Radio New Zealand National. 2015-03-08. 05:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A recording of Radio New Zealand National from 5am to midnight. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

08 March 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns for Sunday; 3:05 Faith, by Tony O'Brien (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Stormalong, by David Somerset, told by Glenis Levestam; Oh No, the Hammer, by Mariao Hohaia, told by William Davis; Nigel in the Green Suit, by Charlotte Crowe, told by Stuart Devenie; White Lightning, by Beverley Dunlop, told by Emily Perkins; Rangi and his Dinosaurs, by Katerina Mataira, told by Jim Moriarty; Feathers of Red, Feathers of Green, by Ron Bacon, told by Temuera Morrison; Would you like to be a Parrot? by Barbara Hill, told by Lee Hatherley (RNZ)

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries including Insight, sport from the outfield, politics from the insiders, plus Mediawatch, music and The Week in Parliament

=AUDIO=

07:12
Te Matatini - the festival
BODY:
Eru Rerekura from Radio New Zealand's Te Manu Korihi reports on the festival.
EXTENDED BODY:

Eru Rerekura from Radio New Zealand's Te Manu Korihi talks with Wallace Chapman about the Te Matatini festival.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini
Duration: 15'59"

07:30
The Week In Parliament for 8 March 2015
BODY:
Maori Affairs Select Committee meets in Auckland to hear submissions on the Maori Language Bill, including one from broadcaster Willie Jackson. Victoria University Emeritus Professor in Political Science Nigel Roberts gives an insight as to what the Northland by-election result could mean for the numbers in Parliament.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'17"

07:50
Lianne Dalziel
BODY:
The mayor of Christchurch, Lianne Dalziel, talks to Wallace about the importance of Te Matatini to Otautahi, and to Ngai Tahu.
EXTENDED BODY:

The mayor of Christchurch, Lianne Dalziel, talks to Wallace about the importance of Te Matatini to Otautahi, and to Ngai Tahu.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Te Matatini, Otautahi, Ngai Tahu, Lianne Dalziel, Christchurch
Duration: 8'43"

08:12
Insight for 8 March 2015 - Blurred Lines - Changing Journalism
BODY:
Kim Vinnell explores how targetting journalists is affecting reporting in the Middle East
EXTENDED BODY:
By Kim Vinnell
"I want to be affected by it. I don't want to feel that I'm blasé about it. That death, murder, destruction have become normal."
Despite working in conflict zones for most of the past 15 years, journalist, Imran Khan still feels passionately about conveying to readers, listeners and viewers all the impact of the events he is witness to.
Insight has been exploring whether it is possible for reporters working in areas such as the Middle East to continue to deliver balanced news, when they have become the targets.
Listen to Insight - Blurred Frontlines - The Changing Nature of Journalism

Imran Khan believes that if he becomes hardened or accustomed to what is often happening around him he will be delivering less than his best.
"Because if they become normal then I've lost a piece of myself, and the story won't get the treatment it deserves either," he says.
Almost a decade ago, psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein explored the stress on those working in war zones in his book 'Journalists Under Fire' .
"When news organisations sanitise the content of news, pandering to their viewers' sensitivities, they also inadvertently cleanse the image of the working lives of war journalists, obscuring many of the risks and dangers that they face"
The images viewed on television, in papers and online - even the most graphic of them - have already been censored. Before these images were published, someone assessed the options and chose something hard-hitting, but stomach-able. But even before that newsroom-based gatekeeper made those choices, the reporter, photographer, camera operator, producer or fixer witnessed those images in playing out in real life, with no pause, rewind, or stop button.
The BBC's world affairs editor, John Simpson doesn't like it when journalists use the title 'war correspondent' to describe the type of work they do. He thinks it's used to make one seem important, powerful or worthy. But Feinstein in his research rarely met a journalist who used it that way. And during my own research I've found much the same.
Over coffee at his apartment in Qatar, I asked correspondent Imran Khan why he covers war zones.
"We live in a world where nobody really cares about the intricacies of politics" he tells me. "People care about celebrity and fashion and music and art. It's only when it's headline grabbing that people pay attention, stuff like ISIS and beheadings. But there are people who have to live there. And if they can live through that, then I can show up and report" he says.
That belief - that reporting on conflict is part of a duty to the people living through it - is repeated time and time again by the journalists I meet. But reporting in dangerous areas, and witnessing trauma, does leave an imprint.
Irene Nasser is a Palestinian Israeli television producer. Covering the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, she's found herself in more dangerous situations that she can remember. She's reluctant to talk about her own experiences, but is disconcerted by how normal danger has become.

"It's strange because after a while, I started to categorise which instances of violence I prefer over others" she says. "Which ways do I feel less threatened, which shooting flying objects do I prefer as opposed to the other kinds".
Organisations like Reporters Without Borders and the Rory Peck Trust are still trying to change the perception that journalists should be staunch in the face of trauma. Some networks are starting to encourage and even help employees find psychological help after difficult assignments. But Tina Carr from RPT says those spending the most time in war zones have to do it on their own.
"Staff journalists will be strongly backed up and supported whatever decision they take. So even if they take what might be risky decision there will still be the support of their organisation behind them. Freelancers don't have any of that support," she says.
Imran Khan was following Benazir Bhutto's convoy in Pakistan, when he witnessed what he describes as one of his most traumatic experiences. Bhutto was the target of a bomb attack. He and his team followed the sirens to the hospital, where the dead and injured were being taken:
"I remember being in this hospital , very old hospital, that was whitewashed, white walls, and there was blood everywhere. There were people screaming and people dead… 150 - something people died in that attack. There were people screaming, with limbs hanging off them, if there was ever a depiction of hell. I think it would be that."
After filing the story, he and his team returned to their hotel.
"I couldn't get the image out of my brain" he says. "I switched on Friends which was on the TV. And I watched episode after episode. And that was the only way I could go on, because I was still in the same clothes. I was caked in blood and dust and I stunk, and I just sat on my bed and watched episodes of friends. I can't remember much, other than it was shiny and clean and new and everybody was happy. I needed something, and that was it."
Feinstein argues that within every war journalist is an element of "self-deception", in believing that he or she can "confront war with impunity". As far as I can tell, there's an element of that, but there's more, too. Some are driven by the adrenaline of war reporting, without a doubt. But it seems many more are driven by a desire to tell the human story.
Before leaving Imran Khan's apartment, he shows me art he's collected during his travels. It's an apt end to our interview.
"Everything you see leaves behind an imprint on you. It doesn't matter what it is. A great piece of art, a great film. Terrible scene of a suicide bombing. Whatever it is, it's going to leave an impression on you" he says.
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: journalism, ISIS, Islamic State (ISIS), Middle East, beheading, Iraq, palestinian territories, Israel
Duration: 23'58"

08:40
Dave Tikao
BODY:
Dave Tikao from Whai Rawa, Ngai Tahu's own superannunuation scheme, talks to Wallace at Te Matatini.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngai Tahu, superannuation
Duration: 4'54"

08:46
NZ Music Award winner Rob Ruha
BODY:
Rob Ruha is an award winning singer songwriter. He picked up the Best Maori album at the 2014 NZ Music awards and that is just one of many awards clinched within a year. His debut EP / album released is called Tiki Tapu.
EXTENDED BODY:

Rob Ruha is an award winning singer songwriter. He picked up the Best Maori album at the 2014 NZ Music awards and that is just one of many awards clinched within a year. His debut EP / album released is called Tiki Tapu.
Topics: te ao Maori, music
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini
Duration: 10'15"

09:05
Mediawatch for 8 March 2015
BODY:
Can the media claim any credit for the quashing of Teina Pora's conviction, and will they now let him live in peace; a convicted killer on a TV talent show was a great story for some media but not others, and more woe for an epic TV drama about Gallipoli.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 34'44"

09:40
Justin Tipa
BODY:
Justin Tipa works for Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu, is a fluent Maori speaker, and is the programme leader for education for the iwi. He joins Wallace Chapman during a live broadcast from Te Matatini - the national kapa haka festival in Christchurch.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngai Tahu
Duration: 9'18"

09:50
Francois Tumahai
BODY:
Francois Tumahai from Ngai Tahu Pounamu talks about the iwi's role of caretaker of greenstone.
EXTENDED BODY:

Wallace Chapman next to pounamu on display at Te Matatini.
Francois Tumahai from Ngai Tahu Pounamu talks about the iwi's role of caretaker of greenstone.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: greenstone, pounamu, Ngai Tahu, Te Matatini
Duration: 9'07"

10:06
Maatakiwi Wakefield
BODY:
Maatakiwi Wakefield talks to Wallace about building boats, called mogi, from reeds. They're under construction at Te Matatini.
EXTENDED BODY:

Maatakiwi Wakefield talks to Wallace about building boats, called mogi, from reeds. They're under construction at Te Matatini.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: boats, mogi, Te Matatini
Duration: 8'53"

10:16
Te Ururoa Flavell
BODY:
Leader of the Maori Party and Minister for Maori Development Te Ururoa Flavell has been stage manager for the last three festivals, but today he has been soaking up the atmosphere and meeting the people.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Te Ururoa Flavell, Te Matatini
Duration: 6'46"

10:30
Amokura Panoho
BODY:
Amokura Panoho is the spokesperson for the Parihaka Passive resistance to Climate Change initiative.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: alternative energy
Duration: 12'18"

10:45
Stan Tawa
BODY:
Chef Sam Tawa on feeding the multitudes at Te Matatini.
EXTENDED BODY:

A kitchen at Te Matatini 2015.
Chef Sam Tawa on feeding the multitudes at Te Matatini.

Topics: te ao Maori, food
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini, kai
Duration: 10'59"

11:10
Wongi Wilson
BODY:
A graffiti artist doing a billboard of a photo-realistic tui at Te Matatini.
EXTENDED BODY:

A graffiti artist doing a billboard of a photo-realistic tui at Te Matatini.

Topics: te ao Maori, arts
Regions:
Tags: graffiti, Te Matatini, graphic artist
Duration: 11'18"

11:30
Rangimarie Parata
BODY:
Rangimarie Parata Taku-rua is the project manager for Te Matatini.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Te Matatini
Duration: 14'08"

11:46
Hemi Inia
BODY:
Hemi Inia is Trust Manager for He Toki ki te Mahi, Apprenticeship Training Trust which supports Maori apprentices.
Topics: te ao Maori, education
Regions:
Tags: He Toki ki te Mahi, employment, mahi, apprenticeships, matauranga
Duration: 6'50"

=SHOW NOTES=

Show Notes
Sunday Morning with Wallace Chapman broadcast live from Te Matatini, the national kapa haka festival, in North Hagley Park, Otautahi/Christchurch.
The show will feature the winner of the Maori Album of the Year at the 2014 NZ Music Awards, Rob Ruha, Otautahi graffiti artist Wongi Wilson, and the Minister of Maori Development (and former festival stage manager) Te Ururoa Flavell.
We'll be speaking to Rangimarie Parata – an event organiser and performer at the event; Stan Tawa, the chef behind the feast of mutton birds, mussels, whitebait, crayfish and quinoa that fed more than 5000 people on the opening night; and Amokura Panoho will tell us about Parihaka’s commitment to passive resistance to climate change.
We will also broadcast our regular programmes at the usual times:
7:30 The Week in Parliament
8:12 Insight: Blurred Frontlines – The Changing Nature of Journalism
The images of Western journalists clad in orange jumpsuits being murdered by fighters claiming a holy war are difficult for the public to ignore. But for journalists, and especially those working in the Middle East, it means much more. Being a war correspondent used to involve watching the front lines, and making calculations on risk versus reward. Now, especially in the Middle East, conflicts involve armed groups who are much harder to predict than armies. Having covered conflicts both up close and from afar, reporter Kim Vinnell takes a look at how groups like Islamic State are changing the game for journalists.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch asks if the media can claim any credit for the quashing of Teina Pora’s conviction – and whether they’ll now let him live in peace. Also: A convicted killer on a TV talent show was a great story for some media but not others; and more woe for an epic TV drama about Gallipoli.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
[image:34658:full]
________________________________

Sunday Morning is produced by Christine Cessford, Zara Potts and Jeremy Rose
Music: Zen Yates-Fill
Research: Clare Gleeson
Christchurch operator: Colin Pearce
Wellington operator: Carol Jones
--------------------------------------------------------

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

The Karekare Beach races had been an annual fundraising event for the tiny beachside community for nearly 30 years, but due to dwindling numbers, time was called in 2013. But with the local surf club celebrating its 80th anniversary, locals saw the opportunity to bring back the races. Join Spectrum's Lisa Thompson for a day at the races beach-style (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:10
Spectrum: Hooves and heroes
BODY:
The Karekare Beach races had been an annual fundraising event for the tiny beachside community for nearly 30 years, but due to dwindling numbers, time was called in 2013. But with the local surf club celebrating its 80th anniversary, locals saw the opportunity to bring back the races. Join Spectrum's Lisa Thompson for a day at the races beach-style.
EXTENDED BODY:
It’s the ultimate community carnival event, the West at its most colourful best, and it’s our big outing of the year, so we both look forward to it tremendously..... Mels Barton

Mels Barton and her spirited grey pony Johnny Depp.
Even on a calm day the surf at Karekare Beach pounds onto the black sand shore. Translated by some to mean rolling thunder, it’s only apt then that the noise of this beach will shortly be amplified by the sound of dozens of thundering horse hooves, as a treasured West Coast tradition gets a new lease of life.
Thundering surf and pounding hooves. Photo: courtesy Tui Images.
Last held in 2013, the Karekare Beach races had been an annual fundraising event for the tiny beachside community for nearly 30 years, but due to dwindling numbers, time had been called.

Photo courtesy Ted Scott.
But with the local surf club celebrating its 80th anniversary this year, a group of dedicated locals have decided the combination of events was too good an opportunity to pass up.

Photo courtesy Tui Images.
Join Spectrum’s Lisa Thompson for a day at the races, beach-style.
Topics: environment, history, life and society, rural, sport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: horse racing, West Coast, Karekare, beach races
Duration: 25'32"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 3:04 The Drama Hour

=AUDIO=

12:39
On the Bright Side
BODY:
As the saying goes, if you want a job done well, do it yourself. And a community group in inner-city Auckland has done just that. They took a grim and possibly dangerous pedestrian tunnel and transformed it into a public work of art.
EXTENDED BODY:

Kowhai Butterflies and artist Kate Millington
As the saying goes, if you want a job done well, do it yourself – and a community group in inner-city Auckland has done just that. They took a grim and possibly dangerous pedestrian tunnel and transformed it into a public work of art.
Kowhai Butterflies is a mural on Bright Street in Eden Terrace and is an example of folk getting on with it instead of waiting for someone else to put things right.
Justin Gregory went for a walk on the bright side.
Topics: arts
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: community art, public art, Mt Eden
Duration: 9'08"

12:52
Loading Docs
BODY:
The hopes of ten New Zealand documentary makers hinge on the kindness of strangers. They're all in the running to get four thousand dollars worth of help to make their short docos. But first, they need to raise two thousand via crowdfunding.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: video art, Loading Docs, crowdfunding
Duration: 8'34"

13:34
Matching sound to vision
BODY:
Worldwide, dubbed film and television is the norm. It's only English speaking nations that don't regularly see a mouth movement that doesn't quite match up to that impassioned speech by the lead.
EXTENDED BODY:
Worldwide, dubbed film and television is the norm. It’s only English speaking nations that don’t regularly see a mouth movement that doesn’t quite match up to that impassioned speech by the lead. Shaun D Wilson asked awarding-winning American journalist Mac McClelland, who for Matter magazine has reported on the French dubbing industry, for her insight into this fundamentally foreign endeavour, where careers prosper depending on the success of English speaking counterparts.

French actress Nathalie Karsenti is the French January Jones, Keira Knightley, Eva Mendes and Zoe Saldana. Credit: Thibault Montamat
Topics: arts, media, technology
Regions:
Tags: France, film, dubbing, Netflix, video streaming
Duration: 12'54"

13:47
NZ On Screen
BODY:
Irene Gardiner from NZ On Screen takes us back to the first year of programmes made with New Zealand on Air Funding, as it celebrates its quarter century.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: NZ On Air, NZ On Screen
Duration: 10'53"

14:26
Author : Julie Thomas
BODY:
Julie Thomas made a real splash with her largely historical novel that started out as an online only book...The Keeper of Secrets, her latest Blood, Wine and Chocolate is an entirely different genre.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'36"

14:36
Charles Brasch: Selected Poems
BODY:
Then how and why the literary executor of Charles Brasch's estate, Alan Roddick has chosen now to put out a collection of the influential poets work.
Topics: history, arts
Regions:
Tags: poetry, Charles Brasch
Duration: 9'40"

14:49
Private Utopia
BODY:
Dunedin is the only place in New Zealand you'll be able to see contemporary art from the UK selected from the British Council's extensive collection. Past Turner Prize winners like Tracy Emin, she of the unmade bed, and Grayson Perry who won with his pornographic pots, are among the 30 artists who hit the headlines from the 1990s onwards.
Topics: arts
Regions: Otago
Tags: Dunedin, British art
Duration: 7'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:39 On the Bright Side
As the saying goes, if you want a job done well, do it yourself. And a community group in inner-city Auckland has done just that. They took a grim and possibly dangerous pedestrian tunnel and transformed it into a public work of art. Kowhai Butterflies is a mural on Bright Street in Eden Terrace and is an example of folk getting on with it instead of waiting for someone else to put things right. Justin Gregory went for a walk on the Bright side.

Kowhai Butterflies and artist Kate Millington
12:47 Loading Docs
The hopes of ten New Zealand documentary makers hinge on the kindness of strangers. They're all in the running to get four thousand dollars worth of help to make their short docos. But first, they need to raise two thousand via crowdfunding. It's the second year for the Loading Docs project, which has New Zealand on Air and Film Commission funding. Last year's batch of 10 docos were seen an estimated 300-thousand times online here and around the world.
This year's month-long fundraising started on Boosted on Monday. By Wednesday, two of the filmmakers had secured 80 percent of their target. Film directors Henry Oliver and Nikki Castle tell us about their projects.

1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
The aptly-named Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, and the new Vista Foundation – altruism is alive and well in New Zealand's boardrooms
1:34 Matching sound to vision
Worldwide, dubbed film and television is the norm. It’s only English speaking nations that don’t regularly see a mouth movement that doesn’t quite match up to that impassioned speech by the lead. Shaun D Wilson asked awarding-winning American journalist Mac McClelland, who for Matter magazine has reported on the French dubbing industry, for her insight into this fundamentally foreign endeavour, where careers prosper depending on the success of English speaking counterparts.

French actress Nathalie Karsenti is the French January Jones, Keira Knightley, Eva Mendes and Zoe Saldana
1:47 NZ On Screen
Irene Gardiner from NZ On Screen takes us back to the first year of programmes made with New Zealand on Air Funding, as it celebrates its quarter century.
2:05 The Laugh Track
If you think New Zealand comedians have difficulty being understood overseas, with our endearing accent, what about Scottish comedians? Sometimes when Billy Connolly or the Proclaimers are in full flight you wonder if it's still English! But if you're bringing two great Scottish comedians here, where better than to the Dunedin Fringe festival? Today’s laugh track guests are Scottish Comedian of the Year, Bruce Fummey and top headliner Vladimir McTavish.

2:26 Author, Julie Thomas
Julie Thomas made a real splash with her largely historical novel that started out as an online only book...The Keeper of Secrets, her latest Blood, Wine and Chocolate is an entirely different genre.

2:38 Charles Brasch: Selected Poems
Then how and why the literary executor of Charles Brasch's estate, Alan Roddick has chosen now to put out a collection of the influential poets work. The influential poet’s work has been out of print for more than 30 years – until now. Charles Brasch: Selected Poems is published by Otago University Press.
2:49 Private Utopia
Dunedin is the only place in New Zealand you'll be able to see contemporary art from the UK selected from the British Council's extensive collection. Past Turner Prize winners like Tracy Emin, she of the unmade bed, and Grayson Perry who won with his pornographic pots, are among the 30 artists who hit the headlines from the 1990s onwards.
Emma Gifford-Mead oversaw the exhibition, it’s called Private Utopia: Contemporary Art from the British Council Collection and opens at the Dunedin public art gallery at the end of the month.
3:05 The Drama Hour
This week on the Drama Hour we have another fabulous New Short winner, it’s The Worst best Night of Our Lives by Teresa Bass. Stranger Things are happening in Wellington. And Sonia Sly talks with Performance Designer Sam Trubridge.

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A musical journey of a Stradivarius violin, recently stolen from the hands of its owner Frank Rich of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra after a concert. Using the sales/purchase record of the instrument we travel across three centuries, from the Italian maker's town of Cremona to Vienna, Revolutionary France, Nazi Germany, London and Cuba to the dusty wardrobe of an Estonian widow in Milwaukee (BBC)

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:40 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Whakatāuki mo 8 o Poutū te Rangi (March) 2015
BODY:
Nōu te rourou, Nāku te rourou, Ka ora ai te iwi. With my basket and your basket the people with thrive. This week's whakatāuki is explained by Dr Leonie Pihama nō Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Māhanga, Nga Māhanga ā Tairi.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nōu te rourou, Nāku te rourou, kia ora ai te iwi
With my basket and your basket, the iwi shall thrive.

This week's whakatāuki is explained by Dr Leonie Pihama nō Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Mahanga, Ngā Māhanga ā Tairi.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Leonie Pihama
Duration: 25"

18:08
The Koha Table - Cannons Creek Porirua
BODY:
Riana Hautapu says Koha is about unconditional giving and receiving. It's based on this concept that she now runs The Koha Table, a weekly service where anyone can visit the front yard of her home at Cannons Creek and help themselves to clothes, Bric-a-Brac, shoes and donated food. Riana and Paula MacEwan run The Koha Table, Paula's is based at her home in Titahi Bay. it's all voluntary and word has travelled around their community of Porirua, so much so that nearby stores and organisations donate goods. Justine Murray is at their launch day.
EXTENDED BODY:

Riana Hautapu (middle) opens The Koha Table at her home, once a week.
According to Riana Hautapu and Paula MacEwan, Koha is unconditional. It is the giving and receiving of an experience or physical transaction between people. In the heart of Cannons Creek Porirua, Riana runs The Koha Table at her home, once a week she puts out bags of clothes, bric-a-brac, donated food and footwear in her front yard, free for anyone. Nearby charity shops who know about The Koha Table also donate goods, the result is a community driven kaupapa and it’s getting community buy-in with three others operating in Titahi Bay and Waitangirua, Justine Murray visits Riana’s home on the launch of The Koha Table.

Cheshire Street, Cannons Creek Koha Table in action.

Local Arise Church donate boxes of cereal.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Riana Hautapu, Paula MacEwan, charity, koha, Porirua
Duration: 11'30"

18:20
Nuku - Symbols of Mana - Art exhibition
BODY:
Bridget Reweti is the 2014 Blumhardt/Creative New Zealand Intern, at the tail end of her internship at The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt she curated the recently opened exhibition Nuku: Symbols of Mana. The Pataka (storehouse) at The Dowse provided inspiration for the work that consists of all women artists, at the kūaha (doorway) of the pātaka is the image of a women breastfeeding, after thinking on her ideas for the exhibition, Bridget based it on mana wāhine, she takes Justine Murray through the space.
EXTENDED BODY:

Areta Wilkinson, The Herbal Mixture. Photo courtesy of The Dowse.
Bridget Reweti is the 2014 Blumhardt/Creative New Zealand Intern, at the tail end of her internship at The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt she curated the recently opened exhibition Nuku: Symbols of Mana.
The Pataka (storehouse) at The Dowse provided inspiration for the work that consists of all women artists, at the kūaha (doorway) of the pātaka is the image of a women breastfeeding. After thinking on her ideas for the exhibition, Bridget based it on mana wāhine.
Justine Murray tours the space.
Topics: arts, te ao Maori
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Bridget Reweti, nuku, Mana
Duration: 9'29"

18:30
Ngā Hua a Tāne Rore - The benefits of kapa haka
BODY:
Dr Leonie Pihama and Dr Jillian Tipene of Te Kotahi Research Institute at The University of Waikato provide a brief analysis into their scoping report commissioned by Manātu Tāonga (Ministry for Culture and Heritage) and Te Matatini ltd. Te Kotahi used kaupapa māori research methodologies to engage with focus groups who, in some cases are at the frontline of kapa haka. One main part of the report findings was that kapa haka is undervalued. Dr Pihama and Dr Tipene discuss the health, social and economic benefits of kapa haka, and the untapped potential of traditional maori performing arts.
EXTENDED BODY:

Dr Jillian Tipene and Dr Leonie Pihama of Te Kotahi Research Institute. Photo courtesy of Te Mata Punenga o Te Kotahi.
As Te Matatini kicks off this week in Waitaha, Dr Leonie Pihama and Dr Jillian Tipene of Te Kotahi Research Institute at The University of Waikato provide a brief analysis into their scoping report about kapa haka (Māori traditional performing arts).
Te Kotahi used kaupapa Māori research methodologies to investigate the social, economic and educational benefits of kapa haka. Focus groups were held in Waikato, Rotorua, and Christchurch.
One main part of the report findings was that kapa haka is undervalued.
Dr Pihama and Dr Tipene discuss the health, social and economic benefits of kapa haka, and the untapped potential of traditional Maori performing arts with Justine Murray.
The report, Ngā Hua a Tāne Rore, was commissioned by Manātu Tāonga (Ministry for Culture and Heritage) and Te Matatini Ltd.

Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: kapa haka, research, Te Matatini
Duration: 25'40"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:06
Achilles - A Reason to Run
BODY:
Achilles in an international organisation that supports people with disabilities to participate in mainstream sporting events. It's in 65 countries, and is particularly active in New Zealand. Recently 32 Achilles athletes and 49 Achilles guides took part in Wellington's 'Round the Bays'. Many of those athletes have their sights set on running in the New York marathon at the end of the year.
EXTENDED BODY:

The Achilles Team.
Richard Warwick plans to run the New York marathon in November. Not a bad effort for a man who hasn’t run for 35 years. Richard had a brain bleed when he was 16 which left him with paralysis on his left hand side.
However, a few months ago he met Peter Loft. Peter established Achilles in New Zealand in 1994. Achilles is a world-wide organisation that aims to get people with disabilities participating in main-stream sporting events.
On the morning the two men first got together, Peter told Richard he’d like him to travel with Achilles to take part in the New York marathon
“I sat there a little bit stunned and said, ‘Well Peter there’s only one problem… I don’t run.’ And he just looked at me and said ‘Well why don’t you run?’ I suddenly realised that up until this stage of my life I hadn’t had a reason to run and suddenly Peter was handing me that reason.”
Recently Richard ran with the Achilles team in Wellington’s Round the Bays event.
“My kids are pretty proud which is nice. You know you get to be proud of your kids but when your kids get to be proud of you that’s pretty cool too.”
Gallery: Achilles - A Reason to Run
Topics: disability, sport
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Round the Bays, New York Marathon, Achilles, Athletes with Disabilities
Duration: 24'29"

=SHOW NOTES=

=TRANSCRIPT=

Carol: Good evening, and welcome to One in Five. I’m Carol Stiles.
Two weeks ago about 14,000 people took part in Wellington’s Round the Bays event. Amongst the throngs of runners and walkers, there were dozens of people wearing bright yellow t-shirts emblazoned with the word ‘Achilles’. You couldn’t miss them. In fact, Achilles was the official charity of the Cigna Round the Bays event. Achilles is a worldwide organisation, aiming to get people living with disabilities to take part in mainstream sporting events.
Felicia Manase didn’t even like walking, let alone running, before she linked up with Achilles. She can now say she’s completed a marathon.
Felicia: So I did New York last year with the Achilles team.
Carol: How was that?
Felicia: Oh, man. It was amazing. It’s just unbelievable. It’s so emotional, especially the first 15K. It’s just… I don’t know, unbelievable. So many people just screaming out your name ‘Go, Felicia. You can do it, you can do it.’ They say you’re halfway there when you’re not halfway there.
(All laugh)
Felicity: I’m like OK. I tried not to cry in the first 5K, but it was just so hard. But it was good. I enjoyed it.
Carol: What about the end? What was that like?
Felicia: Oh, gosh. It was just so unreal. It was like ‘Oh, my gosh. I completed the New York marathon.’ ‘Cause I think halfway through I just started puking up. I think everything just… just got too much. And they kept saying ‘Yes, you can do it. We’re nearly there. We’re nearly there.’ For me, I was crying before we even got on the bus to go on to Staten Island. I was like ‘Oh, my gosh. Why am I crying for?’ They were like ‘It’s alright. It’s normal to get all emotional before it starts.’
Kelly Smith: Totally. I agree.
Felicia: The good thing about Achilles, they’re always there to support you, no matter what. They provide you with a training plan, they provide you with a training coach. Just to give that extra guidance throughout this whole year till New York.
Carol: Achilles was launched in New York more than 30 years ago. It’s now in 65 countries and is thriving in New Zealand. Peter Loft, the man who established Achilles here 20 years ago, says outside the states, New Zealand is Achilles’s most active country. There are chapters in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin and talk of more being established in smaller centres. Athletes and guides train together once a fortnight. The ultimate goal for many of the athletes is to compete in the New York marathon. But for the moment the focus is on Wellington’s coastline. Peter Loft is handing out race packs.
Peter: 20492…
Woman: I think I’m doing the 10K at this stage.
Carol: You are a guide or an athlete?
Woman: Yep, a guide.
Peter: If you ever want to run up a hill, Helen will find the biggest hill in Wellington. She’ll love it down here. And she will get you over the top and down the other side. Then she’ll find another hill.
Naomi: Hi, I’m Naomi.
Carol: Hi, Naomi. Michael, hi. Nice to meet you. (Sounds of people at registration desk fading down)

Peter: The difference between us and paralympics is paralympics gets people with one leg racing against other people with one leg, or people in wheelchairs racing against other people in wheelchairs. We get people with disabilities in mainstream marathon running with people of… for example, this weekend we’ll have double amputees, single amputees, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, totally blind, visually impaired, paraplegics, tetraplegics, all part of the Achilles team doing a run with 15,000 able-bodied people now. Isn’t that good? We don’t pay anyone ‘cause as soon as you pay someone their reasons for being there are different. So from myself down all through the board to our coach to our IT person, they all do it because they want to do it. Niva Retimanu is involved, Frank Bunce, Tawera Nikau. All those guys, we don’t pay them. They just want to be part of the team and support us.
Carol: You’ve been to 20 New York marathons. You’ve run beside a lot of people.
Peter: I’ve done 17 New York marathons, yeah.
Carol: They’d all be special for various reasons, but are there some that stick in your mind?
Peter: Umm the very first one with John Riley because that was my first experience with a person with a disability. And what he went through to finish the marathon and what I went through as his coach, planning the day. We really put some planning into the day, and I carried a backpack ‘cause we knew he was going to be seven hours. It was 100% humidity. Two people died on the course that day through overheat. So I had a backpack on that had extra water bottles ‘cause water stops are a mile apart, but that was a long time for the speed that he was going, so we needed stuff for in between. I had 50g of carbohydrates an hour that I was feeding him, as in bananas and energy bars. But what I didn’t do was feed me. I didn’t think of me. I was like the air hostess, I was busy looking after him but not myself first. And when we got to 32km John had blisters on his hands so big he couldn’t hold his crutches anymore. He couldn’t physically put his hands around his crutch grips. And I thought, yay, we’re going home cause I was ready to pull out. My body was gone. I was mentally shutting down. And John bit the blisters off with his teeth. We put new rubber bungs on the bottom of his crutches ‘cause he’d worn through those and it was bare metal on tar seal. And at that stage there was 20-something athletes with crutches on one leg running the marathon, and he had 5 in front of him and was 15 or 20 minutes behind the first guy – 32Ks. He went on and won by 10 minutes. One, because we were the best-prepared athlete – not coach – there. And when he did the blisters and new rubber bungs it was like putting new shoes on. And him biting the blisters off, just any excuse I had went out the window. And that stands out in memory……and the same like Jared Haumoana taking 21 hours. Jared has cerebral palsy. Walked through the streets of New York for 21 hours with a lady who was supporting him from Hamilton. When he was going through Harlem and the Bronx, the lady that he was with was blonde, and it was not the sort of thing you’d see at two or three or four in the morning in the Bronx and Harlem. And prostitutes were coming up and going ‘What are you doing in our territory, bitch?’ (Laughs) Two policemen saw them in their patrol car, hopped in behind them and drove behind them for… it must have been four or five hours at a really slow pace. And when they got to the finish line it had gone. It was 21 hours. So the police got the emergency tape out, ran ahead and put it across the finish line, and Jared went through he emergency tape. That was a special moment. That put tears in everybody’s eyes. But the one that stands out in memory the most was one year I didn’t do it. A guy called Todd Philpott, who was ex- Mr Australasia bodybuilder champion – and bodybuilders don’t run marathons with two legs, let alone with one. And I explained what Achilles was and what we did and he got the passion for it, trained up, went to New York. But he got a new prosthetic leg a week before, a new titanium carbon fibre. And we said Todd ‘Don’t wear that new leg. Never wear new gear for a marathon.’ But he insisted and he put it on at the start. And I was at the finish that year waiting for the team to come through so we expected he would be 7.5 hours. It took him 13 plus. But we couldn’t communicate. We didn’t know where he was. But what was happening out in the course is within two miles he’d cut his stump open. So the new prosthetic leg had cut into his stump and that was bleeding. At the 21km mark he was hurting so bad that they got a crutch out to take his weight off his stump so he could ease the pain a little bit. He slipped over, dislocated his shoulder. He found a building, relocated his shoulder against the side of a building, but squashed a nerve in the back of it in the process. But he didn’t worry about dislocating it again and re-relocating it, he carried on. And before I get to the end of his story… My team talk, I give a team talk, and hopefully whenever someone takes over from me they’ll give the same or similar team talk is - Failure is not an option. We have body bags. We will take you home. So if you don’t finish this marathon you’ve got two choices – one is to be dead, the other one is to be in an ambulance. ‘Cause that’s the only excuse we will accept. Your disability is not an excuse for failure. Think of all the people that have worked hard to get you to this place now where you’re going to be on a start line tomorrow. You can’t let them down. You’re not here for a shopping trip, you’re here to run the New York City marathon. So if you don’t finish – dead or ambulance. So anyhow, Todd carries on, and he’s carrying on through the streets of New York. 13 hours later he crosses the finish line. And he comes through and we give him a huge hug an put the put the medal round his neck and said ‘Todd, you crazy bugger. You shouldn’t have finished the New York City marathon; you should have gone to hospital.’ And he looked me in the eye and he said ‘Lofty, discipline is less painful than regret.’ That discipline and pushing on through that pain was a damn sight less painful than the regret of not getting the medal. I shut up and just… (Laughs) ..had a tear in my eye. (Voice quavers) There’s too many stories. There’s 270, 280 athletes we’re taken away. There’s some great stories. And a whole lot more to come.
(Sfx in different room)
Carol: Now, this is your first time running this event?
Rob Martin: Yeah, the first time running any event. Yeah, I’m not a runner. (Laughs)
Carol: What do you usually do?
Rob: Hand cycle, yeah.
Carol: So what made you decide to run?
Rob: Um, Peter Loft, basically. I went to New York with a team in 2012 and Hurricane Sandy sort of ruined my chances of racing. I was going to do hand cycling. And I had amazing build-up. Usual story, form of my life - like the fish that got away. But I never got to race. It took a toll on me mentally, probably, and I haven’t raced since. And then spoke to Pete about a new challenge and he said ‘Why don’t you run it?’ So I started doing more mileage on my everyday prosthetic and I rung the limb centre and said ‘That’s pretty hard, you know?’ They said ‘It’s the wrong leg for you. You need a proper running leg.’ So I did a justification and got a blade. Everything was going really well. Within a week of getting it I was running 5.5km nonstop. And then two weeks later my leg broke. I fractured my knee just from the impact of running on the blade and so that ruled me out of Taupo and New York last year. So this is third time lucky. And whilst after Wednesday’s run my leg was left bleeding, and I haven’t really walked on it much since, I don’t want to miss out on three events in a row. It’s starting to get old. (Laughs)
Richard Warwick: My name is Richard. I had a brain bleed when I was 16 and that effectively had a similar impact like a stroke so I was left with paralysis down my left-hand side. But because of my age I got back a level of mobility that allowed me to get around and move about and things, but I’d never been a runner. That’s not something that’s kind of really featured for me until I met Peter Loft from Achilles. Peter just cut to the chase straightaway and said ‘Look, we’re starting a chapter here in Wellington. We want you to be involved. And by the way we’d like you to come and do the New York marathon.’ So I kind of sat there a little bit stunned and said ‘Well, Peter, there’s only one problem with that. And he said ‘What’s that?’ I said to him ‘I can’t run.’ And he just looked at me and said ‘Well, why can’t you run?’ And it did sit me back a little bit. And I suddenly realised that up until this stage in my life I hadn’t had a reason to run. And suddenly Peter was handing me that reason. (Pause) So it’s been quite a meteoric rise from doing no running in 35 years to suddenly signing up and doing the New York marathon. Someone described it, I can’t remember, they said being in the New York marathon is like the population of Invercargill competing with the population of New Zealand watching. So it’s going to be a pretty amazing event. And I’ll just plan towards it and we’ll just work hard to get there. First time up I’m sure it’s going to be a walk-run.
The Kenyans are under no threat from me, by any means. (Laughter)
Carol: What do your family think?
Richard: They’re pretty encouraged, actually. My kids are pretty proud, which is nice. You get to be proud of your kids, but when your kids get to be proud of you that’s pretty cool, too, yeah.
Carol: So tomorrow?
Richard: I’m paired up with Lance Walker. Lance is the CEO of Cigna in New Zealand, and he’s my support runner. And so we’ve begun at a low level, getting out around the bays in Wellington and starting to run. And the bonus is that we’ve become mates.
Carol: The role of guide, Niva – what does a guide do?
Niva: Well, I was approached by Peter two years ago to be a guide/ambassador for Achilles. And at that time I was going through my own journey of discovery of health and fitness. And, through my own admission I wasn’t a runner or a walker or anything. I was heavily overweight and a smoker and a big drinker so I was changing my life for me at the time. Peter heard a bit of my story and he said ‘We’d love you to be a guide and ambassador for Achilles.’ I said ‘That would be great, but what does a guide do?’ He said ‘You would guide a disabled person through the New York marathon. Every November we take a group of athletes. So you would start the marathon with a disabled athlete, and you would finish that marathon with that person.’ And he said ‘So you’re basically there motivating them and you would, over the year, train with them. And it could be anyone throughout New Zealand.’ So even though I was living in Auckland it could have been anyone in Invercargill. But at the time I said to Peter ‘That sounds great in theory, but my biggest problem is I’m not fit enough. I’ve only run one marathon and it took me eight hours.’ And I said ‘And the disabled person would probably be faster than me.’ And he said ‘Look, it’s not about that. It’s not about speed. It’s not competitive.’ He said ‘We’re looking for guides and people who have the patience, who have the personality, to connect with any person. That’s what we want you there for. We don’t want you there for your athleticism.’ And I said ‘OK, well, as long as you know I’m not Kenyan. I say yes!’ Being a guide is very, very special. And it’s remembering to have fun. So a lot of the time I wear costumes.
Carol: I’ve heard about you being a carrot.
Niva: Oh, I’ve been many things, Carol! I’ve been a carrot, I’ve been a card, I’ve been every type of vegetable, every type of animal you can think of. And my goal, too, you’ve got to set yourself short-term goals. And one of my goals, too, with, Achilles, is to put a smile on someone else’s face. And people look at me and say ‘Oh, you’re guiding someone.’ I say ‘Well, in a way they guide me, as well. To be honest, it’s changed my life. It is one of the best things that I’ve ever done.’
Kelly Smith: I’m Kelly and I’ve got immune disease. So I’ve always been a runner and I supported Achilles with donations etc before I got my disease. My immune system is attacking my nervous system. And I’m on medication to control it and I’m in pain. Sometimes when I can run I can run, I’m really good. And other times I’m just bedridden. So life is too short to sit on the sofa the whole time, you know? I’ve done the Wellington half -marathon before, prior to getting sick, and it’s a beautiful day. I love it. So I’m really looking forward to it.
(Gulls squawk. At the waterfront. )
Compere: Welcome again to the Cigna Round the Bays 2015. I’ve got Suzanne here from Cigna with a few little words of encouragement, advice, last-minute motivational tips. We’ll pass it over to her, anyway.
Suzanne: Thank you. Good morning, everyone. (Fades down)
Carol: Good morning.
Peter: Maryanne used to be an ironman athlete. In a waka [she] hit a paddle on her head. Brain bleed. Stroke. Had to learn to walk, talk. Told she would never walk again. Done New York with us twice. She’s doing the half-marathon this morning.
Maryanne, this is Carol from Radio New Zealand.
Carol: Hello, how are you? Nice to meet you.
Maryanne: Good, thankyou.
Peter: If you want to interview here make sure there’s no shops around ‘cause you’ll lose her.
Maryanne: One day I was running the… no, walking the Kerikeri half-marathon a couple of years ago. And a friend of mine said to me ‘Why don’t you fly the flag for us broken-asses and do the New York marathon?’ So he gave my number to Peter. And he rang me and the next year I was in New York. But it was cancelled. We went there and it was Hurricane Sandy. So my sister and I went the next year.
Carol: I’ve been told that it’s a very, very emotional experience.
Maryanne: It was so emotional, it was. When we were at the start line and all these people with all sorts of disabilities, blind, no legs and… I thought ‘Oh, my god.’ And they just had huge smiles on their faces. So ready to go. And when the start gun went off we were just crying, crying to see all these people just so happy to be given a go or just happy to be there. And it was like they had no disability, nothing, yeah.
Carol: Who is the guide here?
Andrew Klein: I’m the guide. This is my wife Vinnie.
Vinnie: Hello, how are you?
Carol: I’m good, good. So are you from Wellington?
Vinnie: Taupo.
Carol: Now you’ve got a wee rope, so can I take it that you’re visually impaired?
Vinnie: Yep.
Carol: So you attach yourself to your husband?
Vinnie: I just sort of loosely hold the rope. Hopefully…
Andrew: We don’t lose each other, yeah.
Vinnie: Don’t trip over anything.
Andrew: Some people look at us and think we’re extremely close ‘cause we run together with a rope.
Vinnie: Very in love. (Laughs)
Carol: One of you is not desperate to go faster than the other?
Vinnie: Yeah, he’s a lot faster than me. (Laughs)
Andrew: No comment. Yeah, it’s definitely a patience thing.
(Both laugh)
Vinnie: (Laughs) That’s nice. That says it all.
Andrew: It tests the marriage. But this would be a nice big run, 15,000 people, I think.
(Change of scene, women laughing)
Rob Martin: They said we’ve got this wool. I said ‘I won’t have time to knit. I’m slow, but I haven’t even got a pattern.’ (Laughs)
Maryanne: His leg is… umm sore, so I thought I’d get some wool and put it on.
Rob: Do you reckon that’s the go?
Maryanne: Yes! We’ve got lanolin. We put in on our feet. The lanolin will be great. It stops friction and it helps protect your feet. So we’ve done all these marathons wearing it. People look at us, but it’s great.
Carol: Oh, it smells like the real thing.
(Laughter)
Woman: It is. It is the real thing. But she took the dags out.
(Laughter)
Rob: If I just focus I won’t drop a stitch.
Man: Yeah, yeah. I know.
Man: Go, Achilles!
Compere: (over loud speaker) Also we’ve got Tawera here from Achilles. Are you all good?
Tawera: (addressing the crowd) Yeah, very good, thanks, mate. As Suzanne said you’ll see a lot of our athletes out there on the track. We’ve got athletes with many different disabilities. Everything from amputees, some of them are tetraplegic, some of them are blind runners. So if you see them out on the track give them a cheer. We’re really privileged to be here. Have a great race and go, Achilles!
(Applause)
Compere: We’ll give you a cheer later out there, as well. Go, Tawera! One minute to go. We’re going to crank a bit of music to get you pumped and into it.
(Music pumps)
Compere: Everyone, run on the spot. Lift it up, lift it up.
Carol: Jaden, tell me about your bike. What sort of a bike is it?
Jaden: Hand cycle.
Carol: And you’re doing the 6.5km today?
Jaden: Yes, I am. It’s going to be fun. I’m going to smoke it. It’s real easy. It’s going to be hard for my guide to catch up.
(Carol laughs)
Carol: And they tell me that you’re one of Achilles’s youngest members.
Jaden: Sadly, I am.
Carol: I think they want other young people to join. Is it a good club to belong to?
Jaden: Yeah, it is. I love how they help young disabled people by keeping them fit and doing all this fun stuff.
Compere: Are we ready?
(Cheering)
Compere: Let’s go. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.
(Start gun fires)
Compere: Good luck, go hard. Don’t leave anything out there.
Man: Achilles!
Woman: Go, Achilles!
(Sound of people running past ….fades out)
(At finish line - fade up ….people running)
Man passing: Yeeha!
Announcer on loud speaker: Well done to all runners today. Fantastic effort. We’ve got thousands of runners coming in.
(Lots of chatter in background and music too. People gathering after the race)
Man: This is Tamati.
Carol: Hi, Tamati.
Tamati: Hello, Carol.
Carol: Hi, how are you going?
Tamati: Good, thank you.
Carol: So you’ve just finished by the looks.
Tamati: Yes, I have, actually.
Carol: What distance did you do?
Tamati: I did the 10K.
Carol: Yeah, how did that go?
Tamati: Pretty good. I was the first one back from Achilles for the 10K… we think.
Man: For the Auckland lot, yes, so very proud of him.
Carol: Was it crowded out there?
Tamati: Yeah, yes and no. But the good side was, from a blind point of view, it was good to have the road closed so you can run free and not worry about the traffic or anything like that, from a blind point of view.
Carol: And you were his guide?
Man: I was his guide, yes. And I’m just so proud of him. It’s just brilliant. We’ve come home. I do a lot of running for myself, but working with these chaps is such an inspiration. And to bring him over the finish line today, I think that’s like one of the best runs I’ve done for a long time. I’m just a bit overwhelmed.
Tamati: Same.
Carol: How was that, Jaden?
Jaden: Good.
Carol: Yeah? Are you exhausted?
Jaden: I’m tired, yeah.
Carol: And what about the crowd? Were they getting in your way or not too bad?
Jaden: No, not too bad.
Carol: What was the atmosphere like out there?
Jaden’s Mum: It’s really lovely. Lots of music and people giving away lollies and water.
Carol: You kept up alright with him?
Jaden’s Mum: Just. (Big sigh!)
Carol: How did you get on?
(Laughter)
Vinnie: It was hard. No, it was good.
Andrew: You did well. Real well. You did well, Vin. Really good.
Vinnie: Really nice surface to run on.
Andrew: The weather was really good and it was cool, there was no wind. Really good. I think everyone had a good day.
Carol: How was that? Tough going?
Man: It was great. No, we had fun. We had a lot of fun, racing along, overtaking some people and dodging others. And I had Felicity the hockey trainee young lass. She was chalking a good pace. My wheelchair was going fast enough for her and she thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a lot of fun, yeah.
Carol: Achilles athletes there at the finish of the Cigna Round the Bays run. We have photos of some of the athletes on our webpage and a link to the Achilles website. I’m Carol Stiles and that was One in Five. We’ll be back at the same time next week with more on the issues and experience of disability.
Until then, ka kite anō.

===7:35 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===7:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical for 8 March 2015 ( Part 1 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53'43"

21:05
Sounds Historical for 8 March 2015 ( Part 2 )
BODY:
Stories of yesteryear from around New Zealand
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:09 Today in New Zealand History 4’42”
Anti-Fenian Riots on the West Coast 8 March 1868.
8:15 Artist: Richard Farrell (piano) 3’46”
Song: Devotion
Composer: Liszt
Album: n/a
Label: PYE 45 CEC 32011
Richard Farrell was born in Auckland on 30 December 1926, but spent most of his young years in Wellington. He attended St Mary's Convent School and St. Patrick's College and became a gifted classical pianist who achieved almost legendary status. His career was cut short in a road accident on 27 May 1958 at the age of 31. He has been described as New Zealand's "greatest classical pianist".
8:19 I Saw Them Fly 12' 45"
A 1955 series of talks, introduced by Arnold Wall Jnr of 3YA Christchurch, in which Frederick Carpenter, who grew up in the village of Farnborough in the United Kingdom, recalls watching it become the centre of British aviation and his friendships with early aviators, from 1903 until the end of World War I. Part One: Balloons and man-lifting kites.
8:33 Artist: Kev and the Kiwifruit Band (1983) (with radio archival inserts) 3’07”
Song: Good On Yer Kiwi
Composer: Steve Robinson
Album: n/a
Label: CBS 45 BA 223047
A member of the group Tambourlaine guitarist Steve Robinson grew up in Fiji, where he studied piano and played the violin in school orchestras and learned the ukulele and guitar. In New Zealand as a teenager, he first played bass in Christ College’s beat covers band The Pagans, and later, lead guitar with Wellington College’s Us Five.
8:36 Fourth anniversary of the earthquake of February 2011 16’55”
Last month Christchurch marked the fourth anniversary of the earthquake of February 2011. Part of the city’s revival has seen the establishment of a new cricket ground at Hagley Park but as a reminder of what’s been lost here’s an extract from a 1994 Spectrum documentary in which Jack Perkins met people who used the park regularly. In part two we hear a mother and child talk about ducks. A woman from The Stables - Hagley Park talks about riding horses in the park with Japanese rider "Sana". Mary-Rose Leversedge, owner of The Stables - Hagley Park talks about her business. Unidentified men at the Christchurch Model Yacht Club on Victoria Lake. Puntsman "Gavin" on the Avon talks about his job and plays "Old Man River" on his gramophone.
8:53 War Report 26
The story of a German-born bowler ejected from a Wellington bowling club of which he had along a long-term and respected member. By early March 1915 what was called the Native Contingent, later the Pioneer Maori Battalion, was on its way to Egypt where it arrived on 26th March. But not all Maori soldiers joined that unit – some joined other units fearing the pioneers might miss out on the fighting and there’s at least one who joined the British Army as veteran Remi Morrison recalled – he was Sonny Breeze (Brees) who was after the war well-known as a carver.
When the Maori Contingent arrived in Egypt it undertook garrison duties as had been expected – as the Gallipoli landings approached there were hopes Maori would be part of the force there but by late April garrison duties in Malta became the lot of the Maori Continget. But before long Maori would be at Gallipoli – pakeha officers often spent time
with them – Captain Ray Curtis, a Canterbury machine gunner, talks about Maori at Gallipoli.
Music:
Song: Hold Your hand Out, Naughty Boy! 1913)
Artist: Kate Moore
Composer: C.W. Murphy & Worton David Rodgers
Album; Oh, It’s a Lovely War
Label CD41 486309
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
9:05 As I Remember 4’32”
The war Years for Us Back Home by Mrs C McGlone of Waipukurau, read by Rebecca Blundell.
9:10 A radio commercial of 40 years ago 0’27”
1975 bargains at Four Square - Greggs Instant coffee (4 ounces) for 77cents! With the breathless enthusiasm of announcers Jim Sullivan and George Speed.
9:11 Artist: The Song Spinners (solos: Arthur Weller and Malcolm Cunninghame) 2’16”
Song: The Way of the Trade
Composer:
Album: Songs of the Gumdiggers (1961)
Label: 45 Kiwi EA 58
9:14 Home brewing in the 80s 2’42”
In January 1989 a resurgence in the Kiwi tradition of home brewing had the commercial breweries worried about the effect of home-made beer on their sales figures. Brewers Association secretary Des Fitzgerald talked to Sean Plunket about the problems caused by the sale of home brewed beer.
9:17 Have a Shot final 1958 6’10”
First prize £100 ($5,000). We heard last week the winner Jack Davidson, but here is another finalist.

Artist: Feli Marino and the Four Snowballs from Samoa
Song: Banana Boat Song
Composer: Trad
Album: n/a NZBS (Radio NZ)
Label: Sound Archives
9:24 Bookshelf 4’24”
Looking for Braki by Ros Fogel of Wellington
The New Zealand Wars by James Belich (Auckland University Press) ISBN 9781869408275
Teak and Tide, the Ebbs and Eddies of the Edwin Fox by Nigel Costley (Nikau Press) ISBN 97809582989863
9:29 Artist: Jack Roberts (piano) with George Campbell (bass) and Don Branch (drums) 3’00”
Song: I Didn’t Know What Time it Was
Composer: Rodgers
Album: Roberts Plays Rodgers (1960)
Label; Columbia SEGM 6007
Jack Roberts played with bands in the 1940s and by the 1960s was resident pianist at the THC Waitangi Hotel.
9:33 A short feature on early film production in New Zealand 5’09”
The founder of the National Film Unit, Cyril James Morton, is interviewed. Henry Gore of Dunedin is interviewed about his experiences as an early filmmaker.
Dunedin's First Film Maker: Henry Gore, 1882-1967. Like many of New Zealand's early film makers, Henry Gore was a photographer by profession. Gore was involved in running Dunedin's earliest picture theatres. In 1910 he was employed as chief operator at the Plaza, also managing Saturday screenings at Hayward's Pictures in the Burns Hall. During this time Gore began filming local events which were shown within days of being filmed. Travelling to Hollywood in 1916, Gore became one of the first New Zealanders to gain overseas film making experience. He visited movie sets, became friends with Charlie Chaplin and worked in a factory assembling Simplex projectors.
Back in New Zealand he continued to make home movies and local interest and sporting films. He filmed many important local events such as the wreck of the SS Tyrone 1913, the Otago Battalion’s departure for the war in 1914, the 1919 Peace procession and the Prince of Wales visit in 1920. Henry Gore was active in the film industry until his death in July 1967. Most of his surviving films are held at the Film Archive.
9:39 Trouble at Mill 8’57”
In February 1980 the Kinleith pulp and paper mill was in the midst of industrial strife. Here’s coverage of the dispute at Kinleith Paper Mill and the intervention made by Prime Minister, Robert Muldoon.
9:49 Artist: Garner Wayne of Ashburton (1964) 2’28”
Song: I’m Gonna Tear Down the Mailbox
Composer: V Horton
Album: n/a
Label: Viking VE 139
Garner Wayne was 1920, he grew up in Canterbury. Each Sunday night in Christchurch there was a variety show, and among the regular acts in about 1935 was a duo from the West Coast called Billy and Buddy. Wayne recalled, “They’d come on stage wearing hats and chaps, singing country songs. I came away from there and said, that’s what I want to be.” Soon Wayne was on the cinema stage himself, singing ‘If I Had A Talking Picture Of You’ during an intermission, and he won two tickets to see the next attraction. In 1995 Wayne said “I’ve always tried to bring New Zealand culture into it. So many Kiwi singers try to imitate the Americans, which annoys me.” For many years he lived in Tinwald, Ashburton, working as a machinist at a knitwear firm. He died in 2007 aged 86.
9:52 The South is being Neglected
“The South is being Neglected” was the cry in 1988 and TVNZ reacted by producing two current affairs programmes for local consumption, one from Christchurch and one from Dunedin. Geoff Robinson asked the presenters, Jim Sullivan in Dunedin and Rodney Bryant in Christchurch, about the programmes.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Quinfluence, the Qwest Years: The influential Qwest years with Quincy running his own label (F, Radio Express)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274263

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 19:00:00

Date 08 Mar 2015