Radio New Zealand National. 2015-06-11. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

11 June 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Bread and Roses, by Sonja Davies (3 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 11 June 2015
BODY:
Welfare concerns as New Zealand's biggest ever live sheep shipment leaves for Mexico today. Wikileaks posts documents from the TPP talks .. opponents say they show America's taking aim at the drug-buying agency Pharmac and farmers question the law that gives dairy companies access to Fonterra's milk.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'36"

06:06
Sports News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'00"

06:10
Wikileaks docs show Pharmac is under threat from TPPA
BODY:
Critics of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement say the latest leaked document to come out of the negotiations shows Pharmac could lose its drug buying muscle.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, TPP, Pharmac
Duration: 2'37"

06:20
Pacific News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'58"

06:23
Morning Rural News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
A union representing mine and quarry workers says Māori are among those most at risk following delays to health and safety laws; The number of people living with diabetes has more than doubled over the last twenty years - and that rate is even higher for Māori and Pasifika; A Māori lawyer is paying tribute to legal defender, Sir Peter Williams QC, who died in Auckland, aged 80; Local hapu in Whangarei have had their say on a revamp of a lookout that's being built on the summit of Parihaka.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'26"

06:40
Animal welfare group doubts sheep being exported for breeding
BODY:
What's thought to be the biggest live shipment of sheep ever from New Zealand leaves Timaru today.
Topics: farming, business
Regions:
Tags: sheep, live shipment
Duration: 2'30"

06:48
Fonterra reviews structure of its business
BODY:
Fonterra says the structure of its business is the right one to compete in international diary markets.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 1'08"

06:49
Reserve Bank decision today on OCR
BODY:
The Reserve Bank will reveal its decisions on interest rate levels in just over two hours, and the Institute of Economic Research's Shadow Board says it's a line call whether the central bank will cut or not.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, OCR
Duration: 41"

06:50
Rebound in electronic card spending
BODY:
Consumer spending using electronic cards has risen.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: consumer spending
Duration: 1'11"

06:51
Orion Healtcare finds good news and bad news in US market
BODY:
It's good news and bad news for Orion Healthcare, as its share price fell almost 10 percent yesterday, after announcing a deal with a major prospective customer has been delayed for one year.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Orion Healthcare
Duration: 2'43"

06:54
Rangaitira's CEO sees great growth opportunities in NZ
BODY:
The new head of the investment firm, Rangatira, sees great opportunities for growth in New Zealand.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Rangatira
Duration: 2'19"

06:58
Morning Markets for 11 June 2015
BODY:
On Wall St, stocks have risen following a Bloomberg news agency report that Germany may be satisfied with Greece committing to at least one economic reform in return for aid.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'16"

07:07
Sports News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'46"

07:11
Farmers respond to animal rights groups concerns
BODY:
What's thought to be the biggest ever live shipment of sheep from New Zealand leaves the port of Timaru today bound for Mexico.
Topics: farming, business
Regions:
Tags: live shipment, sheep
Duration: 6'55"

07:18
TPP opponents say Pharmac will be rendered toothless
BODY:
Wikileaks has published secret documents from the TPP negotiations .. which opponents of the trade deal say show America's taking aim at the drug-buying agency Pharmac.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, TPP
Duration: 7'04"

07:26
Fonterra farmers say laws are subsidising foreign investors
BODY:
Fonterra farmers are hitting out at dairy reform laws which they say let foreign investors milk the system.
Topics: business, farming
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 3'51"

07:29
Line call on whether Reserve Bank will cut rates today
BODY:
A cut to interest rates could be on the cards this morning but some economists say it's a line call.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rates
Duration: 3'04"

07:37
Glitch in plans to build on surplus Crown land
BODY:
There's an embarrassing gaff in the Government's plan to build houses on surplus crown land in Auckland.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Crown land
Duration: 3'20"

07:40
450 more US troops to be sent to Iraq
BODY:
The United States is to send another 450 troops to Iraq.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA, Iraq
Duration: 3'51"

07:49
Government deadline looms for Southern DHB
BODY:
The Southern District Health board has until today to respond to a letter from the Health Minister indicating his intention to appoint a commissioner.
Topics: health
Regions: Southland
Tags: Southern District Health Board, Southern DHB
Duration: 2'56"

07:52
Design Chief quits Team NZ
BODY:
There's surprise from yachting commentators at the news Team New Zealand's design chief Nick Holroyd has resigned.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Team NZ, Team New Zealand, yachting
Duration: 3'22"

07:55
Elixinol founder explains cannabis treatment
BODY:
The founder of the company supplying cannabinoid oil to treat a Nelson teenager in an induced coma says the product might be able to dramatically improve his condition and at worst will have no effect.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Elixinol
Duration: 4'06"

08:07
Sports News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

08:11
Greens say government live sheep trade is inconsistent
BODY:
New Zealand's biggest ever consignment of live sheep is leaving the port of Timaru on a two week voyage to Mexico this morning.
Topics: farming, business
Regions:
Tags: live sheep export, live sheep exports
Duration: 4'35"

08:16
Indonesian Police say refugee crew paid by Australian officials
BODY:
An Indonesian police chief is backing claims from a Bangladeshi refugee, first heard on Morning Report, that an Australian customs officer paid the captain and crew of a people-smuggling boat to leave Australian waters.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, refugees, Indonesia, people smuggling
Duration: 4'39"

08:21
Cost of Dunedin floods still being counted
BODY:
Volunteers and Dunedin City Council staff went door-knocking yesterday to find out what help they can provide those still cleaning up after last week's floods.
Topics: weather
Regions: Otago
Tags: Dunedin floods
Duration: 3'13"

08:25
Progress to help Labour climb the polls.
BODY:
A new Think Tank is on the cards for Labour but not everybody in the party is convinced it is a good idea.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Think Tank, Labour
Duration: 4'52"

08:29
Small Auckland community bands together to fight development
BODY:
A small South Auckland community is vowing to protect what it claims to be the last significant chunk of land in New Zealand with ties to early Maori heritage from developers.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Fletchers Residential
Duration: 3'34"

08:38
More pipi deaths under investigation in north
BODY:
The Northland community of Ngunguru is calling for a moratorium or rahui on local pipi beds after a mass die-off last month.
Topics: environment
Regions: Northland
Tags: pipi, Ngunguru
Duration: 3'16"

08:42
Supporters of Christchurch town hall hopeful it will be saved
BODY:
People who want the Christchurch Town Hall restored are optimistic the City Council will today commit to saving the earthquake damaged building.
Topics: Canterbury earthquakes
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch town hall
Duration: 3'24"

08:46
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
A union representing mine and quarry workers says Māori are among those most at risk following delays to health and safety laws; A Māori lawyer is paying tribute to legal defender, Sir Peter Williams QC, who died in Auckland, aged 80; The number of people living with diabetes has more than doubled over the last twenty years - and that rate is even higher for Māori and Pasifika; Local hapu in Whangarei have had their say on a revamp of a lookout that's being built on the summit of Parihaka.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'14"

08:50
New effort to ease travel stress
BODY:
This is a common dilemma - just how big a bag can you stash into the cabin baggage
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: cabin baggage, airlines
Duration: 3'22"

08:56
Composer James Last dies
BODY:
Paddi Addison is a sound engineer from Carterton and for the past 23 years has been the chief sound man for James Last's European tours.
EXTENDED BODY:
German composer and big band leader James Last has died.

James Last, 1970. Photo CC BY 3.0 Nationaal Archief
A staple on Radio New Zealand's National Programme for decades, James Last’s music is reported to have sold over eighty million albums worldwide.
Versions of James Last’s song ‘Happy Heart’, performed by Andy Williams and Petula Clark in 1969, saw the song become an international success, and it was later included in the soundtrack to Danny Boyle’s 1994 film Shallow Grave.
Another of Last's compositions, ‘The Lonely Shepherd’, was performed by pan flute virtuoso Gheorghe Zamfir in 1977, and achieved cult status when it was included in Quentin Tarantino’s 2003 film Kill Bill: Vol. 1.
James Last’s super power was adding “cheese” to music of all kinds, by reinterpreting well known songs as lushly produced instrumental dance music, utilising his big band, strings and choir, giving it some swing. The resulting "happy music" was snubbed by music critics, but much loved by the mainstream public.
Last’s first live tour took place in 1968, and he gave approximately 2,500 concerts during his lifetime, the most recent in London in April.

James Last at the Royal Albert Hall, London, 1 April 2015. Photo: Kay McMahon.
Paddi Addison is a sound engineer from Carterton and for the past 23 years has been the chief sound engineer for James Last's European tours. He talks to Guyon Espiner about the man and his music.
London-based New Zealander Kay McMahon was at the final show, reporting “James Last & a 27 piece orchestra: he came out to hip hop & has done pop to TV themes so far”. The largely elderly audience was unfamiliar with some of his newer pop selections, including ‘Happy’ (Pharrell Williams) and ‘Roar’ (Katie Perry). McMahon said Last’s declining health was noticeable when, at one point during the performance “he couldn't stand up and was clutching the podium”.
James Last spoke publically of his regret at having to retire from performing. Music was his world, spanning six decades and over 200 albums. He did what he loved. James Last died, aged 86, surrounded by family in Florida on the 9th of June 2015.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: James Last
Duration: 2'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Undercover Mumbai, by Ayeesha Menon (4 of 9, Goldhawk)

=AUDIO=

09:08
The fight for medical Cannabis oil
BODY:
Eight-year-old Charlotte Figi of Colorado has severe epilepsy, but her seizures were virtually eliminated in 2013 after she was given a low THC form of cannabis oil. Her case has lead to a huge upsurge in the use of cannabis oil as a treatment for epilepsy in the US, as well as research into its effectiveness. Charlotte Figi's condition is similar to that of Nelson teenager Alex Renton, who is in an induced coma for status epilepticus, which causes repeat seizures. He is to be treated with cannabis oil after Wellington hospital was given special one off permission, as all other treatments have failed. Paige Figi is the mother of Charlotte Figi. Edward Maa is the chief of the Denver Health Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, who is researching the effectiveness of medical marijuana in treating epilepsy.
EXTENDED BODY:
A Colorado mother who fought for the use of Cannabis oil to treat her daughter’s severe epilepsy says the decision to allow a Nelson teen to be given the oil is a breakthrough.
Eight-year-old Charlotte Figi of Colorado has severe epilepsy, but her seizures were virtually eliminated in 2013 after she was given a low THC form of cannabis oil.
Her case has lead to a huge upsurge in the use of cannabis oil as a treatment for epilepsy in the US, as well as research into its effectiveness.
Charlotte Figi's condition is similar to that of Nelson teenager Alex Renton, who is in an induced coma for status epilepticus, which causes repeat seizures.
He is to be treated with cannabis oil after Wellington hospital was given special one off permission, as all other treatments have failed.
Alex's mother Rose Renton said it had been a battle to get this recognised treatment approved but finally the doctors have accepted use of cannabis oil might be her son's only hope.
When Charlotte was 5, her doctors told her parents there was nothing more they could do. Charlotte was having 300 grand mal seizures a day. She almost died several times.
Her epilepsy was so severe, she had to put into an induced coma. No treatment had worked.
Her mother Paige Figi, begged her daughter’s doctors to try low THC cannabis oil. At the time there was only anecdotal evidence of its effect on reducing seizures.
She finally found two doctors to sign off treatment with cannabidiol or CBD. The results were remarkable. Charlotte’s seizures immediately ceased.
She is now 8 years old and only has occasional seizures. She gets a dose of the cannabis oil twice a day in her food.
Paige Figi said she hopes Alex Renton’s case allows more people with epilepsy around the world to be treated with cannabis oil, as Charlotte's condition is similar to his.
Kathryn Ryan also spoke with with Dr Edward Maa, the chief of the Denver Health Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, who is researching the effectiveness of cannabis oil in treating epilepsy.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: cannabis, medical cannabis, epilepsy, Alex Renton
Duration: 21'22"

09:31
The Official Cash Rate decision
BODY:
Patrick O'Meara reports on the Reserve Bank decision to cut the 'Official Cash Rate'.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: economy, interest rate, Reserve Bank
Duration: 7'29"

09:37
Maori palliative care stories become nursing resource
BODY:
A new resource for Maori palliative care has been developed by a team at the University of Auckland's School of Nursing.
EXTENDED BODY:

The Kaumatua and the team who collaborated with the University of Auckland school of nursing Te Arai: Palliative and End of Life Care Researchers (Tess is in the back row, third from the left with the white top and pink and yellow scarf)
A new resource for Maori palliative care has been developed by a team at the University of Auckland's School of Nursing. Whanau who are caring for kaumatua at the end of their lives have been filmed, to create a digital story resource for nursing students. The research project involved eight family members telling three minute stories about the important issues that arose caring for a dying loved one. The recorded stories are part of a pilot study at the School of Nursing, and will be launched at the Te Arai: Palliative and End of Life Care Research Conference later this month (25 June).
Co-researcher Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell (Ngai Tai) says it's about making visible what is often invisible by using real whanau stories to talk about end of life caregiving... and to help nursing and potentially other medical staff have a greater understanding of Maori tikanga (customs) around dying. Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell is from school of nursing at the University of Auckland and is part of the Te Arai palliative and end of life care research group.
Topics: health, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell, palliative care, Kaumatua, end of life, nursing, dying, aged care, tikanga
Duration: 14'20"

09:52
UK correspondent Matthew Parris
BODY:
Charles Kennedy former leader of the Liberal Democrats. EU referendum bill.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK, EU
Duration: 5'02"

10:10
Patricia Grace - first novel in 10 years, 'Chappy'
BODY:
Patricia Grace has published six novels and seven short story collections, as well as a number of books for children, and non-fiction. She won the New Zealand Fiction Award for Potiki in 1987, and was longlisted for the Booker Prize in 2001 with Dogside Story. Patricia Grace was born in Wellington and lives in Plimmerton on ancestral land, in close proximity to her home marae at Hongoeka Bay. Her latest book Chappy, is her first novel in ten years. He tells the story of a young man piecing together the history of his Maori family.
EXTENDED BODY:

Patricia Grace has published six novels and seven short story collections, as well as a number of books for children, and non-fiction. She won the New Zealand Fiction Award for Potiki in 1987, and was longlisted for the Booker Prize in 2001 with Dogside Story. Patricia Grace was born in Wellington and lives in Plimmerton on ancestral land, in close proximity to her home marae at Hongoeka Bay.
Her latest book Chappy, is her first novel in ten years. He tells the story of a young man piecing together the history of his Maori family.
Topics: author interview, te ao Maori, books
Regions:
Tags: Patricia Grace, Chappy, Maori writers
Duration: 30'28"

10:41
Book review: 'Girl at War' by Sara Novic
BODY:
Published by Hachette, reviewed by Carole Beu.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'34"

11:06
New Technology commentator Erika Pearson
BODY:
Erika Pearson discusses as the Internet of Things grows, so do the data privacy issues. The security risks for Hospital Devices. Rescue robots.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: robots, privacy
Duration: 12'01"

11:23
How to talk to your kids about sex and what they should know
BODY:
Sex education is getting its first overhaul in over a decade with schools getting new guidelines on what to teach on the facts of life. The Ministry of Education is putting a new focus on issues like consent, coercion and sexual diversity. And there's also a recognition of the role pornography and social media are playing in how young people form their views about sex. So what should parents be talking to their children about when it comes to sex - and how do you start those conversations? Frances Bird is Family Planning's Director of Health Promotion.
EXTENDED BODY:

Sex education is getting its first overhaul in over a decade with schools getting new guidelines on what to teach on the facts of life.
The Ministry of Education is putting a new focus on issues like consent, coercion and sexual diversity. And there's also a recognition of the role pornography and social media are playing in how young people form their views about sex.
So what should parents be talking to their children about when it comes to sex - and how do you start those conversations? Family Planning's Director of Health Promotion Frances Bird talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Related
Topics: education, life and society
Regions:
Tags: sex education, consent, parenting
Duration: 24'23"

11:47
TV Review with Lara Strongman
BODY:
Lara reviews Indian Summers on TV One, a lavish epic new end-of-Empire drama, heat, dust, sweat, silk dresses and fornication. UnREAL on Lightbox; a satirical drama about reality dating shows.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: television, entertainment
Duration: 12'36"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 The fight for medical Cannabis oil

Eight-year-old Charlotte Figi of Colorado has severe epilepsy, but her seizures were virtually eliminated in 2013 after she was given a low THC form of cannabis oil. Her case has lead to a huge upsurge in the use of cannabis oil as a treatment for epilepsy in the US, as well as research into its effectiveness. Charlotte Figi's condition is similar to that of Nelson teenager Alex Renton, who is in an induced coma for status epilepticus, which causes repeat seizures. He is to be treated with cannabis oil after Wellington hospital was given special one off permission, as all other treatments have failed. Paige Figi is the mother of Charlotte Figi. Edward Maa is the chief of the Denver Health Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, who is researching the effectiveness of medical marijuana in treating epilepsy.
[image:41017:full]
09:20 The Official Cash Rate decision
The Reserve Bank today reduced the Official Cash Rate (OCR) by 25 basis points to 3.25 percent. Radio New Zealand's economics correspondent Patrick O'Meara is at the Reserve Bank where the Governor Graeme Wheeler has been taking questions.

09:37 Maori palliative care stories become nursing resource
A new resource for Maori palliative care has been developed by a team at the University of Auckland's School of Nursing. Whanau who are caring for kaumatua at the end of their lives have been filmed, to create a digital story resource for nursing students. The research project involved eight family members telling three minute stories about the important issues that arose caring for a dying loved one. The recorded stories are part of a pilot study at the School of Nursing, and will be launched at the Te Arai: Palliative and End of Life Care Research Conference later this month (25 June).
Co-researcher Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell (Ngai Tai) says it's about making visible what is often invisible by using real whanau stories to talk about end of life caregiving... and to help nursing and potentially other medical staff have a greater understanding of Maori tikanga (customs) around dying. Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell is from school of nursing at the University of Auckland and is part of the Te Arai palliative and end of life care research group.

The Kaumatua and the team who collaborated with the University of Auckland school of nursing Te Arai: Palliative and End of Life Care Researchers (Tess is in the back row, third from the left with the white top and pink and yellow scarf)
09:45 UK correspondent Matthew Parris
Matthew Parris reports on the sudden death of Charles Kennedy, the former and troubled leader of the Liberal Democrats; and the running champion Mo Farah's denial of doping claims.
10:05 Patricia Grace - first novel in 10 years, 'Chappy'
Patricia Grace has published six novels and seven short story collections, as well as a number of books for children, and non-fiction. She won the New Zealand Fiction Award for Potiki in 1987, and was longlisted for the Booker Prize in 2001 with Dogside Story. Patricia Grace was born in Wellington and lives in Plimmerton on ancestral land, in close proximity to her home marae at Hongoeka Bay.
Her latest book Chappy, is her first novel in ten years. He tells the story of a young man piecing together the history of his Maori family.

10:35 Book review: 'Girl at War' by Sara Novic
Published by Hachette, RRP $37.99. Reviewed by Carole Beu.
10:45 The Reading: 'Undercover Mumbai', by Ayeesha Menon
Inspector Alia Khan, a young detective in the Mumbai Police Force, faces many obstacles as she attempts to solve a series of crimes, make sense of her troubled past and cope with being a woman in a chauvinistic, male-dominated police force (4 of 9, Goldhawk) Note: audio is not available for this programme.
11:05 New technology commentator Erika Pearson
Erika Pearson discusses as the Internet of Things grows, so do the data privacy issues. The security risks for Hospital Devices. Rescue robots.
11:15 How to talk to your kids about sex and what they should know
Sex education is getting its first overhaul in over a decade with schools getting new guidelines on what to teach on the facts of life. The Ministry of Education is putting a new focus on issues like consent, coercion and sexual diversity. And there's also a recognition of the role pornography and social media are playing in how young people form their views about sex. So what should parents be talking to their children about when it comes to sex - and how do you start those conversations? Frances Bird is Family Planning's Director of Health Promotion.
11:45 TV Review with Lara Strongman
Lara reviews Indian Summers on TV One, a lavish epic new end-of-Empire drama, heat, dust, sweat, silk dresses and fornication. UnREAL on Lightbox; a satirical drama about reality dating shows.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Solomon Burke
Song: Maggies Farm
Composer: Dylan
Album:
Label: ACE
Time: 09:58
Artist: Vampire Weekend
Song: Unbelievers
Composer: Batmanglij/Koenig
Album: Modern Vampires of the City
Label: XL
Time: 10:07
Artist: Tyra Hammond
Song: So good at being in Trouble
Composer:
Album:
Label:
Time: 11:15

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
The Official Cash Rate is cut - but could it inflate the property market further? A retired vet tells of sheep ship horrors.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'28"

12:17
Dollar falls after OCR cut
BODY:
The dollar has fallen 2% after the Reserve Bank cut the cost of borrowing and indicated more reductions may be needed.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, NZ dollar
Duration: 1'22"

12:18
Economist sees sting in the tail of RBNZ's rate cut
BODY:
An economist says the Reserve Bank has succeeded in driving the New Zealand dollar down, but warns it could come at a big price.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: NZ dollar, Reserve Bank
Duration: 1'00"

12:20
Pumpkin Patch CEO resigns
BODY:
Pumpkin Patch's chief executive is resigning from the children's clothing retailer, as the firm makes changes to improve the business.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Pumpkin Patch
Duration: 54"

12:22
Wynyard partners with Motorola to access global market
BODY:
Wynyard Group says it's signed a partnership agreement with Motorola, giving it access to more than 100,000 global customers in the law enforcement and national security sectors.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Wynyard Group, Motorola
Duration: 1'31"

12:24
Midday Markets for 11 June 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Melika King at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'01"

12:27
Midday Sports News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
Portugal stands between New Zealand and a world cup quarter final.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'07"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

=AUDIO=

13:10
Your Song
BODY:
Wish You Were Here by Pink Floyd. Chosen by Mark Sedon, Festival Director of the Mountain Film Festival.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: film, arts festival, Mountain Film Festival
Duration: 12'57"

13:20
Our New Zealand A to Z - Ngunguru
BODY:
N is for Ngunguru, a small but perfectly formed village sitting right on the southern end of the Tutukaka Coast.
EXTENDED BODY:
N is for Ngunguru, a small but perfectly formed village sitting right on the southern end of the Tutukaka Coast.
Topics: history
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 38'24"

14:10
AC/DC Promoter - Garry Van Edmond
BODY:
After three decades as ACDC's promoter, Garry Van Edmond has some tales to tell. He joins us in the Auckland studio to discuss the Rock or Bust tour that has just been announced for New Zealand.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: ACDC
Duration: 17'43"

14:41
Feature Album - The Greatest
BODY:
The Feature Album is 'The Greatest' by Chan Marshall aka Cat Power.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 19'10"

15:08
The Expats - Talima Fruean
BODY:
Talima Fruean is a rugby coach living in New York's Hell's Kitchen. She is teaching children in low socio-economic neighbourhoods the importance of leadership, discipline and teamwork.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: New York, rugby
Duration: 12'36"

15:44
The Panel pre-show for 11 June 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'15"

21:34
Examining the Benefits of Standing Desks
BODY:
Masters student Dan Archer looked at metabolic biomarkers to see if there were benefits from working at standing desks
EXTENDED BODY:
By Ruth Beran
There’s a lot of hype at the moment about standing up desks, with proponents touting the benefits of standing at work rather than sitting for long periods of time.
To analyse the hype, Unitec Masters of osteopathy student Dan Archer set about trying to measure the effects of standing desks on six participants’ health, over 19 weeks. In particular, he was looking at metabolic health.
I believe there is data to show that we can reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome particularly in sedentary people, people who sit down at the office all day,” says Dan.

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that occur together, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. These cluster of conditions are increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels. To measure metabolic biomarkers, Dan was tracking blood pressure, waist circumference, height, fasting glucose, triglyceride (or fat) levels, and cholesterol in the blood.
Participants were people who primarily sit in the workplace, and were of different genders and ethnicities. People used the desks for 19 weeks, with the first three weeks being an introductory phase where participants could stand for an hour or so at a time.
Ultimately the study did not show huge changes in metabolic markers, although there was a decrease in waist circumference in some participants. Dan believes this may be because the study wasn’t long enough. “Over the 17 weeks we saw changes in some people but it might be that over a year we’d see even better changes,” says Dan. Also the factors being measured were quite transient, dependent on factors that are hard to control, like diet and lifestyle.
Anecdotally though the standing desks were a success, with all participants showing a marked decrease in their daily sitting time and marked increase in daily standing time. The smallest increase in standing was 111 minutes, and the smallest change in daily sitting was a decrease of close to two hours a day. “I had people reporting that they felt more comfortable during the day, less fatigued and more energetic. Some people mentioned slightly higher concentration levels,” says Dan.
There were also some slight negative effects associated with switching to the standing desk, with some reports of mild discomfort in the lower back. “We tried to ease those with certain stretches and exercises, but overall there was a very positive response to it," says Dan.
All but one of the participants chose to continue to stand after the study.

The changes in daily sitting and standing times were evident across the entire period. “So people didn’t revert back to sitting down once they got used to it, or the novelty of the standing desk wore off,” says Dan. This makes him think that standing desks are a viable solution for intervention into occupational sedentary behaviour, even though the six participants in the study were biased because they were already interested in standing desks before the study started.
Dan believes that a larger study could examine how viable standing desks are, and what kind of changes to sitting and standing happen over a longer period of time.
Topics: health, science
Regions:
Tags: standing desks, health, biomarkers, metabolic, metabolic syndrome
Duration: 12'57"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
Wish You Were Here by Pink Floyd. Chosen by Mark Sedon, Festival Director of the Mountain Film Festival.
1:20 Our New Zealand A to Z - Ngunguru
Today, it's N for Ngunguru, a small but perfectly formed village sitting right on the southern end of the Tutukaka Coast.
[gallery:1194]
2:10 AC/DC Promoter - Garry Van Edmond
After three decades as ACDC's promoter, Garry Van Edmond has some tales to tell. He joins us in the Auckland studio to discuss the Rock or Bust tour that has just been announced for New Zealand.
2:30 NZ Reading - One Flat Coyote
Karen and Ken torture each other with 'bear attacks human' stories.
2:45 Feature album
Cat Power - The Greatest.
3:10 The Expats - Talima Fruean
Our expat this week is a rugby coach living in New York's Hell's Kitchen. She is teaching children in low socio-economic neighbourhoods the importance of leadership, discipline and teamwork.
3:20 BBC Witness - Inuit Experiment
In June 1951 a group of 22 Inuit children were sent from Greenland to Denmark to be re-educated as 'little Danes'. The hope was that they would help create a new and modern Greenland. Helene Thiesen was among the young indigenous children who took part in this social experiment.
3:35 Stand-Up Desks - Ruth Beran
Desks that allow you to stand while working are being introduced into many offices around the world, but what are the benefits? Masters student Dan Archer wanted to see if there were changes in metabolic biomarkers such as blood pressure and glucose before and after the use of standing desks, and Ruth Beran caught up with him and a participant during and after his study to talk about his findings.
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Jim Mora, Zara Potts, Steve McCabe and Irene Gardiner.

MUSIC DETAILS:

Thursday 11 June 2015
YOUR SONG:
ARTIST: Pink Floyd
TITLE: Wish You Were Here
COMP: Gilmour, Waters
ALBUM: Pink Floyd: A Foot In The Door, The Best Of
LABEL: EMI 896625
A TO Z - NGUNGURU:
ARTIST: The Muttonbirds
TITLE: Anchor Me
COMP: McGlashan
ALBUM: The Muttonbirds: Flock, The Best Of
LABEL: EMI 543090

ARTIST: Dave Dobbyn
TITLE: Song Of The Years
COMP: Dave Dobbyn
ALBUM: Baxter
LABEL: UNIVERSAL
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Cat Power
TITLE: The Greatest
COMP: Marshall
ALBUM: The Greatest
LABEL: MATADOR
ARTIST: Cat Power
TITLE: Lived In Bars
COMP: Marshall
ALBUM: The Greatest
LABEL: MATADOR
ARTIST: Cat Power
TITLE: Love And Communication
COMP: Marshall
ALBUM: The Greatest
LABEL: MATADOR
ARTIST: Cat Power
TITLE: After It All
COMP: Marshall
ALBUM: The Greatest
LABEL: MATADOR
THE PANEL:
ARTIST: The Beautiful South
TITLE: Perfect 10
COMP: Heaton, Rotheray
ALBUM: Quench
LABEL: GODISC TBSQP 1

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

14:42
Panel Says
BODY:
What Panelists Irene Gardiner and Steve McCabe have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'53"

15:44
The Panel pre-show for 11 June 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'15"

16:04
The Panel with Irene Gardiner and Steve McCabe (Part 1)
BODY:
Dr Christoph Schumacher joins The Panel to discuss which industries and innovations NZ needs to be cultivating to get ahead, and joins the Panel to discuss which industries and innovations NZ needs to be cultivating to get ahead. Dr David McKay, of the University of Otago's Centre for Sustainability, joins us to talk about south Dunedin's blocked mud-tanks and why some drains and pumps won't be a long term solution to flooding.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'26"

16:08
The Panel with Irene Gardiner and Steve McCabe (Part 2)
BODY:
A battle between a plus-size model and a weight loss guru. Would you be tempted to move to a small community or would you miss the bright lights of the big city too much? The average house price in Herne Bay is now $2,003,300. Dr Charlotte Sunde joins The Panel to discuss community. Mt Victoria human poo clean up delays tunnel re-opening for 45 minutes. Boeing is cramming more seats onto its 777s by shrinking the bathrooms. It can add 14 more seats with smaller loos. Sir Tim Hunt has said his comments about having "girls" in labs was meant to be humorous. Do we choose to be offended?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'27"

16:11
Panel Intro
BODY:
What Panelists Irene Gardiner and Steve McCabe have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'57"

16:12
Where to for the economy?
BODY:
The banks have been quick to slash mortgage rates after the Reserve Bank cut the official cash rate cut a quarter-point. More may be on the way because the dairy sector's weak outlook is burdening the nation's terms of trade. Dr Christoph Schumacher joins The Panel to discuss which industries and innovations NZ needs to be cultivating to get ahead.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'45"

16:20
Sister cities
BODY:
Dr Christoph Schumacher enlightens us on the benefits of sister cities.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: sister cities
Duration: 3'16"

16:25
South Dunedin flooding
BODY:
Dr David McKay, of the University of Otago's Centre for Sustainability, joins us to talk about south Dunedin's blocked mud-tanks and why some drains and pumps won't be a long term solution to flooding.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: public services, Dunedin City Council
Duration: 7'15"

16:34
Being happy
BODY:
A battle between a plus-size model and a weight loss guru.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: diet, fashion, modelling
Duration: 7'13"

16:47
$2 million suburb or move to Westport?
BODY:
Would you be tempted to move to a small community or would you miss the bright lights of the big city too much? The average house price in Herne Bay is now $2,003,300. Dr Charlotte Sunde joins The Panel to discuss community.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury, Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 9'00"

16:56
Tunnel poo
BODY:
Mt Victoria human poo clean up delays tunnel re-opening for 45 minutes.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'15"

16:57
Smaller airline bathrooms
BODY:
Boeing is cramming more seats onto its 777s by shrinking the bathrooms. It can add 14 more seats with smaller loos.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'20"

16:59
Scientist's views on women in lab
BODY:
Sir Tim Hunt has said his comments about having "girls" in labs was meant to be humorous. Do we choose to be offended?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 11 June 2015
BODY:
Man and three paramedics ill from unknown substance; Banks rush to slash mortgage rates after OCR cut; Breeder says no worries about sheep going to Mexico; Green light for restoring Christchurch town hall; Green light for restoring Christchurch town hall; Racing legend Bonecrusher laid to rest at Ellerslie; and Sea Shepherd US agrees to pay millions to Japanese whalers.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'11"

17:10
Man and three paramedics ill from unknown substance
BODY:
Three paramedics have been rushed to hospital after being exposed to a mystery substance in a bathroom at an Auckland shopping mall.
Topics: health
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'55"

17:11
Banks rush to slash mortgage rates after OCR cut
BODY:
Banks have rushed to slash their mortgage rates after the central bank cut the Official Cash Rate for the first time in more than four years. The Reserve Bank Governor, Graeme Wheeler, says the prospect of ongoing weak dairy prices meant a rate cut, to 3.25%, was the right thing to do and warns another may be needed. Economics Correspondent Patrick O'Meara says the Reserve Banks latest figures show that in April home mortgages were worth about $204 billion, with a quarter of those on floating rates and a slightly higher number fixed for six months.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: NZ dollar, finance
Duration: 6'46"

17:18
Green light for restoring Christchurch town hall
BODY:
All but one of Christchurch city's councillors have given their final vote to fully restore the quake-damaged town hall at a cost of well over $100 million.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch City Council, Town Hall, Christchurch earthquakes
Duration: 3'42"

17:21
Breeder says no worries about sheep going to Mexico
BODY:
A Canterbury sheep breeder who has stock on board a shipment of 50 thousand rams and ewes to Mexico says she has no worries about the animals safety.
Topics: farming
Regions:
Tags: sheep
Duration: 2'11"

17:25
Racing legend Bonecrusher laid to rest at Ellerslie
BODY:
One of New Zealand's greatest racehorses Bonecrusher was put down and buried today at the Ellelrslie Racecourse where he so often triumphed. In the 1980s Bonecrusher, the first NZ thoroughbred to earn a million dollars, reached legendary status.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: racing, Bonecrusher
Duration: 5'19"

17:32
Evening Business for 11 June 2015
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, NZ dollar
Duration: 2'00"

17:34
Mortgage broker says OCR cut good for home buyers
BODY:
The impact from the central bank's rate cut is already being felt on people's pockets as retail banks cut floating mortgage rates. The governor of the Reserve Bank, Graeme Wheeler, cut the official cash rate saying it's the right move given ongoing weak dairy prices.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, NZ dollar
Duration: 4'03"

17:42
Malaysian sacred mountain nudists in court
BODY:
Four Western tourists have appeared in court over posing naked atop a sacred Malaysian mountain, and police are chasing six more. A senior government minister is suggesting the tourists angered the spirits of Mount Kinabalu, causing a magnitude six earthquake last Friday which left 18 people dead.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Malaysia
Duration: 3'44"

17:46
Sea Shepherd US agrees to pay millions to Japanese whalers
BODY:
The environmental group, Sea Shepherd has agreed to pay three and a half million dollars to Japanese whalers for breaching an American court injunction to stay clear of their vessels in the Antarctic Ocean.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

17:51
Looking to the past to solve Māori housing woes
BODY:
An architectural expert says learning from the past could help solve some of the housing issues facing Māori. Rau Hoskins, says introducing 'papakainga' - or housing that sees whanau living in closer proximity to each other - could remedy some of the problems they face such as damp, overcrowded and poor quality homes.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'57"

17:53
Sophisticated share scam snares $800,000
BODY:
A West Auckland business has lost $800,000 to scammers who convinced it to buy shares in a fictitious gold mining company. The scammers used a name similar to that of a genuine firm in Asia in what Detective Sergeant Nick Salter describes as an extremely sophisticated con.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: crime
Duration: 3'56"

18:05
Sports News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'00"

18:12
A warning against rushing to lock in mortgages
BODY:
A mortgage broker is warning against rushing to lock in mortgages, saying there's a good chance the rates from 6 months to 5 years could all come under the 5% mark - something not seen in decades.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: finance, housing
Duration: 3'09"

18:14
Labour says Reserve Bank forced to stimulate economy
BODY:
The Labour Party says the Reserve Bank has been forced to cut interest rates to stimulate the economy which serves as another warning to the Government to stop being complacent.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, NZ dollar
Duration: 3'07"

18:18
Man accidentally strangled to death by electrical cords
BODY:
An elderly man with a severe intellectual disability was accidentally strangled to death by loose electrical cords hanging under his bed. Coroner David Crerar has ruled it was a tragic unfortunate event but that no one was responsible for Eric Haydon's death last year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'50"

18:26
Bowel screening pilot doesn't hit participation rate targets
BODY:
The first report on a bowel cancer screening programme in Waitemata says it's saved lives but more work is needed before the pilot can be rolled out nationally.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: cancer, bowel cancer, bowel cancer screening
Duration: 4'23"

18:35
Anti-miners give up on Karangahake court action
BODY:
A conservation group has abandoned legal action to block gold exploration at Mount Karangahake near Paeroa. But the group Protect Karangahake is vowing to fight , though its attempt to get a court to review the resource consents has failed.
Topics:
Regions: Waikato
Tags:
Duration: 4'25"

18:39
Family angry at sentence for wife who murdered husband
BODY:
The New Zealand family of murdered businessman Robert Ellis are upset at the length of the jail term handed down to his Balinese wife, who instigated the plot to kill him. Noor Ellis got 12 years jail but Robert Ellis's children fear she'll be out within five years. Mr Ellis was found with his throat cut, bound in plastic, and dumped in a ditch in a rice paddy.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: crime
Duration: 3'48"

18:47
Te Manu Korihi News for 11 June 2015
BODY:
An architectural expert says learning from the past could help solve some of the housing issues facing Māori; Whanganui River iwi decendants concerned about protecting and being able to tell their tribal stories through traditional performing arts have gathered in Whanganui this week to learn more about their history; Horticultural experts in Canterbury are hoping the relaunch of a iwi market garden from the 19th century will bring tangata whenua back to Koukourarata.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'19"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:10
The Delicatessen Dynasties
BODY:
Documentary director Erik Greenberg Anjou on Deli Man, a film in pursuit of the great Jewish Deli experience.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 21'44"

20:40
Contemporary Classical Music
BODY:
RNZ Concert's Sound Lounge host Kate Mead raises the baton on both contemporary classical music plus recent releases of old masters.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'10"

20:59
Conundrum
BODY:
Conundrum clue 7.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 09"

21:59
Conundrum
BODY:
Conundrum clue 8.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:10 The Delicatessen Dynasties
Documentary director Erik Greenberg Anjou on Deli Man, a film in pursuit of the great Jewish Deli experience.
7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

[video] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZyEAiQuHss
[video] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGSE_XPF4_g
[video] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMXjmYmwp-o

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies 598
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews two under-performing American comedy-dramas - Aloha, starring Bradley Cooper, and the movie spin-off of the TV series Entourage. He also discovers the Estonian Oscar nominee - Tangerines - is as good as everyone says it is.
EXTENDED BODY:
Simon Morris reviews two under-performing American comedy-dramas:Aloha, starring Bradley Cooper, and the movie spin-off of the TV series Entourage. He also discovers the Estonian Oscar nominee Tangerines is as good as everyone says it is.
The big picture with Simon Morris
I can’t tell you what a relief it is when a decent movie comes along. The recent drought has been pretty dire, and it’s only my generally sunny outlook that prevented me from assuming it would never end.
Certainly the word in the trade papers has been far from optimistic, blaring their warnings of more revivals of comic-book properties that had already worn out their welcome. Hello again Spiderman, The Fantastic Four, Aquaman and the gloomy prospect of Batman fighting Superman.
There are also got some desperate remakes of films that hardly needed making again, surely – Point Blank, Ghostbusters, Independence Day and Poltergeist.
It’s all a depressing indication that Hollywood has lost the plot – or more to the point, it’s forgotten how to make new ones. But maybe it’s a bit too soon to announce its death, even if the old formula – make it big, make it familiar and fill it up with stars – isn’t working right now. The usual defence is still true - there’s nothing wrong with Hollywood that can’t be fixed with a few good films. Even if they don’t come from America.
The good news this week comes from as far from Lala Land as it’s possible to get – a little gem from Southern Russia, starring nobody anyone’s ever heard of. Tangerines is everything you want from a movie – it’s touching, it’s exciting, it’s funny and it’s about something.
But this week also offered two smaller films from America that suggest what is going wrong in the former movie capital of the world.
Entourage is actually about the idle rich of Hollywood – out of work actors, scrabbling agents, stars who think they should be directors - all partying as if they meant something.
And a similar sense of entitlement pervades the latest film by one-time wonder-boy Cameron Crowe. It’s called Aloha, and it’s about… Well frankly, I’m not sure what it’s about.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, Entourage, Tangerines, Aloha
Duration: 22'56"

19:31
Aloha - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews under-performing American comedy-drama Aloha, in which everyone seems to be having fun... except the audience.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by Cameron Crowe, starring Bradley Cooper, Emma Stone, Rachel McAlpine.
Simon Morris reviews under-performing American comedy-drama Aloha, in which everyone seems to be having fun... except the audience.
Former Rolling Stone journalist Cameron Crowe has made a number of films that all share a certain baby boomer smugness – like Jerry Maguire and Almost Famous. They assume we share Crowe’s love of the ‘golden age of rock’, middle-brow, vintage Hollywood movies, the Camelot of JFK and astronauts. And they all star surrogate Cameron Crowes who are loved for their endearing flaws.
Here it’s Brian Gilchrist (Bradley Cooper), an ex-Army hot-shot from Hawaii. He screwed up in some way, maybe something to do with taking bribes? But let’s not live in the past. Now he’s a contractor for a media billionaire, returning to Hawaii to get a satellite space station up and running… the actual story is a little vague. Gilchrist has to negotiate with a Hawaiian king for permission to use his land for some reason, and he’s given a United States Air Force Captain to help him out.
Before we get into how appropriate it is to cast Emma Stone as part native-Hawaiian, part Chinese Captain Allison Ng – short answer, not remotely appropriate – I was starting to struggle with why anyone was there.
Can’t the Air Force do its own negotiating? Why is the Air Force even involved in a private satellite launch? And why is everyone so keen on Brian Gilchrist?
Meanwhile, what passes for the plot of Aloha - alongside the love interests - American-Hawaiian cultural relations and the compromises involved when the Army gets into bed with private enterprise – rumbles away in the background.
When Brian Gilchrist sabotages the best-laid plans of business and the military, for I’m sure the very best of reasons, I’d become so irritated with the lot of them that I’d long given up trying to make sense of Aloha.
The worst thing is that I usually like all the actors involved, and there may even have been some intelligent message buried under all the Cameron Crowe candy-floss. I can’t work out whether Crowe the writer short-changed Crowe the director, or if Crowe the director made a hash of Crowe’s script.
Either way, there’s no question whose fault it was.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review
Duration: 6'18"

19:40
Entourage - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews the movie spin-off of the TV series Entourage, which explains how films like Entourage get made.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by Doug Ellin, starring Adrian Grenier, and a host of B-Listers.
Simon Morris reviews the movie spin-off of the TV series Entourage, which explains how films like Entourage get made.
The TV series Entourage was about under-employed film stars, and the people dependant on them. All stars have entourages apparently – ranging from drivers and agents to menial dogs-bodies and gofers. The idea for the series came from someone who should know. Actor Mark Wahlberg was both the producer and the role model for lead character Vince. The show ran for about seven years.
Now, four years later, they’ve made a movie about what’s happened to Vince, E, Turtle, Drama and Ari. If you liked the original series, you might like this. It depends on whether you’re as fascinated by celebrities as you keep being told you are.
If this were a real-life portrait of how terrible films get made – like Robert Altman’s The Player, or even old classics like Singin’ In The Rain or Sunset Boulevard – this would be a darker, and possibly better film.
But it’s not. It’s about fun in Tinseltown, where the least talented people can party pretty much all the time. The obvious comparison is with New Zealand series Auckland Daze, but without the charm, the brains and the jokes.
Entourage is like an interminable home-movie of Hollywood playing itself, a gigantic selfie of the most self-absorbed industry on earth. They toil not, neither do they spin. They certainly don’t make movies any more, apart from complete rubbish like Entourage.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review, Entourage
Duration: 6'42"

19:50
Tangerines - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews the Estonian Oscar nominee Tangerines - one house, three nationalities, one great film.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by Zaza Urushadze
Simon Morris reviews the Estonian Oscar nominee Tangerines - one house, three nationalities, one great film.
Estonian produced film Tangerines is not actually set in Estonia. It takes place hundreds of kilometres away, on the border of Georgia and Russian Chechnya where there’s been a small Estonian community for over a hundred years. People like tangerine-farmers Ivo and Margus.
Tangerines takes place in 1990, when war broke out between the two neighbours. The Estonians are neutral bystanders, but are far more likely to be collateral damage. One day there’s a gunfight between Chechen and Georgian patrols. When the smoke clears, Ivo discovers two badly-wounded survivors – a Chechen called Ahmet and a Georgian, Nika. Ivo carries them back to his house and nurses them back to life. The big problem now is keeping them apart so they don’t kill each other.
As the two soldiers recuperate they find themselves examining their reasons for fighting – and, by implication, what motivates any conflict. In fact, neither Ahmet nor Nika are particularly political. They’re just soldiers who fight for their pay, and for their comrades.
And that’s basically the story. Like most war-movies, Tangerines isn’t about the big picture. Who can see that when you’re face-down in the mud, or helplessly bandaged and unarmed?
Tangerines – which was nominated for both a Golden Globe and an Academy Award this year – was directed by Georgian director Zaza Urushadze, who in 25 years has made just five films. But on the strength of Tangerines I’m strongly tempted to check out the other four. It really is a masterpiece.
It’s also a masterpiece with the bare minimum of elements – four very strong characters, an easily-grasped, riveting situation, and an ending that will punch you in the heart.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review
Duration: 4'38"

7:30 At the Movies
Films and movie business with Simon Morris.
8:10 Windows on the World
International public radio documentaries - visit the Windows on the World web page to find links to these documentaries.
8:40 Contemporary Classical Music
RNZ Concert's Sound Lounge host Kate Mead raises the baton on both contemporary classical music plus recent releases of old masters.
9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:06
Getting Wet and Experiencing Marine Reserves
BODY:
Since 2002 the Experiencing Marine Reserves programme has been taking primary school students snorkelling so they can see for themselves how effective marine protection is
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“The formula is – give them a bit of information, give them an amazing experience and then get them to put it into action in some way. And after they’ve done that the kids really can tell you a whole lot about what’s different inside and outside a marine reserve.”
Zoe Studd, Experiencing Marine Reserves co-ordinator, Wellington

Since 2002 the Experiencing Marine Reserves programme has been taking primary school students around the country to snorkel inside and outside marine reserves, so they can see for themselves how effective marine protection is. The kids snorkel first in an unprotected area, and they find this exciting as for many of them it is their first experience of snorkelling in the sea. But the biggest excitement comes when they open their eyes underwater in a marine reserve, and find it teeming with life. “We’re really lucky because we’ve got Taputeranga Marine Reserve right on our back door step,” says Wellington Experiencing Marine Reserves (EMR) co-ordinator Zoe Studd.
Teacher ‘Mr Matt’, as he is known to his class of year 5 and 6 pupils at St Anne’s School in Newtown, says he and his class “have been learning about marine reserves, and how we can protect our sea life so that there’s plenty around for generations to come.”
“We snorkelled last week at Worser Bay beach, which is an unprotected area. And even though for many of us it was our first time seeing the mussels, a little bit of seaweed and a couple of spotties, and it was really exciting, I’ve been fortunate to do it before and I know that what we’re going to see today [in Taputeranga Marine Reserve] is going to blow their minds, because there’s lots out there.”
Julian Hodge is Discovery Programme Manager for the Island Bay Marine Education Centre, which hosts the EMR programme at Taputeranga, and he says that the programme is a great way introducing adults, as well as pupils, to the concept of marine protection. For safety, each buddy pair of children go out in the water with an adult, who might be a marine biology student volunteer, or a teacher aide or parent from the school. “Not only does it help us with the supervision and the safety aspect but also we know the programme is reaching more than just the kids. It’s a double good for us when we get so many parents and aunties and uncles coming along as well.”
The St Anne’s School students I spoke to after the marine reserve snorkel were excited about what they had seen, including several large eagle rays and associated cleaner fish, as well as large paua, blue cod, spotties, kina, blue moki and other fish. They all commented on how much more they saw in the marine reserve than at unprotected Worser Bay.
One of the parent helpers said she had never done anything like it before.
“It was so cool. And it was amazing that it was so close to the actual beach – and there’s all that sea life that I didn’t realise was so accessible. I’m so pleased I took the day off work!”

The Experiencing Marine Reserves programme is time-consuming to run as each school takes part for about a week in total, over the course of a term. The programme begins with a class session learning about the sea. Then, learning to snorkel in a local pool, when students discover how a dive mask lets them see underwater, they experience breathing through a snorkel, and they learn about underwater safety. The safety essentials include sticking together with their buddy pair, signs to indicate that they’re okay, and understanding whistle signals from the shore.
After their snorkel in an unprotected area followed by one in a protected area the students work on action plans and creative projects. Zoe says a previous class made ‘Seed to Sea’ envelopes, containing seeds suitable to plant along streams and waterways, in an effort to prevent sediment running into the sea. Art works, songs and dance have also been used by the students to express their experience. One of the students from St Anne’s school, Enzo Rabino, won the Experiencing Marine Reserves Boddy Stafford Poor Knights Competition, which involved him in a snorkelling trip to the Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve.
The Wellington Experiencing Marine Reserves programme worked with three schools during the first term of 2015. Houghton Valley School were also involved in an ongoing marine reserve monitoring programme. The programme provides all the wet suits and snorkel equipment for the students and adults.
As well as Experiencing Marine Reserves Zoe Studd is also involved in two other hands-on outdoor education projects: Healthy Harbours Porirua, and Whitebait Connection, which has previously featured on Our Changing World.
Topics: science, environment, education
Regions:
Tags: Taputeranga Marine Reserve, Island Bay, marine protection, snorkelling, outdoor education, eagle ray, fish, primary school
Duration: 14'11"

21:20
Kelp, Urchins and Marine Reserves
BODY:
Marine biologist Nick Shears monitors marine reserves to evaluate how effective marine protection is and he is also interested in the effects of climate change on the ocean
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
Underwater ‘crop circles’ that have been made in kelp forest around the Hauraki Gulf are part of a global experiment, and marine biologist Nick Shears hopes they will also show us how resilient – or not - the dominant kelp species around New Zealand might be in the face of climate change.
“The idea is that kelp forest researchers all around the world are removing kelp in different temperature regimes and we’re going to look at how the recovery rates vary with temperature,” says Nick. “As well, here in the Hauraki Gulf we have a big turbidity gradient, so we’re also interested in how temperature changes might interact with light. Obviously when it’s warmer the plant respires more, so it also needs to photosynthesis more to make up for that – and to do that it needs more light.”

One of the expected consequences of climate change will be an increase in severe weather events, such as the recent heavy rainfalls experienced in Dunedin and the Kapiti Coast (check out this week’s Extreme Weather and Climate Change story for more about that). While most people are focused on what the impacts of this will be on land, marine biologists are concerned about the flow-on effects to neighbouring coastal ecosystems. Nick explains:
“One of the expectations of climate change will be reductions in light due to more storms, more runoff and more sediment coming in. But also with more sea level rise you’re going to have more coastal erosion bringing in more sediment and causing lower light.”

Ecklonia radiata is northern New Zealand’s most common kelp species, and it is also found in Australia, in much warmer conditions than it lives in here. It is considered to be a keystone species, which underpins the coastal ecosystem. If the recruitment and survival of the kelp is affected by warming temperature and increasing sedimentation, it could have a significant impact on the healthy functioning of our marine ecosystem.
While long term sea temperature records collected from the Leigh Marine Laboratory do not yet indicate any increase in temperature, Nick says that the ocean near the Portobello Marine Laboratory in Dunedin has begun to warm, as has water around Tasmania. These increases are due to increases in the intensity of the South Pacific sub-tropical gyre.
A major part of Nick’s research is involved in studying marine reserves and monitoring the impact of protection. He carried out PhD research in the Leigh marine reserve where, prior to protection, large numbers of sea urchins, Evechinus chloroticus, had created significant areas of kina barrens. Full protection 40 years ago has led to an increase in the numbers of big predators such as crayfish and snapper, and a subsequent improvement in the kelp forest as the predators eat the kina that were eating the kelp.
Nick has recently been involved in monitoring at the Poor Knights Islands marine reserve. While there are good numbers of snapper at the Poor Knights, there have always been very few crayfish. While the number of kina has declined since protection, there has been a big increase in the numbers of a large black subtropical long-spined urchin called Centrostephanus rodgersii.
The same species has relatively recently established in Tasmanian waters, where it is overgrazing seaweeds and invertebrates on rocky reefs and creating urchin barrens. It has established there due to the same changes in the temperature and strength of East Australia Current that are increasing sea temperatures in southern New Zealand, and it is having a detrimental effect on lobster and abalone fisheries. Nick is not sure why they’re increasing here since there is no evidence of warming sea temperatures, and he speculates that as they are larger than kina snapper alone may not be able to control them in the absence of crayfish
"They’re a more intense grazer than the regular kina and will graze right down to bare coralline. So they’ve had a big impact in Tasmania, and we’ll just need to keep an eye on what’s happening with them here."

Nick holds joint positions in the Institute of Marine Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of Auckland. In 2011 he was awarded a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of New Zealand to support his research into kelp forests and rocky reef ecosystems.
You can listen to the audio or download a podcast of Nick's interview here:
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: marine reserves, Marine Protected Areas, conservation, Poor Knights Islands, Leigh marine reserve, fish, blue cod, crayfish, lobster, sea urchins, kina
Duration: 12'40"

21:34
Examining the Benefits of Standing Desks
BODY:
Masters student Dan Archer looked at metabolic biomarkers to see if there were benefits from working at standing desks
EXTENDED BODY:
By Ruth Beran
There’s a lot of hype at the moment about standing up desks, with proponents touting the benefits of standing at work rather than sitting for long periods of time.
To analyse the hype, Unitec Masters of osteopathy student Dan Archer set about trying to measure the effects of standing desks on six participants’ health, over 19 weeks. In particular, he was looking at metabolic health.
I believe there is data to show that we can reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome particularly in sedentary people, people who sit down at the office all day,” says Dan.

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that occur together, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. These cluster of conditions are increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels. To measure metabolic biomarkers, Dan was tracking blood pressure, waist circumference, height, fasting glucose, triglyceride (or fat) levels, and cholesterol in the blood.
Participants were people who primarily sit in the workplace, and were of different genders and ethnicities. People used the desks for 19 weeks, with the first three weeks being an introductory phase where participants could stand for an hour or so at a time.
Ultimately the study did not show huge changes in metabolic markers, although there was a decrease in waist circumference in some participants. Dan believes this may be because the study wasn’t long enough. “Over the 17 weeks we saw changes in some people but it might be that over a year we’d see even better changes,” says Dan. Also the factors being measured were quite transient, dependent on factors that are hard to control, like diet and lifestyle.
Anecdotally though the standing desks were a success, with all participants showing a marked decrease in their daily sitting time and marked increase in daily standing time. The smallest increase in standing was 111 minutes, and the smallest change in daily sitting was a decrease of close to two hours a day. “I had people reporting that they felt more comfortable during the day, less fatigued and more energetic. Some people mentioned slightly higher concentration levels,” says Dan.
There were also some slight negative effects associated with switching to the standing desk, with some reports of mild discomfort in the lower back. “We tried to ease those with certain stretches and exercises, but overall there was a very positive response to it," says Dan.
All but one of the participants chose to continue to stand after the study.

The changes in daily sitting and standing times were evident across the entire period. “So people didn’t revert back to sitting down once they got used to it, or the novelty of the standing desk wore off,” says Dan. This makes him think that standing desks are a viable solution for intervention into occupational sedentary behaviour, even though the six participants in the study were biased because they were already interested in standing desks before the study started.
Dan believes that a larger study could examine how viable standing desks are, and what kind of changes to sitting and standing happen over a longer period of time.
Topics: health, science
Regions:
Tags: standing desks, health, biomarkers, metabolic, metabolic syndrome
Duration: 12'57"

21:45
Extreme Weather and Climate Change
BODY:
Climate scientists are using the spare capacity of thousands of home computers to zoom in on links between extreme weather events and climate change
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand is already nearly a degree warmer than it would have been without climate change. But also our rainfall extremes and our droughts, and the frequency and risk of those, are already changing as a result of climate change.
Sam Dean, NIWA

Dunedin was swamped by two months’ worth of rain in a single day last week, causing widespread flood damage.
The southern deluge followed record rainfalls dumped down on the North Island's Kapiti Coast and in other parts of New Zealand.
Climate scientists say they believe climate change is contributing to such extreme weather events.
National Institute of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA) climate scientist Suzanne Rosier heads the Weather@home project, which pools the spare computing capacity donated by thousands of volunteers to run state-of-the-art regional climate models.
The regional scale of the models allows her to capture weather patterns in more detail than would otherwise be possible, and the combined computing power means she can zoom in on how extreme weather events are affected by climate change.
“Collectively, the volunteers produce an awesome force of computing power, bigger than the world’s fastest super computer, and this has enabled scientists to run these models many thousands of times, orders of magnitude bigger than scientists can usually expect to run complex models. The combination of computing power with higher resolution modelling means that we can capture some of the rarest events and get at the statistics of these sorts of events.”
Attributing climate change influence to individual weather events is an emerging area of research but the project, which is part of the international climateprediction.net effort, means scientists are getting a better handle on the risk of such events in a warming world.
NIWA chief scientist for climate, atmosphere and hazards Sam Dean said it was too early to know how big a role climate change played in the Dunedin floods but the project had studied past events such as the 2011 floods in Golden Bay, when 650mm of rain fell within 48 hours, and last year’s drought.
"What we found in the Golden Bay study was that the moisture available for those kinds of rainfall events has increased. What we found for the drought was that the risk was increased because of the combination of climate change as well as ozone depletion. The ozone hole forming over Antarctica every spring has changed how often we get high pressures and how intense they are over New Zealand, and that’s had a big impact on droughts over New Zealand.”
Four months ago, the Weather@home project launched a specific experiment to investigate last winter’s floods in Northland, when five days of extremely heavy rain caused severe damage.
Dr Rosier said when she compared models runs of actual conditions with those that simulate how things might have been without human influence on the climate, she could “indeed see a change in the risk of such an event, such that it had become more likely”.
Dr Dean said New Zealand was exposed to conveyor belts, or atmospheric rivers, which brought moist air from the tropics.
Most of our extreme rainfall events are caused by subtropical air coming out of the tropics, very wet, and as climate change warms the tropics it causes more moisture to be held in that air. So as it comes down to New Zealand those air flows do carry more moisture. They can also actually potentially speed up, so it’s both the rate at which that moisture comes down as well as the [increased] moisture content that's in the air.

The team had not yet looked at the Dunedin floods in detail but Dr Dean said “you probably will find that it is possible to understand that there is a contribution ... from climate change and that increase of moisture in the atmosphere”.
He said while atmospheric changes brought higher rainfalls, the fact that such record downpours caused flooding had more to do with inadequate infrastructure.
“One of the things you might see in climate change is that systems that were built to carry water out of the cities are a certain size and used to historical amounts of water. Now as we’re seeing increased amounts of water, you might see systems starting to fail, and that's a question of planning and investment and increasing our infrastructure to cope with a changing world.”
Dr Dean said one of the reasons the project was investigating specific weather events was to “help people understand that climate change is something that is here now and that it affects our lives today”.
It’s not something that is just a problem for the future. We're trying to understand that we live in a different world already because of what we have done to the atmosphere via emitting greenhouse gases and, for New Zealand in fact, ozone depletion as well, which has a significant effect on our climate.

He said New Zealand was already nearly 1degC warmer than it would have been without climate change. “But also our rainfall extremes and our droughts, and the frequency and risk of those, is already changing as a result of climate change.”
He said the rainfall extremes would have still been possible, but their risk has changed. However, Dr Rosier said the team had also looked at the record warm winter of 2013, and found that “it really would have been extremely unlikely that such a warm winter would have occurred in New Zealand if there hadn’t been human interference with the climate system”.
Dr Rosier said the team wanted to extend the project to 2030.
“What people mainly want to know now is what do they have to start planning for. We are now able to say with increasing certainty how the risk of extreme weather events is changing with climate change, but ultimately what people really need to know is how this is going to affect them in their daily lives.”
If you would like to join the Weather@home experiment, this page will get you started.
Follow Our Changing World on Twitter
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: climate change, weather, floods, warming, extreme weather events, global climate models, downscaling, regional climate models, National Institute for Water and Atmosphere
Duration: 13'07"

21:55
Global Ocean Legacy
BODY:
The director of the Pew Charitable Trusts' Global Ocean Legacy discusses the importance of protected marine areas.
EXTENDED BODY:
By Veronika Meduna
The director of the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Global Ocean Legacy project is calling on the New Zealand government to establish a large-scale fully protected marine reserve around the Kermadec islands.
Matt Rand was visiting New Zealand this week to talk about the importance of fully protected marine areas as an insurance policy to maintain the health of the world’s oceans.
Most people are unaware that the oceans have seen significant declines and face major challenges.

He says fisheries worldwide are facing a crisis, with about 90 per cent of world’s fish populations either fully exploited or over-exploited. “Add on top of that ocean acidification, pollution causing dead zones, and we really need to start addressing the problems that we’re seeing in the ocean.”
Matt Rand says protected areas are an important part of the solution. He refers to recommendations under the Convention on Biological Diversity that seek to protect about 30 per cent of the world’s oceans to provide enough buffer to maintain its health despite the human impact on the rest of the marine ecosystem.
With about 2 per cent of the global oceans currently under full protection he says we “are nowhere near that”.
But it’s not all bad news. Last year, the Obama administration announced the expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, the “largest single action for expansion of protected ocean”, and then, earlier this year, the UK government announced the world’s largest marine reserve around the Pitcairn Islands.
Find out more about the Kermadec Islands here:
Matt Rand says the gold standard for marine protected areas was spelled out in a Nature paper, which lists five key features that make marine reserves effective in helping to rebound biodiversity and abundance. They have to be old, very large, fully protected, isolated and well managed and enforced.
There are still some ecosystems that are more or less pristine or less degraded and those are important areas to protect. It gives some scientific perspective on what a truly natural state of an ecosystem is and we’re quickly losing that.

Most proposed marine reserves are in areas close to islands, simply because there is no easy legal mechanism to protect areas in the high seas, despite efforts by the United Nations to develop a convention for the management of international waters.
Matt Rand says he often looks back at the history of conservation campaigns on land, such as the protection of the area that is now the Yellowstone National Park. “There are certainly biological treasures there, including minerals and possibly oil and natural gas, that could have been extracted. If you asked the residents of that area now whether they would be interested in mining or shooting the remaining buffalo that are left, they of course would object. The national park is the driver of the whole economy in the region now.”
He says his hope is that governments and citizens will recognise the value of remote ocean areas such as the Kermadecs beyond short-term interest. “There will always be aspirations to develop and extract. You can’t go back through. Once you’ve done that it’s virtually impossible to recreate history and to recreate the opportunity to protect something.”
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: oceans, Kermadecs, Pitcairn Islands, marine reserves, Marine Protected Areas, Pew Charitable Trusts
Duration: 10'47"

9:06 Our Changing World
Science and environment news from New Zealand and the world.
10:17 Late Edition
A review of the leading news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 Music 101 pocket edition
A contemporary music magazine with interviews and music from New Zealand and overseas artists, coverage of new releases, tours, live sessions, music festivals and events.

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

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Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274358

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 11 Jun 2015

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