RNZ National. 2016-09-26. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

26 September 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Dare, Truth or Promise by Paula Boock (1 of 12, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 26 September 2016
BODY:
UN Security Council holds urgent meeting on Syria conflict, Rain - flooding hammers Thames Coromandel district, Coromandel garage owner tells story of rescue, Law Society backs Supreme Court decision on prisoners, Fashion victims: the true cost of H&M clothing, and John Key disputes fish dumping is systemic.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30'47"

06:06
Sports News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'14"

06:15
Labour leader skeptical about NZ leadership on Syria
BODY:
Labour leader Andrew Little is skeptical about New Zealand's ability to influence Syria war through its UN Security Council presidency.
Topics: politics, conflict
Regions:
Tags: Syria
Duration: 2'33"

06:19
Organiser: safety is paramount in charity boxing
BODY:
The organiser of an upcoming charity boxing event, Nelson's Fight for Victory, doesn't expect anything to change following the death of a fighter over the weekend.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: boxing
Duration: 1'51"

06:20
Early Business News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'48"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'03"

06:39
NZTA update on road conditions after flooding
BODY:
Heavy rain has lashed the Thames Coromandel district, bringing down slips, flooding rivers and cutting off the township of Pauanui.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'53"

06:41
Collins to brief Cabinet about Supreme Court ruling
BODY:
The Corrections Minister will today brief her cabinet colleagues about the blunder which means thousands of prisoners will be released from prison earlier than expected and may receive compensation.
Topics: law, politics, crime
Regions:
Tags: sentance length
Duration: 3'29"

06:50
Troubled education provider suffers another blow
BODY:
The troubled education provider Intueri Education Group's board has suffered another blow, following a negative audit review by the Australian Skills Quality Authority.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Intueri Education Group
Duration: 1'47"

06:52
Year ahead looking up for retailers, but future is less certain
BODY:
Retailers have reported a solid start to their new trading year after last week's round of strong earnings reports.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'18"

06:53
Finance arm exceeding expectations for The Warehouse
BODY:
The country's biggest listed retailer, The Warehouse, says it expects its recently launched Financial Services business to turn a profit expected in the next financial year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: The Warehouse
Duration: 1'04"

06:54
Tauranga company seeks $300k to fund expansion
BODY:
A Tauranga based company is looking for at least 300-thousand dollars to fund the development and marketing of an innovative boat loading mechanism.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Balex Marine
Duration: 1'14"

06:58
Morning Markets for 26 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'00"

07:06
Sports News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'10"

07:10
UN Security Council holds urgent meeting on Syria conflict
BODY:
The UN Security Council has met overnight in New York. The urgent meeting was called by the United States, France and Britian to discuss the deteriorating situation in Syria.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Syria
Duration: 7'19"

07:18
Rain - flooding hammers Thames Coromandel district
BODY:
Dumping of rain leaves roads a mess in the Coromandel. Civil Defence is urging people to delay travel while they clean up the slips.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'54"

07:21
Coromandel garage owner tells story of rescue
BODY:
Bill Prescott who owns a garage and petrol station in Coromandel was called in to help pull a man and his three children whose car had become stuck in the flood water.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'19"

07:25
Law Society backs Supreme Court decision on prisoners
BODY:
Law Society back Supreme Court decision on release dates for prisoners.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags: sentence lengths
Duration: 3'42"

07:29
Fashion victims: the true cost of H&M clothing
BODY:
The world's second largest clothing retailer, H&M, opens its first store in Auckland this weekend. But human rights activists say the retailer is accused of using child labour and having unsafe factories.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: H&M
Duration: 3'55"

07:37
Ngapuhi treaty negotiations group turmoil worsens
BODY:
Ngapuhi's attempts to negotiate the iwi's massive Treaty claim appears to have been derailed by a series of dramatic resignations from the board of the who currently hold the negotiating mandate.
Topics: te ao Maori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi
Duration: 4'03"

07:41
Should first home buyers be exempt from LVRs
BODY:
Property Institute calls for Reserve Bank to make first home buyers exempt from their loan-to-value ratios as new figures show 80% of renters will struggle to scrape together a 20% deposit.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: first home buyers
Duration: 4'11"

07:45
Calls for end to charity boxing
BODY:
A death in the boxing ring at the weekend sparks calls for an end to charity boxing bouts.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: boxing
Duration: 3'05"

07:47
Jeremy Corbyn re-elected UK Labour leader
BODY:
Jeremy Corbyn has been re-elected leader of the UK Labour party with 62% of the vote, which is more support than he won in the initial selection last year.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Jeremy Corbyn
Duration: 4'40"

07:56
John Key disputes fish dumping is systemic
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key says no reshuffle for Cabinet this year and he's backing Nick Smith and Nathan Guy.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

08:06
Sports News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'37"

08:11
Minority groups held back by local election system
BODY:
An AUT researcher says minority groups are severely under represented and held back by the local election system.
Topics: politics, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Local Body Elections
Duration: 3'42"

08:16
Change vote in Dunedin mayoralty
BODY:
A crowded field of ten hopefuls are trying to unseat the two term Dunedin mayor Dave Cull.
Topics: politics
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 3'27"

08:18
Nga Puhi chair of Tehoronuku responds to claims of bullying
BODY:
The future of Tuhoronuku is now in doubt after 8 years and a crown investment of more than 4 million dollars to establish a mandate to settle Ngapuhi's Treaty claims.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi
Duration: 1'00"

08:20
Nga Puhi trustees resign, walk out of treaty claim meeting
BODY:
We talk to Ngapuhi lawyer Moana Tuwhare who walked out of a fraught eight hour meeting of the board Tuhoronuku on Friday and resigned.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngapuhi
Duration: 4'16"

08:23
Govt warned against any delay to bowel screening roll-out
BODY:
Officials have warned the Government against permitting any delay to the rollout of national screening for bowel cancer.
Topics: health, politics
Regions:
Tags: bowel cancer
Duration: 4'46"

08:29
Markets Update for 26 September 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 56"

08:29
Foreign investment in food exporters raises fears
BODY:
A wave of overseas money into the food processing industry has heightened fears New Zealand is losing control over its biggest export earner.
Topics: farming, rural
Regions:
Tags: food production
Duration: 3'37"

08:37
Protestors gather outside ECan to challenge 'lack of democracy'
BODY:
Protestors are outside Environment Canterbury in Christchurch this morning, critical of what they said is a lack of democracy in the region.
Topics: politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: ECan
Duration: 2'39"

08:43
Universities seek millions in donations
BODY:
The University of Auckland wants to raise $300 million by 2020 in the the biggest fund-raising campaign ever run by a New Zealand university.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'18"

08:47
Black Caps in uphill battle against India in opening test
BODY:
The almost 30-year cricket test drought in India doesn't look like breaking. Bar a miracle India is set to beat New Zealand in the first test in Kanpur.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: cricket
Duration: 3'56"

08:52
Invercargill looks at housing options for the city's art
BODY:
The Invercargill City Council has taken the first steps towards deciding whether the city should build a new art gallery for the city's three public art collections. The council's agreed to spend fifty thousand dollars on a feasability study.
Topics: politics
Regions: Southland
Tags: Invercargill
Duration: 3'06"

08:55
Solutions to the wet school holiday panic!
BODY:
A survival guide to the school holidays.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: holidays, school holidays
Duration: 2'38"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: I Am Rebecca by Fleur Beale. Life in the Fellowship changes for Rebecca when she reaches 14, betrothal age. (Part 1 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Has NCEA delivered?
BODY:
It's 14 years since NCEA was introduced to replace School Certificate, UE and Bursary. Kathryn Ryan talks to Dr Rosemary Hipkins the co-author of a new book, examining what she says is one of the most complicated qualification systems in the world. She says NCEA has been a success, but some students are still too focused on gathering credits as opposed to learning for learning's sake.
EXTENDED BODY:
Support for the NCEA has consolidated but some schools are still doing too much assessment, an author of a new book about the school qualification says.
Rose Hipkins from the Council for Educational Research told Nine to Noon students work harder under the NCEA than they did under previous qualification systems that were based on end-of-year exams.
Dr Hipkins is one of the authors of the book NCEA in Context which charts the development of the qualification from its introduction in 2002-2004.
She said some students were collecting as many as 250 credits a year when NCEA was first introduced, because they were trying to differentiate themselves as high achievers.
Dr Hipkins said that changed when the Qualifications Authority introduced merit and excellence endorsements, which gave the most able students something to aim for.
She said the introduction of NCEA created a huge workload for teachers and there was still considerable anxiety for them in trying to ensure their judgements about students' work were correct.
Dr Hipkins said more students were staying at school since the introduction of NCEA and more were being successful and gaining a qualification that was meaningful for the path they wanted to take when they left school.
One problem area with the NCEA was the short answers required by many assessments did not prepare students well for university study, where they were expected to write critically and at length.
However, she said the same criticism could be levelled at the Bursary qualification that preceded NCEA.
"The NCEA is only the method of assessing the learning that's taking place, and actually what should be driving, we know it's not in many cases, but what should be driving is the curriculum," she said.
Dr Hipkins said NCEA put more pressure on students throughout the year, especially if schools were doing more assessment than they really needed to do.
"When there was just the exam at the end of the year, there wasn't so much pressure during the year," she said. "It's certainly more relentless."
Related stories

Topics: education, author interview
Regions:
Tags: NCEA
Duration: 22'15"

09:34
Ethical considerations in mathematics
BODY:
Professor Steven Galbraith from the University of Auckland's Mathematics Department on ethical considerations in maths and the changes technology is bringing to some fields of mathematics. His inaugural lecture next month, "From Pythagoras to Turing to Snowden, will touch upon some of the Edward Snowden revelations and their implications in his research.
Topics: education, science, technology
Regions:
Tags: Steven Galbraith, maths, University of Auckland
Duration: 14'42"

09:48
Russia correspondent Andrew Roth
BODY:
Washington Post correspondent in Moscow Andrew Roth on Russia's role in Syria and reports about Vladimir Putin forming a new super spy agency.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Russia, Syria
Duration: 11'31"

10:07
Christine Spring: HOPE
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan speaks to author, photographer and former engineer Christine Spring about her book HOPE. The hard cover book is a photo essay of Syrian refugees in Lebanon taken in October 2015 when Christine travelled to informal settlements in the Bekka Valley with UNICEF.
[gallery:2356]
Topics: life and society, conflict
Regions:
Tags: refugees, Middle East, Unicef, Syria
Duration: 30'36"

10:42
Book review - The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride
BODY:
Reviewed by Sonja deFriez, published by Text Publishing.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'20"

11:06
Political commentators Stephen Mills and Matthew Hooton
BODY:
Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills discuss John Key and Murray McCully at the UN, including putting Syria on the Security Council agenda, ongoing lobbying for Helen Clark and the Winston Peters/Gerry Brownlee spat that delayed the completion of Treaty settlement legislation.
EXTENDED BODY:
Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills discuss John Key and Murray McCully at the UN, including putting Syria on the Security Council agenda, ongoing lobbying for Helen Clark and the Winston Peters/Gerry Brownlee spat that delayed the completion of Treaty settlement legislation.
You can subscribe to the Nine to Noon Politics podcast on iTunes and have it delivered to your phone or computer every week.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'21"

11:32
Anna Bordignon: Munch Lunchbox
BODY:
Wellington based Munch has released its second book which includes recipes for wrapper-less lunch boxes which are healthy and cater for children from pre school to high school. The book is called Munch Lunchbox. Munch founder Anna Bordignon is also fresh back from the Emmy Awards in LA where she was able to show case the brand, products and books to celebrities. Anne's sharing two recipes, one for grape focaccia bread and another for blackbean brownies. She's in the studio to tell us about her trip and the latest book from Munch.
EXTENDED BODY:
The first book of recipes from Wellington company Munch – simply called Munch – focused on healthy seasonal recipes for children and was an international success.
Their second book Munch Lunchbox includes recipes for healthy wrapper-free lunchboxes for preschoolers to high schoolers.
Founder Anna Bordignon is fresh back from the Emmy Awards in Los Angeles where she showcased books and products to celebrities hungry for 'green' products.
Recipes

Grape focaccia bread
Black-bean brownies

Topics: food, books
Regions:
Tags: lunchboxes, recipes
Duration: 14'53"

11:54
Off the beaten track with Kennedy Warne
BODY:
Kennedy Warne has been travelling the West Coasts of the North and South Islands.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'01"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Has NCEA delivered?
[image:46071:full] no metadata
It's 14 years since NCEA was introduced to replace School Certificate, UE and Bursary. Kathryn Ryan talks to Dr Rosemary Hipkins the co-author of a new book, examining what she says is one of the most complicated qualification systems in the world. She says NCEA has been a success, but some students are still too focussed on gathering credits as opposed to learning for learning's sake.
0925 Ethical considerations in mathematics
[image:82340:full]
Professor Steven Galbraith from the University of Auckland's Mathematics Department on ethical considerations in maths and the changes technology is bringing to some fields of mathematics. His inaugural lecture next month, "From Pythagoras to Turing to Snowden, will touch upon some of the Edward Snowden revelations and their implications in his research.
09:45 Russia correspondent Andrew Roth
Washington Post correspondent in Moscow Andrew Roth on Russia's role in Syria and reports about Vladimir Putin forming a new super spy agency.
10:05 Christine Spring: HOPE
[gallery:2356]
Kathryn Ryan speaks to author, photographer and former engineer Christine Spring about her book HOPE. The hard cover book is a photo essay of Syrian refugees in Lebanon taken in October 2015 when Christine travelled to informal settlements in the Bekka Valley with UNICEF.
10:35 Book review - The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride
Reviewed by Sonja deFriez, published by Text Publishing.
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Political commentators Stephen Mills and Matthew Hooton
Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills discuss John Key and Murray McCully at the UN, including putting Syria on the Security Council agenda, ongoing lobbying for Helen Clark and the Winston Peters/Gerry Brownlee spat that delayed the completion of Treaty settlement legislation
[image:76861:full]
[image:82663:quarter]
11:30 Anna Bordignon, Munch Lunchbox
Wellington based Munch has released its second book which includes recipes for wrapper-less lunch boxes which are healthy and cater for children from pre school to high school. The book is called Munch Lunchbox. Munch founder Anna Bordignon is also fresh back from the Emmy Awards in LA where she was able to show case the brand, products and books to celebrities. Anne's sharing two recipes, one for grape focaccia bread and another for blackbean brownies. She's in the studio to tell us about her trip and the latest book from Munch.
[gallery:2493]

11:45 Off the beaten track with Kennedy Warne
[gallery:2509]
Kennedy Warne has been travelling the West Coasts of the North and South Islands.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
Makers of Nurofen suffer pain of another kind. Coromandel flooding leaves hundreds temporarily homeless.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'35"

12:17
Trade deficit smashes billion dollar mark in August
BODY:
The country has posted a bigger than expected monthly trade deficit as a fall in exports outpaced lower imports.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: trade deficit
Duration: 1'33"

12:19
Worker confidence jumps - survey
BODY:
The faster growing economy has lifted confidence among workers about their job prospects.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: confidence
Duration: 1'47"

12:21
Augusta Capital takes cornerstone stake in NPT
BODY:
The property investment company, Augusta Capital, has bought a cornerstone stake in the commercial and industrial property investor, NPT.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Augusta Capital
Duration: 1'18"

12:23
Midday Markets for 26 September 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Belinda Stanley at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'53"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The developer of laser measurement devices, ikeGPS, has raised 3-million dollars in an offer to existing shareholders.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 48"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
The Black Caps will have to make history to win the opening cricket test against India, with even a draw looking well beyond their reach.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'06"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 26 September 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:13
Are same-sex parents better parents?
BODY:
Same sex parents provide better quality parenting and lesbian mothers are providing the highest quality of all. Research published by the Australian Institute of Families says kids with same sex parents are generally better equipped than other children to deal with issues of equality and diversity. It comes at an interesting time, with Australia to hold a referendum to decide on the issue of same-sex marriages. The study also showed that there's a growing number of same sex parented families in Australia in spite of what's happening politcially. One of the researchers who looked at the outcomes for children of same sex parents is Melbourne University's Dr Simon Crouch.
EXTENDED BODY:
Same-sex parents provide better quality parenting and lesbian mothers are providing the highest quality of all, according to a new study.
Research published by the Australian Institute of Families says kids with same-sex parents are generally better equipped than other children to deal with issues of equality and diversity and their families scored higher in general health and family cohesion.
The findings come at an interesting time, with Australia about to hold a referendum deciding on the issue of same-sex marriages. The study also showed that there's a growing number of same-sex parented families in Australia in spite of what's happening politcially.
Dr Simon Crouch tells Jesse Mulligan the researchers found that same-sex families were set up in a "much more negotiated" way - with parents performing roles according to their skill sets rather than (stereotyped) gender.
Dr Simon Crouch is a public health doctor and lead investigator of the Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: same sex parents
Duration: 6'37"

13:20
H&M to open in Auckland
BODY:
Shoppers are excited this week about the arrival of another global fashion brand in New Zealand. The opening of H&M in Auckland is causing a retail frenzy. RNZ online magazine The Wireless has been looking at the ethical issues behind fast fashion provided by brands like H&M. The story was co-authored by Anusha Bradley and Tess McClure.
EXTENDED BODY:
Shoppers are excited this week about the arrival of another global fashion brand in New Zealand. The opening of H&M in Auckland is causing a retail frenzy. RNZ online magazine The Wireless has been looking at the ethical issues behind fast fashion provided by brands like H&M. The story was co-authored by Anusha Bradley and Tess McClure.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: H&M
Duration: 7'26"

13:28
Banned Book Week
BODY:
Librarians thumb their nose at censorship and book banning, and celebrate the freedom to read, during Banned Books Week. Louise LaHatte is regional collections manager at Auckland Libraries.
EXTENDED BODY:
Librarians thumb their nose at censorship and book banning, and celebrate the freedom to read, during Banned Books Week. Louise LaHatte is regional collections manager at Auckland Libraries.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: banned books, Auckland Libraries
Duration: 9'49"

13:38
Walking the new Christchurch 360 trail
BODY:
Twenty-five years ago, Christchurch ecologist Colin Meurk came up with the idea of a nature trail and walkway encircling Christchurch. It has been a long time coming, but it's almost complete. This Friday Colin Meurk will begin an eight day journey walking the entire 140 km long trail - through restored wetlands, preserved coastal dunes, the Bottle Lake Forest Park, Crater Rim walks high above the city and historic European and Maori village replicas.
EXTENDED BODY:
Twenty-five years ago, Christchurch ecologist Colin Meurk came up with the idea of a nature trail and walkway encircling Christchurch.It has been a long time coming, but it's almost complete.
Topics: environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch Walking Festival
Duration: 10'17"

13:48
Favourite album
BODY:
Shannon Phipps has picked Carboot Soul by Nightmares on Wax.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'56"

14:09
KAHA Takes On Hollywood
BODY:
New Zealand television producer, Bailey Mackey, is the man behind Sidewalk Karaoke, The GC, Marae and The Game Chef, and now he's taking Hollywood by storm. But it's not in a way you may think, he hasn't pitched a new television programme, but launched a new cloud-based production tool. And the start-up, KAHA, is taking off.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand television producer, Bailey Mackey, is the man behind Sidewalk Karaoke, The GC, Marae and The Game Chef, and now he's taking Hollywood by storm. But it's not in a way you may think, he hasn't pitched a new television programme, but launched a new cloud-based production tool. And the start-up, KAHA, is taking off.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 8'59"

14:18
Television Critic
BODY:
Alex Casey, from The Spinoff, reviews Easy, Transparent, Dirty Laundry, Auckward Love and Friday Night Bites.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 12'20"

14:30
Why the Universe is structured to be left handed
BODY:
Ninety percent of humans are right handed, yet the rest of the universe is generally structured to be left handed. Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger is a Rutherford Medal awardee and world leading quantum chemist and physicist at Massey University. He joins Jesse to delve into the fascinating world of quantum physics and chemistry, to try and shed light on why the world is asymmetrical, and what would happen without that imbalance.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: universe, right handed
Duration: 17'44"

15:07
Who Killed JonBenet Ramsey?
BODY:
Twenty years ago, a six-year-old beauty queen was bashed over the head and strangled in her home in Colorado. A two and a half page note, written in the house, claimed the little girl had been kidnapped and demanded a hefty ransom. But JonBenet's body was found in the basement. Suspicion fell on parents John and Patsy Ramsey and her nine-year-old brother Burke, but the murder has never been solved. Investigative journalist, Paula Woodward, looks at the evidence and talks to investigators about who they think is responsible in her book, We Have Your Daughter: The Unsolved Murder of JonBenet Ramsey, 20 Years Later.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'29"

15:30
The race for Auckland's ethnic communities
BODY:
More than 65% of new migrant, ethnic New Zealanders live in Auckland and the race for votes on, but how much thought have mayoral candidates given to the needs of their ethnic communities? Lynda Chanwai-Earle and Tim Watkin meet Auckland's leading mayoral candidates Phil Goff and Vic Crone get some answers.
EXTENDED BODY:
Housing, immigration, homelessness, employment, public safety for new migrant Chinese and Indians living in the region ... just some of the pressing issues that Auckland's ethnic communities want answers to. Around two-thirds of new migrant, ethnic New Zealanders live in the Auckland region and the race for votes is on, but how much thought have mayoral candidates given to the needs of their ethnic communities?
On a door knock campaign in the heart of Mt Roskill, Phil Goff is doing what he's done for three decades: Retail politics. As MP for New Zealand's most ethnically diverse electorate and a former Foreign Minister, he has a fearsome reputation for connecting with the country's new ethnic communities.
And there's one issue that's as big with them, as it is with every other Aucklander: Houses and how much they cost.
"The Kiwi dream is to own a home. A young couple wanting to pay their mortgage will be paying ten times their household income to pay their mortgage off. For people at the bottom, they have nowhere to go at all. [Homelessness] is a disgrace for New Zealand."
"There needs to be a strong working relationship between local and central government to solve this housing crisis. Auckland City brought in the unitary plan changes so we can both move up and out. Central government has to come to the party; 60 percent of the price of the house is in the land. So what can council do? Make sure zoning is right, that we've got plenty of land to build on, that we take some of that pressure out of it, that we get building consents and resource consents processed quickly and efficiently, and hopefully more cheaply."
"The government's got to take some pressure off demand. It should stop foreign investment buying existing homes and forcing the prices up. You want to invest in a house from overseas? Build a new one, at least you're adding something to the community more than inflation." Phil Goff

At a cafe on the waterfront of the CBD, newcomer Vic Crone meets with RNZ's Tim Watkin. She's not phased by her seasoned opponent's Goff deep track record with ethnic communities, having worked across Asia and with many new arrivals to New Zealand in her management role at Xero.
"I come at it from a different angle, I've been working with ethnic communities more from the business perspective for ten years now. I have a good feel for the New Zealand view but also a good feel for actually how vibrant these countries are internationally and how far they're progressing." Vic Crone

On the possibility of Auckland house prices falling; "It's a moot point. The only way they're going to fall is if there some sort of a global crisis which collapses the economy. We're 30,000 homes short and adding to that shortage by 5000 every year. We need to be focused on how to build more homes and more affordable homes. We need to open up more land, we need to abolish the urban limit that's artificially increasing the price of land, and we've got to get consenting moving a heck of a lot faster and we need to signal to the market we don't need big homes, the market needs more apartments, more town houses."
Crone says its back to the lack of supply that drives up the prices in Auckland and has promised to take on land bankers should she win, forcing them to 'use it or lose it'.
"Developers are being caught between land bankers and an extremely expensive trades market. It's about understanding each part."
She sees issues around foreign buyers as a necessary conversation with central government . "But we shouldn't lose sight of the primary way we fix housing. We need to get more houses built, we need to look at every single lever; look at empty homes, look at land banking, how to incentivize investors, working with central government."
"Given that I think that the government is looking at that, its more appropriate for them to keep doing that. Council has a lot to do in the housing space, lets get that underway and focus on that."
When asked whether some public sentiment blaming buyers from Asia for rising house prices is xenophobic, Crone says that Auckland has elements of racism:
"There are undertones of prejudice and bordering on racism in Auckland. Employers sometimes judging by the surnames, it's disappointing to see some of that behavior from our political leaders ... such as the comments by the Labour Party [by] picking peoples names as foreign buyers, singling out Indian and Chinese chefs for example. That does not help towards a city that is inclusive of everybody. As leaders we need to do more, we need to build bridges." Vic Crone

But Goff is adamant that challenging issues with foreign buyers is not racist; "You shouldn't point the finger at any community. It doesn't matter whether the money comes from Chicago or Beijing. I'm not going to single out any ethnic community and blame them, [but] it doesn't make sense for us to allow existing homes to be sold to international investors that push up the price of the property but add not a single extra dwelling."
"You can't go to Shanghai or Singapore and buy a property if you don't live in that place. This is not about xenophobia at all, it's about common sense." Phil Goff

Our country has the highest inflow of workers and new residents of any OECD country. Is that wise? Or should we be turning down the tap? Crone's response: "Immigration is a cycle. We don't like it when [people leave] and we don't like it when there are too many people coming here. It's hard to get the balance right."
"I feel really strongly that we can't blame Auckland's lack of infrastructure on new migrants. We've been under-investing in Auckland for decades and decades, so you can't blame immigrants." Vic Crone

"My focus would be on recognising that immigration is a cycle, how does Auckland council work with government to stand up the infrastructure that we need? We need to take accountability."
Goff's response is to urge the government to ease up on the inflow for the sake of sustainability.
"Immigration is good for a country, people that come here, come here to make a contribution, but you have to pace the rate at which immigration is happening." Phil Goff

"In the last year we've given out 207,000 temporary work visas for people to come here and work. I think we have to refocus the people we're giving temporary visas to and in terms of permanent residents, we ease the tap down a little bit, so it's sustainable. That's not xenophobic, that's what the Reserve Bank is calling for."
One area both contenders agree on; with a little over half of migrants who arrive in New Zealand staying on in Auckland, should more be done to urge people to move on? If so, what?
Crone says we are in danger of making many migrants feel unwelcome. "We're in danger of making many people who feel like Kiwis, who have been here for 5 to 15 years, feel part of a problem they haven't created themselves. I think its worth talking to the government about, but how much would we cut immigration by? Who are we going to cut?"
Goff reckons the government's attitude is contradictory.
"The government's paying people in state housing $5000 to move out of the region and through another department they're paying them $3000 to move back to Auckland because that's where the jobs are. You can't have an artificial form of regional development, if the government could bring in a good form of regional development that was sustainable in the regions, I would be the first to say "Go to it!" We would be happy to share Auckland's growth with the rest of the country. That's why people want to live here. If you're a member of a smallish ethnic community, you're coming here to be a Kiwi but you're wanting to keep your culture and heritage alive. That's natural for any migrant group."
"You don't want to be the only person from a small ethnic group living in a town with no temple or mosque to go to, or with no cultural celebration that's important to you. So people naturally congregate where their cultures are, and that's more likely to be Auckland than not." Phil Goff

And as for the recent scandal over the $150,000 donation from Chinese Aucklanders at one of Goff's campaign events, Crone accuses him of hypocrisy; he's opposed to foreign buyers, but is happy to take money from new migrants.
But Goff won't have a bar of Crone's accusations, pointing out that the donation was from Chinese New Zealanders and that the money is being used appropriately.
"If people are trying to influence you they probably would not have done it live streamed with social media. Anything we raise for the campaign, we raise openly in the public eye, and we will meet all of the disclosure requirements of the electoral commission." Phil Goff

And when challenged like-wise, Crone says she too will meet the disclosure requirements of the electoral commission.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Mayoral Race, local body elections 2016, local governance, ethnic communities, refugees and migrants, economy, housing, employment, inequity.
Duration: 10'43"

15:47
One Quick Question for 26 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'00"

15:52
The Panel pre-show for 26 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'55"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1.15 Same Sex Parents Better Parents?
Same sex parents provide better quality parenting and lesbian mothers are providing the highest quality of all. Research published by the Australian Institute of Families says kids with same sex parents are generally better equipped than other children to deal with issues of equality and diversity. It comes at an interesting time, with Australia to hold a referendum to decide on the issue of same-sex marriages. The study also showed that there's a growing number of same sex parented families in Australia in spite of what's happening politcially. One of the researchers who looked at the outcomes for children of same sex parents is Melbourne University's Dr Simon Crouch.
[image_crop:17648:full]
1.20 H&M to open in Auckland
Shoppers are excited this week about the arrival of another global fashion brand in New Zealand. The opening of H&M in Auckland is causing a retail frenzy. RNZ online magazine The Wireless has been looking at the ethical issues behind fast fashion provided by brands like H&M. The story was co-authored by Anusha Bradley and Tess McClure.
[image:83212:full]
1:25 Banned Book Week
Librarians thumb their nose at censorship and book banning, and celebrate the freedom to read, during Banned Books Week. Louise LaHatte is regional collections manager at Auckland Libraries.
[image:83198:full]
1:35 Walking the new Christchurch 360 trail
Twenty-five years ago, Christchurch ecologist Colin Meurk came up with the idea of a nature trail and walkway encircling Christchurch.It has been a long time coming, but it's almost complete.
[image:82988:full]
This Friday Colin Meurk will begin an eight day journey walking the entire 140 km long trail - through restored wetlands, preserved coastal dunes, the Bottle Lake Forest Park, Crater Rim walks high above the city and historic European and Maori village replicas.
[image:82989:full]
1:40 Favourite album
Shannon Phipps has picked Carboot Soul by Nightmares on Wax.
2:10 KAHA Takes On Hollywood
New Zealand television producer, Bailey Mackey, is the man behind Sidewalk Karaoke, The GC, Marae and The Game Chef, and now he's taking Hollywood by storm. But it's not in a way you may think, he hasn't pitched a new television programme, but launched a new cloud-based production tool. And the start-up, KAHA, is taking off.
[image:83191:full]
2.20 Television Critic
Alex Casey, from The Spinoff, reviews Easy, Transparent, Dirty Laundry, Auckward Love and Friday Night Bites.
2:20 Why the Universe is structured to be left handed
Ninety percent of humans are right handed, yet the rest of the universe is generally structured to be left handed.
Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger is a Rutherford Medal awardee and world leading quantum chemist and physicist at Massey University.
He joins Jesse to delve into the fascinating world of quantum physics and chemistry, to try and shed light on why the world is asymmetrical, and what would happen without that imbalance.
[image:82604:full]
3:10 Who Killed JonBenet Ramsey?
[image:82614:half] no metadata
Twenty years ago, a six-year-old beauty queen was bashed over the head and strangled in her home in Colorado. A two and a half page note, written in the house, claimed the little girl had been kidnapped and demanded a hefty ransom. But JonBenet's body was found in the basement. Suspicion fell on parents John and Patsy Ramsey and her nine-year-old brother Burke, but the murder has never been solved.
Investigative journalist, Paula Woodward, looks at the evidence and talks to investigators about who they think is responsible in her book, We Have Your Daughter: The Unsolved Murder of JonBenet Ramsey, 20 Years Later.
3:35 Voices
More than 65 percent of new migrant, ethnic New Zealanders live in Auckland and the race for votes on, but how much thought have mayoral candidates given to the needs of their ethnic communities? Lynda Chanwai-Earle and Tim Watkin meet Auckland's leading mayoral candidates Phil Goff and Vic Crone get some answers
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN AFTERNOONS:
1pm - 4pm
Monday 26th September 2016
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Harry Parsons
TITLE: Exoskeleton
COMP: Harry Parsons
ALBUM: Single
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Nightmares On Wax
TITLE: Les Nuits
COMP: George Evelyn, Robin Taylor-Firth, Sarah Winton
ALBUM: Carboot Soul
LABEL: Warp
ARTIST: Nightmares On Wax
TITLE: Argha Noah
COMP: George Evelyn, Robin Taylor-Firth
ALBUM: Carboot Soul
LABEL: Warp
ARTIST: Nightmares On Wax
TITLE: Survival
COMP: George Evelyn, Robin Taylor-Firth, Sarah Winton
ALBUM: Carboot Soul
LABEL: Warp
THE PANEL:
ARTIST: Josh Groban
TITLE: Try To Remember
COMP: Tom Jones, Harvey Schmidt.
ALBUM: Stages
LABEL: Warner

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
One Quick Question for 26 September 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'00"

15:52
The Panel pre-show for 26 September 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'55"

16:03
The Panel with Barry Corbett and Lisa Tamati (Part 1)
BODY:
It has been a wild weekend, and daylight saving began. Property Institute of New Zealand chief executive Ashley Church says first home buyers need to be exempt from loan-to-value restrictions. "A new survey shows renters take more than the average number of sick days - the result of cold, damp housing." Arnold Palmer, the man who brought golf to the masses, at one time the most beloved figure in the game, dead at the age of 87.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'49"

16:05
The Panel with Barry Corbett and Lisa Tamati (Part 2)
BODY:
We have been discussing growing older, aspects of. What the panelist Barry Corbett and Lisa Tamati have been thinking about. We want to talk to the well-known Hamilton boxing trainer Rick Ellis. Two big events tomorrow our time, Helen Clark will try and survive the next straw poll to find the next incumbent for the U.N.'s top job, and Donald Trump will debate Hillary Clinton. Two big events tomorrow our time, Helen Clark will try and survive the next straw poll to find the next incumbent for the U.N.'s top job, and Donald Trump will debate Hillary Clinton.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'29"

16:07
Daylight Saving
BODY:
It has been a wild weekend, and daylight saving began.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Daylight saving
Duration: 5'13"

16:12
Exemptions from loan-to-value restrictions
BODY:
Property Institute of New Zealand chief executive Ashley Church says first home buyers need to be exempt from loan-to-value restrictions.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: loan-to-value restrictions
Duration: 9'53"

16:22
Renters take more sick days
BODY:
"A new survey shows renters take more than the average number of sick days - the result of cold, damp housing."
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'22"

16:24
Arnold Palmer dies
BODY:
Arnold Palmer, the man who brought golf to the masses, at one time the most beloved figure in the game, dead at the age of 87.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'32"

16:24
Living longer
BODY:
We have been discussing growing older, aspects of. There's a new book out by two professors at the London Business School called 'The 100-year Life: living and working in the age of longevity.' It's envisaged that children born today will be working till they're 80.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'16"

16:39
Panel Says
BODY:
What the panelist Barry Corbett and Lisa Tamati have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'06"

16:47
Boxer died in the ring
BODY:
We want to talk to the well-known Hamilton boxing trainer Rick Ellis.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'22"

16:54
Politics - Helen Clark and Donald Trump vs Clinton.
BODY:
Two big events tomorrow our time, Helen Clark will try and survive the next straw poll to find the next incumbent for the U.N.'s top job, and Donald Trump will debate Hillary Clinton.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'22"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Monday 26th September 2016
BODY:
Watch Monday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:07
Manurewa shooting accused dragged from court by guards
BODY:
A man was dragged from Manukau court by security guards when he appeared today.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Manukau District Court, Bodie McKee
Duration: 2'55"

17:10
Heavy rain causes chaos on Coromandel Peninsula
BODY:
Heavy rain has caused flooding and stranded motorists on the Coromandel Peninsula.
Topics: weather
Regions: Waikato
Tags: flooding, Coromandel
Duration: 4'14"

17:18
"Russia does not need to win these wars, it just can't lose"
BODY:
The Interpreter editor James Miller talks to Checkpoint about Russia's motivation in the Syria conflict.
Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Russia, Syria, Aleppo, The Interpreter
Duration: 5'18"

17:23
Charges laid over Nurofen products, consumer groups react
BODY:
Nurofen is facing a number of charges over its labelling of pain products.
Topics: business, law
Regions:
Tags: Nurofen, Commerce Commission
Duration: 3'24"

17:26
Family move from motel to marae, because they say WINZ won't foot bill
BODY:
A homeless family in Auckland is moving from a motel to a marae because they say WINZ won't pay for their accommodation anymore.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Tuaine Murray, homelessness
Duration: 3'49"

17:31
Golfing icon Arnold Palmer dies
BODY:
Arnold Palmer, one of golf's greatest players who helped propel the game just as television was coming of age, has died at the age of 87.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Arnold Palmer, golf
Duration: 3'25"

17:37
Evening business for 26 September 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'14"

17:42
Akld Council urged to quit tobacco, sugary drinks & fossil fuel
BODY:
Auckland Council is being appluaded for pulling out of a fund which may invest in companies that make weapons.
Topics: politics, business
Regions:
Tags: Auckland Council, investments
Duration: 3'04"

17:46
Wellington wants to become predator free
BODY:
Wellington has unveiled plans to become the world's first predator-free capital.
Topics: environment
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: predator-free, Miramar
Duration: 2'46"

17:49
Banking expert says LVR exemptions for first home buyers admin
BODY:
Exempting first home buyers from lending restrictions may create more problems that it solves, a banking expert says.
Topics: economy, housing
Regions:
Tags: lending restrictions, David Tripe
Duration: 1'59"

17:50
Battle for democracy in Chch taken to council
BODY:
The battle to have fully democratic elections re-instated in Canterbury has been taken to the doorstep of the Canterbury Regional Council.
Topics: politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: elections, protest, ECan
Duration: 3'12"

17:54
Neurologist backs calls to scrap charity boxing matches
BODY:
Calls are growing for charity boxing matches to be abolished after a fighter died at an event in Hamilton at the weekend.
Topics: health, sport
Regions:
Tags: boxing, charity, Rosamund Hill
Duration: 1'31"

17:55
Royal family delights Canadian crowds
BODY:
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have impressed the Canadian public on their first overseas tour as a royal family.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Canada, royal family
Duration: 2'19"

18:08
Motorists spend night at Coromandel garage due to flooding
BODY:
Around 200 motorists were forced to spend the night at Bill Prescott's garage in Hikuai after heavy rain flooded roads lastnight.
Topics: weather, transport
Regions: Waikato
Tags: flooding, Bill's Garage, Hikuai
Duration: 4'24"

18:12
Key condemns latest Aleppo bomb strikes
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key says after more five years of brutal fighting Syria has become the greatest crisis of our time.
Topics: politics, conflict
Regions:
Tags: Aleppo, Syria, John Key
Duration: 1'44"

18:16
Protesters oppose Todd Corporation's oil and gas exploration
BODY:
A group of noisy demonstrators staked out Todd Corporation's headquarters in Wellington today, protesting against the company's oil and gas exploration.
Topics: politics, environment
Regions:
Tags: Todd Corporation, protest, Oil Free Wellington
Duration: 2'11"

18:18
Paris abandons cars for a day to curb pollution
BODY:
Cyclists and pedestrians ruled the roads in Paris for one day, as cars were temporarily banned in much of the city, in a bid to curb air pollution.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Paris, cars
Duration: 1'26"

18:22
Pest free plans backed by community champion
BODY:
NEXT's Predator Free Community Champion Kelvin Hastie talks about his efforts to clear pests from the capital.
Topics: environment
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Kelvin Hastie, Predator Free Community Champion
Duration: 3'29"

18:26
Former navy man finds owner of army medals via FB
BODY:
A former navy man has helped reunite an Afghanistan veteran with his stolen medals, with the help of Facebook.
Topics: defence force, internet
Regions:
Tags: medals, navy, Facebook, Kelly Kidd
Duration: 2'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Jimmy Barnes Working Class Boy

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Representing disability
BODY:
Esther Woodbury was one of the organisers of a protest against the film Me Before You because of how it depicts disability. We'll talk to her about the way films and other media commonly focus on disabled people as tragic, inspirational to other people, or heroically overcoming perceived barriers, while misunderstanding what those barriers actually are.
EXTENDED BODY:
Esther Woodbury was one of the organisers of a protest against the film Me Before You because of how it depicts disability.
Bryan Crump talks with her about the way films and other media commonly focus on disabled people as tragic, inspirational to other people, or heroically overcoming perceived barriers, while misunderstanding what those barriers actually are.
Read an edited excerpt from the interview below:
I got a sense that the protest with the movie was not just about the movie on its own, it’s almost as if Me Before You was the final straw for some.
Yeah, and perhaps the makers of this film were in some ways unfairly targeted, because it is a story that has been made before, but I think because there are so few stories about disabled people, there are so few opportunities for disabled people to see themselves on screen. I think that they definitely push the… ‘This is a story about a disabled person and this is a love story that involves disability’, so I think that they themselves pushed it. For example in Million Dollar Baby, the story is not really promoted like that, it’s not really framed liked that, but Me Before You was presented as a different kind of love story.
What are some of the things that you in particular are battling with in terms of the friction between you and the able-bodied world and the media portrayals of disabled people. What are you wanting to see?
I would like to see more stories told about disability and more stories told by disabled people so that any particular story and character or media representation isn’t going to be held up as the view of disability. I think it’s really great that we have celebrations of disabled athletes, but you don’t often see many celebratory stories about disability outside of sports arenas. And it’s very frustrating.
Has it been a good month though, because we have had the Paralympics?
Absolutely. I don’t want to detract from the athletes at all and they should be celebrated. I think it’s really good that disabled people are in the public consciousness. That’s really important because I would hope that the more that you see disabled people, the more you realise that disabled people are people and have their own stories and their own lives and motivations and complexities and things like that.
But it’s really interesting when you look at… there has been a lot written about really big promotion of the Paralympics for example in the UK and how on one side of the paper there would be this celebration of disabled athletes and then on the other side of the paper, there would be stories about disabled people trying to rip off the state by claiming welfare and how the government was cracking down on them.
There seems to be these two stories about disabled people. They’re either inspiring because they’ve overcome these barriers, which are usually perceived to be their disability rather than a whole lot of social discrimination, or they’re really sad sob stories or bludgers on welfare, sort of thing.
There’s nothing in the middle.
No, there are no ordinary disabled people doing ordinary, boring things.
Because in the end, I am guessing that most disabled people are like those of us who do have control of all of our limbs and digits or whatever and that is that you’re ordinary human beings who struggle with the ordinary things like getting motivated to get up in the morning, getting into work and doing all of that stuff. These are the things that we all face. What I do see sometimes is the disabled person as the guru in some movies, not the protagonist.
No. they are either the inspiration or the motivation for the main character. The main character can pick themselves up and feel like, ‘You know what, that disabled person told me something inspirational and I’m going to go out there and save the day.’ They’re very often background characters of plot points. Disappointing.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'30"

20:11
Nights' Science - Native Fish Ecology
BODY:
Stella McQueen, self-confessed native fish geek, reports on the recent review of eel quotas by the Ministry for Primary Industries. Plus she shares a cool competition idea to get kids caring for, rather than killing, eels.
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: fish, fresh water, eels
Duration: 22'56"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Representing Disability - #Not your Inspiration Porn
Esther Woodbury was one of the organisers of a protest against the film Me Before You because of how it depicts disability. We'll talk to her about the way films and other media commonly focus on disabled people as tragic, inspirational to other people, or heroically overcoming perceived barriers, while misunderstanding what those barriers actually are.
[image_crop:17655:full]
7:35 Upbeat
Chris Booth is a sculptor and environmental artist who creates work for communities. The works are always site-specific and culturally-sensitive installations of stone and natural materials based on natural forms and spiritual inspiration. That inspiration comes from where he's working so the sculpture will mean something to the people who live there. Chris' work takes time, starting with conversations with communities, before it gets to concept stage, and then the fabrication and engineering using stone and other materials can takes years to complete.
8:12 Nights' Science - Native Fish Ecology
Stella McQueen, self-confessed native fish geek, reports on the recent review of eel quotas by the Ministry for Primary Industries. Plus she shares a cool competition idea to get kids caring for, rather than killing, eels.
[image_crop:13286:full]
8:30 Window on the World
The New Sushi - It's widely agreed that bugs could be a sustainable source of protein for humans in the future, but large-scale production is very labour intensive. As the BBC's Katy Watson discovers, in Mexico - where there is a long bug-eating tradition - the infrastructure required for a profitable bug industry is almost non-existent. In the US though, where the idea of having insects for lunch still turns most stomachs, some farmers are adding bugs to protein bars and crushing them into powder for health-conscious Californians. Some proponents say insects could be the new sushi. But are they right?
9:30 Insight
Catherine Hutton talks to some families who say changes that were meant to improve the Family Court have left them in a desperate situation
10:17 Late Edition
A roundup of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 Nashville Babylon
This week on Nashville Babylon Mark Rogers presents the very best in alt.country, Americana and blues. Tonight, music from Margo Price, The Band, Karen Dalton, Slim Harpo and Mary Chapin Carpenter.

===7:35 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

Monday 26 September - The New Sushi
It's widely agreed that bugs could be a sustainable source of protein for humans in the future, but large-scale production is very labour intensive. As the BBC’s Katy Watson discovers, in Mexico - where there is a long bug-eating tradition - the infrastructure required for a profitable bug industry is almost non-existent. In the US though, where the idea of having insects for lunch still turns most stomachs, some farmers are adding bugs to protein bars and crushing them into powder for health-conscious Californians. Some proponents say insects could be the new sushi. But are they right?

Tuesday 27 September - How to Win a Presidential Debate
Katty Kay has covered US presidential election campaigns and debates since 2004. She explores the business of preparing candidates for their make-or-break one-on-one confrontations. She considers how this year’s debates may differ from previous campaigns and whether the debates could decide who will be elected president in November. We hear about what debate preparation entails, from advisers and strategists who have taken part in previous debate preparation. We hear from those covering the current campaign explain the challenges Hillary Clinton faces in preparing to debate with Donald Trump.

Wednesday 28 September - Blind Man Roams the Globe #3 of 3
Rio de Janeiro: When Peter White jets, sails or walks into a new city, it is the sounds, not the sights, which assail him. He sets off to Rio on the eve of the Paralympics. In Rio he finds a city poised with excitement as the Paralympics are set to begin. Like some of the arriving athletes, he is forced to navigate a strange environment without being able to see his way around: “Having been born blind, I’ve always travelled blind – and for me, sightseeing is more a case of ‘sound-hearing.”

Thursday 29 September:
Programme Replaced by Live coverage of the 2016 APRA Silver Scroll Award presentations.

===9:30 PM. | Insight===
=DESCRIPTION=

An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

A roundup of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Nashville Babylon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Wairarapa's Mark Rogers presents a selection of old and new music - the very best in alt.country, Americana and blues (Arrow FM)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288352

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 26 Sep 2016