RNZ National. 2016-09-22. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

22 September 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Discovery (BBC); 1:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 2:05 The Cultural Frontline; 3:05 A Day With Yesterman by Owen Marshall read by Peter Hayden (1 of 2, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC); 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 22 September 2016
BODY:
John Key presides over fiery UN exchanges on Syria; Vic Crone says Phil Goff hypocritical to take Chinese donation; Rio Paralympics team returns to rousing welcome; Dargaville motorcycle dealer hit by ramraiders; Winston Peters defends forcing full vote on Treaty Settlements; emails reveal how MPI backed away from prosecutions.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 33'56"

06:07
Sports News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'10"

06:16
NZ Paralympian team touches down in Auckland
BODY:
The 31 athletes of the New Zealand Paralympic team touch down in Auckland.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Paralympics, Rio 2016
Duration: 1'37"

06:18
Iwi won't be left out of pocket after treaty bills cancelled
BODY:
Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson pledges to meet iwi expenses after NZ First delays the passing of treaty bills.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'53"

06:21
Early Business News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'05"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'23"

06:44
Protests, petitions fail to stop Westpac closures
BODY:
Protests, petitions and public meetings are all in vain as Westpac decides to shut regional branches.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Westpac
Duration: 3'27"

06:49
RBNZ set to hold interest rates today
BODY:
The Reserve Bank seems certain to sit on the sidelines when it issues its latest interest rate review statement at nine o'clock.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: RBNZ
Duration: 5'14"

06:54
Debt burden may ease with higher forecast payout
BODY:
Fonterra's higher forecast payout is likely to take some pressure off struggling, debt laden dairy farmers.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 49"

06:55
Super Fund says NZ needs change of attitude to get infrastructure backing
BODY:
The country needs to change its attitude to paying for infrastructure projects if it's to attract Superannuation Fund investment in new roads, bridges and the like.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'15"

06:56
Kathmandu looks to grow profit through international expansion
BODY:
The outdoor clothing and sporting goods retailer, Kathmandu Holdings, is planning a big push to increase sales in the United States and Europe.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 58"

06:58
Morning Markets for 22 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'21"

07:07
Sports News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'22"

07:10
John Key presides over fiery UN exchanges on Syria
BODY:
The Prime Minister John Key has presided over fiery exchanges between Russia and the United States at United Nations Security Council meeting convened to shore up the crumbling ceasefire in Syria. Our Political Editor Jane Patterson was at the UN for the meeting.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'00"

07:18
Vic Crone says Phil Goff hypocritical to take Chinese donation
BODY:
Phil Goff denies rival's claim that he's a hypocrite for accepting election funding from Chinese community.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 8'37"

07:25
Rio Paralympics team returns to rousing welcome
BODY:
The New Zealand Paralympian team has touched down at Auckland Airport where they were welcomed by family and friends. Our reporter at the airport says they received a warm welcome.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'59"

07:35
Dargaville motorcycle dealer hit by ramraiders
BODY:
Ramraiders drive truck through the wall of Dargaville's Honda motorcycle dealership and steal the safe and chainsaws before fleeing. One the of the staff describes the scene.
Topics: crime
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 2'52"

07:37
Winston Peters defends forcing full vote on Treaty Settlements
BODY:
Winston Peters has denied New Zealand First's withdrawl of support for two Treaty settlement bills is a political stunt.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'05"

07:44
Emails reveal how MPI backed away from prosecutions
BODY:
An email trail reveals how top bureaucrats were intent on prosecuting fishermen for dumping - until they got worried about being publicly embarrassed in court.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: fish dumping
Duration: 4'43"

07:49
Industry-run fisheries monitoring criticised
BODY:
Canadian company that missed out on a contract to carry out electronic monitoring of fishing boats says the successful tenderer lacks the necessary independence to have public credibility.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: fish dumping
Duration: 6'07"

07:55
Students test online NCEA exams
BODY:
RNZ education correspondent John Gerritsen sits down with students who are testing online NCEA exams this year.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: exams
Duration: 3'18"

08:06
Sports News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'21"

08:15
Government blasts Winston Peters over derailing settlements
BODY:
Leader of the House Gerry Brownlee puts the blame for the cancellation of treaty settlement laws being passed squarely on the shoulders of Winston Peters.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'09"

08:21
Europe on heighten security alert after NY bomb attacks
BODY:
Security remains high in Europe in the wake of the New York bomb attacks. RNZ's Andrew McRae reports from Brussels.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'42"

08:24
Queenstown mayoral hopefuls debate capping growth
BODY:
Queenstown's unruly growth is the defining issue for the town's five mayoral candidates.
Topics: politics
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 3'43"

08:28
Hip implant case could tear hole in ACC law, court hears
BODY:
A court case over a faulty hip implant could "tear a hole" in New Zealand's no fault ACC system the High Court has heard.
Topics: health, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'54"

08:29
Markets Update for 22 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'20"

08:37
Man arrested after ramraid crime spree in Dargaville
BODY:
Police have arrested a man in Dargaville after an early morning crime spree in which a stolen vehicle was used to smash into two stores.
Topics: crime
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 55"

08:39
Paralympians given a warm homecoming
BODY:
The Paralympics team has returned home. We talk to athletes including Sophie Pascoe and Liam Malone.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'59"

08:41
Black Caps face stern test in India
BODY:
The Black Caps look to break their 28 year Indian test drought.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'58"

08:48
Fonterra releases latest financial results
BODY:
Fonterra reports a $834 million profit, up 64 percent on last year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'14"

08:48
Police officer who battled tumour wins top dog handler award
BODY:
A police dog handler has won the country's top award after successfully battling a life-threatening brain tumour.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: police
Duration: 1'47"

08:52
Seven months after cyclone devastation, Fiji still struggles
BODY:
Koro Islanders struggle to rebuild their homes and lives seven months after Cyclone Winston.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Fiji
Duration: 3'43"

08:56
Curtain up at Auckland's newest theatre
BODY:
The curtain is about to go up at Auckland's newest theatre. RNZ's Joanne McKenzie takes a preview tour.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Going Up is Easy by Lydia Bradey, with Laurence Fearnley. A life lived on the edge - quite literally. The riveting account of the controversial first ascent of Everest without supplementary oxygen by NZ mountaineer Lydia Bradey. (Part 9 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Cats strategy criticised for avoiding hard questions
BODY:
The National Cat Management Strategy Group final document proposes curfews, restrictions on the number of cats allowed to be kept on a property, and nationwide mandatory microchipping and desexing of cats. Kathryn Ryan speaks to Associate Professor Brett Gartrell, who is the co-director of New Zealand's only dedicated wildlife hospital, Wildbase at Massey University, who says the strategy won't reduce the impact of cats and Shalsee Vigeant, head veterinary manager for the Auckland SPCA.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20'19"

09:29
Uber drivers threaten further action over pay rates
BODY:
The so-called ride sharing company, Uber, is facing legal action over it's decision to cut drivers pay.Back in April Uber cut the rate it pays drivers from $1.80 to $1.35. The Uber Drivers' Association says one of its members is taking a case to the disputes tribunal arguing that Uber had no right to cut the rate without alerting or consulting drivers.
EXTENDED BODY:
A group representing Uber drivers is threatening further action over the company's decision to cut driver fares in New Zealand.
In April, the ride sharing service cut drivers' pay rates from $1.80 per kilometre to $1.35.
An Uber Drivers Association member is taking a case to the Disputes Tribunal, arguing the company had no right to cut the rate without alerting or consulting drivers.
Association chair Ben Wilson said if the challenge was successful, the group was considering further action over the way Uber handles the dismissal of drivers.
Drivers were being cut off from using the app unilaterally without being given any explanation, he said.
Some drivers had reported they were being deactivated without warning, when their ratings from customers using the service went down.
The rating system is based on the average rating out of five that drivers have received from riders, over their last 500 trips.
If a driver's rating fell below an arbitrary number - which the association did not know, but believed to be somewhere below 4.6 - then they faced the chance of losing their jobs, Mr Wilson said.
"Essentially they have no recourse - it's just, 'Sorry you're out, good-bye.'"
The group was first looking to see whether the international company could be challenged by New Zealand's legal system, he said.
"Some of the point of our dispute is to see at what point can this organisation, this multinational corporation, be challenged by our legal system?
"Drivers should be compliant, they should be safe, and driving should be profitable. That's what we are trying to get to happen," Mr Wilson said.
Ben Wilson said it was hard to know how Uber would respond to the dispute.
An Uber spokesman said the company had a publicly available deactivation policy, "which provides a comprehensive explanation of the policy for drivers".
"In all situations where an account is at risk of deactivation, driver-partners will be either be warned so they can take appropriate steps to improve their service, or have the opportunity to present their version of events should an allegation be made against them," the spokesman said.
The deactivation policy stated that each city had a minimum average rating.
"We will alert you if your rating is approaching this limit, and we will share information about third-party quality improvement courses that may help you improve your rating," the policy said.
"If your average rating is below the city minimum after multiple notifications, your Uber partner account will be deactivated."
The policy does not state what the minimum ratings are for each city.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Uber, employment
Duration: 11'35"

09:41
Fa'alavelave, financial burden or family imperative?
BODY:
Fa'alavelave, is the Samoan cultural practice of contributing money to large occasions, including funerals, weddings and special birthdays.In an online survey, University of Auckland Pacific Studies student Robyn Lesatale has canvassed the attitudes of Samoans to the custom, and looked at what it costs.
EXTENDED BODY:
A survey has found young Samoan New Zealanders feel the cultural practice of fa'alavelave - or donating money - is getting out of hand.
The practice sees people contribute money to large occasions such as funerals, weddings and significant birthdays.
University of Auckland Pacific studies student Robyn Lesatale surveyed more than 400 Auckland Samoans about the practice.
Ms Lesatale says most took a lot of pride in fa'alavelave.
“It’s part of our culture, part of our identity the love and respect we get from our parents, it’s an obligation that encourages a sense of community and reciprocity.”
But she says the practice can be a huge financial burden with some extended families giving up to $10,000 to a grieving family.
Most of those surveyed were full Samoans who lived in New Zealand and were first generation. She says predominantly they were from South Auckland and between the ages of 19 to 35.
Some respondents described the practice as being used as a kind of social boasting and as being out of control.
Ms Lesatale says people in the community felt under pressure to give more than they could afford.
“Instead of it being about supporting the other party, it’s more about showing ‘I have all this money and I’m able to show my family can afford it’.
“But behind the scenes a lot of family members are struggling to contribute.”
Many, she says, had to get loans out to cover the cost of giving and this is exacerbated by the financial pressures on many Samoans living in Auckland.
“With the housing crisis we have at the moment, a lot of people feel they can’t contribute, and they are sort of outcast from their community.”
Ms Lesatale says fa'alavelave may die out if it is not brought back to its true cultural meaning.
“We should really look at fa'alavelave through a Samoan perspective and should emphasis it’s about love about family.”
Topics: Pacific, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Robyn Lesatele, fa'alavelave
Duration: 9'17"

09:50
UK Correspondent Dame Ann Leslie
BODY:
Dame Ann Leslie on the Labour Party leadership and Jeremy Corbyn's "biscuit strife" and the London city airport protest that brought travel to a standstill.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 9'10"

10:12
Social surveys: a history of resistance, scandal & negotiation
BODY:
For more than a hundred years, social surveys have been a major tool of social investigation. Dr Charlotte Greenhalgh talks to Kathryn Ryan about their history in Australia and New Zealand, including the people who went door-to-door, the details they exposed, and how local populations responded to questions about their everyday lives.
Topics: politics, life and society
Regions:
Tags: social surveys, social science
Duration: 27'25"

10:42
Book review - You'll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
BODY:
Reviewed by Leah McFall, published by Penguin Random House.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'46"

11:07
New technology with Andy Linton
BODY:
Andy Linton on changes to the oversight of the internet domain name system - and he'll be getting on his e-bike.
Topics: life and society, media, technology
Regions:
Tags: internet, domain names, e-bike, Andy Linton
Duration: 12'10"

11:19
What’s going on in the minds of children with neurological disorders?
BODY:
Susan Haldane is the head of Mind Over Manner - an organisation which uses the power of theatre to help people understand what's going on in the minds of children with neurological disorders like ADHD and autism.
EXTENDED BODY:
Kathryn Ryan speaks to Susan Haldane, the head of Mind Over Manner - an organisation which uses the power of theatre to help people understand neurological disorders like ADHD and autism.
We invited some of her actors into RNZ’s Auckland studio to demonstrate what goes on in the minds of people with neurological conditions and how parents and caregivers can respond.
The internal thought process of people with different neurological conditions:

A demonstration of the build up to a meltdown:

How to positively recover from a meltdown:

Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: autism, ADHD
Duration: 29'51"

11:50
Viewing with Tamar Munch
BODY:
Tamar Munch reviews how successful the transition is of internet sensation High Maintenance to a HBO series, Auckward Love and Friday Night Bites and American crime drama Quarry.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: High Maintenance, Auckward Love, Friday Night Bites, quarry, Tamar Munch
Duration: 9'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Cats strategy criticised for avoiding hard questions
[image:79558:full]
The National Cat Management Strategy Group final document proposes curfews, restrictions on the number of cats allowed to be kept on a property, and nationwide mandatory microchipping and desexing of cats. Kathryn Ryan speaks to Associate Professor Brett Gartrell, who is the co-director of New Zealand's only dedicated wildlife hospital, Wildbase at Massey University, who says the strategy won't reduce the impact of cats and Shalsee Vigeant, head veterinary manager for the Auckland SPCA.
09:20 Uber faces legal action
The so-called ride sharing company, Uber, is facing legal action over it's decision to cut drivers pay.Back in April Uber cut the rate it pays drivers from $1.80 to $1.35. The Uber Drivers' Association says one of its members is taking a case to the disputes tribunal arguing that Uber had no right to cut the rate without alerting or consulting drivers.
09:25 Fa'alavelave, financial burden or family imperative?
[image:82442:third]
Fa'alavelave, is the Samoan cultural practice of contributing money to large occasions, including funerals, weddings and special birthdays.In an online survey, University of Auckland Pacific Studies student Robyn Lesatale has canvassed the attitudes of Samoans to the custom, and looked at what it costs.
09:45 UK Correspondent Dame Ann Leslie
Dame Ann Leslie on the Labour Party leadership and Jeremy Corbyn's "biscuit strife" and the London city airport protest that brought travel to a standstill.
10:05 Social surveys: a history of resistance, scandal & negotiation
For more than a hundred years, social surveys have been a major tool of social investigation.
Dr Charlotte Greenhalgh talks to Kathryn Ryan about their history in Australia and New Zealand, including the people who went door-to-door, the details they exposed, and how local populations responded to questions about their everyday lives.
[gallery:2488]
10:35 Book review - You'll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
Reviewed by Leah McFall, published by Penguin Random House
10:45 The Reading
Going Up is Easy by Lydia Bradey with Laurence Fearnley (Part 9 of 10)
11:05 New technology with Andy Linton
Andy Linton on changes to the oversight of the internet domain name system - and he'll be getting on his e-bike.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3108785/us-says-transfer-of-internet-governance-will-go-ahead-on-oct-1.html
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20160909/00512835471/ted-cruz-still-blatantly-misrepresenting-internet-governance-transition.shtml
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/09/19/cruz_internet_crusade_peters_out/
https://www.protectinternetfreedom.com/the-facts/
11:25 What’s going on in the minds of children with neurological disorders?
Kathryn Ryan speaks to Susan Haldane, the head of Mind Over Manner - an organisation which uses the power of theatre to help people understand neurological disorders like ADHD and Autism.
We invited some of her actors into RNZ’s studio to demonstrate what goes on in the minds of people with neurological conditions and how parents and caregivers can respond.
The internal thought process of people with different neurological conditions:

A demonstration of the build up to a meltdown:

How to positively recover from a meltdown:

11:45 Viewing with Tamar Munch
Tamar Munch reviews how successful the transition is of internet sensation High Maintenance to a HBO series, Auckward Love and Friday Night Bites and American crime drama Quarry.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
All dangerous and menacing dogs will be given the snip. John Key's blood -on-your -hands warning over Syria.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'21"

12:17
RBNZ still in rate cutting mode - economist
BODY:
As you may have heard in the news, the Reserve Bank did what was expected -- leaving the cash rate steady a record low 2 percent -- but making clear that another cut is probably coming
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: RBNZ
Duration: 1'43"

12:19
US Fed leaves interest rates unchanged
BODY:
The United States Federal Reserve has left interest rates unchanged, but signaled a rate rise is in the pipeline before the end of the year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: US, Federal Reserve
Duration: 1'17"

12:21
Fonterra announces bumper full-year profit
BODY:
The dairy co-operative, Fonterra, has reported a bumper full-year profit off the back of low milk prices and stronger sales of high-value products.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 1'33"

12:23
Restaurant Brands Q2 sales jump on Australian stores
BODY:
Fast food operator Restaurant Brands has reported a near one third rise in sales in the second quarter, driven by its recently acquired KFC stores in Australia.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Restaurant Brands
Duration: 51"

12:24
Midday Markets for 22 September 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'39"

12:26
Business briefs
BODY:
The Overseas Investment Office has given approval for the merger between media companies Fairfax and NZME.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand cricket captain Kane Williamson says his batsmen must play the ball and not the pitch if they're to be successful in the opening test against India, which starts this afternoon in Kanpur.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'42"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 22 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:11
Stopping stink bugs!
BODY:
The Ministry for Primary Industries is on high alert, to try and stop the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, from getting to our shores. It's been bolstering New Zealand's border defences, as the horticultural pest has spread to the United States, Canada and parts of Europe. MPI response adviser, Catherine Duthie, explains.
EXTENDED BODY:
The invasive brown marmorated stink bug is on the move. Already a serious horticultural pest in North America and Europe, it has yet to establish in New Zealand.
And the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is on high alert to try and keep it that way.
MPI response adviser Catherine Duthie says now is the time in the Northern Hemisphere when the insect is looking for a safe place to over winter.
So it is likely to hole up in containers and machinery destined for warmer climes. In this way it can reach New Zealand in numbers that are major concern.
It looks very similar to the green vege bug that many will find in their gardens - except that it’s brown and stinks.
“It’s quite unpleasant and one of the big problems with this bug is it’s a severe horticultural pest, but it also likes to invade peoples’ homes.
“So it’s a problem for all of New Zealand should it get in.”
So far none have been found in New Zealand, but Ms Duthie says many have been detected at the border.
“It is spreading quickly overseas, though it’s been in the United States for a number of years, but it’s becoming quite a serious problem throughout the east and west coast and heading up into Canada.
“It’s just recently reached Europe spreading quite rapidly throughout Italy becoming a horticultural and social nuisance pest there.”
If you find one it will most likely be in your garden, she says.
“When they reach New Zealand they’ll be in their overwintering state, but it takes about two weeks of summertime conditions and then they get ready to mate and feed on your fruit and veges.
“They’re not picky, they’ll eat almost everything.”
Call MPI on 0800 80 99 66 to report any sightings.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Stink Bugs
Duration: 3'53"

13:15
Could Paralympians become the new super-athletes?
BODY:
Professor Mark Orams - the head of AUT's school of sport & recreation believes paralympic athletes will soon become faster and higher performing than able-bodied athletes - thanks largely to improvements in technology.
EXTENDED BODY:
Professor Mark Orams - the head of AUT's school of sport & recreation believes paralympic athletes will soon become faster and higher performing than able-bodied athletes - thanks largely to improvements in technology.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Paralympics
Duration: 9'26"

13:25
The People Walker
BODY:
It can be a lonely world for many, and it can become even more lonely, as we spend more and more time interacting online. One man that knows just how lonely people can be, is Chuck McCarthy. So much so, he's started a new business, he is The People Walker.
EXTENDED BODY:
It can be a lonely world for many, and it can become even more lonely, as we spend more and more time interacting online.
One man that knows just how lonely people can be, is Chuck McCarthy. So much so, he's started a new business, he is The People Walker.
Chuck charges by the mile to walk and talk with people, and it's part of a growing industry, trading in companionship.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: US, people walker
Duration: 10'50"

13:37
The Young and Lonely
BODY:
Just how lonely are young people in New Zealand?
EXTENDED BODY:
The Ministry of Social Development's Social Report for 2016, says those aged 15-24 years had the highest levels of loneliness.
It says, in general, loneliness decreases as we get older. New Zealand Samaritans provides 24 hour, confidential emotional support, to those experiencing loneliness, depression, despair, distress or suicidal feelings.
Bernadine Reid is the chair of operations committee for Samaritans and says the number of calls from people experiencing loneliness is increasing.
“We take a minimum amount of statistics, but listeners note what emotions are being expressed by the callers and loneliness is cropping up a lot more than it used to. It changes places with anxiety, but it’s right up there at the top most months in the last year.”
Social media use can have a negative impact on young people especially, she says.
“They are more and more connected on Facebook or texting and there are dangers in that. It may be completely taking the place of actual conversations. What we know is people feel good when they have had a meaningful conversation.”
It’s those meaningful conversations and connecting with others that will reduce any feelings of loneliness.
“People who ring us get that sense of companionship and often quite deep conversations, but it’s a very limited thing. We’ll be their best friend for the 10 minutes, half an hour that we might talk with them, but really what they need to be doing is going out and doing things. You have to be doing something to make contact with people.”
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: loneliness, Samaritans
Duration: 6'54"

13:44
Favourite album
BODY:
Flaming lips - Yoshimi battles the pink robot, chosen by Rebecca Wadey.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'32"

14:09
Population X
BODY:
New research has identified a group of humans or, Population X, that made migrated from Africa much earlier than thought.
EXTENDED BODY:
We've just come a little closer, to the mystery of how and when ancient humans migrated from Africa.
New research has identified a group of humans or, Population X, that made the move much earlier than thought.
Massey University computational biologist, Professor Murray Cox is involved in the project.
Topics: science, history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'17"

14:15
Theatre Critic: Michael Hooper
BODY:
Michael reviews the New Zealand Opera co-production of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, currently playing in Auckland with short seasons next month in Wellington and Christchurch
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre
Duration: 7'03"

14:22
Whatever happened to Think Big and Rogernomics?
BODY:
Jesse's given economist Geoff Simmons the unenviable task of looking at the big name economic experiments of the past, such as Think Big, Rogernomics and The Mother of All Budgets.
EXTENDED BODY:
Forty years ago New Zealand was being rocked by external economic forces.
Once one of the richest nations in the world, the collapse of wool prices, oil price shocks and Britain’s entry into the European Common Market had left the country’s economy reeling.
So how did the government respond to these existential crises? It thought big.
Geoff Simmons, economist at the Morgan Foundation assesses some of the economic policies of the past and asks how do they look with the benefit of hindsight?
New Zealand was a different world in the 1970s. The government was more heavily involved in the economy.
You couldn't import goods or take money overseas without permission and the top tax rate was 66 percent – unemployment was very low however.
But New Zealand was struggling to pay its way in the world, its exports were not earning enough to pay for what the country needed.
Think Big was a response to that.
One of its main aims was to reduce the country’s dependency on expensive foreign oil.
In the late 1960s offshore gas was discovered in Taranaki and by the 1970s New Zealand had more gas than it could possibly use.
Think Big gave the nation methanol plants, petrol plants, the Marsden Point Oil Refinery, the electrification of the main trunk railway in the North Island and the Clyde Dam on the Clutha River.
After Think Big came Rogernomics and the ‘Mother of All Budgets’ - how do those monetarist policies of the 1980s and 1990s look now?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Geoffonomics
Duration: 14'29"

14:37
History: Closer Economic Relations
BODY:
New Zealand has very strong historical connections with Australia. Today our history commentator, Dr Grant Morris of Victoria University is looking at how this all came about.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand has very strong historical connections with Australia.
Today our history commentator, Dr Grant Morris of Victoria University is looking at how this all came about.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'32"

15:09
Masterpieces: Barbara Brinsley
BODY:
Our masterpieces guest today is a fashion model, among other things - but there's something that separates her from other catwalk models.
EXTENDED BODY:
Barbara Brinsley is a Dunedin-based fashion model and style leader, she also happens to be 78 years old.
Images Courtesy of NZ Life & Leisure/Guy Frederick
Barbara was scouted by World fashion label on the Dunedin waterfront in 2003 when she was 65.
She modelled for them at ID Dunedin Fashion Week and then at New Zealand fashion week.
She says she can't remember what she was wearing when World spotted her.
"It would have been something that covered me completely and kept me warm, it’s rather fresh in Dunedin."
She gets many comments form the public on her style which can be overwhelming, she says.
"I do turn heads, and I turn them in Auckland as well. I do have quite a lot of comment about the way I’m looking and it’s not unusual and I find it’s quite overwhelming when people say how good I look today.
"But I think that goodness is right inside of me and shines out of my face and what I’m wearing.”
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: fashion, Barbara Brinsley
Duration: 8'49"

15:18
The Expats: UK based author Stella Duffy
BODY:
Stella Duffy grew up in Tokoroa, but has called London home for 3 decades now - where she's doing pretty well for herself as an author and theatre director. And she also runs an organisation called Fun Palaces - which is all about using arts and science events for community engagement.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: expats, UK
Duration: 12'24"

15:35
This Way Up: GPS for rubbish bins
BODY:
If you've used your eftpos card, caught a bus or taxi, taken a photo on your smartphone or mapped a run or walk then you've probably used GPS - the global positioning system developed by the US military. Christchurch city council is using location technology to keep tabs on the city's rubbish bins. With nearly half a million wheelie bins in circulation, it's hoping to track down 16.000 wheelie bins that are missing following the February 2011 earthquake.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: GPS
Duration: 10'36"

15:47
One Quick Question for 22 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
EXTENDED BODY:
Fonterra explains why there isn't much organic butter around
Military historian John Crawford answers: Why were no Turkish soldiers made P.O.Ws during the Gallipoli campaign?
Cor Vink of Canterbury Museum answers: Why did dinosaurs grow so big?

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'22"

15:52
The Panel pre-show for 22 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'13"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Stopping Stink Bugs!
The Ministry for Primary Industries is on high alert, to try and stop the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, from getting to our shores. It's been bolstering New Zealand's border defences, as the horticultural pest has spread to the United States, Canada and parts of Europe. MPI response adviser, Catherine Duthie, explains.
[gallery:2497]
1:25 Could Paralympians become the new super-athletes?
Professor Mark Orams - the head of AUT's school of sport & recreation believes paralympic athletes will soon become faster and higher performing than able-bodied athletes - thanks largely to improvements in technology.
[image:82804:full]
1:30 The People Walker
[image:82648:half]
It can be a lonely world for many, and it can become even more lonely, as we spend more and more time interacting online. One man that knows just how lonely people can be, is Chuck McCarthy. So much so, he's started a new business, he is The People Walker. Chuck charges by the mile to walk and talk with people, and it's part of a growing industry, trading in companionship.
1.40 The Young and Lonely
Just how lonely are young people in New Zealand? The Ministry of Social Development's Social Report for 2016, says those aged 15-24 years had the highest levels of loneliness. And it says, in general, loneliness decreases as we get older. New Zealand Samaritans provides 24 hour, confidential emotional support, to those experiencing loneliness, depression, despair, distress or suicidal feelings. Bernadine Reid is the chair of operations committee for Samaritans.
[image:82676:full]
1:45 Favourite album
Flaming lips - Yoshimi battles the pink robot
2:10 Population X
[image:82817:full]
We've just come a little closer, to the mystery of how and when ancient humans migrated from Africa. New research has identified a group of humans or, Population X, that made the move much earlier than thought. Massey University computational biologist, Professor Murray Cox, explains.
2.20 Theatre Critic: Michael Hooper
[image:82774:full]
Michael reviews the New Zealand Opera co-production of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, currently playing in Auckland with short seasons next month in Wellington and Christchurch
[image:73105:third]
2:25 Geoffonomics: Whatever happened to Think Big and Rogernomics?
Jesse's given economist Geoff Simmons the unenviable task of looking at the big name economic experiments of the past, such as Think Big, Rogernomics and The Mother of All Budgets. What kind of legacy have they left, and how have they changed our nation?
[image:82770:third]
2:35 History: Closer Economic Relations
New Zealand has very strong historical connections with Australia.
Today our history commentator, Dr Grant Morris of Victoria University is looking at how this all came about.
3:10 Masterpieces: Barbara Brinsley
Our masterpieces guest today is a fashion model, among other things.
She was scouted by World on the Dunedin waterfront in 2003 and modelled for them at ID Dunedin Fashion Week and then at New Zealand fashion week. She's a style leader in the city and there's only one thing that separates her from other catwalk models.
She's 78 year old Barbara Brinsley.
[gallery:2501]
Images courtesy of Life & Leisure magazine
3:25 The Expats: UK based author Stella Duffy
Stella Duffy grew up in Tokoroa, but has called London home for 3 decades now - where she's doing pretty well for herself as an author and theatre director.
And she also runs an organisation called Fun Palaces - which is all about using arts and science events for community engagement.
[embed] https://vimeo.com/107262132
3:30 This Way Up: GPS for rubbish bins
If you've used your eftpos card, caught a bus or taxi, taken a photo on your smartphone or mapped a run or walk then you've probably used GPS - the global positioning system developed by the US military.
Christchurch city council is using location technology to keep tabs on the city's rubbish bins. With nearly half a million wheelie bins in circulation, it's hoping to track down 16.000 wheelie bins that are missing following the February 2011 earthquake.
[gallery:2496]
Tim Joyce of Christchurch City Council shows This Way Up's Simon Morton how the bin tracking system works.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN AFTERNOONS:
1pm - 4pm
Thursday 22nd September 2016
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Sampa The Great
TITLE: Blessings
COMP: Sampa
ALBUM: Blessings
LABEL: iTunes
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Flaming Lips
TITLE: Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots
COMP: Wayne Coyne, Steven Drozd, Michael Ivins
ALBUM: Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots
LABEL: Warner
ARTIST: Flaming Lips
TITLE: It's Summertime
COMP: Wayne Coyne, Steven Drozd, Michael Ivins
ALBUM: Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots
LABEL: Warner
ARTIST: Flaming Lips
TITLE: Do You Realise
COMP: Wayne Coyne, Steven Drozd, Michael Ivins
ALBUM: Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots
LABEL: Warner
ADDITIONAL MUSIC:
ARTIST: Mel Parsons
TITLE: Far Away
COMP: Mel parsons
ALBUM: Drylands
LABEL: NZOA
THE PANEL:
ARTIST: Donovan
TITLE: Lay of The Last Tinker
COMP: Donovan Leitch
ALBUM: A Gift From A Flower To A Garden
LABEL: Epic

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
One Quick Question for 22 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
EXTENDED BODY:
Fonterra explains why there isn't much organic butter around
Military historian John Crawford answers: Why were no Turkish soldiers made P.O.Ws during the Gallipoli campaign?
Cor Vink of Canterbury Museum answers: Why did dinosaurs grow so big?

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'22"

15:52
The Panel pre-show for 22 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'13"

16:03
The Panel with Selwyn Manning and Fiona MacMillan (Part 1)
BODY:
Al Gillespie is in New York and joins us to talk about John Key's performance at the UN. Emanuel Kalafetalis talks about the latest Research NZ survey revealing New Zealanders attitudes to foreigners buying poperty. Should some government pressure have been put on Westpac to not close small town banks?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'34"

16:05
The Panel with Selwyn Manning and Fiona MacMillan (Part 2)
BODY:
You can now eat cheese to your heart's content. What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Fiona MacMillan want to talk about. Planner Charlotte Thompson talks about her idea of using feng shui in the earthquake rebuild. New ideas for cat control and new laws around dangerous breed dogs.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'38"

16:07
John Key's performance at the UN
BODY:
What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Fiona MacMillan want to talk about.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: UN, John Key
Duration: 12'12"

16:19
Goff donation hypocrisy?
BODY:
Emanuel Kalafetalis talks about the latest Research NZ survey revealing New Zealanders attitudes to foreigners buying poperty.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Phil Goff
Duration: 7'04"

16:26
Westpac closures
BODY:
Should some government pressure have been put on Westpac to not close small town banks?
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Westpac
Duration: 4'57"

16:34
The (latest) truth about cheese
BODY:
You can now eat cheese to your heart's content.
Topics: health, food
Regions:
Tags: cheese
Duration: 6'24"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Fiona MacMillan want to talk about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'35"

16:45
Chch feng shui rebuild
BODY:
Planner Charlotte Thompson talks about her idea of using feng shui in the earthquake rebuild.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: feng shui
Duration: 7'47"

16:54
Cats and dogs
BODY:
New ideas for cat control and new laws around dangerous breed dogs.
Topics: health, environment
Regions:
Tags: cats, dogs
Duration: 5'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell Thursday 22 September 2016
BODY:
Watch Thursday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
US and Russia face off over Syria at UN
BODY:
The US and Russia have faced off over Syria in a UN Security Council meeting chaired by John Key, who told the council it would have "blood on its hands" if it didn't find a solution soon
Topics: politics, conflict
Regions:
Tags: Syria, UN, John Kerry, Russia, John Key
Duration: 4'45"

17:12
New law means all 'menacing' dogs have to be neutered
BODY:
All dogs deemed "dangerous and menacing" will have to be neutered and wear a special collar identifying them, under a new law introduced by the government.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: dogs, Neutering
Duration: 3'35"

17:20
Liam Malone arrives home with Paralympics team
BODY:
New Zealand's Paralympic team have returned from their huge successful run at the Rio games - and will attend a welcome ceremony tomorrow. Medallist Liam Malone speaks to Checkpoint.
EXTENDED BODY:
Paralympic champion Liam Malone says developing a high level of discipline has been his greatest achievement over the past couple of years.
He has returned home from Rio with two gold medals and a silver medal from the athletics programme.
The 22-year-old is originally from Nelson, but now studies in Auckland.
Malone told Checkpoint with John Campbell that, as a 19-year-old, he was struggling with the death of his mother a year earlier.
He had to find something that was fun and would override his life, and setting goals allowed him to achieve that, he said.
Malone trained every day for two years before Rio, mostly on his own in Wellington with his coach in Nelson, and said that learning to be that disciplined was the hardest thing he had ever done.
[h] Related
[LB-RELATED]
[LE]

Topics: sport, disability
Regions:
Tags: Paralympics
Duration: 7'36"

17:28
Supreme Court rules Corrections miscalculating prisoner release
BODY:
More than 20 prisoners are set for release as early as tomorrow because the Corrections Department miscalculated their release dates, and has held them beyond their sentences.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags: Corrections Department, Release dates
Duration: 4'10"

17:35
Evening business for 22 September 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'09"

17:39
MPI tried to rig fishing monitoring contract - Labour
BODY:
The Ministry for Primary Industries has been accused of attempting to rig a contract to electronically monitor the fishing industry.
Topics: politics, business
Regions:
Tags: Ministry for Primary Industries, fishing
Duration: 3'11"

17:42
Fonterra posts $834 million year profit
BODY:
The country's biggest company, Fonterra's annual profit has surged by two thirds to $834 million, despite low milk prices.
Topics: business, economy, farming
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, profit, Theo Spierings
Duration: 3'32"

17:45
Committee on spy laws keeps meeting behind closed doors
BODY:
The Parliamentary committee considering proposed new spy laws promised an open session on the Intelligence and Security Bill, but closed it minutes before it was due to start.
Topics: security, politics
Regions:
Tags: Intelligence and Security Bill
Duration: 3'02"

17:48
Horror film keeps R18 rating amid domestic violence concerns
BODY:
New Zealand's film review board has refused to downgrade the R18 rating on a new American horror film, for fear its violent content will help fuel domestic violence rates.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: Film Review Board, Don't Breathe, R18
Duration: 2'26"

17:50
Dinner about to be served in Hobbiton on International Hobbit Day
BODY:
Hobbit fans will pack out the Green Dragon Inn for a special banquet tonight, marking the first ever International Hobbit Day. Checkpoint speaks to the general manager of Hobbiton.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: International Hobbit Day, Matamata, Hobbiton
Duration: 5'23"

17:56
Auckland mayoral candidates take bus ride with John Campbell
BODY:
John Campbell and five Auckland mayoral candidates take a bus ride through the city during peak hour traffic.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland, mayoral candidates
Duration: 3'40"

18:00
Auckland mayoral candidates take bus ride with John Campbell
BODY:
John Campbell and five Auckland mayoral candidates take a bus ride through the city during peak hour traffic.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland, Mayoral Election
Duration: 26'02"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Dianne Brunton: bird songs and dialectst

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Domestic Postal Censorship in WW1
BODY:
Researcher Jared Davidson talks about censorship and surveillance of mail within New Zealand during the Great War.
EXTENDED BODY:
Researcher Jared Davidson talks about censorship and surveillance of mail in New Zealand during the Great War.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
Did it begin as soon as the war began, pretty much?
Pretty much. Once war broke out, the military asked university lecturers who were language experts to be censors, but they were paid for every mail and every post letter that they censored and they were soon racking up this massive bill that the defence department couldn’t afford.
In October they actually branched out and got in postal clerks from the post office. You had a team of nine censors working across the country under the head of… his official title was property clerk, but he was the deputy postal censor, his name was Walter Tanner. He led this team of censors and interestingly enough, he used this experience to go on to be the head censor after the First World War.
He censored the film All Quiet on the Western Front, he also censored James Joyce’s Ulysses. That’s another thing. 1916 cinematography censorship was put in place as well, so the First World War has a lot of roots for modern day surveillance and things.
Was it just nine censors in the post office?
You had Walter Tanner who was running this team. He reported directly to Colonel Charles Gibbon, who had quite a lot of ties with Defense Minister James Allen, he shared things with the Solicitor General Sir John Salmond, but basically under Walter Tanner there were two censors in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin, but in saying that, in places like Samoa and Matiu Somes Island, where you had internment, the camp commandants and their own postal service as well and were censoring internees’ mail. In fact, in terms of censorship of mail, 3000 letters per month between internees were censored and over 19,000 letters per month to neutral countries around the world were censored, so that gives you an idea of the scale.
How much mail did they go through all together?
It’s hard to quantify it because there are some reports from the end of the war, but it started off pretty patchy. Based on Tanners’ reports and those figures to neutral countries and mail to and from internees, it would be over 1.2 million letters, and that’s not including those marked people under surveillance as well.
If letters had pages removed or were not arriving, people must have known that there were censorship going on, and were people therefore writing in code and trying to get around the censors?
It is interesting, so the sale of invisible ink was banned in 1917. Walter Tanner kept these lovely reports and he does talk about deciphering code and heating up invisible ink with irons, but it’s all of a comical nature, so it seems like people were having a bit of a laugh at the authorities.
Like the underground network of Irish objectors, there were an underground mail systems, so seamen were smuggling mail in and out up until March 1916 when the authorities really clamped down on control of the ports.
You had people like a priest who was identified by the Canadian authorities as someone to watch out for and when he arrived in New Zealand he was stopped at the ports and his waistcoat was opened to have all of this letters hidden inside him.
People were definitely aware that censorship was happening. It was advertised, but people were going about trying to find their own ways around it.
Did surveillance stop when the war stopped?
Not at all. So in fact, censorship of mail officially stopped in November 1920 and you had people in parliament complaining all through 1919 about that.
Why were they censoring and checking mail then?
If you look around at society at that time both in New Zealand and around the world, it was a real time of turmoil. You had people coming back from the war who were not happy with the conditions and their treatment, you had the rise of political parties such as the New Zealand Labour Party and the Communist Party of New Zealand was in its formation period as well. You had what was called the Red Scare, the fear of Bolshevism. That fear of the Red Scare meant that the authorities thought it would be beneficial to keep Walter Tanner on board to keep an eye on things.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20'27"

20:10
Nights' Culture - Video Games
BODY:
This week's cultural ambassador is 'Birth. Movies. Death' & GamePlanet reviewer Andrew Todd on the world of Virtual Reality.
Topics: arts, business, education, internet, life and society, technology
Regions:
Tags: video games, computer games
Duration: 17'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image_crop:17420:full]
7:12 Domestic Postal Censorship in WW1
Not many people know that domestic postal censorship existed - yet from the outbreak of the First World War until November 1920, the private letters of mothers, lovers, internees and workmates were subject to a strict censorship. A team of diligent readers in post offices around the country poured over 1.2 million letters. In some cases, people were arrested and deported because of their private thoughts, or mail was used to hunt down objectors hiding in the bush. We talk to Jared Davidson who is currently completing a book on the topic.
[gallery:2498]
7:35 New Horizons
Ear Candy - William Dart tastes a number of examples of the musical equivalent of sugar. Unlike food though, there are no health downsides here. We feature tracks from Linda Thompson, The High Llamas, Billy Preston and Syreeta, and The Lonely Heartstring Band among others.
8:12 Nights' Culture - Video Games
Andrew Todd on the latest innovations and uses of Virtual Reality.
8:30 Window on the World
Blind Man #2 - Peter White explores the American capital, Washington DC, through the sounds of the city. He finds a city struggling to develop a transport system, which properly caters for all communities and he explores the gulf between the well off and those living hard at heel. He is forced to navigate a strange environment without being able to see his way around: "Having been born blind, I've always travelled blind - and for me, sightseeing is more a case of 'sound-hearing."
9:07 Our Changing World
How is the air up there? -Households in Rangiora are being wired up, inside and out, with small devices to measure wood smoke. Households in Rangiora are being wired up, inside and out, with small devices to measure wood smoke. Katy Gosset joins NIWA's Ian Longley in the town and discovers that, in future, communities will be able to use these devices to monitor their own air pollution levels.
Bad air is bad for health - Air pollution is the world's leading environmental risk factor for disease, killing over 7 million people each year. Much of the risk comes from indoor pollutants such as smoke from cooking fires. While New Zealand has relatively clean air public health researchers Caroline Shaw and Simon Hales, from the University of Otago Wellington, tell Alison Ballance that long term exposure to fine particles causes about 1000 premature deaths each year.
9:30 This Way Up
Simon Morton heads to Christchurch to see the Hivemind system in action. It's being used to monitor beehives remotely so beekeepers can make sure their bees are staying healthy and producing honey. Plus he tests the best line trimmers - or weed eaters- on the market.
[gallery:2475]
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 Music 101 pocket edition
Yadana Saw pays a visit to up and coming rap act Name UL, the M101 team examine the new frontier of wireless headphones and Trevor Reekie talks about the uncensored history of punk with Legs McNeil.

===7:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music commentator and critic William Dart offers fascinating insights and surprising links across contemporary music.

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | Our Changing World===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlights from the world of science and the environment, with Alison Ballance

===9:30 PM. | This Way Up===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring the things we use and consume. Some content may offend. (RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

In this programme; taking the human for a walk. Uber - part of the smart economy - or the low wage one? And in Dateline Pacific Fiji prepares for the cyclone season.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on New Zealand/Aotearoa (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288348

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 22 Sep 2016