Radio New Zealand National. 2015-07-06. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

06 July 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris (RNZ); 1:05 Te Ahi Kaa (1 of 2, RNZ); 2:30 NZ Music Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Head in the Clouds - A Hartley Manners Story, by Matthew O'Sullivan (1 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 Science (RNZ); 5:10 War Report (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:18 Pacific News 6:22 Rural News 6:27 and 8:45 Te Manu Korihi News 6:44 and 7:41 NZ Newspapers 6:47 Business News 7:42 and 8:34 Sports News 6:46 and 7:34 Traffic

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Greeks vote against bailout terms, Dunedin mayor celebrate Highlanders win, Has the Christchurch rebuild peaked? Does your child have a sleep disorder? Manu Samoa, All Blacks to meet on Samoan turf, John Key on the Greek referendum, Oamaru residents fight for hospital, and Greece appears to reject bailout with resounding "no"
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 36'41"

06:06
Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

06:18
Samoans worldwide will back their team - Jones
BODY:
The All Blacks leave today for Samoa where they will this week play their first ever Test in the Pacific.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: All Blacks, Samoa
Duration: 2'30"

06:20
Pacific News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Pacific News for Monday 6 July 2015
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'38"

06:23
Morning Rural News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'02"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
A leader of the Te Kotahitanga o Nga Hapu Ngapuhi says Sonny Tau has no choice but to step down from all his responsibilities, now that charges have been laid against him; And a conservation organisation says it was almost inevitable that charges would be laid against Ngapuhi leader Sonny Tau, after he was caught taking kereru from the South Island; Any move to allow advertising for junk food on Māori Television has been roundly condemned by a leading academic; Financial help is being offered to Whanganui residents affected by the devastating floods that hit the region last month.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'19"

06:44
Celebrations continue for Highlanders fans
BODY:
There will be a few sore heads in Dunedin today as Highlanders fans recover from toasting their team's historic victory over the Hurricanes to clinch their first Super Rugby championship.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'07"

06:47
Counting in Greek referendum underway
BODY:
Official results in the Greek referendum put the "no vote" in the lead.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debit crisis
Duration: 31"

06:48
Inflation pressures could be building - economist
BODY:
One bank economist is warning that inflation pressures may be building even as the economy falters
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: inflation
Duration: 1'48"

06:50
China attempts to prop up stock market
BODY:
China is attempting to prop up its plunging stock markets, as fears spread the meltdown could threaten the world's second largest economy.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: China
Duration: 1'39"

06:51
Financial literacy programmes in spotlight
BODY:
A researcher says financial literacy programmes have often focused on the wrong areas, and have little impact.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'07"

06:53
Nelson Airport growth aims to double
BODY:
Nelson Airport's new boss is predicting it'll need to double in size over the next thirty years to accommodate expected growth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Nelson Airport
Duration: 2'09"

06:55
Jim Parker in Australia
BODY:
Australia's recently signed free trade agreements with China, Japan and Korea are coming in for high profile criticism.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 1'56"

06:58
Morning markets for 6 July 2015
BODY:
In the US, Wall Street was closed on Friday due to a public holiday.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'07"

07:07
Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'04"

07:10
Greeks vote against bailout terms
BODY:
In Greece, large crowds are gathering in Athens as the votes are still being counted in a crucial referendum that will shape the fate of Greece and Europe.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debit crisis
Duration: 6'11"

07:18
Dunedin mayor celebrate Highlanders win
BODY:
The celebrations continue for the newly-crowned Super Rugby champions the Highlanders and their fans today.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'45"

07:21
Has the Christchurch rebuild peaked?
BODY:
Demand for overseas workers in the Christchurch rebuild is showing no sign of slowing, despite comments from the Finance Minister suggesting the city's rebuild was peaking.
Topics: economy
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Canterbury rebuild
Duration: 3'15"

07:25
Does your child have a sleep disorder?
BODY:
It's thought up to five percent of children are suffering from breathing sleep disorders.
EXTENDED BODY:
Up to 5 percent of children are estimated to suffering from breathing sleep disorders preventing them getting a good night's rest.
Paediatric sleep disorders are thought to affect 15,000 children in Auckland alone, but there are no firm figures, and no national plan to tackle the problem.
Acting Health Correspondent Gareth Thomas reports.
Doctor Alex Bartle, who runs a network of Sleep Well clinics, said a lot was known about snoring in adults but not about sleep disorders in children.

Dr Liz Edwards of Starship Hospital.
Photo: SUPPLIED

"I think it's a bit of a shock to a lot of people to think that children can have this thing that has traditionally been (associated with) fat, middle-aged males. I mean that's absolutely true, they do have sleep apnoea, but it's much broader than that.
Obstructive sleep apnoea in adults can easily be identified by the noise of snoring but it is more difficult to spot in children.
Dr Liz Edwards, a respiratory paediatrician and sleep specialist at Auckland's Starship Hospital, said children showed different symptoms and unlike adults did not always clearly snore.
"There may be heavy breathing or noisy breathing that might not be recognised. You think of sleep apnoea in adults, you tend to think of sleepy, drowsy adults, whereas in children who sleep too little or poorly because of airway problems, they're more likely to be wired or inattentive than drowsy".
Dr Edwards says the problem can be hard to identify at home.
"Sometime we have referrals of families where this has gone unrecognised for some time, and it's not until they go away on holiday and they're sleeping in the same room as the child they've actually realised this is happening".
Risk factors for developing obstructive sleep apnoea include obesity and the structure of upper airways, says Angela Campbell, manager of University of Otago's WellSleep, a sleep investigation centre.

Angela Campbell of the University of Otago.
Photo: SUPPLIED

"One (risk factor) is what the upper airway looks like, said Ms Campbell.
"So, whether they've got a very small airway and maybe nose and mouth and maybe very large tonsils blocking the airway space at the back of their throat'.
"But we also know that obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with obesity".
Specialists say there is no hard data on paediatric sleep disorders but plenty of anecdotal evidence that suspected problems are rising.
But with limited sleep medicine services for children, is it something health leaders really want to know?
Angela Campbell believes they do. "Kids are our future and really focusing on their health and ensuring they get the best start is really key," she said.
"So yes we do want to know and we want to help these children. But it's also a matter of prioritising.
The paediatric society has been working recently to create some guidelines for health professionals".
Ms Campbell said it was important for all children to get a good night's sleep.
"It's certainly important children with sleep apnoea get enough sleep time, and to make sure they don't do anything before bedtime to prolong sleep onset".
Clinicians will be urging GPs to screen for sleep problems in children, because conditions are often not mentioned by parents.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: sleep disorders, sleep, parenting
Duration: 3'29"

07:28
Manu Samoa, All Blacks to meet on Samoan turf
BODY:
The All Blacks leave today for Samoa where they will this week play their first ever Test in the Pacific country.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: All Blacks, Samoa
Duration: 2'45"

07:36
John Key on the Greek referendum
BODY:
Greeks have been voting strongly against accepting a harsh bailout offer from Europe.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis
Duration: 6'46"

07:45
Oamaru residents fight for hospital
BODY:
More than two thousand people have taken to the streets of Oamaru to protest against the proposed cuts to their local hospital.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'56"

07:52
Principals says potential legal disputes taking away time
BODY:
Secondary school principals say they are dealing with an increasing number disputes involving parents, which is taking time away their job of running a school.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'54"

07:53
Help for principal's as parents look to lawyers
BODY:
Patrick Walsh the former President of the Secondary Principals' Association...
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'12"

07:57
NZ joins Australian and US troops in Exercise Talisman Sabre
BODY:
For the first time New Zealand is taking part in the largest warfighting exercise Australia conducts with the American military.
Topics: defence force
Regions:
Tags: Talisman Sabre
Duration: 3'11"

08:07
Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'02"

08:11
Greece appears to reject bailout with resounding "no"
BODY:
The people of Greece have spoken resoundingly against austerity and in favour of facing the future on their own terms.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis
Duration: 5'54"

08:17
ABs not enough to secure win for Hurricanes
BODY:
The Hurricanes might have had more All Blacks but that wasn't enough to stop the Highlanders beating out the Wellingtonians at their home ground to take out the Super Rugby title for the first time
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'35"

08:22
NZ economist keeping eye on Greek crisis
BODY:
Greece voting out the European Union's debt restructuring plan.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis
Duration: 3'09"

08:26
NZ First wants big banks to play nice
BODY:
With dairy farmers under pressure from Fonterra's low milk payout, there are fears many will be forced off the land under the burden of debt.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'16"

08:29
Valerie Adams 56 competition winning streak comes to an end.
BODY:
For the first time in almost five years Valerie Adams has lost a shot put competition.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Valerie Adams
Duration: 2'07"

08:31
Markets Update for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'02"

08:40
NASA's SOFIA investigates southern sky from New Zealand
BODY:
Far above New Zealand, a Boeing seven-four-seven manned by scientists, has been flying out over the Southern Ocean for the past several weeks, gathering data from star, planets and galaxies far, far away.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: NASA, SOFIA
Duration: 5'25"

08:46
Te Manu Korihi News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
A leader of the Te Kotahitanga o Nga Hapu Ngapuhi says Sonny Tau has no choice but to step down from all his responsibilities, now that charges have been laid against him; And a conservation organisation says it was almost inevitable that charges would be laid against Ngapuhi leader Sonny Tau, after he was caught taking kereru from the South Island; Any move to allow advertising for junk food on Māori Television has been roundly condemned by a leading academic; Financial help is being offered to Whanganui residents affected by the devastating floods that hit the region last month.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'16"

08:50
School principals call for help
BODY:
They say their work is so complicated and stressful they need experienced, independent mentors to advise them - especially if they are new to the job
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'08"

08:55
Quake barrier could help protect cities from shakes
BODY:
Scientists at the University of Brighton have come up with new technology which they say could help protect cities from damaging earthquakes.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: I Am Not Esther, by Fleur Beale, read by Hana Pomare The tale of a teenager's battle for identity after her mother sends her to live with relatives in a closed religious sect (1 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
NO vote to prevail in crucial Greek referendum
BODY:
Greece, is on course to vote NO to accepting the latest terms for an international bailout. The government has urged a "No" vote, but the "Yes" side has warned this could see Greece ejected from the eurozone. Thorsten Beck is Professor of Banking and Finance at Cass Business School in London who has worked in the research department of the World Bank and a consultant for the IMF. He says the next 48 hours will be crucial, and predicts Greece taking a big financial hit.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Greece, bailout, Greek debt crisis
Duration: 16'52"

09:27
How will electricity prices be affected by new technologies?
BODY:
The rules for how much lines companies can charge consumers for their use of local electricity grids are being reviewed, with the focus on how emerging technologies such as photovoltaic and battery systems might affect people's production and use of electricity. What does that mean for future investment in existing grid systems and whether they become increasingly stranded - and will consumers have to pay for that? The Commerce Commission's General Manager John Hamill and NZIER economist David de Boer.
Topics: economy, environment, politics, technology
Regions:
Tags: electricity prices
Duration: 23'45"

09:50
Africa correspondent Debora Patta
BODY:
Sudan's leader Omar al-Bashir - facing war crimes - and with a warrant issued for his arrest - has managed to attend a conference in South Africa, and then leave the country again. Our correspondent Debora Patta has the latest.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Africa
Duration: 9'17"

10:08
UK chemist light ups the stage and RNZ's studio!
BODY:
Dr Peter Wothers is bringing chemistry to life in a series of demonstration lectures and public talks across New Zealand. Audiences are getting the chance to learn about the chemistry of two items they use daily: lighting, including the glow from smart phones, and shampoo. He is being brought here by the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry as part of the International Year of Light celebrations, in partnership with the Royal Society of New Zealand, Massey University, Victoria University of Wellington, the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, and the UK's Royal Society of Chemistry.
EXTENDED BODY:

Dr Peter Wothers is bringing chemistry to life in a series of demonstration lectures and public talks across New Zealand. Audiences are getting the chance to learn about the chemistry of two items they use daily: lighting, including the glow from smart phones, and shampoo.
Dr Peter Wothers is being brought here by the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry as part of the International Year of Light celebrations, in partnership with the Royal Society of New Zealand, Massey University, Victoria University of Wellington, the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, and the UK's Royal Society of Chemistry.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: chemistry
Duration: 28'55"

10:40
Book Review: Starlight Peninsula by Charlotte Grimshaw
BODY:
Starlight Peninsula by Charlotte Grimshaw, Published by Vintage, RRP $38.00
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Starlight Peninsula
Duration: 5'50"

11:06
Politics with Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton
BODY:
Political commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton discuss clouds on the economic horizon and the government's social housing policy - can it work?
EXTENDED BODY:
Political commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton discuss clouds on the economic horizon and the government's social housing policy - can it work?
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'12"

11:32
Fungi Seekers! NZ's first celebration of all things truffle
BODY:
New Zealand's first ever truffle festival is to be held in Canterbury over 11-18th July giving local growers, top chefs, restaurants and wineries the chance to show case Canterbury's 'black gold'. Organiser and North Canterbury truffle grower Gareth Renowden.
EXTENDED BODY:

Top left: Gareth with a half kilo Burgundy truffle, the largest ever found in NZ, photo: POD Gardening 2013, top right: Large bianchetto white truffle - worth $500. Bottom: Rosie and Gareth harvesting truffle, photo credit: Nicky Claridge.
New Zealand's first ever truffle festival is to be held in Canterbury over 11-18th July giving local growers, top chefs, restaurants and wineries the chance to show case Canterbury's 'black gold'.
Kathryn Ryan talks to organiser and North Canterbury truffle grower Gareth Renowden.
Related Links

Tips on cooking with truffles
Rosie the truffle dog has her own Facebook page

Topics: food, farming
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: truffles
Duration: 16'30"

11:48
Off the Beaten Track with Kennedy Warne
BODY:
Outdoors man and adventurer Kennedy Warne discusses cycleways, the proposed Eden Project in Christchurch and community conservation.
EXTENDED BODY:

Outdoors man and adventurer Kennedy Warne discusses:
1. The latest round of investment in cycleways, along with the clip-on cycle/pedestrian path on the Auckland Harbour Bridge
2. The recently announced proposal for Eden Project
3. Matariki tree planting and the value of community conservation.

Topics: rural, environment, life and society
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Kennedy Warne, Cycleways, Eden Project, community conservation
Duration: 12'25"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 NO vote to prevail in crucial Greek referendum
Greece, is on course to vote NO to accepting the latest terms for an international bailout. The government has urged a "No" vote, but the "Yes" side has warned this could see Greece ejected from the eurozone.
Thorsten Beck is Professor of Banking and Finance at Cass Business School in London who has worked in the research department of the World Bank and a consultant for the IMF. He says the next 48 hours will be crucial, and predicts Greece taking a big financial hit.
09:20 How will electricity prices be affected by new technologies?
The rules for how much lines companies can charge consumers for their use of local electricity grids are being reviewed, with the focus on how emerging technologies such as photovoltaic and battery systems might affect people's production and use of electricity. What does that mean for future investment in existing grid systems and whether they become increasingly stranded - and will consumers have to pay for that? The Commerce Commission's General Manager John Hamill and NZIER economist David de Boer.
09:50 Africa correspondent Debora Patta
Debora Patta reports on Sudan's leader Omar al-Bashir facing war crimes and with a warrant issued for his arrest has managed to attend a conference in South Africa, and then leave the country again.
10:05 UK chemist light ups the stage and RNZ's studio!
Dr Peter Wothers is bringing chemistry to life in a series of demonstration lectures and public talks across New Zealand. Audiences are getting the chance to learn about the chemistry of two items they use daily: lighting, including the glow from smart phones, and shampoo. He is being brought here by the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry as part of the International Year of Light celebrations, in partnership with the Royal Society of New Zealand, Massey University, Victoria University of Wellington, the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, and the UK's Royal Society of Chemistry.

10:35 Book review: 'Starlight Peninsula' by Charlotte Grimshaw
Published by Vintage, RRP $38.00. Reviewed by Sonja de Friez.
10:45 The Reading: 'I Am Not Esther' by Fleur Beale, read by Hana Pomare
The tale of a teenager's battle for identity after her mother sends her to live with relatives in a closed religious sect (1 of 10, RNZ).
11:05 Politics with Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton
Political commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton discuss clouds on the economic horizon and the government's social housing policy - can it work?
11:20 Fungi Seekers! NZ's first celebration of all things truffle
New Zealand's first ever truffle festival is to be held in Canterbury over 11-18th July giving local growers, top chefs, restaurants and wineries the chance to show case Canterbury's 'black gold'. Tips on cooking with truffles.

Top left: Gareth with a half kilo Burgundy truffle, the largest ever found in NZ, photo: POD Gardening 2013, top right: Large bianchetto white truffle - worth $500. Bottom: Rosie and Gareth harvesting truffle, photo credit: Nicky Claridge. Rosie has her own Facebook page.
11:45 Off the beaten track with Kennedy Warne
1. The latest round of investment in cycleways, along with the clip-on cycle/pedestrian path on the Auckland Harbour Bridge
2. The recently announced proposal for Eden Project
3. Matariki tree planting and the valueof community conservation

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Hanover investors to receive 18-million dollars in an out-of-court settlement and the government gives E-Q-C a shakeup, in its latest review.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'29"

12:17
FMA says $18m settlement is best outcome for investors
BODY:
The Financial Markets Authority says the 18-million dollar out of court settlement for Hanover Finance investors is the best outcome for investors
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Financial Markets Authority, FMA
Duration: 1'35"

12:21
New Zealand dollar cautious
BODY:
The New Zealand dollar fell about a percent against the euro, but has since recovered slightly.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand dollar, NZ dollar
Duration: 1'48"

12:23
Upgrade for Air NZ creditworthiness
BODY:
Moody's has upgraded Air New Zealand's creditworthiness by one notch to Baa2, and says the outlook for the national carrier's rating is stable.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Air New Zealand
Duration: 26"

12:23
Commission trying to improve financial programmes
BODY:
The Retirement Commissioner, Diane Maxwell, says the Commission for Financial Capability is trying to improve the quality of programmes in New Zealand.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Retirement Commissioner
Duration: 57"

12:24
Midday Markets for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at First NZ Capital
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'17"

12:26
Midday Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Rotorua golfer Danny Lee has won his maiden PGA Tour title with a playoff victory at the Greenbrier Classic in West Virginia.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'45"

12:35
Midday Rural News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'11"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

=AUDIO=

13:07
Your song - Maybe Tomorrow
BODY:
'Maybe Tomorrow' by Goldenhorse. Chosen by Katherine Jacobs.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'49"

13:22
New Zealand Retro: Western Springs
BODY:
For decades New Zealanders have flocked to Western Springs in their tens of thousands to hear the biggest names in rock. And it's a multi functional stadium. It's also been home to athletics, rugby, and the occasional visiting evangelical preacher.
Topics: history
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Western Springs
Duration: 38'06"

14:08
Cook Strait whale survey
BODY:
It's the first time a white humpback whale has been seen in New Zealand, and it's only one of only four ever recorded in the wild
Topics: science
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: whale survey
Duration: 5'24"

14:13
Waiheke Island's 'push' to cut ties with Auckland
BODY:
Councils around the country have, of late, been considering whether they should follow Auckland's lead and go 'Super'. Wellington and Northland said no, people in Hawke's Bay will vote later this year. But in Auckland itself, some say it's time to cut ties with the Super City, and govern themselves. The push for change comes from an elected member of the Waiheke Local Board, John Meeuwsen.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: rates, Waiheke Island
Duration: 8'05"

14:22
How do we sell New Zealand? - Karl Chitham
BODY:
How do we sell New Zealand to the world? An exhibition called Selling the Dream is on now at the Rotorua Museum exploring how, in the past, we've promoted tourism. It includes more than 50 lithographs and silk-screen prints portraying an idealised New Zealand. The tourism posters were produced by some of the country's leading artists between the 1920s and 1960s.The curator at the Rotorua Museum is Karl Chitham.
Topics: history, business
Regions:
Tags: tourism, Selling the Dream
Duration: 10'44"

14:47
Feature album - Postcards From Paradise
BODY:
Our feature album to day is the most recent release by Richard Starkey MBE who will be celebrating his 75th Birthday tomorrow - known professionally as Ringo Starr, the English drummer, singer, songwriter, and actor who gained worldwide fame of course as the drummer for the Beatles. Since the break up of the Beatles in 1970 he's released 19 albums and it's the latest of those from March this year - 'Postcards From Paradise.'
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'41"

15:10
Earl Charles Spencer
BODY:
As British Monarchs go, the reign of Charles I is not cloaked in glory. Found guilty of high treason and executed, his reign brought about the bloodiest conflict in British history. Much has been written about Charles I, but not the men who signed his death warrant. The ninth Earl Charles Spencer, historian, brother of Diana, Princess of Wales, and distant relative of Charles I reveals the stories of the men, motivated by revenge and religious fervor, who sent the King to his death. His book is called Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I.
EXTENDED BODY:
It was a dark time in English history. In 1642, parliamentarians led by Oliver Cromwell, tired of the absolute power of King Charles I, fought a bloody civil war with Royalists who stood by the Monarchy.
Charles I would be found guilty of high treason and executed. His son Charles II would reclaim the throne and seek vengeance against the men who ordered the execution of his father.
Much has been written about this period in English history. Lord Charles Spencer, the 9th Earl Spencer and brother of Princess Diana, is an historian who had written books about this period before.
He tells Afternoons with Simon Mercep he stumbled on the idea for this latest book, Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I, accidentally.
“I was on this obscure website called Executed Today about four years ago. It told me a bit part player from one of the earlier books I’d written on this period had been put to death exactly 350 years before I stumbled across this website for being a killer of the king.”
Spencer says he knew the story of Cromwell, but not the others when he started looking into it. “ I found endless stories, gripping personal stories set against this vengeance tale” Spencer says. “I don’t want to sound corny but I saw it as a 17th century Game of Thrones in a way.”
The book describes the global manhunt by Charles II to find the men responsible for his father’s death.
“Of course the penalty was going to be hanging, drawing and quartering which is basically being mutilated until you are fortunate enough to die. They ran for their lives and they scattered around the world.” Spencer explains.
Lord Spencer can trace his own family roots to both sides of the conflict, descending from both Charles II through his mistresses and Sir Hardress Waller who signed the death warrant. “He was so boring I couldn’t really get him into the book” Spencer says.
As an historian, Spencer says he knew the trial of Charles I was unfair and unconstitutional. But he says he changed his perspective on the men who signed the death warrant while writing the book.
“At the end of the day I totally understood why these men felt they had to put him to death. They did it for totally patriotic reasons. You think you know a subject and you delve into it and find so much more”.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'27"

15:30
Jack Yan - Wellington's next mayor?
BODY:
It seems that Wellington entrepreneur Jack Yan will never give up his dream to be our capital city's next mayor. Lynda Chanwai-Earle meets the man to find out what's driving this dream and what he's been up to in the meantime with his successful international fashion magazine Lucire.
EXTENDED BODY:

Jack Yan at his desk, the hub for Lucire Fashion Magazine. Photo RNZ
One of my ancestors got in trouble with the Emperor. We were always stirrers. I come from a family of political stirrers – centuries, going back a thousand years in China!

Jack Yan's ancestors moved from Hebei in the north of China to Táishan during the 13th century to get away from the Emperor's wrath.
So your family tree dates way back?
“We were the 201st family to be assigned a surname in China.”
Was it Yan back then?
“Yes and no – up North it was Gin. A lot of us were executed – a lot of bloodshed back in those days. So we moved to Southern China. We think of ourselves as Táishānese, which is great for politics. If you think of Chinese Mayors and politicians [across the globe] – they’re all from the same area of China, Southern China.”
It seems politics runs in the blood for Jack Yan. His illustrious family history is filled with political intrigue that spans China’s dynasties. Born in Hong Kong in 1972 Jack Yan is a Wellington entrepreneur who it seems, will never give up his dream to be Wellington’s next mayor. This perennial candidate is a man driven to make better the future of our capital city.
So what is drives this dream as well as the international success of his fashion magazine Lucire?
Jack’s sitting at his home based office in Lyall Bay next to his Lucire assistant Fenella Clarke. Fenella is doing her second year at Massey University in Arts, majoring in fashion, so this opportunity to gain work experience with one of New Zealand’s leading and longest standing fashion publishers is perfect.
Jack continues to fill me in on his fascinating family history, which largely explains their family tradition of political activism, provoking the wrath of emperors.
Jack’s family had been well-off landowners in Táishān and formerly Kuomintang supporters. After the 1940’s and with the communist takeover in China, Jack’s family became refugees – fleeing to Hong Kong.
During the Second World War Jack’s grandfather was a colonel with the Chinese Constitutional Army. On the day of the Japanese surrender – Jack’s grandfather, a pacifist, showed the family’s humanitarian side by helping former Japanese soldiers to return to their families. “War’s over, they’re just people – so he created jobs for them so they could get home.”
“In 1949 our family moved to Hong Kong – a cultural backwater in those days but soon the population exploded to a million."
Hong Kong is where Jack's parents met, married and then had Jack in 1972. Jack’s mother had gone back to Communist China to help family during the 1950’s and spent some years surviving the famine. She was ever fearful that her son might have to live through these hardships so in 1976 – Jack’s parents and their family moved to New Zealand.
Jack began school at the age of five at Saint Mark’s College in Wellington – where culture shock came in the form of exposure to a lot of New Zealand’s only television channel; Selwyn Toogood’s It’s in the bag and Play School.
Multilingual and fluent in Cantonese, Taishanese, English and French, with some Swedish, Jack eventually made Dux of St Mark's, before a scholarship to Scots College as a secondary student and early forays into publishing with school journals. Then it was a double degree in law and commerce at Victoria University before gaining an MCA, a Masters in Marketing.
Jack’s international online fashion magazine Lucire was born in 1997 during the dramatic rise of the internet – and went into print in 2004. From humble beginnings Lucire now has over a dozen photographers and a cosmopolitan team of contributors across the globe.

Left: Interviewed by TV3 on the 2010 campaign trail. Photo courtesy Jack Yan. Right: With Lucire fashion editor Sopheak Seng. Photo by Louise Hatton.
“In 1997 I decided this was the way to go – I fell in love with the world-wide web. We were the first commercial on-line fashion magazine in New Zealand. At the time there were people going; “What is the internet?”"
"It was a tricky time but at the same time it was incredibly profitable. The predominant readership – 70% came from the U.S. There were even Kiwis who thought we were an American publication.”
Why the title Lucire?
“The name was thought up by my friend, designer Sylvie Poupard-Gould. She was learning Italian at the time – and Lucire sounded nice. It looked a bit like the word for light Lumiere – so it stayed.”
Lucire is 18 years old as a fashion publication – that’s an achievement, isn’t it?
“We had beaten Vogue – there was no such thing as on-line fashion magazines at that time – we have survived 18 years. It could have gone belly up in 2001 – after 9/11 all the US clients cancelled ad bookings and a lot of online publications went to the wall.”
“I was lucky I had another business – typeface design – I was designing fonts. I could have become a very famous calligrapher in Wellington or a famous typeface designer internationally. I chose the latter. My success with global font design got me involved with the international brand company The Medinge Group, a not-for-profit branding think-tank which aims to influence businesses to become more human and humane and of which I am a member.”
We decide the best place to talk politics and mayoral runs would be strolling through a typically windy Wellington day in Civic Square. We find ourselves standing strategically right beneath the Mayor’s office. Jack explains his visions to make our Capital a better place.
Image: The most recent Lucire cover. Photo by Dave Richards, styled by Sopheak Seng. Photo courtesy Jack Yan
When were you first inspired?
“During the mid-2000’s. I thought it would be good for the city to have an internationalist to make Wellington a lot more technology based because I believed in frictionless exports – that were friendly to the environment – to see this in the future. It seemed like a no-brainer – the next Mayor needed to come from these industries.
Global enterprise that is “frictionless” – why not? It’s sensible way to be.

"We have the greatest number per capita of intellectual capital base - million dollar green businesses and industries. We have a great creative base here – film, design, high tech software – a lot of young people that want to be in these industries too. We’ve got talent coming through computing and engineering at Victoria University – yet none of these graduates are getting connected up to the jobs downtown – let’s do a media lab to get internships for young graduates – Mayor Peter Chin did this, if Dunedin can do it – why can’t Wellington?”
“Another strength - we are a very internationally minded city – very global. Wellingtonians identify with being Wellingtonians – we are a unique bunch identifying with our ‘city’, we should be promoting that – we are equal to cities like San Fransisco, Stockholm, Paris.”
“Frictionless – that part is important to me because of the work I do at Medinge (Sweden) as well, in line with Sir Paul Callaghan’s visions. For example in 2010 – let’s look at the light use in the city. Why aren’t we using LEDs? One of my campaign ideas was to get more solar panels up around Wellington; I approached Vattenfall - Electricity Companies in Sweden to get an electric car network started in Wellington and Vattenfall were really keen, they really wanted to promote this in Wellington.
Where the polls were concerned – both Jack and the current Mayor Celia Wade-Brown led the youth vote with policies popular with the younger generation.
"I’ve always been 5 to 10 years ahead – my visions have taken place. In my 2010 campaign I had a desire for transparency – I was living the "sustainable, eco conscious brand". Our youth could see that in my policies, they were saying; "We support Jack because he’s about the future.""
Topics: politics, education, language, identity, life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Medinge Group, Brands with a conscience, fashion, Typeface design, author interview, Chinese New Zealanders, Hong Kong, cultural practice, migrants.
Duration: 10'16"

15:46
The Panel pre-show for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'06"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
Maybe Tomorrow - Goldenhorse. Chosen by Katherine Jacobs.
1:20 New Zealand Retro: Western Springs
For decades New Zealanders have flocked to Western Springs in their tens of thousands to hear the biggest names in rock. And it's a multi functional stadium. It's also been home to athletics, rugby, and the occasional visiting evangelical preacher.
Guests: Aaron Dreaver and Roy Colbert.
Archival audio supplied by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.
2:06 Albino Humpback - Nadine Bott
A rare white humpback whale spotted in Cook Strait yesterday is thought to be Migaloo, usually seen off the Australian coast.
2:12 Waiheke Island's 'push' to cut ties with Auckland - John Meeuwsen
Councils around the country have, of late, been considering whether they should follow Auckland's lead and go 'Super'. Wellington and Northland said no, people in Hawke's Bay will vote later this year. But in Auckland itself, some say it's time to cut ties with the Super City, and govern themselves. The push for change comes from an elected member of the Waiheke Local Board, John Meeuwsen.
2:20 How do we sell New Zealand? - Karl Chitham
How do we sell New Zealand to the world? An exhibition called Selling the Dream is on now at the Rotorua Museum exploring how, in the past, we've promoted tourism. It includes more than 50 lithographs and silk-screen prints portraying an idealised New Zealand. The tourism posters were produced by some of the country's leading artists between the 1920s and 1960s.The curator at the Rotorua Museum is Karl Chitham.
2:30 NZ Reading - Shooting The Moon
Nick's dad grounds him for being punched at the school ball by Beattie, his date and climbing companion. And the chemistry lab experiment he's working on blows up. But Rob his climbing instructor tells him about the National Trials coming up, and he and his brother Nick share a moment of laughter in the car.
2:45 Feature album
Postcards From Paradise - Ringo Starr
3:10 Feature interview - Earl Charles Spencer
As British Monarchs go, the reign of Charles I is not cloaked in glory. Found guilty of high treason and executed, his reign brought about the bloodiest conflict in British history. Much has been written about Charles I, but not the men who signed his death warrant. The ninth Earl Charles Spencer, historian, brother of Diana, Princess of Wales, and distant relative of Charles I reveals the stories of the men, motivated by revenge and religious fervor, who sent the King to his death. His book is called Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I
3:30 Voices - Lynda Chanwai-Earle
It seems that Wellington entrepreneur Jack Yan will never give up his dream to be our capital city's next mayor. Lynda Chanwai-Earle meets the man to find out what's driving this dream and what he's been up to in the meantime with his successful international fashion magazine Lucire.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Jim Mora, Julie Moffett, Michelle Boag and Brian Edwards.

MUSIC DETAILS:

Monday 6 July 2015

YOUR SONG:

ARTIST: Goldenhorse
TITLE: Maybe Tomorrow
COMP: Maddock / Morelle / Goldenhorse
ALBUM: Maybe Tomorrow
LABEL: SIREN 551718

RETRO:

ARTIST: Pink Floyd
TITLE: Breathe
COMP: Gilmour / Mason / Waters / White
ALBUM: Dark Side of the Moon
LABEL: EMI 829752

ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Immigrant Song
COMP: Page / Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin III
LABEL: ATLANTIC 782678

ARTIST: David Bowie
TITLE: Let's Dance
COMP: Bowie
ALBUM: Let's Dance
LABEL: EMI 521896

FEATURE ALBUM:

ARTIST: Ringo Starr
TITLE: Island in the Sun
COMP: Gregg Bissonette / Warren Ham / Steve Lukather / Richard Page / Gregg Rolie / Todd Rundgren / Richard Starkey
ALBUM: Postcards From Paradise
LABEL: UNIVERSAL 472364

ARTIST: Ringo Starr
TITLE: 'Postcards From Paradise'
COMP: Todd Rundgren / Richard Starkey
ALBUM: Postcards From Paradise
LABEL: UNIVERSAL 472364

ARTIST: Ringo Starr
TITLE: You Bring The Party Down'.
COMP: Steve Lukather / Richard Starkey
ALBUM: Postcards From Paradise
LABEL: UNIVERSAL 472364

THE PANEL:

ARTIST: Elton John
TITLE: Candle In The Wind
COMP: Taupin / John
ALBUM: Something About The Way You Look Tonight / Candle In The Wind
LABEL: Mercury 568 109-2

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:46
The Panel pre-show for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'06"

16:02
The Panel with Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Michelle Boag and Brian Edwards have been up to. Paul McCartney says he didn't like John Lennon being turned into a martyr after he was murdered. He also says he would've like some song credits to read McCartney-Lennon. Greeks have voted against austerity measures. What now for the financial and social crisis in the world's first democracy? We ask Dr Claire Matthews of Massey University. New Zealanders need to improve how they handle their personal finances. But a visiting expert says it's hard to tell if education makes any difference. New Zealanders have been refunded $50million in tax. Why has the IRD made it a mission to return your money?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'56"

16:04
The Panel with Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag (Part 2)
BODY:
Lionel Richie scores his first #1 album in 23 years on the British chart. What the Panelists Michelle Boag and Brian Edwardshave been thinking about. Professor Paul Spoonley of Massey University talks to the Panel about how the immigrants points system could help keep services in the provinces. Banks are now encouraging first home buyers into apartments in Auckland. Two Christchurch City councillors shared an opinion piece about Gerry Brownlee. One says "like" doesn't necessarily mean agreeing. Former Prime Minister Helen Clark is now the World Class New Zealand Supreme Award winner.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'56"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Michelle Boag and Brian Edwards have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'50"

16:10
Lennon McCartney. McCartney Lennon
BODY:
Paul McCartney says he didn't like John Lennon being turned into a martyr after he was murdered. He also says he would've like some song credits to read McCartney-Lennon.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Beatles
Duration: 2'22"

16:13
Greeks say oxi
BODY:
Greeks have voted against austerity measures. What now for the financial and social crisis in the world's first democracy? We ask Dr Claire Matthews of Massey University.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis
Duration: 7'20"

16:20
Financially lacking
BODY:
New Zealanders need to improve how they handle their personal finances. But a visiting expert says it's hard to tell if education makes any difference.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: money
Duration: 4'15"

16:24
IRD woo-hoos increase
BODY:
New Zealanders have been refunded $50million in tax. Why has the IRD made it a mission to return your money?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: IRD
Duration: 5'33"

16:33
Number 1s
BODY:
Lionel Richie scores his first #1 album in 23 years on the British chart.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'06"

16:35
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Michelle Boag and Brian Edwards have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'56"

16:40
Encourage immigrants to the regions
BODY:
Professor Paul Spoonley of Massey University talks to the Panel about how the immigrants points system could help keep services in the provinces.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 9'35"

16:49
Apartments for first home buyers
BODY:
Banks are now encouraging first home buyers into apartments in Auckland.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: apartments
Duration: 3'54"

16:53
What does a Facebook "like" really mean?
BODY:
Two Christchurch City councillors shared an opinion piece about Gerry Brownlee. One says "like" doesn't necessarily mean agreeing.
Topics: internet
Regions:
Tags: Facebook
Duration: 1'32"

16:55
Helen Clark receives prestigious award
BODY:
Former Prime Minister Helen Clark is now the World Class New Zealand Supreme Award winner.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Helen Clark
Duration: 4'08"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
Just 18 million dollars in the final payout for angry Hanover investors. A life changing win for Danny Lee in the US and Highlanders on a high in Dunedin.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'39"

17:07
Hanover investors to get $18m in settlement
BODY:
The Financial Markets Authority has walked away from a four million dollar investigation into the collapsed Hanover finance group saying an 18 million dollar settlement is better than going to court.
Topics: business, crime
Regions:
Tags: Hanover finance
Duration: 5'51"

17:14
Greece overwhelmingly vote no in referendum
BODY:
European leaders have been stunned by Greece's overwhelming rejection of a rescue package from creditors overnight.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis, Greece
Duration: 4'03"

17:18
10000 Highlanders fans celebrate Super Rugby win
BODY:
Chants, songs, applause and cheering in Dunedin as more than 10-thousand Highlanders fans lined the streets today to celebrate their team's first Super Rugby title.
Topics: sport
Regions: Otago
Tags: Highlanders
Duration: 2'05"

17:20
EQC changes welcomed in Christchurch
BODY:
People in Christchurch who argue they've had a rough deal from the insurer are backing plans to double the maximum amount EQC pays out on a home destroyed in a disaster.
Topics: housing, Canterbury earthquakes
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: eqc, insurance
Duration: 2'42"

17:24
Danny Lee wins NZ's first PGA title in decade
BODY:
Danny Lee, has become the first New Zealander to win a PGA Tour title in a decade, winning the Greenbrier Classic in West Virginia this morning.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Danny Lee, golf
Duration: 3'48"

17:27
Court sees video of girl saying teacher pulled her onto his lap
BODY:
Video evidence has been played in court of a girl telling authorities her primary school teacher pulled her onto his lap and touched her chest and thighs in front of the class.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: sexual assault trial
Duration: 2'50"

17:34
Today's market update
BODY:
Moody's has upgraded Air New Zealand's creditworthiness by one notch to Baa2, and says the outlook for the national carrier's rating is stable.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'35"

17:36
Leader who quit over kereru backs hui on Tau
BODY:
A hapu leader who quit from his Treaty talks role over the kereru case says Sonny Tau's fronted up to Ngapuhi and a hui was right to back him.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions: Northland
Tags: kereru, Sonny Tau, Ngapuhi
Duration: 5'23"

17:41
NZ weightlifter pulls out of games over "cannibal" label
BODY:
A champion New Zealand weightlifter has voluntarily pulled out of the Pacific Games in Papua New Guinea after making a reference to PNG and cannibals on social media.
Topics: sport, Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Pacific Games
Duration: 2'39"

17:44
Rare albino humpback spotted in Cooks Strait
BODY:
Australia's most famous humpback whale - Migaloo - a rare albino, appears to have moved into New Zealand waters.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Migaloo, humpback whale, whales
Duration: 3'37"

17:48
Liquid food before surgery is better than fasting
BODY:
Patients forced to fast for up to 18-hours before an operation may no longer have to endure the headaches, cramping and nausea that comes with not eating.
Topics: health, food
Regions:
Tags: surgery
Duration: 3'57"

17:52
Te Manu Korihi News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
A prominent Ngapuhi kuia says she understands the kereru Sonny Tau was caught with in Murihiku, were a gift; Whanganui is bracing itself for another round of heavy rain, just weeks after the region experienced its biggest flood in recorded history. The MetService has issued a severe weather watch for the region and expects downpours to hit the area tonight and tomorrow morning; Waikato-Tainui says an education plan for its people for the next 30-years has a strong focus on the marae.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'12"

17:55
Australians on Airbnb threatened with million dollar fines
BODY:
Australians are being threatened with a fine of 1.1 million dollars if they advertise their homes on the popular renting site - Airbnb.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Airbnb
Duration: 4'34"

18:07
Sports News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'27"

18:13
Hanover investor labels the settlement 'chequebook justice'.
BODY:
Hanover Finance's directors have avoided court with an 18 million dollar final settlement today derided by some investors.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Hanover finance
Duration: 5'15"

18:18
Analyst says Europe should dump Greece from Eurozone
BODY:
Greece's Finance Minister, Yanis Varoufakis, has resigned, one day after the country overwhelmingly rejected a bailout offer from creditors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greek debt crisis, Greece
Duration: 6'31"

18:25
Government says lower premiums could be expected
BODY:
The Government says insurance premiums could come down under changes proposed to the Earthquake Commission Act.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: eqc, insurance
Duration: 3'25"

18:28
Big names face off at Wimbledon tonight
BODY:
All the big names still in contention at Wimbledon are in action at the All England Club tonight, for places in the quarter-finals.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon, tennis
Duration: 4'51"

18:41
Danny Lee wins first PGA title
BODY:
Danny Lee has become the first New Zealander to win a PGA Tour title in a decade, winning the Greenbrier Classic in West Virginia this morning.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Danny Lee, golf
Duration: 2'23"

18:43
More that $21million sent home by Pacific Island athletes
BODY:
More than 21-million dollars is sent back to the Pacific Islands each year by sports' stars who've moved away from home.
Topics: sport, Pacific
Regions:
Tags: money, Pasifika
Duration: 3'58"

18:50
US trounces Japan with fastest World Cup hat trick
BODY:
The US has thrashed Japan to win the Women's World Cup final in Vancouver.... courtesy of the fastest hat trick in men's or women's cup history. It took just 16 minutes.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: USA, Japan, Women's World Cup final, football
Duration: 3'13"

18:55
Te Manu Korihi News for Monday 6 July 2015
BODY:
A prominent Ngapuhi kuia says she understands the kereru Sonny Tau was caught with in Murihiku, were a gift; Whanganui is bracing itself for another round of heavy rain, just weeks after the region experienced its biggest flood in recorded history. The MetService has issued a severe weather watch for the region and expects downpours to hit the area tonight and tomorrow morning; Waikato-Tainui says an education plan for its people for the next 30-years has a strong focus on the marae.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:30 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:10
Uganda
BODY:
Uganda's Daily Monitor journalist Tabu Butagira reports on the Republic of Uganda, pop. 35,873,253 (est. 2012)... Ivory smuggling and the threats to rhinos; plus finally, sacked former secretary general of the ruling party Amama Mbabazi has declared his intention run against incumbent and long time ally, President Yoweri Museveni who has been in power for about 30 years.
Topics: life and society, politics, economy, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Uganda, ivory smuggling, rhinos, Uganda elections, Amama Mbabazi, Yoweri Museveni
Duration: 18'38"

20:45
Toxicology
BODY:
What's your poison? toxicologist Dr. Leo Schep tests for substances taken internally or applied externally that are injurious to health or dangerous to life. We talk about carbon monoxide.
Topics: science, health
Regions:
Tags: NZ National Poisons Centre, toxicology, toxins, poisons, carbon monoxide
Duration: 14'38"

20:59
Conundrum - clue number 1
BODY:
Conundrum - clue number 1.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16"

21:10
Cataloguing the Serengeti
BODY:
The Snapshot Serengeti survey with University of Oxford's Zooniverse ecologist Ali Swanson, and how 'citizen scientists' played their part in classifying this diverse and dynamic ecosystem.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Serengeti, photography, animals, migration
Duration: 19'57"

21:59
Conundrum - clue number 2
BODY:
Conundrum - clue number 2.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:10 Uganda
Uganda's Daily Monitor journalist Tabu Butagira reports on the Republic of Uganda, pop. 35,873,253 (est. 2012). Ivory smuggling and the threats to rhinos; plus finally, sacked former secretary general of the ruling party Amama Mbabazi has declared his intention run against incumbent and long-time ally, President Yoweri Museveni who has been in power for about 30 years.
8:10 Windows on the World
International public radio documentaries - visit the Windows on the World web page to find links to these documentaries.
8:40 Toxicology
What's your poison? Toxicologist Dr Leo Schep tests for substances taken internally or applied externally that are injurious to health or dangerous to life. We talk about carbon monoxide.
9:10 Cataloguing the Serengeti
The Snapshot Serengeti survey with University of Oxford's Zooniverse ecologist Ali Swanson, and how 'citizen scientists' played their part in classifying this diverse and dynamic ecosystem.
9:30 Insight
10:00 Late Edition
A review of the news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 Blues Unlimited
Exploring the wonderful world of the Blues and its history, heritage and rich cultural traditions (9 of 12, PRX)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring the wonderful world of the Blues and its history, heritage and rich cultural traditions (9 of 12, PRX)

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Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274383

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 06 Jul 2015

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