RNZ National. 2016-09-19. 00:00-23:59, [2016 Paralympics in Rio end].

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

19 September 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Classical Music by Joy Cowley read by Peta Rutter (13 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 19 September 2016
BODY:
Motive for New York bombing still unclear, NZer living near blast site says apartment building shook, New Zealand will push ahead to find solution to Syrian crisis, Foreign student allegedly pays thousands for fake marks, MPI responds to damning fish dumping report, Tolley defends Ministry for Vulnerable Children title, and English admits Kermadec sanctuary could have been handled better
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 35'22"

06:06
Sports News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

06:17
Ceremony to mark centenary of WWI in France
BODY:
A ceremony to mark the centenary of WWI in France was forced indoors after heavy rain batters the Capital.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: WW!
Duration: 2'52"

06:20
Early Business News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'27"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'58"

06:40
UN ends emergency session after botched air strikes in Syria
BODY:
The United Nations has wrapped up an emergency session after the US admitted carrying out air strikes that killed dozens of Syrian government soldiers. Our Political Editor spoke to the Foreign Minister Murray McCully ahead of New Zealand heading a meeting for a special debate on Syria.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: United Nations
Duration: 5'01"

06:46
MPI admits fish dumping is widespread
BODY:
Top fisheries officials say proper enforcement of a ban on dumping fish would drive half the industry out of business but fishing company Sanford says they're wrong.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: fish dumping
Duration: 3'15"

06:50
RBNZ to hold rates this week
BODY:
The Reserve Bank looks set to sit on the sidelines this week when it reviews its official cash rate on Thursday.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 4'45"

06:55
The Shareholders Association says it won't let up the pressure
BODY:
The Shareholders Association says it won't let up the pressure on technology company, Rakon, even though it succeeded in getting a director dumped off the board.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Rakon
Duration: 1'51"

06:58
Morning Markets for 19 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 34"

07:06
Sports News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'03"

07:10
Motive for New York bombing still unclear
BODY:
New York's Governor and the city's police chief say they still don't know who was behind a bombing in Manhattan yesterday that injured 29 people.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, US
Duration: 5'49"

07:16
NZer living near blast site says apartment building shook
BODY:
New Zealander Jarrod Laban lives 100 metres from where the Manhattan bomb exploded. He describes how the building shook.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Manhattan bomb, Terroism, US
Duration: 3'56"

07:23
New Zealand will push ahead to find solution to Syrian crisis
BODY:
The Prime Minister John Key will be walking into an international firestorm when he chairs a meeting at the United Nations on the Syrian crisis this week. Our Political Editor Jane Patterson is travelling with Mr Key.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Syria
Duration: 2'10"

07:26
Foreign student allegedly pays thousands for fake marks
BODY:
Failing foreign students are allegedly paying thousands of dollars to pass their exams.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: foreign students
Duration: 3'02"

07:29
MPI responds to damning fish dumping report
BODY:
Head of the Ministry of Primary Industries disputes senior official's claim that rigid enforcement of fish dumping laws would put half the inshore operators out of business.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: fish dumping
Duration: 7'30"

07:40
Tolley defends Ministry for Vulnerable Children title
BODY:
Anne Tolley defends government's commitment to children after facing criticism from a United Nations committee in Geneva.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: vulnerable children
Duration: 5'12"

07:45
English admits sanctuary could have been handled better
BODY:
Deputy Prime Minister Bill English says his party will find agreement with Maori Party over the Kermadec sanctuary.
Topics: politics, environment
Regions:
Tags: Kermadec Sanctuary
Duration: 7'01"

07:52
Greenpeace calls for independent review of fish quotas
BODY:
Greenpeace director Russel Norman says commercial fish dumping is systemic and calls for an independent review of the fish quota system.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: fish dumping
Duration: 5'12"

08:06
Sports News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'10"

08:13
Police film domestic violence victims in pilot trial
BODY:
Police have used their Iphones to film domestic violence victims in order to get a statement straight after an attack - in a trial that will soon spread to other parts of the country.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'14"

08:16
75% of obese children at greater risk of long-term heart disease
BODY:
Study finds three of every four obese children show signs of being at risk of long-term heart disease.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: child obesity
Duration: 3'57"

08:20
Kiwisaver providers accused of not disclosing the fees
BODY:
New Kiwisaver provider accuses existing schemes of failing to disclose $350 million of fees they take each year.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 4'59"

08:20
Kiwisaver providers accused of not disclosing the fees
BODY:
New not-for-profit Kiwisaver provider accuses existing schemes of failing to disclose $350 million of fees they take each year. He tells us it's the largest household expense nobody knows about ..equivalent to your phone bill and power bill added together.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 4'59"

08:25
Mining drags on growing economy
BODY:
New Zealand's mining sector continues to struggle despite the economy being one of the fastest growing in the developed world.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: growth
Duration: 3'28"

08:29
Markets Update for 19 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'03"

08:37
21 medal haul for New Zealand as Paralympics wind up
BODY:
NZ's Paralympics team exceeds its medal target. We talk to Paralympics NZ chief executive Fiona Allan, who says the team's performance was outstanding.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016 Paralympics
Duration: 4'09"

08:40
Further ructions within Ngapuhi over who holds mandate
BODY:
The long-running debate over who gets to negotiate Ngapuhi's treaty settlement has reached crisis point. Our Northland reporter Lois Williams explains how there are now calls for the government to scrap its mandate to negotiate the settlement.
Topics: politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi
Duration: 4'22"

08:46
Down on the prison farm, training gives new lease on life
BODY:
Former prisoners aim to take up some of the 50,000 jobs New Zealand needs to fill in the farming sector.
Topics: farming, crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'50"

08:49
Waikato residents can now speak to doctors online after hours
BODY:
Waikato residents now have the option of speaking to a family GP after hours in a new online service.
Topics: health
Regions: Waikato
Tags: after hours, Gp
Duration: 3'34"

08:53
Nelson College representing NZ at Rugby 450th
BODY:
The origins of rugby will be marked next year with an Under18 Sevens tournament in the grounds of the English school where the first game was played in 1823.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby
Duration: 3'55"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Going Up is Easy by Lydia Bradey, with Laurence Fearnley. A life lived on the edge - quite literally. The riveting account of the controversial first ascent of Everest without supplementary oxygen by NZ mountaineer Lydia Bradey. (Part 6 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Family court lawyer shortage 'reaching crisis point'
BODY:
The Law Society says the number of family court lawyers have dropped below a critical mass. That means in some regions of New Zealand there aren't enough lawyers willing to take on things like filing protection orders and acting for vulnerable children. Nine to Noon speaks to the Law Society's Michelle Duggan as well as two lawyers who are giving up on, or scaling back on their family law work. Caroline McCarthy is in Blenheim and Gareth Bodle has just packed up his Wairarapa office and moved to Auckland.
EXTENDED BODY:
The number of Family Court lawyers has dropped to the point where there aren't enough to file protection orders or act for vulnerable children, the Law Society is warning.
Over the last five years, there has been a 25 percent decrease nationally in the number of lawyers providing family legal aid services, with some saying it has reached crisis point.
The government, however, says the number of lawyers around the country is more than adequate to meet demand.
Law Society spokesperson Michelle Duggan told Nine to Noon the regional variation could be much worse than the national situation.
Marlborough, for example, had experienced a 64 percent drop since 2012. In the Wairarapa, the number of Family Court lawyers had dropped from 15 to seven in the last three years.
The situation was also "critical" on the West Coast, Ms Duggan said.
"The challenge of this work is that it's needed urgently. It isn't OK that people can get appointments but the appointments are two weeks out or three weeks out.
"When you're in an urgent situation, when there are safety issues, you need to see a lawyer - if not today, then tomorrow, so the documents can be prepared and orders hopefully made."
Blenheim-based lawyer Caroline McCarty said there were only three lawyers providing legal aid in her area and the situation was "in crisis".
"There's simply not the pool of lawyers to do that work, and the work is stressful, it's urgent and people are just not wanting to do it anymore."
She said the main issue was that the system operated with fixed-fee funding that covered only a certain number of hours for each step of the legal process.
"From my inquiries, and I did send a sort of SOS request around other law firms when things were just becoming so difficult for us to continue to take on the work, the response [to what is causing the problem] appears to be remuneration," she said.
"And I don't think it's just the new fixed-fee regime that came into place with legal aid, but it's the fact that the system of legal aid makes it very difficult to be adequately renunerated for the work that you're doing."
When lawyers inevitably went over the number of hours for which funding was provided, they had to go through the process of asking Legal Aid Services for more money, she said.
"I think it's just got to the stage where you have to keep asking for money to do your job well.
"People are not able to run businesses using a standard model of income versus liabilities and outgoings on the legal aid fixed-fee rate. It's just not feasible, and that's the feedback I've received from other law firms in Blenheim as well."
Aside from the issue of remuneration, the work was difficult and often urgent, she said.
"I think lawyers have just got to the stage where they are burnt out, and I can speak only really for Blenheim, where they're burnt out with doing that sort of work and are just not willing to accept it, and I'm in that boat as well."
That meant people were having to go outside the region to get the representation they needed, she said.
"We've found in Marlborough that they're having to go outside of the region. They're getting picked up fortunately by Nelson and Christchurch lawyers but of course they're not getting a face-to-face lawyer."
'There's just not enough of us and we're not funded'
Gareth Bodle, who provides family legal aid services, has just closed his Wairarapa law office and moved to Auckland.
He said, despite six months of advertising, nobody applied to take his place.
"I just had to stop taking instructions back in about March and just spent two or three months turning people away until I left.
"The cases I still have, I'm having difficulty find other lawyers to take, I'm still dealing with matters down in Wairarapa, Palmerston North, Wellington at present by phone. I'll appear in the Masterton Family Court this afternoon by phone because there's no one to take the cases.
"There's just not enough of us and we're not funded," he said.
He was most worried about what would happen if domestic violence victims couldn't get the help they needed.
"The domestic violence is probably the one that concerns me most because it is urgent and it kind of defies the nature of the work if you have to wait three to four weeks to get an appointment for an urgent protection order."
He said, if it took longer than about 24 to 72 hours to get an order, it became difficult for people to finish the process and other support services dissipated.
Law practices in bigger communities could balance legal aid with private fee-paying clients, Mr Bodle said.
"But in a place like the Wairarapa, and I guess Blenheim must have gone through the same process, where maybe 100 percent of your clients are legally aided, it's just not sustainable."
Changes to the funding system should be considered, he said.
"If you really want our most vulnerable families, our most impoverished families to have access to justice, you've got to be able to fund the lawyers there.
"I don't have the big solutions but, to my way of thinking, where there is a large percentage of legal aid users going through the courts, that the legal aid spend should be biased towards that - with some kind of subsidy for any application made in that court just to help fund that ability to have lawyers there for the people."
Government response
Associate Justice Minister Simon Bridges said there were more than 1000 lawyers approved to provide family legal aid throughout the country.
"The number of available lawyers is more than adequate to meet client demand."
He said, if gaps were found, Legal Aid Services ensured funding was available for lawyers from neighbouring regions to help.
"The government has recently invested in legal aid. Budget 2016 included $17.2 million to increase eligibility for civil and family legal aid - which will help an additional 2700 New Zealanders each year by 2018/19 - as well as $74.5m for the overall provision of legal aid."
Related
Topics: law
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: domestic violence, vulnerable children, Family Court
Duration: 28'24"

09:09
Adam Cohen: the origins of eugenics
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to Time magazine writer and author Adam Cohen about the origins of eugenics. In his book Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, he lays out the history of American eugenics and its occasionally surprising proponents - which include several of the country's most famous presidents and Supreme Court justices. What's more, he says eugenics is still happening today.
EXTENDED BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to Time magazine writer and author Adam Cohen about the origins of eugenics. In his book Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, he lays out the history of American eugenics and its occasionally surprising proponents - which include several of the country's most famous presidents and Supreme Court justices. What's more, he says eugenics is still happening today.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
What is the origin of eugenics?
It actually began in England and the word eugenics was coined by Francis Gallton, who was a half cousin of Charles Darwin and it kind of followed in some of the Darwinian traditions. Darwin had observed survival of the fittest in the natural world and Francis Carlton thought humans could actually take nature into their own hands by doing their own survival of the fittest; choosing who could reproduce and encouraging them to reproduce and choosing who should not reproduce and discouraging them. The idea was to use this control over who was born to create a better race of humanity.
Would people be surprised to hear who some of the proponents were?
Absolutely. Here in the United States, it was some of our finest people. Theodore Roosevelt, the great, progressive president, Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor and the presidents of Harvard and Stanford universities. Many socialists and progressive thinkers in England as well. It was actually a very popular, progressive movement, supported by a lot of the elites.
Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood in the States I think was another. What was the reasoning though, of their advocacy of eugenics and their concept of eugenics?
The progressives were doing something that they considered to be progressive, which was looking at the advances of technology and science in this case and saying, how can we harness this scientific advancement for the betterment of humanity? They believed in using progress, they also believed in using government, so they thought, why not have government begin to use the genetic science to make a better society? So in some ways this sounded like a progressive idea, but of course, this was progressivism that really went off the rails.
In the United States, eugenics drove two major legal changes. What were they?
There were concerns about the threat to the nation from without, and threat to the nation from within. Eugenicists believed immigrants were bringing in bad genes and believed that certain nationalities had better genes than others.
In particular at that time in the 1920’s, they were worried about Italians, Eastern European Jews and Asians, who they thought were genetically less fit. The eugenicists were actually the driving force behind the adoption of the Immigration Act of 1924, which radically changed American immigration. It closed the door to those countries, Italy, Eastern Europe and Asia and opened the door more to Eastern Europe, so that the threat from without.
The threat from within, they were worried about the people who were already in the United States who would be bringing down the gene pool. They were worried about poor, disabled people, the deaf, the blind… and also in particular what they called the feeble-minded. They were afraid that the feeble-minded were taking over the country and they wanted to use eugenicists law to stop that.
And indeed they did. What happened with the legalisation of forced sterilisation? How did this come about?
The United States were actually the leaders in that, well before Nazi Germany. Louisiana in 1907 was the first state to pass eugenics sterilisation law and a bunch of states followed quickly there on. The idea was that people who fit into various categories that were listed in the statute - the deaf, the blind, the disabled, in some cases the alcoholic and even the indolent or the poor. So poor people were thought to be genetically inferior and could be sterilised. And then of course, the feeble-minded, which was this large amorphous category, that was used to label all sorts of people who the people in charge didn’t like. A lot of people were designated in these categories and a lot of people were sterilised.
Was there any political or media debate around this or was it just the groupthink of the time?
It’s surprising to me how much it was the groupthink of the time. There was widespread support in the medical community, widespread support from geneticists themselves, widespread support in the media… one of the few groups in the United States who opposed it were Catholics, and Catholics were reliably the ones who would show up at legislatures - nuns, priests, Catholic laypeople - to oppose genetic sterilisation bills and it was really for two reasons. One was the traditional Catholic reverence for the reproductive cycle, but the other was the Catholics believed that people should be judged on their inner qualities, their spiritual qualities and they didn’t agree with eugenicists that people should be judged by physical attributes that may or may not be designated fit or unfit. But other than the Catholics and the Catholic organisations, there was not a lot of opposition.
Topics: science, author interview, history
Regions:
Tags: eugenics
Duration: 24'04"

09:36
Aid agencies frustrated by UN in Syria
BODY:
73 NGOs working in Syria have slammed the UN's response to the humanitarian crisis there, and have suspended some cooperation with UN agencies in the country. In a joint letter, the organisations have accused the UN and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent of operating under the political influence of the Assad regime - alleging a "deliberate manipulation of humanitarian and medical aid". Kathryn Ryan talks to Dr Ahmad Tarakji of the Syrian American Medical Society Foundation or SAMS, one of the signatories to the letter.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Syria, aid, United Nations, UN
Duration: 15'11"

09:52
South America correspondent Joel Richards
BODY:
Joel Richards on the shift in UK-Argentina relations over Falklands/Malvinas Islands, former president Lula da Silva charged with corruption and Colombia's Peace Process.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: South America, Dilmah Rousseff, Lula de Silva, Joel Richards
Duration: 7'51"

10:37
Book review - The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware
BODY:
Reviewed by Gail Pittaway, published by Penguin Random House.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'25"

11:07
Political commentators Stephen Mills and Matthew Hooton
BODY:
Political discourse on the Kermadec sanctuary issue, the Government's domestic violence policy, Auckland transport alignment and Andrew Little challenging the TVNZ political poll.
EXTENDED BODY:
Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills discuss the Kermadec sanctuary, the government's domestic violence policy, Auckland transport alignment and Andrew Little challenging the TVNZ political poll.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Kermadec, domestic violence, Auckland Transport, Andrew Little, Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills
Duration: 28'45"

11:37
Food with Sue Harrison and Richard Turnbull
BODY:
Sue Harrison and five volunteers have given their time to put together a cook book to raise funds for the Himalayan Trust. The recipes are from well known mountaineering families and have been adapted to be able to be cooked outside. The cookbook is called Outdoor Appetite. Sue along with fellow volunteer Richard Turnbull will share two recipes from the book for Scott's Farewell Square and Marinated Butterflied Leg of Lamb. For more on how to buy the book you can visit the Himalayan Trust website.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: fundraising, mountaineering, Himilayan Trust, outdoor cooking
Duration: 12'51"

11:50
Urbanist Tommy Honey
BODY:
Urbanist Tommy Honey talks about Architecture Week and its theme "Housing for the Future".
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: urban, cities
Duration: 9'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Family court lawyer shortage 'reaching crisis point'
[image:82294:half] no metadata
The Law Society says the number of family court lawyers have dropped below a critical mass. That means in some regions of New Zealand there aren't enough lawyers willing to take on things like filing protection orders and acting for vulnerable children.
Nine to Noon speaks to the Law Society's Michelle Duggan as well as two lawyers who are giving up on, or scaling back on their family law work. Caroline McCarthy is in Blenheim and Gareth Bodle has just packed up his Wairarapa office and moved to Auckland.
09:30 Aid agencies frustrated by UN in Syria
[image:82128:half]
73 NGOs working in Syria have slammed the UN's response to the humanitarian crisis there, and have suspended some cooperation with UN agencies in the country. In a joint letter, the organisations have accused the UN and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent of operating under the political influence of the Assad regime - alleging a "deliberate manipulation of humanitarian and medical aid". Kathryn Ryan talks to Dr Ahmad Tarakji of the Syrian American Medical Society Foundation or SAMS, one of the signatories to the letter.
09:45 South America correspondent Joel Richards
Joel Richards on the shift in UK-Argentina relations over Falklands/Malvinas Islands, former president Lula da Silva charged with corruption and Colombia's Peace Process.
10:05 Adam Cohen: the origins of eugenics
[image:81967:full] no metadata
Kathryn Ryan talks to Time magazine writer and author Adam Cohen about the origins of eugenics. In his book Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, he lays out the history of American eugenics and its occasionally surprising proponents - which include several of the country's most famous presidents and Supreme Court justices. What's more, he says eugenics is still happening today.
10:35 Book review
Gail Pittaway reviews The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Political commentators Stephen Mills and Matthew Hooton
Political discourse on the Kermadec sanctuary issue, the Government's domestic violence policy, Auckland transport alignment and Andrew Little challenging the TVNZ political poll.
11:30 Food with Sue Harrison and Richard Turnbull
[image:82063:quarter] no metadata
[image:82585:quarter]
Sue Harrison and five volunteers have given their time to put together a cook book to raise funds for the Himalayan Trust. The recipes are from well known mountaineering families and have been adapted to be able to be cooked outside. The cookbook is called Outdoor Appetite. Sue along with fellow volunteer Richard Turnbull will share two recipes from the book for Scotts Farewell Square and Marinated Butterflied Leg of Lamb. For more on how to buy the book you can visit the Himalayan Trust website.
11:45 Urbanist Tommy Honey
Urbanist Tommy Honey talks about Architecture Week and its theme “Housing for the Future”.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
Helen Clark and John Key meet in New York. The motive for a bomb attack on Manhattan remains unknown.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'43"

12:17
Synlait annual profit triples
BODY:
Dairy company Synlait has reported a tripling of its full-year profit on the back of booming sales of infant formula, and announced ambitious expansion plans.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Synlait
Duration: 1'32"

12:19
Briscoe Group 1st half profit rises by a third
BODY:
The sporting goods and homeware retailer, Briscoe Group, has reported a 33 percent jump in net profit on rising sales and market share.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Briscoe Group
Duration: 1'33"

12:20
Westpac: Consumers feeling a little more upbeat
BODY:
Consumer confidence has picked up because of a stronger economy, but pockets of nervousness remain.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'25"

12:22
Services index picks up pace
BODY:
Activity in the services sector is at its highest level this year, with growth in sales and new orders.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: services sector
Duration: 1'11"

12:23
Local oil lobby group confident of activity pick-up
BODY:
A local oil and mining lobby group is confident there'll be a pick up in activity over the coming year, despite sluggish global oil prices.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: oil
Duration: 1'11"

12:24
Midday Markets for 19 September 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'02"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
The Rio Paralypians are enjoying a spectacular musical show as the curtain comes down on the 10 days of competition.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'47"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 19 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'40"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:16
Thai Trafficking
BODY:
Francis Maiava is a former cop who has spent the past three years in Thailand, investigating the culture within the Thai police force, to try to find ways to deal with human trafficking. Thailand has one of the world's worst records for human trafficking - including forced labour and sex trafficking. Francis Maiava says a major cultural change is needed in Thai police force to deal withe problem... which is easier said than done.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Thailand, human trafficking
Duration: 7'28"

13:23
MCAT maths exam "too hard"
BODY:
Maths teachers in Wellington will meet tonight to discuss what action they may take over last weeks MCAT algebra exam for year 11 students.
EXTENDED BODY:
Maths teachers in Wellington will meet tonight to discuss what action they may take over last weeks MCAT algebra exam for year 11 students.
Students have complained it was too hard and based on material they had not studied, and the Principal of Hutt Valley High School, Ross Sinclair is making a formal complaint to the NZQA about the issue.
President of the Wellington Maths Association is Bruce Wels
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: NZQA, maths
Duration: 5'38"

13:29
A medical journal like no other
BODY:
One doesn't usually associate poetry and fiction with medical journals. But Helen Ker has combined medicine and creative writing to create a literary medical journal focussing on the human body. It's called Atlas.
EXTENDED BODY:
One doesn't usually associate poetry and fiction with medical journals. But Helen Ker has combined medicine and creative writing to create a literary medical journal focussing on the human body. It's called Atlas.
Topics: language, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'23"

13:35
Turning a family pickle tradition into a thriving business
BODY:
Joe McClure grew up in Michigan where the family always made pickles, based on their great grandmother's recipe. In 2006 he and his brother dug out the old recipe, and started making pickles to sell... they managed it into a highly successful family business, McClure's pickles.
EXTENDED BODY:
Joe McClure grew up in Michigan where the family always made pickles, based on their great grandmother's recipe. In 2006 he and his brother dug out the old recipe, and started making pickles to sell... they managed it into a highly successful family business, McClure's pickles.
Joe McClure is in New Zealand this week - as his pickles are used in some of the country's most popular restaurants, including the Federal deli, Burger Burger and Logan Brown
Topics: farming, business
Regions:
Tags: pickles
Duration: 9'34"

13:43
Favourite album
BODY:
Rastaman Vibrations by Bob Marley, chosen by Henry Dixon.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'19"

14:09
Push to allow hemp based foods in NZ
BODY:
You can smoke as much hemp as you like but it won't get you high. So says the local hemp industry, who say it's time New Zealand made the most of our ideal growing conditions for the plant, and the 50,000 industrial uses for hemp stalk and seeds. They're running a week of events to raise the profile of hemp as a legitimate crop. Richard Barge is the treasurer of the Hemp Industries Association.
EXTENDED BODY:
The local hemp industry says it is time New Zealand made the most of our ideal growing conditions for the plant, and the 50,000 industrial uses for hemp stalk and seeds.
The industry is running a week of events to raise the profile of hemp as a legitimate and potentially profitable crop.
Richard Barge treasurer of the Hemp Industries Association, says the industry has been legitimate in New Zealand since 2006 when trials were conducted.
So what is hemp?
“Industrial hemp which is which is low THC cannabis so we’re not a drug and we have a legal regulatory framework within which we can grow industrial hemp under licence,” he says.
There are two parts of the industrial form of hemp that can be used: the stalk which has an inner and outer part and the seeds.
Oil is derived from the seed which Richard says is high in essential fatty acids and minerals and considered a super food.
At the moment however it is illegal to sell as a food for human consumption, but it can be used as animal feed. An anomaly Richard hopes will soon change.
Its industrial uses include composites for 3D printing filaments, plastics, industrial fibres, automotive parts, textiles and ropes.
“As a fibre it is anti-static, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and it stops 95 percent of UV light - it’s quite a phenomenal fibre.”
Richard says New Zealand has the ideal growing conditions for this plant which can even, he says, remediate contaminated or poor soils.
So why aren’t more people growing it?
He says there is still some discomfort about growing the cannabis plant, albeit one low in THC, and there remains a lack of volume in the industry.
But he says there is a growing and global market for products made from this plant.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: hemp
Duration: 9'57"

14:18
Television Critic: Phil Wallington
BODY:
Phil gives his verdict on the six part Ed Hillary Bio/Doc and casts his gaze at the Great British Pottery Throw Down.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 13'04"

14:33
How fair is our tax system?
BODY:
All New Zealanders are Equal, but some are more equal than others'. It's the title of the 2016 Bruce Jesson lecture, which is being delivered by Lisa Marriott - an Associate Professor of Taxation at Victoria University of Wellington's School of Accounting and Commercial Law.
EXTENDED BODY:
'All New Zealanders are equal, but some are more equal than others.'
That's the title of the 2016 Bruce Jesson lecture, which is being delivered by Lisa Marriott - an associate professor of Taxation at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Accounting and Commercial Law.
Lisa Marriott's research interests include social justice and inequality, and the behavioural impacts of taxation.
Tax evasion is a significant problem in New Zealand, with $1 billion deliberately unpaid tax detected, and possibly nine times that amount going undetected.
So why doesn't the Inland Revenue chase down more of this unpaid money.
"The Inland Revenue, to my mind, could be spending a lot more of their resources chasing down these missing funds. Although you do have to remember people go to extreme lengths to make sure they are not caught.
"But the Inland Revenue do have some pretty sophisticated resources these days to engage in the data analytics that allows them profile the types of people that might be engaging in tax evasion and to detect them," she says.
When it comes to welfare fraud, which causes much less economic harm than tax evasion, the Ministry of Social Development chases fraudsters down with the full force of the law. While the Inland Revenue might only bring 60 to 80 criminal prosecutions a year a lot of these cases never get to court.
"The overall job of the IR is to collect the largest amount of revenue at the lowest possible cost, prosecuting is probably not going to achieve either of those things. So only the most serious cases get prosecuted.
"The Ministry of Social Development does not have that same objective, their job is not to collect revenue, the opposite they have an expenditure role, they are an expense line of the government balance sheet."
So is it true that if you owe the government money, it is more likely to come and get it off you if you’re poor rather than rich?
Yes, Lisa says.
"Two to three years ago the amount written off in tax debt was $435 million, and the amount written off in welfare debt was $8.7 million."
Topics: business, money, law
Regions:
Tags: tax
Duration: 26'22"

15:08
The Unslut Project
BODY:
When Emily Lindin was in Intermediate school, she kept a diary detailing the bullying she endured when her classmates labelled her a slut. It was so bad, she contemplated suicide. Lindin is sharing her raw, emotional diaries, from age 11-14, online in a blog and in a documentary. She hopes the view from a teenager girl can start a conversation about bullying and slut shaming. It's called The Unslut Project.
EXTENDED BODY:
When Emily Lindin was in Intermediate school, she kept a diary detailing the bullying she endured when her classmates labelled her a slut. It was so bad, she contemplated suicide. Lindin is sharing her raw, emotional diaries, from age 11-14, online in a blog and in a documentary.
She hopes the view from a teenager girl can start a conversation about bullying and slut shaming.
It's called The Unslut Project.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: Emily Lindin
Duration: 22'28"

15:47
One Quick Question for 19 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'08"

15:54
The Panel pre-show for 19 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song: Crowded House - Private Universe
1:15 Combatting human trafficking in Thailand
Francis Maiava is a former cop who has spent the past three years in Thailand, investigating the culture within the Thai police force, to try to find ways to deal with human trafficking.
Thailand has one of the world's worst records for human trafficking - including forced labour and sex trafficking.
Francis Maiava says a major cultural change is needed in Thai police force to deal withe problem... which is easier said than done.
[image:82319:half] no metadata
1:25 MCAT maths exam "too hard"
Maths teachers in Wellington will meet tonight to discuss what action they may take over last weeks MCAT algebra exam for year 11 students.
Students have complained it was too hard and based on material they had not studied, and the Principal of Hutt Valley High School, Ross Sinclair is making a formal complaint to the NZQA about the issue.
President of the Wellington Maths Association is Bruce Welsh.
1:30 A medical journal like no other
One doesn't usually associate poetry and fiction with medical journals. But Helen Ker has combined medicine and creative writing to create a literary medical journal focussing on the human body.
It's called Atlas.
1:35 Turning a family tradition into a thriving business
Joe McClure grew up in Michigan where the family always made pickles, based on their great grandmother's recipe. In 2006 he and his brother dug out the old recipe, and started making pickles to sell... they managed it into a highly successful family business, McClure's pickles.
Joe McClure is in New Zealand this week - as his pickles are used in some of the country's most popular restaurants, including the Federal deli, Burger Burger and Logan Brown
[image:82313:full]
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Push to allow hemp based foods in NZ
You can smoke as much hemp as you like but it won't get you high.
So says the local hemp industry, who say it's time New Zealand made the most of our ideal growing conditions for the plant, and the 50,000 industrial uses for hemp stalk and seeds.
They're running a week of events to raise the profile of hemp as a legitimate crop. Richard Barge is the treasurer of the Hemp Industries Association.
[image:82325:full]
2:20 Television Critic: Phil Wallington
Phil gives his verdict on the six part Ed Hillary Bio/Doc and casts his gaze at the Great British Pottery Throw Down.
2:30 How fair is our tax system?
‘All New Zealanders are Equal, but some are more equal than others‘ .
It's the title of the 2016 Bruce Jesson lecture, which is being delivered by Lisa Marriott - an Associate Professor of Taxation at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Accounting and Commercial Law.
Lisa Marriott's research interests include social justice and inequality, and the behavioural impacts of taxation.
She joins Jesse in the studio to discuss white collar fraud, tax evasion, equity and privilege.
[image:80921:full]
3:10 The Unslut Project
When Emily Lindin was in Intermediate school, she kept a diary detailing the bullying she endured when her classmates labelled her a slut. It was so bad, she contemplated suicide. Lindin is sharing her raw, emotional diaries, from age 11-14, online in a blog and in a documentary.
She hopes the view from a teenager girl can start a conversation about bullying and slut shaming. It's called The Unslut Project.
[embed] https://youtu.be/V-Rx03DyOhQ

3:30 Song

3:35 Voices
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN AFTERNOONS:
1pm - 4pm
Monday 19th September 2016
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Crowded House
TITLE: Private Universe
COMP: Neil Finn
ALBUM: Together Alone.
LABEL: Capitol
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Bob Marley & The Wailers
TITLE: Positive Vibration
COMP: Vincent Ford
ALBUM: Rastaman Vibration
LABEL: Island
ARTIST: Bob Marley & The Wailers
TITLE: Roots Rock Reggae
COMP: Vincent Ford
ALBUM: Rastaman Vibration
LABEL: Island
ARTIST: Bob Marley & The Wailers
TITLE: War
COMP: Allen Cole, Carlton Barrett
ALBUM: Rastaman Vibration
LABEL: Island
ARTIST: Bob Marley & The Wailers
TITLE: Rat Race
COMP: Rita Marley
ALBUM: Rastaman Vibration
LABEL: Island
FEATURE INTERVIEW:
ARTIST: Jenny Lewis
TITLE: Just One of The Guys
COMP: Jenny Lewis
ALBUM: The Voyager
LIVE: Warner
THE PANEL:
ARTIST: Graham Candy
TITLE: Back Into It
COMP: Graham Candy
ALBUM: Plan A
LABEL: iTunes

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
One Quick Question for 19 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'08"

15:54
The Panel pre-show for 19 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'09"

16:03
The Panel with Ella Henry and Josie McNaught (Part 1)
BODY:
John Key has arrived in New York for the United Nations Leaders' Week. Residents of a Douth Auckland motel have been moved on to make room for the homeless. The CEO of Drug Free Sport NZ Graeme Steel talks about when it's ok for athletes to use steroids. There's a claim that David Bowie staged managed his death.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'01"

16:05
The Panel with Ella Henry and Josie McNaught (Part 2)
BODY:
Slouchy, brisk or with a slope of the shoulders - your walk reveals your personality. What the Panelists Ella Henry and Josie McNaught want to talk about. Julia Davidson of Wellington Girls' College talks about the homework load and why her school ditched it. Stereotypes about female fragility underpin the scrutiny over Hillary Clinton's health.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'46"

16:07
The PM in NY
BODY:
John Key has arrived in New York for the United Nations Leaders' Week.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN
Duration: 2'58"

16:10
Residents out - homeless moved in
BODY:
Residents of a South Auckland motel have been moved on to make room for the homeless.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'51"

16:14
Drug exemptions for athletes
BODY:
The CEO of Drug Free Sport NZ Graeme Steel talks about when it's ok for athletes to use steroids.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Paralympics
Duration: 13'42"

16:28
Speculating on celebrities
BODY:
There's a claim that David Bowie staged managed his death.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: David Bowie
Duration: 2'44"

16:33
What your gait says about you.
BODY:
Slouchy, brisk or with a slope of the shoulders - your walk reveals your personality.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: walking
Duration: 4'50"

16:38
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Ella Henry and Josie McNaught want to talk about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'28"

16:45
The too-hard maths exam
BODY:
Julia Davidson of Wellington Girls' College talks about the homework load and why her school ditched it.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'48"

16:56
Womens bodies - everyone's business
BODY:
Stereotypes about female fragility underpin the scrutiny over Hillary Clinton's health.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 3'21"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Monday 19th September 2016
BODY:
Watch Monday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:07
Three people killed in road crash in Huntly
BODY:
Three people have died in a crash on State Highway One at Huntly this afternoon. Waikato Fire Service Assistant Area Commander Darryl Papesch joins Checkpoint.
Topics: transport
Regions: Waikato
Tags: Huntly, State Highway 1, crash
Duration: 3'52"

17:10
Indian immigration agent still working despite involvement in fraud
BODY:
An Indian immigration agent several students used to help get them into New Zealand is still working despite being proven to have used fraudulent documents.
Topics: refugees and migrants, law
Regions:
Tags: Indian students, Immigration Agents
Duration: 8'18"

17:18
Don't wear low cut tops, Colin Craig told press secretary
BODY:
Former Conservative Party leader Colin Craig described his former press secretary as wonderful and beautiful in a letter read out in court today, but said his views changed after she resigned.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: Conservative Party, Colin Craig, trial
Duration: 2'56"

17:21
Dirty Politics hits mayoral candidates in Nelson and Marlboroug
BODY:
Mayoral candidates in Marlborough and Nelson are being targeted by a smear campaign, and there's allegations right-wing blogger Whaleoil is stirring the pot.
Topics: politics
Regions: Marlborough, Nelson Region
Tags: Whaleoil, Smear Campaign
Duration: 3'47"

17:25
Maths exams leaves year 11 students in tears
BODY:
Year 11 maths students were in tears last week after their maths exam shattered their confidence and left them devastated.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: maths, exam
Duration: 3'26"

17:34
Evening business for 19 September 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 4'12"

17:37
John Key and Helen Clark talk tactics in New York
BODY:
There was no sign of the fierce political rivalry that used to exist between the Prime Minister John Key and his predecessor Helen Clark as they met to "talk tactics" in New York.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN, John Key, Helen Clark
Duration: 2'20"

17:40
RNZ Political Editor discusses John Key, Helen Clark dynamics
BODY:
RNZ Political Editor Jane Patterson is in New York. She joins Checkpoint to discuss John Key and Helen Clark's meeting. and what the dynamics between them are like now.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: John Key, Helen Clark, UN
Duration: 2'04"

17:45
Liam Malone leads NZ during Paralympics closing ceremony
BODY:
The New Zealand Paralympics team was led by triple medalist Liam Malone during the closing ceremony, and will soon return home as one of our most successful teams ever with 21 medals all up.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Paralympics
Duration: 4'25"

17:49
South Akld motel tenants expect Housing NZ to evict them
BODY:
Tenants at a motel in South Auckland say they could become homeless after Housing New Zealand bought the property and issued eviction notices.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Housing New Zealand, motel
Duration: 3'14"

17:53
First-of-its-kind national surfing reserve proposed for Taranaki
BODY:
A first-of-its-kind national surfing reserve is being proposed for Taranaki that will encompass many of the region's prime surf breaks.
Topics: sport, environment
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: surfing, reserve
Duration: 3'45"

18:07
Immigration Minister on fraud in Indian immigration system
BODY:
150 Indian students facing deportation cannot blame their agents and advisors for fraudulent documentation, Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse says.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Michael Woodhouse, Indian students, immigration
Duration: 7'06"

18:15
Chch Council denies inaction over chlorination of water
BODY:
Christchurch City Council denies sitting on its hands over chlorinating drinking water coming from wells that pose a high contamination risk. Christchurch Local Government reporter Conan Young reports.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Drinking Water, Chlorination, Christchurch
Duration: 4'01"

18:19
Sports chat for 19 September 2016
BODY:
The Rio 2016 Paralympics wrapped up today at Maracana stadium in Rio. RNZ sports reporter Matt Chatterton joins Checkpoint to discuss New Zealand's success at the games and other sports news.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'47"

18:24
Pro-Putin party dominates Russia parliamentary vote
BODY:
Russian President Vladimir Putin has visited the ruling United Russia party headquarters after exit polls show it won parliamentary elections.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Russia, elections, Vladimir Putin
Duration: 1'15"

18:25
South Auckland theatre remodels Shakespeare through Pasifika
BODY:
A theatre group in South Auckland is using classic English literature to break down negative stereotypes surrounding Maori and Pasifika people.
Topics: arts, te ao Maori
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Pasifika, Macbeth, theatre
Duration: 4'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Money with Mary Holm

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Paul Wood - From Prison to PhD
BODY:
How do you turn your life around? We ask Dr Paul Wood, who at 18 was in prison for killing his drug dealer. Today he has a PhD and works to help people transform their lives.
Topics: life and society, education, crime
Regions:
Tags: Paul Wood, Corrections, prisons, psychology, philosophy, personal growth, Incarceration, rehabilitation, Reformation
Duration: 18'39"

20:10
Nights' Science - Physics
BODY:
Prof. Shaun Hendy from the University of Auckland examines the life and work New Zealand astronomer and and cosmologist Beatrice Hill Tinsley. The Association of Scientists have just awarded the very first Beatrice Hill Tinsley medal, the first science award named after a woman in New Zealand. You can also hear more about her on the RNZ series The Stars are Comforting - The letters of Beatrice Hill Tinsley (1941-1981)
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: physics, Beatrice Hill Tinsley, cosmology, astronomy
Duration: 22'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image_crop:17158:full]
7:12 Paul Wood - From Prison to PhD
How do you turn your life around? we'll ask Dr Paul Wood, who at 18, was in prison for killing his drug dealer. Today he has a PhD and works to help people transform their lives. You can view his TEDx talk here.
7:35 Upbeat
Accomplished Australian soprano Antoinette Halloran is in New Zealand to play the role of 'The Worst Pies in London' maker Mrs Lovett in New Zealand Opera's Sweeney Todd, which opened in Auckland on the 17th of September. She's already well versed in the Sondheim show, having performed it with the Victorian Opera in 2015. The opera will tour to Wellington and Christchurch as well.
[image:82332:half]
8:12 Nights' Science - Physics
Prof. Shaun Hendy from the University of Auckland examines the life and work New Zealand astronomer and and cosmologist Beatrice Hill Tinsley. The Association of Scientists have just awarded the very first Beatrice Hill Tinsley medal, the first science award named after a woman in New Zealand. You can also hear more about her on the RNZ series The Stars are Comforting - The letters of Beatrice Hill Tinsley (1941-1981)
8:30 Window on the World
Food on the Open Road - It could be argued that our global economy is in some ways, driven by drivers. That is, long-haul truckers who carry goods from one side of a country to another. But truck driving is a profession that is struggling to recruit new members and a lot of it has to do with lifestyle and what's available to eat. The BBC's Mike Johnson discovers that a lack of fresh food options, combined with a sedentary lifestyle and strict schedules, leave truck drivers facing a higher rate of obesity and a shortened life-span when compared to other professions. But some truck drivers are working to change that. Plus, we discover what it's like to eat on the road in the world's longest country, and get a lesson in cab cooking along the way.
9:30 Insight
Kate Pereyra Garcia explores whether veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder are being left with little help.
10:17 Late Edition
A roundup of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 Nashville Babylon
An hour of country, soul and rock 'n' roll. Tonight, music from Van Morrison, Bonnie 'Prince' Billy and Courtney Marie Andrews.

===7:35 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:30 PM. | Insight===
=DESCRIPTION=

An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

An Indian immigration agent is still working despite being proven to have used fraudulent documents, calculating the cost of an unfair maths test, the history of eugenics, and in Dateline Pacific, Fiji's NGOs are cautious about meeting after recent arrests.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Nashville Babylon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Wairarapa's Mark Rogers presents a selection of old and new music - the very best in alt.country, Americana and blues (Arrow FM)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288345

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 19 Sep 2016