODY:
What panelist Jonathan Krebs has been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'39"

16:10
Survival in the snow
BODY:
How well would our Panelists do without power for a few days?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'58"

16:14
NZ's Rio results
BODY:
A disappointment for the New Zealand women's sevens team at the Rio Olympics.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'36"

16:16
Gap narrows between Nats and Labour-Greens
BODY:
The latest political poll by Newshub-Reid Research has Labour-Greens and National neck-n-neck.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'54"

16:22
Labour MP Phil Goff is changing his colours
BODY:
Auckland's Labour List MP Jacinda Ardern talks about fellow Labour MP Phil Goff's choice of blue for his mayoral hoardings.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'44"

16:26
Mob doing the job of Police
BODY:
The rangatira of Waikato's Mongrel Mob Sonny Fatupaito is helping Police efforts to find attempted abductors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'41"

16:28
Drowsiness as bad as drink driving
BODY:
Research from the US finds driving while sleep deprived is as bad as drink driving.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'09"

16:30
The Panel with Chris Wikaira and Jonathan Krebs (Part 2)
BODY:
Revolver is 50 years old; Panel says; Why are Olympic athletes into cupping?;Too many fast food outlets near schools;The Building Pools Amendment Bill has passed its second reading;Family smarts.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'01"

16:33
Revolver is 50 years old
BODY:
The Beatles Revolver album is now 50 years old.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

16:35
Panel says
BODY:
What the Panelists Chris Wikaira and Jonathan Krebs have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'40"

16:46
Why are Olympic athletes into cupping?
BODY:
Dr Shaun Holt talks about the ancient practice of cupping and if it actually does anything for circulation.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'45"

16:52
Too many fast food outlets near schools
BODY:
A community initiative in Christchurch wants to see limits on the number of fast food outlets near schools.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'27"

16:55
The Building Pools Amendment Bill
BODY:
Plunket says what's needed are fences with a secure gate, and that the pool should be completely isolated from the house.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'38"

16:59
Family smarts
BODY:
A new book claims that families are the great equalizer when it comes to intelligence.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'49"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 9 August 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
Pike families payout was to buy off prosecution - lawyer
BODY:
An insurance payout to Pike River victims' families was designed to ensure the mine's former CEO Peter Whittall wouldn't be prosecuted, Nigel Hampton, the lawyer for two of the families says.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: Pike River, insurance
Duration: 6'03"

17:14
No deal struck in Pike River payment, Worksafe says
BODY:
A payment from former Pike River CEO Peter Whittall's insurer to the victims' families was not a bargain or a deal, Worksafe's lawyer Joanna Holden says.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: Pike River, payout
Duration: 34"

17:14
Where is Peter Whittall?
BODY:
Where is Peter Whittall, the former Pike River boss and Pike's very public face in the aftermath of the explosions, now?
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: Pike River
Duration: 3'53"

17:18
NZ women's sevens win silver at Rio
BODY:
The New Zealand women's sevens side will come home from Rio with silver medals after a heartbreaking loss to a very impressive Australia team.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Rugby Seven, Womens
Duration: 3'20"

17:23
Power in central NI could be out for weeks
BODY:
It could be a matter of weeks before power is restored to some properties in the central North Island. Unison's Danny Gough joins Checkpoint.
Topics: life and society
Regions: Hawkes Bay, Waikato
Tags: power, Taupo
Duration: 4'42"

17:27
More police needed, minister says
BODY:
The government is looking at boosting police numbers to keep up with the growing population. Police Minister Judith Collins joined Checkpoint.
Topics: law, politics
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 4'23"

17:33
Evening business for 9 August 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Markers
Duration: 2'42"

17:36
Repeat drink drivers face compulsory alcohol interlocks
BODY:
Alcohol interlocks to stop drunks starting their cars will soon become compulsory for high level drink drivers and repeat offenders.
Topics: law, transport
Regions:
Tags: drunk driving, Alchohol, Alcohol interlocks
Duration: 2'36"

17:40
NZ aware of China trade concerns in May
BODY:
The government was aware of China's concerns about trade back in May, Trade Minister Todd McClay now says.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: trade, China
Duration: 3'05"

17:43
Unions battle school funding plan
BODY:
Primary and secondary teacher unions have banded together in an unprecedented step to battle the government over a proposal to change the way schools are funded.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: unions, funding
Duration: 2'44"

17:46
Bomb attack in Pakistan kills at least 70
BODY:
A suicide bomber in Pakistan has killed at least 70 people and wounded more than 100 at a hospital in Quetta. Financial Times correspondent in Pakistan Farhan Bakhari joins Checkpoint.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Suicide bomber, Pakistan
Duration: 5'29"

17:55
Auckland apartment without power for 3 days
BODY:
Residents in Auckland's Metropolis Hotel Apartments will spend their third night in the dark tonight with no word on when power might be restored.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: power, Metropolis Hotel Apartments
Duration: 3'43"

17:59
Apartment dwellers face another night without power
BODY:
The operations manager for the Metropolis Apartments, where hundreds of residents face another night without power, says there is no back-up option available.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Metropolis Apartments
Duration: 56"

18:09
Boost in police numbers is bottom-line for NZ First
BODY:
The government says it's considering boosting police numbers but is playing down suggestions that New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters has forced its hand.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 2'26"

18:11
NZ sevens team win silver at Olympics
BODY:
The women's sevens team have won New Zealand's second silver medal at the Olympics after they were beaten 24 to 17 by tournament favourites Australia this morning.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, Women's sevens team, Medal
Duration: 2'55"

18:14
Fottballer Abby Erceg back in NZ team
BODY:
The New Zealand women's football team's skipper Abby Erceg has had her red car overturned and can join the team again.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Olympics, football
Duration: 4'58"

18:19
Auckland Council may have $770,000 invested in tobacco
BODY:
Auckland councillors have been told the council may have $770,000 invested indirectly in British American Tobacco.
Topics: politics, business
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland Council, British American Tobacco
Duration: 3'31"

18:23
More problems for Fire Services' new fleet
BODY:
A new fleet of fire trucks worth millions of dollars are riddled with faults and should be ditched, firefighters say.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: firefighters, fire engines, Faults
Duration: 2'50"

18:26
Manganui field delighted with heavy snow
BODY:
The huge dump of snow which has closed roads and knocked out power to homes has also delighted ski fields, particularly the unheralded club-run Manganui field on Mt Taranaki.
Topics: life and society, sport
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: Mt Taranaki, skiing, snowboarding
Duration: 4'09"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 9 August 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Birthday wishes for the prime minister from Mitiria Turei when MPs gather in their debating chamber for their first Question Time in just over a month. Questions dominated by housing issues of prices and supply. Winston Peters gets into a grammatical tangle over whether there are less or fewer houses being built. Prime Minister John Key claims there is a construction boom and dismisses Andrew Little's allegations of a Chinese ban on New Zealand kiwifruit in retaliation for complaints about faulty steel imports. Maggie Barry talks up the advantages of a pest-free New Zealand by 2050.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Our Own Odysseys - Cakes in Kenya
BODY:
Going to Africa to meet her sponsor child and volunteer was on Becs Lake's "before-30 bucket list". The owner of Stiletto Studio even managed to share some of her cake making skills.
EXTENDED BODY:
Volunteering in Africa and meeting her sponsor child there was on Becs Lake's 'Before 30 Bucket List'. The owner of Stiletto Studio even managed to share some of her cakemaking skills.
She talks with Bryan Crump about the experience.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Africa, charity, child sponsers, cake
Duration: 18'58"

20:10
Kai a Miro: Ngapo Wehi and Nanaia Mahuta
BODY:
Shannon Haunui-Thompson from RNZ's Te Manu Korihi team acknowledges the passing of Kapa Haka master Ngapo Wehi and looks at the significance of Nanaia Mahuta's new moko.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: moko, Nanaia Mahuta, Ngapo Wehi, kapa haka
Duration: 21'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:77289:full]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - Cakes in Kenya
Going to Africa to meet her sponsor child and volunteer was on Becs Lake's "before-30 bucket list". The owner of Stiletto Studio even managed to share some of her cake making skills.
[gallery:2353] Our Own Odyssey - Becs Lake
7:30 The Sampler
This week Nick Bollinger discusses a soulful and personal set from Aaradhna and a tribute to arguably the most miserable song ever written, while Kirsten Johnstone investigates recent local electronic pop releases.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Kai a Miro
Shannon Haunui-Thompson from Radio New Zealand's Te Manu Korihi team acknowledges the passing of Kapa Haka master Ngāpō Wehi and looks at the significance of Nanaia Mahuta's new moko.
8:30 Window on the World
Graffiti #2 of 2 - Graffiti's modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. In part two Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists from Brazil. Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo's walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Others choose to cover historic buildings with stark, crude lettering known as 'pixação'.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Court in the Centre - The American academic and legal commentator Jeffrey Rosen explores how the US Supreme Court, once derided as the third branch of government, has become the busiest and most powerful institution in American politics, and how that makes the court's current vacancy a particularly valuable prize in this presidential year.
10:17 Late Edition
A roundup of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 World Music
Tonight in Episode 9 of WOMAD Taranaki - The World's Festival 2016' features a live performance by 47 Soul, a young quartet who are originally from Palestine, Jordan and Syria but currently reside in London. 47 Soul have built a global audience with their synthesized adaptation of Debka dance music and political lyrics calling for freedom of movement, not only on dancefloors, but also Middle Eastern borders.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 9 August
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger discusses a soulful and personal set from Aaradhna and a tribute to arguably the most miserable song ever written, while Kirsten Johnstone investigates recent local electronic pop releases.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger discusses a soulful and personal set from Aaradhna and a tribute to arguably the most miserable song ever written, while Kirsten Johnstone investigates recent local electronic pop releases.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Aaradhna, Gloomy Sunday, Hungarian Noir, Suren Unka, Levi Patel, October, Sachi
Duration: 29'55"

19:31
Brown Girl by Aaradhna
BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses a soulful and personal set from Aaradhna.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses a soulful and personal set from Aaradhna.
Over the years, I’ve heard a lot of things described as soul music. But it’s not so often that I feel like I’m really hearing somebody’s soul. ‘Brown Girl’, the title track from Aaradhna’s new album, is soul on every level.
For a start, it is in a tradition of soul ballads that harks back to the 60s when black American singers, raised in the churches, were defining soul as a genre. A generation later, deep in the South Pacific, Aaradhna Patel heard something in that music that spoke to her own feelings.
But ‘Brown Girl’ is much more than just a collection of learned soul licks; the song is a personal one. And like the greatest soul songs, it is a song born of suffering. It reflects on Aaradhna’s childhood, growing up in Porirua, the daughter of a Samoan mother and Indian father, and dealing with people’s prejudices towards not just one but two cultures. Her lyric lays it bare and you can feel the pain of memory stinging beneath Aaradhna’s stoic, intimately recorded vocal. But then she goes a step further, rising above that pain to make a triumphant declaration of who she is and isn’t, as she pleads to be seen not as a set of preconceptions but for the person she really is. She asks, in effect, that we see her soul - and then she shows it to us, unleashing the full power of her voice. It’s an extraordinary performance, and even after half a dozen listens it blindsides me every time I hear it.
‘Brown Girl’ is, in a way, the mission statement of the album; it’s the reason everything else is here. But it’s by no means the only thing worth hearing. And one of the remarkable things about the album is that it strikes far more than just one emotional note. In fact it runs the gamut from pain-drenched soul to pot-party pop.
Perhaps the reason for the party is to drown the memory of some childhood trauma, or maybe get over some relationship drama, still ‘Drunken Heart, Smoky Mind’ - with its acoustic strum and hint of a baion beat - makes a bright contrast to the title track. Between the poles of the title track and that ode to excess is plenty of emotional ground.
Brown Girl is Aaradhna’s fourth album, and second truly great one. The last was 2012’s Treble and Reverb. For that album, Aaradhna worked with local producers Pete Wadams (a.k.a. P Money) and Evan Short to create something like a jukebox packed with great lost 60s singles. The hooks were Motown-ish and immediate; the sound bright and crackly, like vintage vinyl. This time she recorded in the States, with the Brooklyn-based producer Jeff Dynamite and the same musicians with which he made Aloe Blacc’s breakthrough album Good Things. And while both Treble and Reverb and Brown Girl draw on the same classic soul influences, the latter is not so consciously retro – though, paradoxically, it has more live instruments on it.
Also surprising is that while Brown Girl was made in America, parts of it have a recognisably Pacifican flavour, particularly ‘I’m The One For You’, which starts with a ukulele and develops into a classic Aotea-reggae.
Though that track might have the most obvious signposts to the Pacific, the whole of Brown Girl is really a Pacifican story; a daughter of two cultures growing up in a country that is not always as kind as it likes to see itself. Add to that the more universal feelings that go with love and loss, and you’ve got soul music of a very personal and powerful kind.
Songs featured: Brown Girl,Drunken Heart Smoky Mind, Empty Hall, Messin’ Around, Devil’s Living In My Shadow, I’m The One For You.
Brown Girl is available on Universal Music.
Related stories
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Aaradhna
Duration: 11'46"

19:40
Hungarian Noir: A Tribute To The Gloomy Sunday
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a tribute to arguably the most miserable song ever written.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a tribute to arguably the most miserable song ever written.
I first heard the song ‘Gloomy Sunday’ on a compilation of Billie Holiday, and it stood out – even in a set that included ‘Strange Fruit’ – as a song of exceptional bleakness. It wasn’t just the lyric, in which the singer is clearly mourning for a deceased lover, but equally the melody. I’d never heard a tune that wallowed quite so much in its minor-ness. The song is widely associated with Holiday, though she didn’t write it, nor was she by any means the first person to record it. The song comes from the pen of Rezso Seress, a Hungarian pianist who, in 1933, was living in Paris. Seress’s original title for the tune translated as ‘The World Is Ending’ and his lyrics may have been inspired by the worsening political state of Europe at the time. But the original lyrics had already been reworked by poet Laszlo Javor by the time of the song’s first Hungarian recording – as ‘Sad Sunday’ - the following year.
Pal Kalmar made the first Hungarian recording of ‘Gloomy Sunday’ from 1934. Both that and the Holiday version appear as bonus tracks on a curious new compilation devoted entirely to this rather miserable song. The album is called Hungarian Noir: A Tribute To Gloomy Sunday. It’s mainly comprised of recent interpretations of the song, from all over the world. And perhaps it’s real achievement is in showing how many different varieties of misery there are.
There’s Polish singer Kayah, and a version that seems to be riffing off the original lyric, by Brazilian rapper GOG. There are also purely instrumental versions, like the solemnly beautiful arrangement by Argentine accordion player Chango Spasuik. And if Spasuik gets to the tragic heart of the matter, there are other versions that find an almost jaunty element inside the despondent song, like the version by Colombian theatre band Bambarabanda.
And there’s half a dozen other readings on this collection, including an a cappella treatment by Cuban group Vocal Sampling. Still, you get the idea. It’s wall-to-wall Gloomy Sunday, and if that’s your idea of fun Hungarian Noir is the record for you. I’m wary, though: even the label responsible for this compilation has a note on its cover that warns: this music may be hazardous to your health. Listener precaution is advised.
Songs featured: Gloomy Sunday/Triste Domingo/Szomoru Vasarnap.
Hungarian Noir: A Tribute To The Gloomy Sunday is available on Piranha/Southbound.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Hungarian Noir, Billie Holiday
Duration: 10'01"

19:50
The Sampler - Sachi, October, Suren Unka and Levi Patel
BODY:
Kirsten Johnstone takes a listen to a trio of recent local electronic EP releases: Lunch With Bianca by Sachi; Switchblade by October; and 5/8 by Suren Unka and Levi Patel
EXTENDED BODY:
Kirsten Johnstone takes a listen to a trio of recent local electronic EP releases: Lunch With Bianca by Sachi; Switchblade by October; and 5/8 by Suren Unka and Levi Patel
If you’ve been to rock gigs lately and wondered where the younger audience is, I can tell you. Clubs and underground raves have cycled back around again, and they’re out dancing.
Cheaper and more intuitive technology has levelled the playing field for local production. It used to be that, without major label backing and a big budget studio engineer, NZ pop songs didn’t sit so comfortably beside international artists. But that’s not an issue now. Sure, there still needs to be talent and songwriting nous behind the machines, and it takes a huge amount of dedication to get to this level. But there’s no reason why any of these artists couldn’t stand back to back with stadium filling EDM artist Flume.
Lunch With Bianca by Sachi
Future-bass duo Sachi are Childhood friends from Auckland Will Thomas and Nick Chrisp. They’ve been playing music together since they were six, though apparently back then it was more punk than electro.
They’re now 18, and hold big ambitions. They mentioned in our ‘Introducing’ podcast a couple of months ago they’d like to win Grammy’s, and if they’re this polished this early in their careers, I don’t doubt that they will. They have a million and a half spotify streams of their debut EP Lunch With Bianca, which was released last month, they’re attaching themselves to international rising talent, and getting played by Zane Lowe and Diplo - who they stalked in order to get a USB stick of their music to. He played it on his BBC radio show six months later.
Drawing from 80s and 90s house music, current EDM, trap and hip-hop, their production is shiny, day-glo and upbeat. It’s addictive stuff, best consumed in moderation. They’ve built this EP around the idea of getting to know a fictional character called Bianca, and it’s a clever, human song cycle, with all the highs and lows of falling in love.
Vocalists like Los Angeles-based rapper Duckwrth, and locals INF and Zoe provide variety and interest. In a post-Lorde New Zealand, there’s the sense that anything is possible, you just need to want it bad enough.
Switchblade by October
October’s ‘Switchblade’ knocked me out first time I heard it, in the same way that Lorde did back in 2012.
She is 19 year old producer Emma Kate Logan. She comes from a well balanced musical household - mum is a classical music teacher, dad’s into classic 70s rock, and she’s obviously had a steady diet of pop and electronica on top. She’s Blenheim born, but says she was ‘raised by the internet.’
Like Lorde, she’s got smart lyrics, with a hip-hop braggadocio in places, barbed hooks, and a strong, singular voice.
But while Lorde is relying on other producers to supply her music, October does all her own production. She’s described herself as a control freak, and I think taking on all aspects of her music works to her advantage.
It’s dark, angsty and tension filled, and sometimes I want her to just let it go and smash something.
The EP’s five tracks aren’t all radio-ready and polished in the way Sachi’s are, and a couple of the songs could be stronger. But it’s an impressive introduction to a production voice I look forward to hearing more of.
5/8 by Suren Unka and Levi Patel
When you’re ready for the comedown try the collaborative EP by young Auckland based musicians Suren Unka and Levi Patel.
It’s called ⅝ - a reference to the percentage of Indian heritage they have between them. Each have a few releases already - Unka’s El Chupacabra was one of the local highlights of dance music in 2014 for me. It was a confident debut, with its clean synth sounds, dancefloor-ready beats, and pretty melodic progressions.
Levi Patel comes from more of an ambient, classical, film music background. Think Nils Frahm, or Ólafur Arnalds, or locally Rhian Sheehan. The 24 year old is already getting work for film, TV, ads and promotional videos internationally.
Here Patel takes the piano and string lines,and the percussion driven Unka brings the beats, bass and synth textures. It’s a cohesive effort, with the sound palate consistent throughout the EP.
I’m reminded of Burial and James Blake at times with its spaciousness, ghostly vocal samples, subtle field recordings, and frosty mood.
This four-track EP isn’t groundbreaking but it’s well constructed, cinematic, moving - and makes me want to move.
New research suggests your brain is more receptive to new information with a certain type of music in your ears - I’d say this is exactly the one to go for if you need something to fire up those neurons, think clearly and zone in on what you’re doing. Or zone out completely.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music review, electronic music, synths, pop, House
Duration: 12'04"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Court in the Centre
Jeffrey Rosen explores how the US Supreme Court, once derided as the third branch of government, has become the busiest and most powerful institution in American politics, and how that makes the court’s current vacancy a particularly valuable prize in this presidential year. (BBWS)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

Re-opening a debate on close adoptions, the silver lining in this week's storm clouds, and in Dateline Pacific the future of Reo in the Cook Islands.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Coverage from the world music festival - No Man's Land (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288304

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 09 Aug 2016

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