Radio New Zealand National. 2015-08-27. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

27 August 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 3:05 The Heroics of Hughie, by David Hill (RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ): 5:10 Witness (BBC); 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 27 August 2015
BODY:
Children's Commissioner's scathing CYF report. Social Development Minister responds to report. Bars to open during Rugby World Cup. Further paid parental leave negotiations under way in Parliament. Challenges for communities as tourism looks set to eclipse dairy as export earner. Retirement village staff celebrate double-digit pay rise. Finances set to tighten for DHBs following major pay deal.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 32'50"

06:08
Sports News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'19"

06:21
Pacific News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'27"

06:23
Morning Rural News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'15"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
The Green Party says a bill to introduce a warrant of fitness for rental properties would benefit thousands of Māori as renting is now the reality for more than half the Māori population. The head of the Whanau Ora funding agency for the North Island says more money is needed to support a cross sector approach to improve Māori health. The Trans Pacific Partnership, indigenous trade relationships, and the future of the Māori fishing industry are among topics up for debate at the Te Putea Whakatupu Trust's annual conference next week. The organisation that represents Māori tourism operators says visitors to Aotearoa are wanting more than just a "haka, hongi and hangi" experience and are now looking something more meaningful and authentic.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'44"

06:40
Opposition MPs call for urgent action to fix CYF
BODY:
A scathing report by the Children's Commissioner has highlighted a "dump and run" culture at Child Youth and Family where children are neglected by the system, with some having up to 60 care placements.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

06:43
Tourism growth poses challenges for communities
BODY:
Tourism looks set to become New Zealand's number one export earner after the latest trade figures showed a dramatic annual drop in dairy exports.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: tourism
Duration: 2'00"

06:48
Air NZ say isn't afraid of increasing competition - sees growth
BODY:
Air New Zealand is confident it can navigate the looming storm clouds of greater competition, a global slowdown and falling currency to lift earnings even further.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Air New Zealand
Duration: 2'39"

06:51
Kathmandu Holdings reviewing head office operations
BODY:
The takeover target, Kathmandu Holdings, is planning to axe up to a tenth of the jobs at its head office workforce to cut costs.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 58"

06:53
Ebos lifts its full year profit
BODY:
Ebos says stronger cash flow has given it the fire power to pay investors more and still have the room to acquire more businesses.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'19"

06:55
Annual deficit narrows
BODY:
The annual trade deficit has narrowed slightly, as a sharp lift in exports more than offset higher import costs.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'19"

06:56
Kiwisaver helping middle New Zealand save more says lobby group
BODY:
A lobby group says Kiwisaver is helping middle New Zealand save more, contrary to The Treasury's assertions.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 3'14"

06:58
Morning markets for 27 August 2015
BODY:
On Wall St, stocks have risen more than 2 percent after a top US Federal Reserve official said the economic turmoil in China has eroded the argument for raising interest rates in September.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'21"

07:08
Sports News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'52"

07:10
Children's Commissioner's scathing CYF report
BODY:
Child, Youth and Family has been accused of a "dump and run" culture in a scathing report published today.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

07:15
Social Development Minister responds to report
BODY:
The Social Development Minister, Anne Tolley, has been listening to that.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'54"

07:34
Bars to open during Rugby World Cup
BODY:
Fans will be able to watch early morning Rugby World Cup matches while enjoying a pint at the pub after Parliament rushed in new rules last night.
Topics: politics, sport
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015
Duration: 3'17"

07:35
Further paid parental leave negotiations under way in Parliament
BODY:
Fresh from the Rugby World Cup legislation passing, Act has turned its attention to paid parental leave.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: families, paid parental leave
Duration: 6'01"

07:44
Challenges for communities as tourism looks set to eclipse dairy as export earner
BODY:
Tourism looks set to eclipse the dairy industry as New Zealand's number one export earner, prompting warnings the growing number of visitors could be a challenge for the industry.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: dairy, tourism
Duration: 3'42"

07:48
Retirement village staff celebrate double-digit pay rise
BODY:
Staff in some retirement villages are celebrating a pay rise of up to 14 per cent.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: retirement villages
Duration: 2'59"

07:51
Finances set to tighten for DHBs following major pay deal
BODY:
Cash-strapped district health boards face more tough financial decision-making in the wake of a major pay deal.
Topics: health, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'18"

07:56
Government officals head to Northland's controversial Stat Oil hui
BODY:
Government officials have been accused of muscling their way into a meeting about controversial deep sea oil drilling being held in Northland tomorrow.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 3'48"

08:08
Sports News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'06"

08:12
"Dump and run" culture in CYF
BODY:
A report is exposing a "dump and run" culture in Child, Youth and Family, where children are neglected and chewed up by the system.
Topics: politics, health
Regions:
Tags: families
Duration: 3'01"

08:15
TV crew shot dead on live TV
BODY:
America is in shock after two television journalists were executed during a live interview on breakfast TV.
Topics: crime, media
Regions:
Tags: America
Duration: 6'07"

08:20
City Rail Link appeals over
BODY:
Work is expected to begin on Auckland's City Rail Link in November after Auckland Transport cleared its final legal hurdle yesterday.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

08:24
Norwegian oil explorer accused of divide-and-rule tactics in Northland
BODY:
A Norwegian company that plans to look for oil off the Northland coast is being accused of breaking Norwegian government guidelines for dealing with indigenous people.
Topics: politics
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 3'02"

08:28
Statoil responds to accusations
BODY:
Statoil's representative in New Zealand, Bryn Klove has been listening to that.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'20"

08:33
NZ skittled for 221 in Durban
BODY:
The Black Caps have lost their third-match decider against South Africa in Durban early this morning.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: cricket, Black Caps
Duration: 2'17"

08:35
Markets Update for 27 August 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'21"

08:38
Contaminated Dunedin tar pit jumps into national top 10
BODY:
A pit on the site of an old gas works in South Dunedin has jumped into the top ten list of the country's most contaminated sites.
Topics: environment
Regions: Otago
Tags: Dunedin
Duration: 3'52"

08:44
Homeowners say quake claims are being lowballed
BODY:
Frustrated Canterbury homeowners say taking legal action against their Crown-owned insurer is a last resort, after years of battling over earthquake claims.
Topics: housing
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Canterbury earthquakes
Duration: 3'17"

08:50
Te Manu Korihi News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
The Green Party says a bill to introduce a warrant of fitness for rental properties would benefit thousands of Māori as renting is now the reality for more than half the Māori population. The Trans Pacific Partnership, indigenous trade relationships, and the future of the Māori fishing industry are among topics up for debate at the Te Putea Whakatupu Trust's annual conference next week. The head of the Whanau Ora funding agency for the North Island says more money is needed to support a cross sector approach to improve Māori health. The organisation that represents Māori tourism operators says visitors to Aotearoa are wanting more than just a "haka, hongi and hangi" experience and are now looking something more meaningful and authentic.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'42"

08:53
Government clamps down on enrolments at Dunedin school
BODY:
Principals say a government clampdown on enrolments at a popular Dunedin school is part of a national problem.
Topics: education
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 3'03"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Marriage Mender, written by Sarah Quigley, read by Jennifer Ward-Lealand (4 of 5, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:10
Children's Commissioner says CYF failing children in state care
BODY:
Five thousand children are in the care of the state but a new report by the Children's Commissioner questions whether they are better off as a result of that intervention. In his first comprehensive review of Child Youth and Family, Russell Wills highlights a lack of monitoring, follow up and reporting, by the agency. Lucy Sandford-Reed is the Chief Executive of the Social Workers Association.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: children, Child, Youth and Family, CYF, Russell Wills, social workers, Lucy Sandford-Rees
Duration: 14'28"

09:11
Children's Commissioner says CYF failing children in state care
BODY:
Five thousand children are in the care of the state but a new report by the Children's Commissioner questions whether they are better off as a result of that intervention. In his first comprehensive review of Child Youth and Family, Russell Wills highlights a lack of monitoring, follow up and reporting, by the agency. Lucy Sandford-Reed is the Chief Executive of the Social Workers Association.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: children, Child, Youth and Family, CYF, Russell Wills, social workers, Lucy Sandford-Rees
Duration: 25'36"

09:35
Should KiwiSaver kickstart have been axed?
BODY:
Kiwisaver is likely to give middle and lower income New Zealanders a higher standard of living in retirement according to an independant evaluation of Kiwisaver by NZIER. The Financial Services Council who commissioned the report says that means KiwiSaver's $1000 kickstart was removed on the basis of inaccurate information. Treasury's report argued KiwiSaver was poor value for money and had not substantially increased New Zealanders' savings. Peter Neilson is the Chief Executive of the Financial Services Council.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver
Duration: 11'56"

09:50
UK correspondent Kate Adie
BODY:
The aftermath of the airshow disaster on a South England motorway and the ongoing immigration issue people]
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK news
Duration: 10'41"

10:09
From Baghdad to boat person to bionic surgeon
BODY:
Kathryn Ryan talks to a Sydney-based surgeon at the forefront of osseointegration technology which has helped more than 100 amputees walk after being fitted with bionic titanium limbs. Dr Munjed Al Muderis had a privileged upbringing, born into one of Iraq's ruling families and beginning a career in medicine. But his life as a young medic in his homeland, under Saddam Hussein's rule took a dangerous turn when he and other Baghdad surgical colleagues were ordered to mutilate the ears of army deserters. He refused and paid a people smuggler for a passage on a leaky boat bound for Christmas Island. After reaching Australian soil, he spent 10 months in a refugee camp, and upon release completed his orthopaedic training and became a pioneering surgeon.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Munjed Al Muderis, osseointegration, orthopaedic surgeon, Iraq
Duration: 30'34"

10:40
Book Review: Whizzing All Over the Place
BODY:
'Whizzing All Over the Place: A Foreign Correspondent's Memoir' by David Barber, Steele Roberts Publishing. Reviewed by Gyles Beckford.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'19"

11:09
New technology with Nat Torkington
BODY:
The fallout from the hacking of the cheating website, Ashley Madison.
Topics: technology, internet
Regions:
Tags: Ashley Madison
Duration: 21'18"

11:31
Parenting with Sarb Johal
BODY:
Clinical and health psychologist Sarb Johal, and Associate Professor at Massey University on school holidays - are they fun or just a lot of hard work? Tips to make the most of school breaks.
Topics: education, life and society
Regions:
Tags: parenting
Duration: 17'10"

11:48
Film reviewer Dan Slevin
BODY:
Boxer film Southpaw, Romantic comedy set at Broadway production She's Funny That Way and comedy Vacation.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Dan Slevin, film
Duration: 10'22"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Children's Commissioner report on Child, Youth and Family
Five thousand children are in the care of the state but a new report by the Children's Commissioner questions whether they are better off as a result of that intervention. In his first comprehensive review of Child Youth and Family, Russell Wills highlights a lack of monitoring, follow up and reporting, by the agency. Kathryn Ryan speaks with Dr Wills and Lucy Sandford-Reed, the Chief Executive of the Social Workers Association.

09:30 Should KiwiSaver kickstart have been axed?
Kiwisaver is likely to give middle and lower income New Zealanders a higher standard of living in retirement according to an independant evaluation of Kiwisaver by NZIER. The Financial Services Council who commissioned the report says that means KiwiSaver's $1000 kickstart was removed on the basis of inaccurate information. Treasury's report argued KiwiSaver was poor value for money and had not substantially increased New Zealanders' savings. Peter Neilson is the Chief Executive of the Financial Services Council.
09:45 UK correspondent Kate Adie
The fallout from the air show disaster, immigration and the BBC's dropping of the Met Office for weather forecasts.
10:05 Munjed al Muderis - from Iraqi refugee to pioneering Australian surgeon
Kathryn Ryan talks to a Sydney-based surgeon at the forefront of osseointegration technology which has helped more than 100 amputees walk after being fitted with bionic titanium limbs. Dr Munjed Al Muderis had a privileged upbringing, born into one of Iraq's ruling families and beginning a career in medicine. But his life as a young medic in his homeland, under Saddam Hussein’s rule took a dangerous turn when he and other Baghdad surgical colleagues were ordered to mutilate the ears of army deserters. He refused and paid a people smuggler for a passage on a leaky boat bound for Christmas Island. After reaching Australian soil, he spent 10 months in a refugee camp, and upon release completed his orthopaedic training and became a pioneering surgeon.
10:30 Book Review: Whizzing All Over the Place: A Foreign Correspondent's Memoir by David Barber
Reviewed by Gyles Beckford
Whizzing All Over the Place: A Foreign Correspondent's Memoir by David Barber, Steele Roberts Publishing.
10:45 The Reading: The Marriage Mender by Sarah Quigley (Part 4 of 5)
11:05 New technology with Nat Torkington
The fallout from the hacking of the cheating website, Ashley Madison.
11:30 Parenting with Sarb Johal
Clinical and health psychologist Sarb Johal, and Associate Professor at Massey University on school holidays - are they fun or just a lot of hard work? Tips to make the most of school breaks.
11:45 Film reviewer Dan Slevin
Boxer film Southpaw, Romantic comedy set at Broadway production She's Funny That Way and comedy Vacation.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Great North
Song: I Was Gold
Composer: Great North
Album: Up in Smoke
Label: Private
Time: 09:33

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Children's Commissioner highlights chronic staffing problems at Child Youth and Family and Parliament is urged to keep parents in the loop about underage abortions.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'29"

12:17
Tourism Holdings posts record profits, up 81%
BODY:
Tourism Holdings says it's now focused on strong revenue growth after an 81 percent jump in its annual profit.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tourism Holdings
Duration: 1'11"

12:18
Vodafone posts heavy loss
BODY:
Vodafone has reported a heavier full year loss.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Vodafone
Duration: 28"

12:19
NZOG posts loss due to asset writedowns
BODY:
New Zealand Oil and Gas has reported a full year loss, due to asset writedowns.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Oil and Gas
Duration: 1'19"

12:20
TVNZ lifts full year result
BODY:
The state-owned broadcaster, TVNZ, has lifted its full year profit result by a half, due to taking greater market share and selling property.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: TVNZ
Duration: 42"

12:21
Delegat Group makes record high profit - sees growth continuing
BODY:
Delegat Group has made a record high operating profit, following record case sales.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Delegat Group
Duration: 1'19"

12:22
Scales first half profit up 60%
BODY:
Scales half year profit has risen more than 60 percent, resulting from a strong performance across all parts of its apple production, processing and export business.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Scales
Duration: 1'33"

12:24
Midday Markets for 27 August 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by James Grigor at Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'29"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Our Olympic track silver medallist Nick Willis is hoping several weeks of altitude training will give him an edge at the World Athletics Championships in Beijing.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'30"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:09
Song You Have To Hear - Little Wing
BODY:
It's the 25th Anniversary of the day a helicopter went down traveling from Alpine Valley to Chicago, after a legendary show that featured Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray. Guitar legend Stevie Ray Vaughan was on that helicopter, with three other members of his team: bodyguard Nigel Brown, tour manager Colin Smythe and legendary agent Bobby Brooks.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'49"

13:18
Dunedin Butchers - James Biggs and Ben Henry
BODY:
A couple of Dunedin lads are sharpening their knives. They're about to head off to the National Butchers competition final in Auckland next month. James Biggs is representing the Lower South Island in the '2015 Young Butcher' final, and Ben Henry's made it into the 'Apprentice of the Year' final.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: National Butchers competition
Duration: 8'03"

13:26
New Zealand Fashion Week - Kelly Thompson
BODY:
It's day four of New Zealand Fashion Week and today we're speaking with expat fashion illustrator and photographer, Kelly Thompson. She's based in Melbourne where she's worked on major international campaigns for Covergirl, Escada Paris, Maybelline and Saatchi and Saatchi. We catch up with her at the delegates lounge just before she nips into another fashion show.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Fashion Week, fashion
Duration: 5'37"

13:32
Sister Anzac - Amanda Rees
BODY:
With the 100 year commemorations of Gallipoli and Chunuk Bair we've heard a lot recently about the battles and sacrifice thousands of New Zealand men made in World War One. But we don't hear much about what women did. A theatre show about to open in Auckland, Sister Anzac, will shed more light on womens' stories of war, in particular the nurses who went to Gallipoli on the hospital ship, The Maheno.
Topics: history, arts
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Sister Anzac, WW1
Duration: 9'14"

13:41
Feature Album
BODY:
London Grammar - If You Wait. Chosen by Judith McNeill.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'17"

14:10
Dunedin Hotels - Norcombe Barker
BODY:
Does Dunedin need to lift it's game on hotel accommodation?
Topics: business
Regions: Otago
Tags: hotels
Duration: 3'54"

14:14
Road map: Kaeo
BODY:
It's Kaeo on the roadmap today, a little village tucked into a green valley at the top of a magnificent Harbour in Northland.
EXTENDED BODY:
Introducing a little Northland village tucked into a green valley at the top of a magnificent harbour.
Kaeo gets its name from a kind of freshwater mussel unique to nearby Whangaroa Harbour. Once an important early European settlement, Kaeo's population fell as timber was shipped out and farming started. Now it's a village of nearly 500 (495, to be exact) with three new people since the last census!
Jesse Mulligan talks with locals Bruce Mills, Patricia Tairua, Lindsay Murray, Geoff Stone and Olive Sheppard.
Topics: life and society, history
Regions:
Tags: Kaeo
Duration: 46'14"

15:10
The Expats - Chris Byrne from Woodstock Ontario
BODY:
Chris has more than 30 years experience in the radio industry, and is using these skills to help stations across Canada improve their ratings and performance. He also owns his own FM radio station in Ontario.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: radio, Chris Byrne
Duration: 11'31"

15:20
Masterpieces - Don McGlashan
BODY:
Singer/songwriter Don McGlashan talks about his favourite NZ song - SJD's Beautiful Haze.
EXTENDED BODY:
Singer/songwriter Don McGlashan talks about his favourite NZ song – SJD's Beautiful Haze.
Related stories

SJD: Songs From a Dictaphone - interview
Songs From A Dictaphone - Review
NZ Live - SJD
NZ Live - Don McGlashan
Don McGlashan - Lucky Stars
Don McGlashan in Session 2012
The Mutton Birds Live 2012
Don McGlashan and Neil Finn play Don's song 'Andy' in the stairwell at Roundhead studios

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Don McGlashan
Duration: 11'57"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'07"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Songs You Have To Hear
Stevie Ray Vaughan - Little Wing.
It's the 25th Anniversary of the day a helicopter went down traveling from Alpine Valley to Chicago, after a legendary show that featured Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray. Guitar legend Stevie Ray Vaughan was on that helicopter, with three other members of his team: bodyguard Nigel Brown, tour manager Colin Smythe and legendary agent Bobby Brooks.
1:15 Dunedin Butchers - James Biggs and Ben Henry
A couple of Dunedin lads are sharpening their knives. They're about to head off to the National Butchers competition final in Auckland next month. James Biggs is representing the Lower South Island in the '2015 Young Butcher' final, and Ben Henry's made it into the 'Apprentice of the Year' final.
1:25 New Zealand Fashion Week - Kelly Thompson
It's day four of New Zealand Fashion Week and today we're speaking with expat fashion illustrator and photographer, Kelly Thompson. She's based in Melbourne where she's worked on major international campaigns for Covergirl, Escada Paris, Maybelline and Saatchi and Saatchi. We catch up with her at the delegates lounge just before she nips into another fashion show.
[image:46229:full]
1:30 Sister Anzac - Amanda Rees
With the 100 year commemorations of Gallipoli and Chunuk Bair we've heard a lot recently about the battles and sacrifice thousands of New Zealand men made in World War One. But we don't hear much about what women did. A theatre show about to open in Auckland, Sister Anzac, will shed more light on womens' stories of war, in particular the nurses who went to Gallipoli on the hospital ship, The Maheno.
1:40 Feature Album
London Grammar - If You Wait. Chosen by Judith McNeill.
2:10 Dunedin Hotels - Norcombe Barker
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull says the Dunedin City Council will soon begin a major push to attract hotel development to the city. The mayor was responding to criticism from a delegate at the Tourism Export Council conference in Dunedin about the city's accommodation.
2:20 Road map: Kaeo
It's Kaeo on the roadmap today, a little village tucked into a green valley at the top of a magnificent Harbour in Northland.
[gallery:1370]
3:10 The Expats - Chris Byrne from Woodstock Ontario
Chris has more than 30 years experience in the radio industry, and is using these skills to help stations across Canada improve their ratings and performance. He also owns his own FM radio station in Ontario.
3:25 Masterpieces - Don McGlashan
Singer/songwriter Don McGlashan talks about his favourite NZ song, SJD - Beautiful Haze.
3:35 Our Changing World - Vanuatu after Cyclone Pam
In March this year, Cyclone Pam descended on Vanuatu, destroying houses and most food crops. It was the worst natural disaster in the nation's history, and a reminder that tropical cyclones are becoming more intense as a consequence of climate change. Four months on, Veronika Meduna pays a visit.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'07"

16:03
The Panel with Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant have been up to. The bill has passed allowing bars to open to screen Rugby World Cup matches outside of the usual trading hours. A firefighter says being issued with a parking ticket when crew stopped to get some food was an over-the-top move by the parking warden. Telecommunications company Spark is laying off 400 workers. But it says it's business as usual and we won't feel a thing. How woried should we be about the Chinese economy and how it effects the rest of the world?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'59"

16:05
The Panel with Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant (Part 2)
BODY:
When, where and for how long is it ok to be on your mobile phone in public? What the Panelists Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant have been thinking about. The UK's controversial Labour candidate Jeremy Corbyn is being derided for suggesting a way to stop violence against womenon trains is to separate the genders. Dr Deborah Russell tells the Panel if she thinks this is a good idea. There's debate around comments by a former rugby league player about Labour MP Jacinda Ardern. What's the harm in calling Jacinda Ardern a "pretty little thing?" Dr Deborah Russell explains.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'48"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'46"

16:11
Which party's managed state housing best?
BODY:
What the Panelists Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant have been up to.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: state housing
Duration: 8'21"

16:19
Pubs to open for RWC
BODY:
The bill has passed allowing bars to open to screen Rugby World Cup matches outside of the usual trading hours.
Topics: politics, sport
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015, pubs
Duration: 2'43"

16:22
Fire truck parking ticket
BODY:
A firefighter says being issued with a parking ticket when crew stopped to get some food was an over-the-top move by the parking warden.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: tickets, fire engine
Duration: 1'32"

16:23
Spark jobs going
BODY:
Telecommunications company Spark is laying off 400 workers. But it says it's business as usual and we won't feel a thing.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Spark
Duration: 4'12"

16:27
The Great Fall of China
BODY:
How woried should we be about the Chinese economy and how it effects the rest of the world?
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: China, stock markets
Duration: 6'05"

16:36
Mobile phone etiquette
BODY:
When, where and for how long is it ok to be on your mobile phone in public?
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: mobile phones
Duration: 5'49"

16:43
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Bernard Hickey and Niki Bezzant have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'44"

16:52
Women only train carriages
BODY:
The UK's controversial Labour candidate Jeremy Corbyn is being derided for suggesting a way to stop violence against womenon trains is to separate the genders. Dr Deborah Russell tells the Panel if she thinks this is a good idea.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 4'45"

16:57
Pretty litttle thing
BODY:
There's debate around comments by a former rugby league player about Labour MP Jacinda Ardern. What's the harm in calling Jacinda Ardern a "pretty little thing?" Dr Deborah Russell explains.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: sexism
Duration: 2'53"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:08
'Dump and run' in state care
BODY:
A woman who spent years in multiple foster homes says the system is broken and cannot be repaired.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: CYF
Duration: 1'33"

17:10
Woman recalls her experience in multiple foster homes
BODY:
A woman in her late 40s has told us about her horrific experiences in state care and multiple foster homes in the late 70s. She was eleven when she was taken away from an abusive family member and put in Bollard Girls Home in Auckland where she spent the first few weeks in isolation.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: CYF
Duration: 8'57"

17:19
Māori trust hundreds of thousands of dollars in the red
BODY:
A Far North Trust board is hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt and now subject to a ministerial inquiry.
Topics: politics, te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags: Trust board
Duration: 2'51"

17:22
Fired journalist 'a human powder keg'
BODY:
A sacked journalist who gunned down two former colleagues during a live television broadcast in Virginia had described himself as a human powder keg just waiting to go boom.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA, shooting
Duration: 5'01"

17:27
Urgent review needed of crossings at train stations
BODY:
Flashing lights and bells weren't enough to stop Tejaskumar Patel who was killed when he walked in front of a train at Morningside Station in Auckland, in January.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Kiwi rail, deaths
Duration: 4'18"

17:35
Today's market update
BODY:
Fisher and Paykel Healthcare has upgraded its earnings forecast due to the lower dollar.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'13"

17:38
Landcorp's profit slumps
BODY:
Profits at the country's largest farmer, Landcorp, are down by about 80 percent. That's a drop from 30 million last year to just just four-point-nine-million-dollars. It's also carrying a debt of 2 hundred and 10 million dollars.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: Landcorp
Duration: 3'58"

17:41
No extra cash for CYF despite critical report
BODY:
The Social Development, Anne Tolley, is refusing to throw money at Child Youth and Family despite a grim report into how it looks after children in care.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: CYF
Duration: 2'31"

17:44
31 out of 32 truck shops in dodgy dealings
BODY:
An investigation into 32 truck shops has found all but one of them engaged in dodgy dealings.
Topics: business, law
Regions:
Tags: truck shops
Duration: 3'55"

17:48
Call for roll out of wahakura to curb Māori SUDI rates
BODY:
The alarmingly high rates of sudden unexpected death in Māori infants is prompting calls for a nationwide roll out of wahakura or baby sleeping pods. Between 2008 and 2012, 31 babies unexpectedly died in the Wellington region alone, 70 percent of them Māori. More than 100 people gathered at Kokiri Marae in Petone today to address the problem, and Te Manu Korihi reporter Leigh Marama McLachlan was there.
Topics: te ao Māori, health
Regions:
Tags: wahakura, SUDI
Duration: 3'41"

17:55
Mother makes emotional plea to MPs
BODY:
A Taranaki mother has made an emotional plea to MPs urging them to change the law so parents are told if their under-age child seeks an abortion.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: abortion, parents rights
Duration: 2'31"

17:57
Denver movie theatre killer to die in prison
BODY:
The guman who murdered 12 people and wounded 70, when he opened fire in a Colorado movie theatre, has been sentenced to 3,318 years in prison.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA, shooting, James Eagan Holmes
Duration: 2'23"

18:06
Sports News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'43"

18:11
Former CYF ward says he felt like a prisoner
BODY:
As a blistering report of state care for children is released, one former ward says he felt like a burden, worthless, and like a prisoner.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: CYF
Duration: 3'06"

18:14
Stop using multiple foster homes - carer
BODY:
A Wellington woman who's taken on the care of two young children says the practice of using multiple foster homes has got to stop.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: CYF
Duration: 4'28"

18:19
Live TV murders of camera crew unlikely to lead to copycats
BODY:
The murder of a reporter and camerman - as they were going live into a news broadcast in the United States - has triggered fears of copy cat killings because of the way their killer publicised their deaths.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: USA, shootings
Duration: 3'56"

18:22
Court action to clear up overlapping Treaty claims
BODY:
High Court action's been instigated to clear up overlapping Treaty claims on Auckland.
Topics: law, politics, te ao Māori
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: treaty settlements
Duration: 3'28"

18:26
Dairy owner's killer seeks continued name suppression
BODY:
The teenager convicted of the manslaughter of Auckland dairy owner Arun Kumar has gone to the Court of Appeal in a bid to stop his name being published. [regions
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: Arun Kumar, Court of Appeal
Duration: 3'06"

18:35
Fewer people admitted to hospital with rheumatic fever
BODY:
Fewer people are being admitted to hospital with rheumatic fever but the Minister of Health says there is still a lot to do.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: rheumatic fever
Duration: 2'20"

18:36
Community group to keep fighting development despite failed bid
BODY:
A community group opposing a Special Housing Area in south Auckland says the fight's not over yet, despite losing round one in an Auckland Council meeting today.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Special Housing Area
Duration: 3'20"

18:47
Te Manu Korihi News for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Ngati Whatua Orakei are heading to court to get clarity from the Crown on overlapping Treaty claims; A Far North Māori trust board which received 1.4 million dollars in Government funding last year is under a ministerial investigation; The alarmingly high rates of sudden unexpected death in Māori infants is prompting calls for a nationwide roll out of wahakura or baby sleeping pods;
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'25"

18:51
Today In Parliament for 27 August 2015 - evening edition
BODY:
Government pushes through its Health & Safety Reform legislation with just minutes to spare before the House rises; Questions and Snap Debate on Children's Commissioner's State of Care report; Electoral Commission chairman laments declining youth enrolment rates in a submission to the Justice and Electoral Committee's inquiry into the 2014 election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'50"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:10
The growth delusion
BODY:
The history of the economic tool known as Gross Domestic Product (or GDP), which has become a universal measure of progress (regardless of its unsuitability for this purpose). With Dr Dirk Philipsen, professor of Economic History and Sustainability at the Kenan Institute. His latest book is The Little Big Number: How GDP Came to Rule the World and What to Do about It.
Topics: economy, history, business
Regions:
Tags: GDP, gross domestic product
Duration: 23'04"

19:10
Comics
BODY:
Shading in the heroes and villains of an animated realm is cartoonist, writer and illustrator Adrian Kinnaird. Reviews of The Sculptor by Scott McCloud and Here by Richard McGuire.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: comics, animation, illustration
Duration: 16'03"

20:59
Conundrum Clue Seven - Thursday 27 August
BODY:
Conundrum Clue Seven.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16"

21:59
Conundrum Clue eight - Thursday 27 August
BODY:
Conundrum Clue eight.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:10 The growth delusion
The history of the economic tool known as Gross Domestic Product (or GDP), which has become a universal measure of progress (regardless of its unsuitability for this purpose). With Dr Dirk Philipsen, professor of Economic History and Sustainability at the Kenan Institute. His latest book is The Little Big Number: How GDP Came to Rule the World and What to Do about It.
7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies for 27 August 2015
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal as a troubled boxer; Vacation - a sequel/remake of the old 80s comedy; and She's Funny That Way, Peter Bogdanovich's tribute to the classic comedies of the forties.
EXTENDED BODY:

Simon Morris reviews Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal as a troubled boxer; Vacation - a sequel/remake of the old 80s comedy; and She's Funny That Way, Peter Bogdanovich's tribute to the classic comedies of the forties.
The big picture with Simon Morris
Over the past few weeks we’ve been assaulted from both sides – the Northern summer’s usual barrage of blockbusters on the right, and the riches of the mid-year Film Festival on the left. When that happens your ordinary, mainstream movies tend to duck for cover.
But they’re back… which means we can be selective. I don’t think we need to bother with Hitman Agent 47 – a decidedly average-looking shoot-em-up based on a video game.
Instead this week we’re offered all sorts of exciting alternatives – like the long-awaited follow-up to that classic Eighties comedy National Lampoon’s Vacation. All right, perhaps “Long-awaited” may be overstating our anticipation, while “classic” is definitely only true if you were young and dumb in 1983. As it turned out, the word “comedy” may not be quite the word I was looking for either.
For the discerning movie buff, the real thing is the genuinely classic “screwball comedies” of the glory days of Hollywood in the 1940s. And nobody knows Hollywood history better than critic turned film-maker Peter Bogdanovich. She’s Funny That Way is a tribute to the brilliant comedies of Billy Wilder, Preston Sturges and Howard Hawks.
But recognising a great comedy is one thing. Being able to duplicate it is quite another. About five minutes into She’s Funny That Way, I started to wish I’d gone to Hitman Agent 47 instead.
But this is being wise after the event. The one film that picked itself this week was that generally safe bet – the boxing movie. Sports films generally don’t work outside their home territory. Baseball means nothing in Europe, soccer is a mystery to Americans, and so on. But boxing is different. It’s primal, exciting, often tragic and perfect for the movies. Raging Bull, Rocky, Somebody Up There Likes Me, Million Dollar Baby – the number of award-winning films about the fight game is seemingly endless. This week sees a new one – Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 23'39"

19:35
Southpaw - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews boxing drama Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Rachel McAdams, and Forrest Whitaker.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by Antoine Fuqua, starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Rachel McAdams
Simon Morris reviews boxing drama Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Rachel McAdams, and Forrest Whitaker, and finds the old boxing movie still has legs.
Southpaw is a standard boxing movie, but it’s one with better credentials than I was expecting.
Compared to its towering predecessors, it’s an expertly-made B-movie perhaps, rather than a timeless classic. The elements we expect to see: corrupt managers, Billy Hope’s (Gyllenhaal) reckless behaviour and the lives of the kids at Forrest Whitaker’s gym - are slightly glossed over. But the performances fill in the gaps in the script. Unlike many recent, bigger films, there’s a lot of heart underpinning the action. But it resists the temptation to lay on the sentiment with a shovel.
It’s to the credit of director Antoine Fuqua that, having picked the right actors, he stays out of their way and lets them get on with it.
Expect to see Southpaw figure in next year’s Academy Awards. Let’s face it, Oscar has always loved a great boxing movie!
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 7'39"

19:45
Vacation - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews a belated sequel to the 1980s gross-out comedy, National Lampoon's Vacation, featuring Ed Helms, Christina Applegate and star of the first film, Chevy Chase.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by John Francis Daley and Jonathan M Goldstein, starring Ed Helms, Christina Applegate and Chris Hemsworth.
Simon Morris reviews a belated sequel to the 1980s gross-out comedy, National Lampoon's Vacation, featuring Ed Helms, Christina Applegate and star of the first film, Chevy Chase, and wonders if it is merely a cynical redo.
Many years ago, I found myself in New York City, going to the world premiere of the first film by the prestigious humour magazine National Lampoon.
National Lampoon was then a sort of rock and roll New Yorker, home to writers like P J O’Rourke and John Hughes, to performers like Christopher Guest, Bill Murray and musician Paul Schaffer. And the film was called Animal House.
My disappointment at the low-brow idiocy of Animal House was crushing – but it was just the start. National Lampoon made a string of gross-out comedies throughout the Eighties, and the grossest, and most shameless, were the Vacation films, starring Chevy Chase.
To be fair to the new Vacation, it’s no worse than the original ones, despite what a number of Eighties-generation critics may say. They were all as awful as this, though I wonder if the new generation of teenagers may be initially puzzled at the phenomenon.
Vacation is that thankfully rare thing – an R-rated family movie.
I don't know what this says about the state of families today, but the good news for cinema proprietors is that there seems to be a market for it. The teenagers sitting around me dutifully giggled at every inappropriate line in the movie, even if most of them weren’t exactly “jokes” in the strictly literal sense of the word.
The biggest laugh in the film comes when the family has a long, luxurious dip in a sewer outlet, which says so much about Vacation on so many levels.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review, Vacation
Duration: 5'47"

19:50
She's Funny That Way - film review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews Peter Bogdanovich's attempt to revive the old Forties "screwball comedy" in She's Funny That Way, starring Owen Wilson and Jennifer Aniston.
EXTENDED BODY:
Directed by Peter Bogdanovich, starring Owen Wilson, Imogen Poots and Jennifer Aniston.
Simon Morris reviews Peter Bogdanovich's attempt to revive the old Forties "screwball comedy" in She's Funny That Way, starring Owen Wilson and Jennifer Aniston, and finds it to be a back-handed compliment to some even older comedies.
Back in the Forties – the Golden Age of the so-called “screwball comedy” - smart, literate film-makers offered witty, grown-up entertainments like The Lady Eve, Ball of Fire and His Girl Friday that still stand up pretty well today.
Over the years, screwball fans like Woody Allen and the Coen Brothers have attempted, with varying success, to revive the genre. But there’s no screwball fan like former film critic Peter Bogdanovich – he’s written books on the subject. And he’s decided to show the young folks what they’re missing with his new film She’s Funny That Way.
Let me put you out of your misery. There’s no wit, the script refuses to sparkle and the situations hang together as badly as wet toilet paper. The fact is, Peter Bogdanovich may be able to write incisive books about movies. He just can’t write movies. He certainly has no idea how to write punchlines.
In defense of the cast, they do what they can with the little they’re given, but you can’t make bricks without straw. She’s Funny That Way is full of half-remembered bits from half-remembered films. The characters are stock figures from another age, all without exception played by the wrong actors.
The worst thing is that clearly Bogdanovich thought he was making this film specifically for me. I’m sorry, She’s Funny That Way is an insult to far better films, and worse, it’s not remotely funny that – or any other – way.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, film review
Duration: 6'03"

7:30 At the Movies
Films and movie business with Simon Morris
8:10 The Harragas of Algeria

Algeria is supposedly a beacon of stability in a troubled region and it enjoys vast wealth from its oil and gas resources. Yet it remains a major source of illegal migrants to Europe and thousands continue to risk their lives crossing the sea to get there. They are known as ‘Harraga’ derived from the verb to burn in Arabic because they burn their identity documents. Lucy Ash meets some of those heading for Europe’s Eldorado and those bereaved friends and families of harragas who have disappeared in the Mediterranean.
8:40 Comics
Shading in the heroes and villains of an animated realm is cartoonist, writer and illustrator Adrian Kinnaird. Reviews of The Sculptor by Scott McCloud and Here by Richard McGuire
9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:06
Vanuatu after Cyclone Pam
BODY:
On 13 March 2015, Cyclone Pam hit Vanuatu. It was the worst natural disaster in the nation's history, and four months on, we ask how people are doing.
EXTENDED BODY:
by Veronika Meduna
On 13 March 2015, Cyclone Pam tore through Vanuatu. The category five storm caused widespread damage throughout the archipelago, leaving thousands of people homeless and destroying most crops. In Vanuatu’s capital Port Vila, on the main island Efate, most buildings were destroyed.
Radio New Zealand International journalist Koroi Hawkins caught the first possible flight - on a defence force Hercules - to Port Vila to report on the aftermath and to file these images.
Four months later, when I had an opportunity to visit Efate, Port Vila was returning to life, with cafes and shops reopened, amid ongoing construction, including a new convention centre. Cruise ships had also returned to the harbour.
Further out from the capital, at the Eratap village, villagers say they began rebuilding the day after the cyclone struck and most homes are inhabitable again. During the night of the cyclone, some sought shelter in the school, which lost its entire roof and is still waiting to be re-roofed.
Richard Shing, an archaeologist at the Vanuatu Cultural Centre, says people are now realising that they have to build better houses to be prepared for disaster. He says traditional building techniques could help increase resilience.
We have documented accounts of traditional houses that withstood hurricanes in the past. There is a style of housing, not practiced a lot today in Vanuatu, where the roof touches the ground and anchors the beams of the roof into the ground. Where I come from down south we use that a lot and what happens during a hurricane is that you leave your house and go and hide in the traditional hut, and you’re safe.

He says people are aware of climate change, and that it is likely to bring more intense cyclones.
Margaretha Wewerinke is a Dutch environmental law lecturer who moved to Vanuatu a day before Cyclone Pam hit. She has joined the law faculty at the University of the South Pacific, where she teaches law with a focus on equitable development. She says climate change is already affecting island nations throughout the Pacific.
Not long after she left the Netherlands, the Dutch people made legal history. In the world’s first climate liability suit, they brought a claim against the Dutch government for failing to meet its obligation to protect its citizens from dangerous climate change. As a result, the court ordered the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25 per cent within five years.
She says she would prefer if no legal action was needed, but “it may become desirable for people and nations to use legal action to hold people who pollute and those who have the power to regulate polluting activities to account”.
Topics: environment, climate
Regions:
Tags: Vanuatu, Cyclone Pam, Pacific, tropical cyclones, climate change
Duration: 11'51"

21:20
Volcanic Hazard at Mt Taranaki
BODY:
Mt Taranaki is one of New Zealand's most distinctive volcanoes, with a history of euptions and the potential to erupt again in the future.
EXTENDED BODY:
Mt Taranaki, the second-highest mountain in the North Island, has a classic cone shape, which indicates that it is an active volcano. Detailed studies by scientists at Massey University have worked out the history of Mt Taranaki's volcanic eruptions over the last 130,000 years. The team found that while eruptions have not occurred at regular intervals, on average there has been a moderate-sized eruption every 340 years, with numerous small ones.
Mt Taranaki last erupted around 1854, at the culmination of several eruptions in the preceding few hundred years. The western side of the Taranaki region is a volcanic landscape, constructed from the products of eruptions. On three occasions, twice within a very short period of geological time, former cones have collapsed to the north-east, south-east and the west. In each instance extremely large volumes of material flowed more than 40 kilometres across the landscape, reaching the present Taranaki coastline. They have created the distinctive mounds or hummocks on the lowlands surrounding the volcano.
Geologists think of Mt Taranaki as a "slumbering" volcano - active, in a state of quiescence, but certainly not extinct.
Any future eruptions could bring ground-hugging lava flows and landslides or more volatile explosions of ash and pumice. To find out more, Ruth Beran meets Massey University PhD student Rafael Torres-Orozco at his study site below the Curtis Ridge to talk about Mt Taranaki’s volcanic history, its potential for future eruptions and the damage that it could cause.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Mt Taranaki, Volcanic hazard, pyroclastic eruptions
Duration: 17'44"

21:34
The Bugs are in the House
BODY:
After a year it's time to find out what's taken up residence in Lincoln University's Bug Hotels
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
A year ago some little, brightly-coloured buildings appeared around the campus of Lincoln University. With names like the Bug Ale House and the Blue Lagoon Hotel, they are Bug Hotels, also called Insect Hotels. They were built by landscape architecture students, with advice from ecology students, and the idea is to encourage native biodiversity by giving creepy crawlies places to live and raise a family in.
“We call them Insect Hotels,” says Nathan Curtis, an ecology tutor at Lincoln Unviersity. “But we’re obviously looking for any little invertebrates … all sorts of things that might be helping the environment.” He also pointed out that the hotels might provide a safe refuge for lizards.

Twelve months on ‘Bug Bloke’ Rob Cruickshank, one of the masterminds behind the Bug Hotels, is curious to find out what has taken up residence. I joined Rob and Nathan on a demolition job to investigate, which raised an interesting dilemma: how do you judge whether your Bug Hotel is succeeding without destroying it?
The answer is that you can’t, so Rob and Nathan opted to closely investigate just two of the Bug Hotels that had already been condemned because of tree felling in the immediate area, in one case, and building work in the other case.
The first Bug Hotel they autopsied was a small multi-coloured, multi-storey affair that had been in a copse of vegetation by the side of the road. The second one was a letterbox-based design that had been in a shrubbery next to a path. Both hotels used a range of materials to try and attract a variety of invertebrates, including dried grass, sphagnum moss, pine needles, old toilet roll tubes, corrugated cardboard, bits of bamboo, lengths of wood with holes drilled along their length, pine cones and a wide variety of other materials. Rob noted that among the features that make an effective Bug Hotel are the use of mesh across the front and back to prevent all this small material from spilling out.
“Lots of insects are thigmotactic,” says Rob. “They like to crawl into narrow spaces between things and feel their body pushed against the side of the place they’re hiding away in.”

Some hotels are made of untreated timber, and the idea is that these will slowly rot into the surrounding environment, providing home to different kinds of creatures over time, including wood-boring beetles. Other hotels are painted, to keep them weather-tight. Yellow, blue and white colours were chosen as they have been shown to attract different kinds of insects.
We were searching the Bug Hotels in the middle of winter, when there is less invertebrate activity, and there was only a small amount of evidence that the Bug Hotels had been used by insects such as weevils. The most common critters collected were spiders; “it was about six spiders to one insect,” noted Nathan.
While the number of residents was low, Rob pointed out that the hotels were not just for insects, but were there for people as well.
“The Bug Hotels are there to draw people in, give them something to look at, and help them think about the value of biodiversity.”

In a recent Our Changing World story on spiders, Cor Vink from Canterbury Museum showed me how most of the spiders around our houses are introduced species. Since the idea of the Bug Hotels is to encourage native biodiversity, Rob and Nathan were keen to find out if the spiders taking up residence in the Bug Hotels were native or introduced. I delivered the eight spiders found in the two hotels to Cor Vink at the museum, and he identified them as being two native species, two endemic species, one introduced species and three indeterminate (they weren’t mature so it was not possible to identify them). And, since spiders were the most abundant resident in the two Bug Hotels sampled, Cor agreed with me that perhaps they should be renamed Spider Hotels.
Spider ID
New Zealand has about 2000 species of spiders. There are about 70 introduced spiders in New Zealand, and they are mostly found in highly modified habitats. Here is a list of the spiders found in the Bug Hotels:
Garden orbweb spider (Eriophora pustulosa): the most common orb web species in New Zealand. It is a native species that was originally from Australia and arrived in New Zealand by ballooning, using silk threads to float with the wind. It’s called pustulosa because it has five pustules or knobs at the end of its abdomen. As its name suggests, it builds a web, and also builds a messy grey-green egg sac to lay its eggs in.
Australian ground spider (Nyssus coloripes): was probably introduced to New Zealand by people in the 1940s. They are hunters that don’t build a web and are very common around houses as well as in native habitat. They have orange front legs and white spots on their back and back legs.
Cobweb spider (Cryptachaea veruculata): is native to New Zealand and Australia, and common around bush edges and in gardens.
Square-ended cobweb spider (Episinus antipodianus): an endemic species in the family Theridiidae. It hangs upside down on a few threads of silk and catches prey from this position.
Square-ended crab spider (Sidymella spp): are ambush predators rather than web builders and lie in wait for their prey. Cor wasn’t entirely sure what species this was at first glance, but highly likely to be endemic (although there are several introduced species).
Ground spider (Scotophaeus pretiosus): Cor said that we have a number of endemic species, but we don’t know the status of this one. It’s thought to be introduced as it has no close relatives in New Zealand, however it’s also not been found anywhere else.
There were also two native jumping spiders, but as both were immature Cor wasn’t able to identify them – identification of spiders is often based on the genitalia of adult males. There are about 200 species of jumping spider in New Zealand, but although they’re a well-known group only about 50 are described, and Cor says you’d only be able to identify about 12 species based on the descriptions.
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: inverebrates, spiders, bugs, insects, insect hotels, bug hotels, ecology, biodiversity
Duration: 19'15"

21:46
Berry Good News for the Brain
BODY:
Plant and Food Research have shown that blackcurrants can help in tasks involving memory and concentration
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“We design foods, or mixtures of food, that have an appreciable effect on mood or cognition. The two main targets were around learning and memory, and anxiety, sleep and stress. We want to find something that can relax people to a degree, without making them stupid. And that’s actually quite a challenge.”
Arjan Scheepens, Neuroscientist, Plant and Food Research.

The Mood Food research programme, run by Plant and Food Research has spent the last few years trying to identify food that has a proven health benefit. And they’ve recently announced a success – blackcurrants. Their research has shown that New Zealand-grown blackcurrants not only increase mental performance, but also reduce the activity of monoamine oxidases.
“We specifically were looking for things that inhibit enzymes called monoamine oxidases. As their name suggests they oxidise mono-amines, and mono-amines are things like dopamine, serotonin and noradrenalin. These are really important neuro-transmitters … they’re the good guys and more is generally better than less.”
Neuroscientist Arjan Scheepens says that serotonin is involved in depression, while dopamine is involved partly in depression and anxiety, but also in movement disorders such as Parkinsons.
“If you can inhibit the enzyme that removes dopamine, then you should have higher dopamine levels and this should be of benefit to people who don’t have enough.”
Previous research carried out in the lab had showed that compounds found in some berryfruits may act like monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The latest research tested the effects of blackcurrant consumption on adults – as it was a food, not a new drug, it was very easy to carry out these clinical trials.
Participants in the study were 36 healthy adults aged between 18 and 35 years. They consumed a 250ml drink prior to conducting a set of demanding mental performance assessments. The participants consumed either a sugar and taste-matched placebo (no blackcurrant), an anthocyanin-enriched New Zealand blackcurrant extract (Delcyan™ from the company Just the Berries) or a cold-pressed juice from the New Zealand blackcurrant cultivar ‘Blackadder’, bred by Plant & Food Research. The assessments showed that after consuming the Delcyan™ and ‘Blackadder’ drinks, attention and mood were improved while mental fatigue was reduced. In addition, blood tests showed that the activity of the monoamine oxidase enzymes (MAO) was strongly decreased after consuming the ‘Blackadder’ juice, indicating the potential for compounds found in ‘Blackadder’ blackcurrants as a functional food ingredient to support brain health or managing the symptoms of disorders like Parkinson’s disease.
Research results have been published in the Journal of Functional Foods: “Acute supplementation with blackcurrant extracts modulates cognitive functioning and inhibits monoamine oxidase-B in healthy young adults.”
Before you rush out in search of the products mentioned, Plant and Food Research say they are not aware of any products on the market containing only juice from the New Zealand cultivar 'Blackadder'. Blackadder is a commercial cultivar is not currently available to the home gardener.
Plant & Food Research also say they have only analysed the cultivar 'Blackadder' for its effect on cognition in healthy young people - although it is possible that other varieties may have a similar effect this has never been scientifically tested. They have not tested the effects of 'Blackadder', or any other blackcurrant variety, in people with cognition or mood disorders, such as Parkinson’s, depression or anxiety, and are not able to comment on potential effects.
Topics: science, health, food
Regions:
Tags: blackcurrants, mood, brain, Parkinson's Disease, memory
Duration: 15'57"

21:48
Neutrinos - a Poem
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Neutrinos is a poem by Janis Freegard from her collection The Glass Rooster, published by Auckland University Press
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‘Neutrinos’ is a poem by Wellington poet and novelist Janis Freegard. It is part of her poetry collection The Glass Rooster, published by Auckland University Press (2015). We featured it on Our Changing World to mark National Poetry Day on 28th August.
We recently featured an interview about Neutrinos with the University of Canterbury’s Jenni Adams.
Topics: science, books
Regions:
Tags: poetry, neutrinos
Duration: 2'09"

9:06 Our Changing World
Science and environment news from New Zealand and the world.
10:17 Late Edition
A review of the leading news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 Music 101 pocket edition
Kody Nielson as Silicon, Alessia Cara's dreams and Opposite Sex as Hamlet
[video] http://youtu.be/dZliewYZIy4

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

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Year 2015

Reference number 274435

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 27 Aug 2015