Radio New Zealand National. 2015-04-05. 00:00-23:59, [Good Friday and Daylight Saving ends].

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

05 April 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns for Sunday; (extra hour for Daylight saving) 2:05 Can the World get Richer Forever? (BBC); 3:05 A50 and Ernest Trugood, by John Trenwith (9 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Monster in the Library, by Murray Reece, told by Cameron Rhodes; Moira and Liputia, written and told by Apirana Taylor with assorted other actors; Release the Beast, by Romy Sai Zunde, told by Jamie McCaskill; Hairy McClary's Bone, by Lynley Dodd, told by Miranda Harcourt; Easter Story, by Apirana Taylor, told by Carol Smith (RNZ)

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries including Insight, sport from the outfield, politics from the insiders, plus Mediawatch, music and The Week in Parliament

=AUDIO=

07:15
The impact of extreme weather events
BODY:
Ned Olney is the country director for Save the Children's Philippine office. He speaks to Wallace about the devastating impact of extreme weather events, and why we need to help Pacific nations adapt better to climate change.
Topics: international aid and development, Pacific, climate, weather
Regions:
Tags: Philippines, climate change
Duration: 13'41"

07:20
Kenya terror attack
BODY:
This week Kenya suffered its worst terrorist attack since the 1998 bombing of the United States embassy in Nairobi. Gunmen from the Al Shabab militant group killed nearly 150 people at Garissa University - many were told that if they came out they would live, only to be lined up and shot in the back of the head. Wallace talks to ABC Africa correspondent Martin Cuddihy.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Africa, Al Shabab, terrorism, Kenya
Duration: 5'19"

07:30
The Week in Parliament for 5 April 2015
BODY:
Winston Peters debuts as MP-elect for Northland. Sparks fly in General Debate, followed by debate on two Christchurch-related bills on members' day. Justice & Electoral Committee hears submissions on Coroners Amendment Bill. Government Administration Committee considers petition on fireworks. Parliament adjourns for three weeks
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'40"

07:35
The Week In Parliament for 5 April 2015
BODY:
Winston Peters's return to Parliament following his win in the Northland by-election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'43"

07:43
Fijian opposition staffers badly under-resourced
BODY:
Alex Perrottet reports on staffers for opposition members of the Fiji Parliament, who say they are grossly under-resourced, cannot afford to hire a single staffer, and the Secretary General of Parliament is not playing fair.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: Fiji
Duration: 2'59"

07:50
Jason Young - Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank
BODY:
The BBC, The People's Daily and Al Jazeera have all reported that New Zealand was the first western nation to sign up to join the proposed Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank. But Finance Minister Bill English said this week that negotiations were still in their early stages and any decision on whether New Zealand would become a founder member was still months away. Jason Young, a lecturer in international relations, has been following the debate in both the Chinese and Western media.
Topics: economy, politics
Regions:
Tags: China
Duration: 8'38"

08:12
Insight for 5 April 2015 - Demand for Elective Surgery
BODY:
Karen Brown explores the demand and continuing unmet need for elective surgery
EXTENDED BODY:
Doctors worry about rising demand for elective surgery and say many people are unable to get non-urgent surgery in public hospitals.
They have told Insight many face long waits or are digging deep and going private.
A Wellingtonian, who wishes to be known only as Gail, had a bone infection as a child and been told repeatedly by medical specialists that she would eventually need a hip replacement.
Things came to a head in 2013 when she was 56. "The pain was particularly bad for a long time. I couldn't sleep. So I went to my GP who arranged for me to have an x-ray, another x-ray... She was quite matter of fact: You've got no cartilage left, you need a hip replacement."
Gail failed to make the threshold initially for surgery, and only got over it after she and her GP insisted the Capital and Coast DHB reconsider. Gail had her surgery late last year but the initial rejection came as a shock.
"I couldn't walk as a matter of fact. Going to the supermarket was difficult."

Patients seeking non-urgent surgery must have their GP referral for a First Specialist Assessment at a DHB accepted. At that hospital appointment they then must score highly enough to meet the treatment threshold and be placed on the waiting list for surgery.
Another Wellingtonian, Ismay Barwell, 67, was also turned down. Her solution was to get a bank loan and have her hip replacement done privately. "If you can't walk properly you're building up back problems for yourself, or knee problems or something else. That was what I was wanting to prevent."
Rising unmet need
At the Canterbury Charity Hospital in Christchurch, a founder and general surgeon, Philip Bagshaw, says so-called unmet need for elective surgery is increasing. "Unquestionably it's getting more. We see more and more cases." He says the amount of non-urgent surgery has increased by about 3 percent a year, but it is not keeping up with population growth and the extra demands of an older population. He says timely treatment is the best treatment and saves money in the long run.
The Orthopaedic Association president, Wellington surgeon Brett Krause, says it's a worldwide problem, but better planning is needed. "Our concern is what's going to happen in the next 10 to 15 years because as you know the population is ageing and arthritis is more common in older age groups, and that means we're probably going to have a lot more patients with arthritic hips and knees and shoulders and ankles and elbows."
A Canterbury orthopaedic surgeon, Gary Hooper, says the difficulty in gaining access to surgery affects some more than others. "If you've got a hip or knee which is osteoporosis then you've got a reasonable surety you're going to get that operation done in the public hospital in the forseeable future. But if you've got a bunion or you have some other problem with your musculoskeletal system that requires surgery that's neither ACC not hip or knee arthritis, then they're the patients that are slipping through the framework at the moment."
Family doctors say it's frustrating for doctors and their patients. The Medical Association chairman Mark Peterson says what they most want to see is how many patients cannot get a First Specialist Assessment at a hospital outpatients clinic, as well as those who are seen and assessed as needing surgery but then do not make it onto the waiting list. "Once we have an idea of the exact numbers then we can actually do some planning to actually predict how we can deal with that in the future."
Limited health dollar
But others argue new ways are needed to better target the limited health dollar. A Wellington surgeon, Nigel Willis, says there is unmet need and better methods -- known as tools -- are needed to help surgeons make difficult decisions about who is most urgent.
"This is a whole new concept. It's not particularly familiar to most of us because historically we've just been able to do pretty much what we want to do when we want to do it.''

The government believes the system is delivering. Health Minister Jonathan Coleman says 44,000 more procedures have been done since 2008 when the National-led government took office, and considerable extra funding is going towards providing an extra 4000 procedures a year. As well, the Ministry will next year make available new data that will provide better information about what happens to all those referred by their GPs.
Follow Insight on Twitter

Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: hip replacement, cataract, hernia, aging, surgery, elective surgery
Duration: 28'02"

08:35
Vona Groarke - X
BODY:
The symbol 'X' can mean many things - X marks the spot where the treasure is hidden, it's a kiss at the end of a text, a place to put your signature, a mathematical symbol. Vona Groarke is a major voice in Irish poetry and her most recent collection is called X. She joins Wallace to talk about the great legacy of Irish poets.
EXTENDED BODY:
The symbol 'X' can mean many things – X marks the spot where the treasure is hidden, it's a kiss at the end of a text, a place to put your signature, a mathematical symbol.
Vona Groarke is a major voice in Irish poetry and her most recent collection is called X. She joins Wallace to unpick the meaning of X and to talk about the great legacy of Irish poets.
Vona Groarke is coming to New Zealand for the Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival in May.
She will also be speaking at the Auckland Writer's Festival later that month.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: poetry, Ireland
Duration: 9'51"

08:50
Trevor Noah - The Daily Show
BODY:
South African comedian Trevor Noah is the new host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show - he has big shoes to fill, taking over from Jon Stewart. Wallace talks to Trevor about his upbringing in South Africa and how these experiences influenced his comic work.
EXTENDED BODY:

South African comedian Trevor Noah is the new host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show – he has big shoes to fill, taking over from Jon Stewart.
Wallace talks to Trevor about his upbringing in South Africa and how these experiences influenced his comic work.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: The Daily Show, Jon Stewart, apartheid, television
Duration: 9'43"

09:10
Mediawatch for 5 April 2015
BODY:
Inflation of a nation's expectation - then deflation: the media and the World Cup Final; long-serving reporter voices fears about journalism going digital, RWC TV update; seedy pursuit of 'sex romp woman'; a talkback shift from hell.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30'30"

09:42
Alex Sarian - Creativity in the Classroom
BODY:
Alex Sarian is the Director of Finance & New Business of Lincoln Center Education, the education division of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York. He has recently been in New Zealand looking at how we incorporate arts education in our curriculum. He speaks to Wallace about the need for the education system to bring creativity into the classroom and why it is that we need to be shaping more creative economists, doctors and lawyers.
EXTENDED BODY:

Art at St Albans school in Christchurch. Photo by Donna Robertson. From the collection of Christchurch City Libraries (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
We want people to think like artists. With that we mean, to think creatively, to think with discipline, to think with rigour... things that are alive and well for people who practice an art form... these are the habits of mind we want young people to graduate school with, knowing they could take them into a medical degree or a law degree or justice...

Alex Sarian is the Director of Finance & New Business of Lincoln Center Education, the education division of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York. He has recently been in New Zealand looking at how we incorporate arts education in our curriculum.
He speaks to Wallace about the need for the education system to bring creativity into the classroom and why it is that we need to be shaping more creative economists, doctors and lawyers.
The Lincoln's Center's 10 habits of mind for imaginative thinking

notice deeply
embody
pose questions
identify patterns
make connections
empathise
live with ambiguity
create meaning
take action
reflect

Topics: arts, education
Regions:
Tags: Alex Sarian, The Lincoln Centre, creativity
Duration: 18'17"

10:10
Amos Hausner - The Eichmann Trial
BODY:
Amos Hausner's father, Gideon, was the lead prosecutor in the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann - one of the most written about trials of the 20th century. Amos Hausner followed in his father's footsteps becoming an attorney and later a judge on the Supreme Court of the World Zionist Organisation. He reflects on the lasting significance of the Eichmann trial, and shares his views on Palestine attaining formal membership of the International Criminal Court earlier this week.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Amos Hausner, Adolf Eichmann, Israel, International Criminal Court, WW2
Duration: 26'44"

10:35
Cardinal John Dew - Prayer and Protest
BODY:
Wellington's Archbishop John Dew was named a Cardinal earlier this year by Pope Francis. He talks to Wallace about being called to the priesthood, the church's work for social justice, the meaning of Easter in the modern world, and the hope placed in the Pope.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Easter, Catholic Church, Cardinal John Dew, prayer, protest
Duration: 22'43"

12:00
Easter Service Sunday 5 April 2015
BODY:
This year's Easter Service comes from Holy Trinity Cathedral in Parnell, Auckland. The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides. Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist. We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.
EXTENDED BODY:
This Festal Choral Eucharist for Easter comes from the Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.

The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides.
Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist.
We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.

Read the full Order of Service

Dean Jo opens her sermon by asking “Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?”
She goes on to explore what is not found in the Easter Day reading from St Mark’s Gospel – the kind of story-telling detail which provides an emotionally satisfying conclusion to the discovery that the tomb of Christ was empty. Instead, she says, “Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything! That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more.”
During the rest of the sermon, which you can read in full below, she considers the implications of this apparent failure in narrative technique on Christian belief and action.

Today’s service features the Holy Trinity Choir performing a communion setting by the UK composer David Briggs of his Truro Eucharist. Other music conducted by the Cathedral’s Director of Music Timothy Noon and played by organist Philip Smith includes some well-known hymns and traditional works ranging from a French arrangement of Gregorian chant, to a communion motet by William Byrd.
Music Details
This Radio New Zealand recording was produced by Justin Gregory, and engineered by Alex Baron.
All photos © Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.
Easter Choral Eucharist 2015
Acts 10:34-43, Mark 16:1-8
Is it bad ending after all?
A sermon by the Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?!
Well, if you applied that same temptation upon reading St Mark’s Gospel with the tension building as the Gospel writer records the authorities closing in to kill Jesus, if you skipped to the end you could run the risk of feeling truly surprised at the conclusion. What kind of ending is this? Now of course we find the testimony that indeed the tomb was empty – and the proclamation that Jesus is risen – but Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything!
That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more of the ‘what happened next!
In contrast, in today’s Easter reading, we hear from St Mark that awe and amazement, and probably a little fear, arrested these first witnesses in their tracks after they had witnessed the empty tomb.
Where then does Mark leave us as today we celebrate the truth of the risen Christ?
Well, first I think that this resurrection account encourages us to read and engage the Scriptures beyond our presumptions and hopes. We are challenged to seek to understand why it is then that different gospel writers, with different audiences, contexts and emphases, take different approaches in their recording of this, and numerous other, encounters with Jesus and his teaching. And in that engagement to remember that, for our understanding of our Christian faith, and the truth of the empty tomb, this phenomenon does not leave all the evidence seemingly rendered inadmissible, but rather serves to enrich our understanding of Christ and the situation of these early Christians.
Secondly then, what we know is that at the heart of it all four Gospel writers proclaim - Christ is risen! Together they are unified in their witness that the tomb is empty and that this was witnessed first by the women who had stayed faithfully with Christ at the cross and had come to tend him at his death. This empty tomb, the risen Christ, being God’s yes to the way of life and hope offered by Jesus in his living, a way of justice and peace, hope and love for all the world.
And last, but certainly not least, while it would seem this Gospel doesn’t end quite the way we might have expected or hoped perhaps, in fact, in that ending we are given the greatest gift.
For we find a silence into which we can, indeed are compelled to, place ourselves and to ask ‘What will I do after receiving this proclamation that the tomb is empty?’, ‘What is my response to the risen Christ?’
As Jesus asked his followers ‘Who do you say that I am?’, so the risen Christ asks us the same question. Who do you say that he is? And as Jesus told his disciples to live and proclaim the kingdom of God until he comes again, so the risen Christ gives us the same command. What is our response? In the ‘so what?’ of the seemingly absent ‘what happened next’ in Mark’s Gospel, we are reminded that this is our truth, our story, our commission – here and now.
We know that on this sacred day Christians will be gathered around the world to proclaim that Christ is risen because while the women’s initial response might have been to arrest them in their tracks, we know that their shock did not leave them there. We know that in fact, quite soon after, they did tell the story of the greatest hope that the world could ever hear, the story of life, and as a result we are here. Today reminds us then this ‘telling’ is now our task too.
And what might that telling look like?
It is about lives informed by resurrection life and hope, and therefore lived looking to the needs of others, especially those most in need.
As a nation then may we be generous to the people in Vanuatu as this Easter they continue to face the enormous challenge of rebuilding in the midst of their grief. May resurrection hope be theirs.
As communities around Aotearoa New Zealand, may resurrection life call us to care for our neighbours, those we know, those we have yet to meet, those in most need – reaching out practically and in peace and friendship, seeking understanding. And may we be generous so that those in our communities who care for the most marginalized have all the resources that they need.
And as individuals, may the truth of the risen Christ challenge us to examine how we live, what we do with what we have and how we live with those with whom we share our lives – that through us also might come justice and peace, hope and love.
Ultimately this Easter St Mark’s Gospel brings us to the heart of the matter. As it began Chapter 1:1 ‘The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God’; so it ends ‘Do not be alarmed; you are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has been raised.’
So was the response of those first witnesses a bad ending after all? I think we would have to say an emphatic No. Rather, it is an exciting one, an unexpected one, a challenging one, one that invites us into the story, and aren’t they, after all, usually the best endings?
AMEN
The Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Dean, Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity
Easter 2015
Topics: spiritual practices, music
Regions:
Tags: church service, Easter
Duration: 53'00"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:08 Current affairs
Ned Olney is the country director for Save the Children’s Philippine office. He speaks to Wallace about the devastating impact of extreme weather events, and why we need to help Pacific nations adapt better to climate change. Also this hour: Anti-terrorism protests in Tunisia, Opposition parties in Fiji struggle to pay their staff, and the new Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank, and The Week in Parliament.
8:12 Insight Demands for Elective Surgery
More than 165,000 New Zealanders had non-urgent or elective surgery last year – 60 per cent more than in 2003. They were the lucky ones who got through the complex and poorly understood system for choosing which patients are most in need of non-acute hip or knee replacement surgery, or treatment for hernias, varicose veins or cataracts.
Many others failed to make it onto public hospital waiting lists for surgery but were returned to the care of their family doctor to wait and hope for a better outcome in six months' time, or later. No one knows how big this group representing so-called unmet need is, but surgeons say it's growing as the population grows and ages. Radio New Zealand's health correspondent, Karen Brown, reports that surgeons want better planning, prioritisation based on benefit as well as need, and discussion about the limitations of the health system.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.

Philip Bagshaw with one of the operating sets donated to the hospital
8:40 Vona Groarke – X
The symbol 'X' can mean many things – X marks the spot where the treasure is hidden, it's a kiss at the end of a text, a place to put your signature, a mathematical symbol. Vona Groarke is a major voice in Irish poetry and her most recent collection is called X. She joins Wallace to unpick the meaning of X and to talk about the great legacy of Irish poets.
Vona Groarke is coming to New Zealand for the Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival in May.
She will also be speaking at the Auckland Writer's Festival later that month.
8:50 Trevor Noah – Daily Show
South African comedian Trevor Noah is the new host of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show – he has big shoes to fill, taking over from Jon Stewart. Wallace talks to Trevor about his upbringing in South Africa and how these experiences influenced his comic work.
9:06 Mediawatch
Mediawatch looks at how the media pumped up expectations ahead of the big cricket final last weekend – and then dealt with the disappointment of a heavy defeat. Also: A long-serving reporter voices fears for the future of news, and how the focus on a so-called “sex romp” turned off one paper’s readers.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Alex Sarian – Creativity in the Classroom
Alex Sarian is the Director of Finance & New Business of Lincoln Center Education, the education division of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York. He has recently been in New Zealand looking at how we incorporate arts education in our curriculum. He speaks to Wallace about the need for the education system to bring creativity into the classroom and why it is that we need to be shaping more creative economists, doctors and lawyers.
10:06 Amos Hausner – The Eichmann Trial
Amos Hausner’s father, Gideon, was the lead prosecutor in the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann – one of the most written about trials of the 20th century. Amos Hausner followed in his father’s footsteps becoming an attorney and later a judge on the Supreme Court of the World Zionist Organisation. He reflects on the lasting significance of the Eichmann trial, and shares his views on Palestine attaining formal membership of the International Criminal Court earlier this week.
10:30 Cardinal John Dew – Prayer and Protest
Wellington's Archbishop John Dew was named a Cardinal earlier this year by Pope Francis. He talks to Wallace about being called to the priesthood, the church’s work for social justice, the meaning of Easter in the modern world, and the hope placed in the Pope.

Cardinal John Dew, photo: Annette Scullion
11:05 Easter Service
This year’s Easter Service comes from Holy Trinity Cathedral in Parnell, Auckland. The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides. Timothy Noon, the Cathedral’s Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist.
Link to follow the words of the service and the hymns

=PLAYLIST=

ARTIST: Duke Ellington
SONG: Take the A Train
COMPOSER: B Strayhorn
ALBUM: Duke Ellington and his Orchestra - 1933 - 1941
LABEL: JAZZ ROOTS
BROADCAST TIME: 9:37

SONG: Va, Pensiero (Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves)
COMPOSER: Verdi Nabucco
ALBUM: Famous Opera Choruses
LABEL: Decca
BROADCAST TIME: 10:58

===11:06 AM. | Church Services===
=DESCRIPTION=

An Easter service from Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:00
Easter Service Sunday 5 April 2015
BODY:
This year's Easter Service comes from Holy Trinity Cathedral in Parnell, Auckland. The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides. Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist. We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.
EXTENDED BODY:
This Festal Choral Eucharist for Easter comes from the Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.

The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides.
Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist.
We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.

Read the full Order of Service

Dean Jo opens her sermon by asking “Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?”
She goes on to explore what is not found in the Easter Day reading from St Mark’s Gospel – the kind of story-telling detail which provides an emotionally satisfying conclusion to the discovery that the tomb of Christ was empty. Instead, she says, “Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything! That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more.”
During the rest of the sermon, which you can read in full below, she considers the implications of this apparent failure in narrative technique on Christian belief and action.

Today’s service features the Holy Trinity Choir performing a communion setting by the UK composer David Briggs of his Truro Eucharist. Other music conducted by the Cathedral’s Director of Music Timothy Noon and played by organist Philip Smith includes some well-known hymns and traditional works ranging from a French arrangement of Gregorian chant, to a communion motet by William Byrd.
Music Details
This Radio New Zealand recording was produced by Justin Gregory, and engineered by Alex Baron.
All photos © Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.
Easter Choral Eucharist 2015
Acts 10:34-43, Mark 16:1-8
Is it bad ending after all?
A sermon by the Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?!
Well, if you applied that same temptation upon reading St Mark’s Gospel with the tension building as the Gospel writer records the authorities closing in to kill Jesus, if you skipped to the end you could run the risk of feeling truly surprised at the conclusion. What kind of ending is this? Now of course we find the testimony that indeed the tomb was empty – and the proclamation that Jesus is risen – but Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything!
That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more of the ‘what happened next!
In contrast, in today’s Easter reading, we hear from St Mark that awe and amazement, and probably a little fear, arrested these first witnesses in their tracks after they had witnessed the empty tomb.
Where then does Mark leave us as today we celebrate the truth of the risen Christ?
Well, first I think that this resurrection account encourages us to read and engage the Scriptures beyond our presumptions and hopes. We are challenged to seek to understand why it is then that different gospel writers, with different audiences, contexts and emphases, take different approaches in their recording of this, and numerous other, encounters with Jesus and his teaching. And in that engagement to remember that, for our understanding of our Christian faith, and the truth of the empty tomb, this phenomenon does not leave all the evidence seemingly rendered inadmissible, but rather serves to enrich our understanding of Christ and the situation of these early Christians.
Secondly then, what we know is that at the heart of it all four Gospel writers proclaim - Christ is risen! Together they are unified in their witness that the tomb is empty and that this was witnessed first by the women who had stayed faithfully with Christ at the cross and had come to tend him at his death. This empty tomb, the risen Christ, being God’s yes to the way of life and hope offered by Jesus in his living, a way of justice and peace, hope and love for all the world.
And last, but certainly not least, while it would seem this Gospel doesn’t end quite the way we might have expected or hoped perhaps, in fact, in that ending we are given the greatest gift.
For we find a silence into which we can, indeed are compelled to, place ourselves and to ask ‘What will I do after receiving this proclamation that the tomb is empty?’, ‘What is my response to the risen Christ?’
As Jesus asked his followers ‘Who do you say that I am?’, so the risen Christ asks us the same question. Who do you say that he is? And as Jesus told his disciples to live and proclaim the kingdom of God until he comes again, so the risen Christ gives us the same command. What is our response? In the ‘so what?’ of the seemingly absent ‘what happened next’ in Mark’s Gospel, we are reminded that this is our truth, our story, our commission – here and now.
We know that on this sacred day Christians will be gathered around the world to proclaim that Christ is risen because while the women’s initial response might have been to arrest them in their tracks, we know that their shock did not leave them there. We know that in fact, quite soon after, they did tell the story of the greatest hope that the world could ever hear, the story of life, and as a result we are here. Today reminds us then this ‘telling’ is now our task too.
And what might that telling look like?
It is about lives informed by resurrection life and hope, and therefore lived looking to the needs of others, especially those most in need.
As a nation then may we be generous to the people in Vanuatu as this Easter they continue to face the enormous challenge of rebuilding in the midst of their grief. May resurrection hope be theirs.
As communities around Aotearoa New Zealand, may resurrection life call us to care for our neighbours, those we know, those we have yet to meet, those in most need – reaching out practically and in peace and friendship, seeking understanding. And may we be generous so that those in our communities who care for the most marginalized have all the resources that they need.
And as individuals, may the truth of the risen Christ challenge us to examine how we live, what we do with what we have and how we live with those with whom we share our lives – that through us also might come justice and peace, hope and love.
Ultimately this Easter St Mark’s Gospel brings us to the heart of the matter. As it began Chapter 1:1 ‘The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God’; so it ends ‘Do not be alarmed; you are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has been raised.’
So was the response of those first witnesses a bad ending after all? I think we would have to say an emphatic No. Rather, it is an exciting one, an unexpected one, a challenging one, one that invites us into the story, and aren’t they, after all, usually the best endings?
AMEN
The Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Dean, Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity
Easter 2015
Topics: spiritual practices, music
Regions:
Tags: church service, Easter
Duration: 53'00"

12:01
Eastertide
BODY:
Introit - This joyful Eastertide, arr. Wood
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'05"

12:02
Jesus Christ is risen
BODY:
Hymn - Jesus Christ is risen today, Lyra Davidica (tune Easter Hymn)
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'59"

12:03
Kyrie Eleison
BODY:
Kyrie Eleison - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'39"

12:04
Gloria
BODY:
Gloria - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 3'23"

12:05
Victimi paschali
BODY:
Gradual - Victimi paschali, Gregorian chant, arr. Jean Revert
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

12:06
At the Lamb's high feast we sing
BODY:
Hymn - At the Lamb's high feast we sing, tr. R Campbell (tune Salzburg).
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'29"

12:07
Sanctus and Benedictus
BODY:
Sanctus and Benedictus - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'37"

12:08
Agnus Dei
BODY:
Agnus Dei - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 1'44"

12:09
Haec Dies
BODY:
Holy Trinity Choir, Timothy Noon, Philip Smith,
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 2'15"

12:10
Thine be the Glory
BODY:
Hymn - Thine be the Glory, Budry tr. Hoyle, (tune Maccabeus)
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Duration: 3'14"

12:11
Toccata de la Resurrection
BODY:
Organ Sortie - Toccata de la Resurrection, Saint-Martin
Topics: music, spiritual practices
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Tags:
Duration: 2'23"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:12 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

Claire Gormly and Rose Jackson don't just dress up in vintage clothes, they live all things vintage. They've collected clothing, jewellery, hats and handbags from the Victorian era to the 1970s, in fact they rarely buy new clothes or accessories. But as their magazine Glory Days illustrates, vintage touches most things - classic motor scooters, films, furniture, etiquette and good manners - the list is endless. Spectrum's vintage Jack Perkins explores things vintage - excluding himself (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:05
All Things Vintage
BODY:
Claire Gormly and Rose Jackson don't just dress up in vintage clothes, they live things vintage. They've collected clothing, jewellery, hats, and handbags from the Victorian era to the 1970s, in fact they rarely buy new clothes or accessories. But as their magazine Glory Days illustrates, vintage touches most things:- classic motor scooters, films, furniture, etiquette and good manners- the list is endless. Spectrum's vintage Jack Perkins explores things vintage - excluding himself.
EXTENDED BODY:

Rose Jackson (left) and Claire Gormly, a passion for all thigs vintage.
‘We just live in op shops and recycle boutiques, in fact we rarely buy new clothes, jewellery, hats, handbags – you name it.’

But Claire Gormly and Rose Jackson don’t just dress up in vintage clothes, their passion for all things vintage is a way of life. As their magazine Glory Days illustrates, vintage touches most things, because most things have evolved and have a history: classic motor scooters, films, furniture, food; the list is endless.

Behind vintage objects lies social history; the lips of suffragettes boasted deep red lipstick as a protest proclaiming that women should wear what they wanted. Up to the 1900s, red lipstick was the mark of a harlot.

This memory box is one of Claire Gormly's favourites. A 1937 calendar, paper dolls, blue bow and velvet flowers all cosseted in a chocolate box. These were an anonymous girl's treasures.
Vintage is more about style rather than fashion – fashion is commercially driven and transient. Then there’s the psychological side,
‘wearing vintage garb makes us feel confident and we radiate that confidence to others.’

Claire picked up these vintage dresses for $30 or $40 but some vintage clothes can cost $600 upwards because the market is international thanks to the web.
All things vintage has also caught on with men, this often translates into displays of etiquette and good manners.
‘When a man opens a door for a woman it makes them both feel good’, say Claire and Rose.

Topics: history, life and society
Regions:
Tags: vintage fashion, fashion, retro
Duration: 22'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:40 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including:
3:04 The Drama Hour

=AUDIO=

12:38
Dictionary of Slang
BODY:
A comprehensive look at slang in New Zealand - imported words and more than 3500 distinctively Kiwi slang terms. Dictionary of Slang in New Zealand by Noel Kelly is published by Barque books and distributed by Bateman.
EXTENDED BODY:

Nek minnit and noog are among are among the recent additions recorded in a comprehensive new dictionary of Kiwi slang, lovingly collected by Noel Kelly.
Some of Noel Kelly's favourite Kiwi-isms

Appetite of a fantail – an appetite easily sated
All hui and no doey – all talk and no action
Away in the tea tree – person living remotely/person prone to daydreaming
Back door pensioner – retired sheep dog
Back up the truck! – think again/re-evaluate
Funny as a piece of string – extremely amusing
Give it some jandal – accelerate a motor vehicle
Helengrad – a jocular play on ‘Leningrad’ and Helen Clark’s robust leadership style
Finally… solar panel for a sex machine? You’ll have to listen to find out…

Noel explains his fascination with slang and the changing nature informal language in the internet age.
Dictionary of Slang in New Zealand by Noel Kelly is published by Barque books and distributed by Bateman.

We share much of our slang with our cousins over the ditch, including the ubiquitous 'no worries'. Photo: David Neubert (CC BY-SA 200)
Topics: language
Regions:
Tags: Kiwi Slang, slang
Duration: 9'39"

12:49
NZ On Screen classics
BODY:
Irene Gardiner seeks out spoofs from NZ On Screen's archives.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: spoofs
Duration: 8'14"

13:34
Kenneth Rae
BODY:
Expat Kenneth Rae started teaching acting at London's Guildhall School of Music and Drama around 30 years ago and his classes over the years have been studded with stars of the future like Daniel Craig, Ewan McGregor, Orlando Bloom, Michelle Dockery, Lady Mary in Downton Abbey and Damian Lewis of Homeland fame.
Topics: arts, education, music
Regions:
Tags: theatre
Duration: 11'40"

13:47
Sarah-Jayne Howard
BODY:
When Douglas Wright's new dance show The Kiss Inside opens in Auckland later this month, one very special dancer will be in the company. Arts Laureate Sarah-Jayne Howard has been dancing for Douglas since 2002 and he refers to her as his "muse". It's no small thing for our most revered choreographer to say and no small weight to carry around, either. So when Justin Gregory met Sarah-Jayne at rehearsals for the show, he asked her if being a muse means she gets any extra money.
EXTENDED BODY:
Sarah-Jayne Howard in The Kiss Inside. Image courtesy of Pippa Samaya.
When Douglas Wright’s new dance show The Kiss Inside opens in Auckland later this month, one very special dancer will be in the company. Arts Laureate Sarah-Jayne Howard has been dancing for Douglas since 2002 and he refers to her as his “muse”. It’s no small thing for our most revered choreographer to say and no small weight to carry around, either. So when Justin Gregory met Sarah-Jayne at rehearsals for the show, he asked her if being a muse means she gets any extra money.
Read more of Justin's interview with Sarah

Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: dance, choreography, muse
Duration: 11'43"

14:26
Revisiting Beckett
BODY:
Three rarely-performed Beckett plays include a revival of a production performed 30 years ago - same actor, same cast and even the same recording of Krapp's Last Tape. Ed Newborn and Paul Gittens talk about revisiting their production three decades on.
EXTENDED BODY:

A production by of three rarely-performed Beckett plays includes a revival of a 30 year-old performance – same actor, same cast and even the same recording of Krapp's Last Tape.
Ed Newborn and Paul Gittens talk about revisiting their production three decades on.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre, Samuel Beckett
Duration: 8'29"

14:38
Salt and Honey
BODY:
Aucklander Hannah Tunnicliffe ditched her day job in human resources to concentrate on writing and food, and writing about food. She started up a blog called Fork and Fiction and has just released her second novel published by McMillan, called Season of Salt & Honey.
EXTENDED BODY:
Aucklander Hannah Tunnicliffe ditched her day job in human resources to concentrate on writing and food, and writing about food. She started up a blog called Fork and Fiction and has just released her second novel published by McMillan, called Season of Salt & Honey. In it, her protagonist Frankie escapes into a Washington forest after a personal tragedy. Frankie’s dilemma and a whole bunch of Italian recipes are in it.

Topics: books, author interview
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Tags:
Duration: 10'23"

14:49
Cellist Claire Cowan
BODY:
Cellist and composer Claire Cowan is this year's composer in residence with Orchestra Wellington and she's also the creative director for a new show called Dreams that is about to premiere at Auckland's Basement theatre. Dreams opens at the Basement in Auckland on the 14th of April.
EXTENDED BODY:
Cellist and composer Claire Cowan is this year’s composer in residence with Orchestra Wellington and she's also the creative director for a new show called Dreams that is about to premiere at Auckland's Basement theatre. Dreams opens at the Basement in Auckland on the 14th of April.

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: composer, composer in residence, cello, theatre
Duration: 21'21"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:38 Dictionary of Slang
A comprehensive look at slang in New Zealand – imported words and more than three-and-a-half thousand distinctively Kiwi slang terms. Dictionary of Slang in New Zealand by Noel Kelly is published by Barque books and distributed by Bateman.

12:49 NZ On Screen classics
Irene Gardiner seeks out spoofs from NZ On Screen’s archives.
1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris
Simon Morris goes the ball – the latest version of Cinderella, directed by Sir Kenneth Brannagh. He also reviews two American comedies – Will Ferrell in Get Hard and Mark Ruffalo in the rather more improving Infinitely Polar Bear.
1:34 Kenneth Rae
Expat Kenneth Rae started teaching acting at London's Guildhall School of Music and Drama around 30 years ago and his classes over the years have been studded with stars of the future like Daniel Craig, Ewan McGregor, Orlando Bloom, Michelle Dockery, Lady Mary in Downton Abbey and Damian Lewis of Homeland fame.
Ken is from Rotorua originally, and headed to the UK after acting and directing in New Zealand in the 1970s, then studying theatre throughout Asia. Now he's finally written a book offering tips to would-be actors.The Outstanding Actor is published by Methuen.
1:47 Sarah-Jayne Howard
When Douglas Wright’s new dance show The Kiss Inside opens in Auckland later this month, one very special dancer will be in the company. Arts Laureate Sarah-Jayne Howard has been dancing for Douglas since 2002 and he refers to her as his “muse”. It’s no small thing for our most revered choreographer to say and no small weight to carry around, either. So when Justin Gregory met Sarah-Jayne at rehearsals for the show, he asked her if being a muse means she gets any extra money.
Sarah-Jayne Howard in The Kiss Inside. Image courtesy of Pippa Samaya.
2:05 The Laugh Track
Kylie Sealy is running this year’s NZ International Comedy Festival 2015.

2:26 Revisiting Beckett
Three rarely-performed Beckett plays include a revival of a production performed 30 years ago – same actor, same cast and even the same recording of Krapp's Last Tape. Ed Newborn and Paul Gittens talk about revisiting their production three decades on.

2:38 Salt and Honey
Aucklander Hannah Tunnicliffe ditched her day job in human resources to concentrate on writing and food, and writing about food. She started up a blog called Fork and Fiction and has just released her second novel published by McMillan, called Season of Salt & Honey. In it, her protagonist Frankie escapes into a Washington forest after a personal tragedy. Frankie’s dilemma and a whole bunch of Italian recipes are in it.

2:49 Cellist Claire Cowan
Cellist and composer Claire Cowan is this year’s composer in residence with Orchestra Wellington and she's also the creative director for a new show called Dreams that is about to premiere at Auckland's Basement theatre. Dreams opens at the Basement in Auckland on the 14th of April.

3:05 The Drama Hour
Small God by Jacues Strauss.

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A leading USA novelist places her book The Interestings within a life of writing (4 of 5, RNZ)

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

17:06
Spiritual Outlook for 5 April 2015
BODY:
What happens when the faith that we are born into doesn't align with who we are on the inside? We meet two young women who go on an exploration of self-discovery to find a path to freedom and self-acceptance.
EXTENDED BODY:

Claire Baker
“I think I was trying to escape some expectations that were put on me, while I was also trying to get recognition and love and support from my parents [so] it was a tricky time for anyone in their early twenties.”

– Christchurch-based Claire Baker says of having left Christianity behind in search for meaning and purpose.
What happens when the faith that we are born into doesn't align with who we are on the inside? Sonia Sly meets two young women who go on an exploration of self-discovery to find a path to freedom and self-acceptance.
The other side
A woman with a lust for the outdoors and seeking new challenges, Claire grew up in a Christian family, but throughout her life has looked to investigate other forms of religion in the hope of finding one that aligns with her sense of identity. “You only know what you know, especially thinking about a spectrum of conservativeness,” she says of her experience growing up as the daughter of a Presbyterian Minister.
Claire and her siblings attended church regularly with her parents opting not to live in a Manse for the sake of their children, although this didn’t exclude them from their role within the community. “I didn’t feel a great deal of pressure to be honest [but] I felt like I was a bit of a phone receptionist quite a lot… I was writing three messages a day and leaving them on the table. ”
By the age of fourteen, Claire began to experience feelings of unhappiness which triggered questions about her faith and her place of belonging. Overseas experience as an exchange student also prompted further questions about the way in which different people perceived, and related to God. Later, attending university and meeting people, also challenged her perspective: “I started getting around with a bit of a hippy crew and that really impacted on me and my way of seeing things. Before that, I guess I would describe myself as quite mainstream and didn’t really question things too much.”
Finding a clear purpose and sense of belonging has been challenging for Claire, who these days, adheres to yoga as her spiritual practice because it allows for clarity and inner peace: “Every person has so much power over themselves and that’s where I was quite stuck [and] dabbling around [other] religions… I guess I was trying to find a way to be happy and find some answers. I just had to learn to be nice to myself,” she says.

Bee calls herself a cultural liberalist
For Auckland-based Bee, asking questions and looking for answers is territory that she knows all too well.
Born into a strict Muslim family, her life’s path has been mired with obstacles as a woman who did not fit into the mould of her traditional Muslim upbringing.
Having always felt like an outsider, she believes that religion and threat of being ostracized can be incredibly dangerous: “That’s the scariest thing in the world and that’s why people don’t leave. That’s also one of the reasons I had such a lost personal, mental and emotional existence for such a long time. I did get ostracised from that community, even before I left it in my mind. I got ostracised for being different, for being a woman of this modern age who wasn’t going to get told or accept someone else’s order of who she was.”
Bee’s defiance of her family’s tradition and order, along with her continuing to outwardly question her faith, sent her into an unhealthy downward spiral. With stories and rumours already circulating about her in her teens, playing in the back of her mind was the pressure that she felt regarding how her family would be perceived within a tight knit community. “In the Arabic community your reputation is very much linked to your mana, [so] I was most upset for the sake of my parents, because it was their reputation that was gonna get tainted amongst the social ranks.”
Now in her mid-thirties, Bee says that she is finally at peace with herself, although turning her back on her roots hasn’t been without hurt, anger and loss.
Today, like Claire, she has also found clarity and self-expression through yoga as a spiritual basis, and refers to herself a bliss facilitator, acknowledges the good little Muslim girl that lives inside her:
“As I am today integrated with her, I want people to know that they can live in their full authenticity and not hide behind what they perceive as death and what they perceive as rules… I want people to live in their highest freedom.”

Topics: life and society, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Islam, yoga, religion, Christianity
Duration: 29'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

11:05
Sir Tipene O’Regan : Life and Influences
BODY:
Straddling both the Pakeha and Māori worlds it's fair to say his influence on Māoridom has been profound. Sir Tipene O'Regan has been described as the architect of the Maori economic model, who negotiated his guts out, in the words of The Press, to secure an historic 170 million dollar settlement for South Island tribe Ngāi Tahu.
EXTENDED BODY:

Straddling both the Pakeha and Māori worlds Sir Tipene O’Regan’s influence on New Zealand Aotearoa has been profound.
He has been described as the architect of the Māori economic model, who negotiated his guts out, in the words of The Press, to secure an historic 170 million dollar settlement for South Island tribe Ngāi Tahu.
Sir Tipene O’Regan talks to Wallace Chapman about the people, books, thinkers and events that have shaped his life.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Ngai Tahu treaty settlement, Tipene O'regan
Duration: 40'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:06
Twenty years of Disability Services
BODY:
Mike talks with current Disability Services Manager, Rachel Anderson-Smith, who outlines the functions and purpose of the services. He also meets up with the founding and first full-time manager, Ava Gibson, who outlines the early humps and hurdles needed to be overcome in order to get consistent funding, policies and procedures in place.
EXTENDED BODY:

Lucy Croft (2014 Can Do President), Robyn Hunt (Disability Rights Specialist) and Erikka Helliwell (2014 Can Do Vice President).
It was a time when there was increasing political activism amongst disabled students, particularly out of Vic, but it spread throughout the rest of the country as well… - Disability Rights Commissioner Paul Gibson.

Disability Services was set up in 1994, in part due to a human rights complaint taken against Victoria, when it moved its School of Social Work and Sociology from the most accessible part of campus to the least accessible.
Unusually for the time, the approach was to go into mediation with Victoria, to see if there was a long-term solution to the discrimination, applying more systemic solutions to the problem, for example transport around the Campus, the introduction of a study area for disabled students, training of staff in disability responsiveness, and the adoption of policies and procedures across the University.
According to former Victoria student president, and current Disability Rights Commissioner, Paul Gibson, the rising tide of student activism around access to tertiary education, plus the goodwill demonstrated by senior management at Victoria, led to the Government setting aside 9.9 million dollars to assist tertiary institutions to be more inclusive of disabled students.
Mike talks with current Disability Services Manager, Rachel Anderson-Smith, who outlines the functions and purpose of the Services; founding and first full-time manager, Ava Gibson, outlines the early humps and hurdles needed to be overcome in order to get consistent funding, policies and procedures in place; and veteran disability rights activists and disability community representatives, Wendi Wicks and Robyn Hunt, reminisce about the original complaint and its aftermath.

Ava Gibson (Orb Solutions, Former Disability Services Manager) and Mike Gourley

Left: Paul Gibson (Disability Rights Commissioner, Human Rights Commission). Right: Joe Boon (Alumnus, Victoria University) with Rachel Anderson-Smith (Manager, Disability Services, Victoria University).

Disability Services, Victoria University current team
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'24"

=SHOW NOTES=

=TRANSCRIPT=

Mike Gourley: Kia ora and welcome to this edition of One in Five. I’m taking part in an access tour at Victoria University of wellington. We’re heading from the Hunter Building to the Hub for speeches and drinks. It’s all part of an event put on by Victoria’s Disability Services last year to celebrate its 20th year of supporting disabled students. Disability Services was set up in 1994, in part thanks to a human rights complaint taken against Victoria for moving its School of Sociology and Social Work from the most accessible building on campus to the least accessible. Long-time disability rights activist and disability community representatives Wendi Wicks and Robyn Hunt reminisce about the complaint and its aftermath.
Robyn Hunt: There were two women, but in fact that particular school had the highest proportion of disabled students at the time.
Wendi Wicks: So it was we decided that this was a very good opportunity for collective action. And we got together, ‘we’ being DPA and the Victoria University Students Association, and was it Workbridge, was it?
Robyn Hunt: And Workbridge, yes. I was at Workbridge at the time and we decided we would take a complaint. So we got together. Technically, you couldn’t take complaints in those days, but we did anyway.
Mike Gourley: So how did you get round that one?
Robyn Hunt: We actually talked to the commission and we talked to Ross Brereton, who said he would try and…
Wendi Wicks: We did point out that there was provision for it under the legislation and they seemed to be very keen on names, nonetheless, but we kept telling them, no, this is a collective thing. This is on behalf of disabled people, and we’re not going to give you names for stories and things like that because it’s too threatening. And basically they were amenable to it. We were lucky we had very useful staff at the time and the commissioner was onsite.
Robyn Hunt: Ross Brereton was the commissioner at the time, and he decided that one of the reasons it would work was he decided he would mediate the complaint. And on the other side we had Gill Greer, as she was then… Is she Gill Greer now?
Wendi Wicks: She was Gill Body.
Robyn Hunt: She was Gill Body, sorry. She’s now Gill Greer, but she was Gill Body at the time, who was one of the senior managers at Victoria. And she was very positive. She wasn’t the only one on their mediation group. We had three and three. She saw it as an opportunity to make change, rather than a threat or something that they had to scurry round and look as if they were doing something. She saw it as a real opportunity for change and I think that was a huge advantage for us.
Mike Gourley: So there was a bit of goodwill there?
Wendi Wicks: From her there was, yes. And we were very good in eschewing going to the media. We didn’t make a song and dance in public, but we held it over the heads of the less amenable ones that we just might do this if they weren’t showing willing.
Robyn Hunt: And then once they did show willing we had an agreement that neither party would speak to the media until we had some sort of agreement. And the other thing that once we started on this process we decided that we were going to ask for some systemic things rather than look at… Because we’d chosen not to look at from an individual complaints perspective we decided we would look for some systemic outcomes. So we wanted some planning, we wanted some consultation, and we wanted students to be involved, but we also wanted a relationship with the disability community in general and some education of senior staff at Victoria University.
Wendi Wicks: So we were looking at things like transport as a longer term goal, as well as the more immediate things of what about access between the floors in the building that was now housing the school that had the most disabled students on campus?
Robyn Hunt: The transport was about accessible transport from one end of the campus to another. Since Vic is very windy and exposed and cold and it’s got a long campus so we needed transport from one end of the campus to the other. We needed somewhere where people could get some food and something to drink at the other end of the campus, and also a rest area – somewhere they could rest and recover or study.
Wendi Wicks: And that was the wonderful centre that came about in the Victoria University building, which was really very useful.
Robyn Hunt: And the planning, we wanted them to have an ongoing strategic plan that involved consultation with disabled students – the Can Do group – and with the students association. And this was in terms of development of properties, training of staff, support of disabled students, including sign language interpreters.
Mike Gourley: You talked about mediation. Is that something that wouldn’t normally happen with a human rights complaint?
Robyn Hunt: It was quite mediation-driven, but in those days it was much less mediation-driven than perhaps the work of the commission is now. So people were able to take a complaint and the commissioners would find an opinion, which was a legal opinion, and people would have to abide by it. So the commission did find that there was discrimination. And that’s when they decided they would mediate it. And we kind of worked on it together to make sure that, rather than finding an opinion and forcing them to pay some money or do something, that rather than that we would try and improve the situation for students in the future because in a way it was almost too late for the two students who’d approached us, ‘cause they had given up their studies and gone away and were very upset and couldn’t continue. So the only thing we could do really was to improve the situation so it wouldn’t happen again. And that was what we tried to do to get the agreement. And we think that the agreement actually contributed to the subsequent
$9.9 million of funding that came from the government for support of disabled students in tertiary education.
Mike Gourley: Because in past cases what you had, of course… As an example I would think of the bus situation, Stagecoach wellington, where the Human Rights Commission had to find in favour of either the plaintiff, which in that case was people criticising Stagecoach for not having accessible buses, but this view actually put it the other way round – mediation rather than a decision.
Robyn Hunt: Yes. I think we actually might have been really quite keen on the mediation at the time because we felt that the decision had made no difference in terms of the buses and it had been rather disastrous. People had gone to the media. The whole thing had been litigated in the media and we felt that we’d come off second best and that maybe that wasn’t the best strategy to use. Also we felt that we were much better prepared for this complaint and we had a list of things that we wanted, that we felt they could deliver and would benefit everybody and would save them a bit of grief in the future. And they, particularly Gill, saw the sense in this and decided that they would work for it. So it was a very different complaint with a very different kind of group doing the negotiating than there was with the transport.
Mike Gourley: Coming up next we meet up with the current manager of Disability Services, Rachel Anderson-Smith. In the meantime, you’re with One in Five on Radio New Zealand National, Te Reo Irirangi o Aotearoa. Disability Rights Paul Gibson says he was active on the student executive at the time of the complaint.
Paul Gibson: Through the mediation process I became president and it concluded a while after. The whole mediation process took about two years. But it was a time where there was increasing political activism amongst disabled students, particularly out at Vic, but it spread throughout the rest of the country, as well.
Mike Gourley: What was your impression of the mediation process? How much were you involved in it?
Paul Alongside Robyn and Wendi, I was in the mediation team and it was a new and learning experience for me. And there was, I think, led by Gill Greer, a recognition of the opportunity which the complaint bought, to actually make a difference or dsiab students that was genuine. That’s not always the case I think. And I think that was partly because, from our side, we had it strategized well, it wasn’t about the individual. And alongside that it did make a difference that the university, as well as the various groups which we came from, were working with government, that there was a need for some resourcing specific in this area.
Mike Gourley: That’s former Victoria University of Wellington student president and current Disability Rights commissioner Paul Gibson.
Woman: Tena koutou, tena koutou…
Mike Gourley: Rachel Anderson-Smith is the current manager of Disability Services.
Rachel Anderson-Smith: The Disability Services was set up in 1994 so it had been established for some time when I took the reins. I was fortunate to start at a time when many of the hard battles had been fought.
Mike Gourley: So what sort of hard battles were they?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: Well, when I took over from my predecessor, Ava Gibson, she’d already progressed the services from being bottom of the hill, triage, to being a leading provider of Disability Services and tackled a lot of the funding and access battles. So that really enabled me to focus on innovation and strengthening the culture here.
Mike Gourley: How does the service operate, then? How does it function and for what purpose?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: Sure. So Disability Services is Victoria’s provider of advice and expertise and support. We enable over 1,000 students with impairments each year to fully access their education. And we do that through liaison with academic staff, through personal coaching to identify students’ strengths and impairment needs, and providing services like transcription of lectures. We also provide advice for staff on creating an inclusive education experience for students. And we do that through disability awareness and inclusive teaching and technological practices, yeah.
Mike Gourley: What kind of impairment needs do you meet here, then?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: Everything you can kind of think of and more. So we have, as I said, over 1,000 students with impairments here who might have temporary or ongoing impairments, so everything from someone breaks their ankle at footy to someone maybe with multiple sclerosis to the sensory impairments – things you commonly think of when you think of disability. But also impairments that you don’t. And at least a quarter of which we see have some form of mental health impairment. And some students obviously have multiple and complex needs.
Mike Gourley: How do you get on with people with the complex needs? What sort of examples would you have of those in your head?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: I think we get on with them pretty well. I think in terms of that we partner with them and really value and respect their expertise. Many of those people have lived with their disabilities for a long time. So their knowledge… respecting that knowledge is integral to building a partnership with them, yeah.
Mike Gourley: I came here four years ago as a disabled person. As I was taking up a paper in philosophy I think it was, yes. And I was impressed with the service. I got note-takers volunteering to take notes for me in the lectures. ‘Cause that must be one of the most difficult things for some people to do, is keep up with the note-taking.
Rachel Anderson-Smith: Yes, indeed. So we have different layers of note-taking here. We have a voluntary system that provides sort of complementary note-taking for students who are unable to take comprehensive notes themselves. And then we have more professional note-taking services like electronic live transcription, which is where students, and mostly deaf students, or maybe students who have complex impairments, are receiving almost verbatim notes. So I think that’s a really important service because actually the need to take notes is one of the main barriers to tertiary education.
Mike Gourley: I understand you can also record lectures.
Rachel Anderson-Smith: Yes, that’s a growing and very exciting area in tertiary education and education, generally, is not only recording lectures, but captioning them, as well, and making them fully accessible on the internet so that students can access them remotely, as well. The area is quite exciting and we’re really grateful to the academics who are picking that up with gusto.
Mike Gourley: Have you had any reluctance on the part of some academics to do that? Thinking it might be cheating or something?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: I think it’s fair to say the academic opinion on making their intellectual property available in recorded form varies, but the University of Victoria has a policy that says that students are able to do that with the permission of the lecturer, and it’s really encouraged here. I think we’re very lucky to have a lot of progressive academics who are practicing inclusion in their lectures and enjoy showcasing their approaches, yeah.
Mike Gourley: So 20 years on and you’ve been here for, what, 13 of those. What would you say are some of the challenges you’ve had to meet as time as gone on?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: sighs I think one of the challenges and a key challenge that I see for the future, really, is that school-age students with disability have a lack of access to quality inclusive education. All students with disabilities need access to education that recognises their identity, that meets their needs and ensures they can participate, achieve and go on to live full and positive lives. In my time here I’ve seen students coming through with similar impairments, yet because of the very different access to inclusive education they’ve had they’ve received completely different levels of support. So a disabled student who has had their needs met through technology, inclusive teaching practices, a teaching aide, whanau and community support, is more likely to see university education as a natural step and then come here with high expectations of themselves, and indeed of us and the environment here. I think for those disabled students who haven’t experienced that kind of inclusive education we do a lot to mitigate that inequality by ensuring they’re introduced to the support that’s available to them. But I remain very concerned about those students that don’t make it to tertiary education. I guess I want to see all New Zealanders with disabilities living rich and fulfilling lives where their identity is celebrated. And I think an inclusive education system right through from early childhood to tertiary is integral to that. So I see that as the key challenge.
Mike Gourley: Because that would create a higher expectation on the part of a growing number of people. How is the service going to change to meet the increasing demands, do you think?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: We’ve done a lot to evolve and meet the increasing demands of students. I don’t see both the numbers in terms of increasing demand and indeed the increasing expectations of students as a negative. I really see that as a brilliant opportunity and one of the most exciting things about being in this role. I know my generation of disabled students, we were too often constantly grateful for any iota of support that we could get our hands on. And the students that I see coming through the door today are nothing like that. They very often have an expectation of inclusion. Often when they have access to inclusive education prior to this they know their rights and they have expectations of us. That’s brilliant, that’s fantastic and that means we can work with them and partner with them and help them to go on to be leaders and scholars. I’d love to see all students having that kind of opportunity.
Mike Gourley: I suppose one of the perverse outcomes of that is that perhaps students get less active in organisations like Can Do because if needs are being met people don’t have a lot to fight about do they, really? Is that a challenge, as well, getting people involved in things like Can Do?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: I think there’s an unfortunate truth to that. I think supporting… One of the key things we’ve done is support students to reignite Can Do as the rreprestnetive group for students with impairments that you’re referring to. I think that partnership has been really valuable in counteracting disability bias and further encouraging students to support each other. I think although the environment at Vic celebrates disability and I think it is very inclusive of students with disabilities, that doesn’t mean there’s not much to do. That means that there’s a great opportunity there for them to take it and for us to partner with them to take it even further. I think we’re very fortunate that many of New Zealand’s most influential disability rights advocates are also Victoria graduates. And I think our culture at Victoria of celebrating with and partnering with students with disabilities, and Can Do will ensure that legacy continues.
Mike Gourley: So you foresee another 20 years then, maybe, of the service?
Rachel Anderson-Smith: I hope so. And not only this service, but also a university-wide culture that celebrates diversity and indeed disability. The new Victoria strategic direction has just been outlined, and for the first time includes values of inclusion and equity and diversity. And I think that’s really exciting. I’m really excited that the university is taking ownership of that. So another 20 years of Disability Serives, absolutely, but also another 20 years of having a culture that celebrates inclusion.
Mike Gourley: That’s current Disability Services manager Rachel Anderson-Smith. Founding and first full-time manager was Ava Gibson:
Ava Gibson: When I started there was a very active group of students – Can Do – and there were a good group of staff who were extremely supportive and champions of disability issues. However there wasn’t any policies, procedures, systems, anything like that in place at that time. So it was putting all those things together, getting commitment right across the university to make change and not relying on the goodwill of people and students’ personal influence with staff to make things happen. So there was a lot of work to be done. It was a very exciting time to do that and there were a number of people I collaborated with throughout that in various areas of the university and with the students to amek that happen.
Mike Gourley: That’s Disability Services’ founding and first full-time manager Ava Gibson.
(Hubbub)
Man: My name is Faafetai Taase and I’m an ex-student who has been here on and off over 20 years. Amazing. A great day to celebrate.
Mike Gourley: Why is that?
Faafetai Taase: Hey, we get a chance to celebrate the fact that we’ve always been equal because that’s what we deserve.
Man: And that’s it for this edition of One in Five. From Victoria University of Wellington, I’m Mike Gourley singing off. Ka kite ano.

===7:35 PM. | Voices===
=DESCRIPTION=

Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in NZ, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)

===7:45 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

An in-depth perspective of legislation and other issues from the house (RNZ)

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:05
Sounds Historical for 5 April 2015 (Part 1)
BODY:
Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 56'51"

21:05
Sounds Historical for 5 April 2015 (Part 2)
BODY:
Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 57'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:06 Today in New Zealand History 4’44”
Picton proclaimed a port on 5 April 1861
8:12 Artist: Janice Lunn 3’56”
Song: One Fine Day
Composer: Puccini
Album: Mobil Song Quest 1972
Label: Kiwi MS 72
Recorded at final concert, Christchurch Town Hall
8:16 A Wrestling Tale by Winston McCarthy told in Sports Digest during the 1950s 7’17”
Best known as rugby commentator, McCarthy was no slouch when it came to telling sports stories and this one (complete with on-air throat clearing) is about a wrestling match in Melbourne.
8:25 Homework
Three Mystery Voices
8:26 Have A Shot, 1ZB talent quest 1958 Finals 10’23”
“Dud” with a plug for the sponsors and then compere, probably Ian Watkins, introduces contestants.
Artist Nan McFarlane
Song: Annie Laurie
Composer: Trad
Album: Sound Archives
Label:
Artist: Harold Crosby (harmonica)
Song: Caravan
Composer: Tizol
Album: Sound Archives
Label:
8:38 Old Bill's Story (part three) 12’52”
Read by Lance McCaskill, recorded in 1956. This story was told by an old drover to Bill Blackadder of Springs Junction who dictated it for recording by the NZBS. It tells of an 1876 cattle driving trip from the Waiau River in Canterbury, through the Cannibal Gorge (Lewis Pass) to the Robinson River on the West Coast.
8:55 War Report 6’36”
Extracts from diary of Lt Spencer Westmacott on preparing to leave Egypt and the number of troops with VD. Comments on leaving the locals in Cairo. From April 25, 1915 'The most glorious day of my life' - the diaries of Spencer Westmacott, edited by Chris Tobin. Pub: Bosco Press, 22a Reed St, Oamaru, ISBN 9780473 300333. Nigel Piper recalls his early days in the Royal Flying Corps in 1914-15. .
Music:
Artist: John McCormack
Song: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
Artist: Helen Clark
Song: Your King and Country Want You
Composer: Paul Rubens
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 1
Label: CD41 486286
Artist: Radio New Zealand Studio Orchestra (soloist Colin Hemmingson)
Song: My Love
Composer: McCartney
Album: Orchestral Gold Vol 1
Label: Kiwi Tartar TRL 005

9:06 As I Remember 4’15”
Pommie Cowboy (Part Two) by Roy Keeling of Ashburton. Read by Duncan Smith.
9:12 Artist: St Joseph’s Maori Girls College Choir (1980) 2’41”
Song: Amazing Grace
Composer: Trad. Newton
Album: St Joseph’s Maori Girls College Choir
Label: Kiwi SLC 159
School was founded in 1867 in Hawkes Bay.
9:16 Homework
Three mystery voices.
9:18 I Saw Them Fly 13’33”
A 1955 series of talks, introduced by Arnold Wall Jnr of 3YA Christchurch, in which Frederick Carpenter, who grew up in the village of Farnborough in the United Kingdom, recalls watching it become the centre of British aviation and his friendships with early aviators, from 1903 until the end of World War I. Part Two.
9:33 Artist: Rod Derrett 3’08”
Song: Kiwi Bungalow
Composer: Derrett
Album: 45 Puha and Pakeha
Label: HMV
9:37 Book of the Week 20’06”
Entanglements of Empire, Missionaries, Maori and the Question of the Body by Tony Ballantyne, Auckland University Press, ISBN 9781869 408268
9:54 Artist: Deane Waretini 3’08”
Song: Tarawera Eruption
Composer: Tuhourangi Hapu
Album: Now Is the Hour
Label: n/s
9:58 Artist: Radio New Zealand Studio Orchestra (soloist Dick Le Fort) 2’45”
Song: Lucky Me
Composer: Black/Burke
Album: Orchestral Gold Vol 1
Label: Kiwi Tartar TRL 005

===8:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | Church Services===
=DESCRIPTION=

An Easter service from Holy Trinity Cathedral, Auckland (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

12:00
Easter Service Sunday 5 April 2015
BODY:
This year's Easter Service comes from Holy Trinity Cathedral in Parnell, Auckland. The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides. Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist. We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.
EXTENDED BODY:
This Festal Choral Eucharist for Easter comes from the Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.

The Dean of the Cathedral the Very Reverend Jo Kelly- Moore leads the service. The Bishop of Auckland, the Right Reverend Ross Bay, presides.
Timothy Noon, the Cathedral's Director of Music, conducts the Holy Trinity Cathedral Choir. Philip Smith is the organist.
We begin with the choir singing the traditional carol 'This Joyful Eastertide'.

Read the full Order of Service

Dean Jo opens her sermon by asking “Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?”
She goes on to explore what is not found in the Easter Day reading from St Mark’s Gospel – the kind of story-telling detail which provides an emotionally satisfying conclusion to the discovery that the tomb of Christ was empty. Instead, she says, “Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything! That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more.”
During the rest of the sermon, which you can read in full below, she considers the implications of this apparent failure in narrative technique on Christian belief and action.

Today’s service features the Holy Trinity Choir performing a communion setting by the UK composer David Briggs of his Truro Eucharist. Other music conducted by the Cathedral’s Director of Music Timothy Noon and played by organist Philip Smith includes some well-known hymns and traditional works ranging from a French arrangement of Gregorian chant, to a communion motet by William Byrd.
Music Details
This Radio New Zealand recording was produced by Justin Gregory, and engineered by Alex Baron.
All photos © Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.
Easter Choral Eucharist 2015
Acts 10:34-43, Mark 16:1-8
Is it bad ending after all?
A sermon by the Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Are you one of those people who can’t help yourself from skipping to the end of a book, especially a thriller, when it is reaching the tension point, just to find out what will happen? Do you have that overwhelming urge to find out the conclusion so that you can cope with the journey of getting there?!
Well, if you applied that same temptation upon reading St Mark’s Gospel with the tension building as the Gospel writer records the authorities closing in to kill Jesus, if you skipped to the end you could run the risk of feeling truly surprised at the conclusion. What kind of ending is this? Now of course we find the testimony that indeed the tomb was empty – and the proclamation that Jesus is risen – but Mark records that seemingly, as a result, nobody did anything!
That is not the Gospel ending that we might hope for. We don’t just like to know who the winner was, we like the sequels with what happened next. How did all this impact their lives? After all, the other three Gospel writers give us much more of the ‘what happened next!
In contrast, in today’s Easter reading, we hear from St Mark that awe and amazement, and probably a little fear, arrested these first witnesses in their tracks after they had witnessed the empty tomb.
Where then does Mark leave us as today we celebrate the truth of the risen Christ?
Well, first I think that this resurrection account encourages us to read and engage the Scriptures beyond our presumptions and hopes. We are challenged to seek to understand why it is then that different gospel writers, with different audiences, contexts and emphases, take different approaches in their recording of this, and numerous other, encounters with Jesus and his teaching. And in that engagement to remember that, for our understanding of our Christian faith, and the truth of the empty tomb, this phenomenon does not leave all the evidence seemingly rendered inadmissible, but rather serves to enrich our understanding of Christ and the situation of these early Christians.
Secondly then, what we know is that at the heart of it all four Gospel writers proclaim - Christ is risen! Together they are unified in their witness that the tomb is empty and that this was witnessed first by the women who had stayed faithfully with Christ at the cross and had come to tend him at his death. This empty tomb, the risen Christ, being God’s yes to the way of life and hope offered by Jesus in his living, a way of justice and peace, hope and love for all the world.
And last, but certainly not least, while it would seem this Gospel doesn’t end quite the way we might have expected or hoped perhaps, in fact, in that ending we are given the greatest gift.
For we find a silence into which we can, indeed are compelled to, place ourselves and to ask ‘What will I do after receiving this proclamation that the tomb is empty?’, ‘What is my response to the risen Christ?’
As Jesus asked his followers ‘Who do you say that I am?’, so the risen Christ asks us the same question. Who do you say that he is? And as Jesus told his disciples to live and proclaim the kingdom of God until he comes again, so the risen Christ gives us the same command. What is our response? In the ‘so what?’ of the seemingly absent ‘what happened next’ in Mark’s Gospel, we are reminded that this is our truth, our story, our commission – here and now.
We know that on this sacred day Christians will be gathered around the world to proclaim that Christ is risen because while the women’s initial response might have been to arrest them in their tracks, we know that their shock did not leave them there. We know that in fact, quite soon after, they did tell the story of the greatest hope that the world could ever hear, the story of life, and as a result we are here. Today reminds us then this ‘telling’ is now our task too.
And what might that telling look like?
It is about lives informed by resurrection life and hope, and therefore lived looking to the needs of others, especially those most in need.
As a nation then may we be generous to the people in Vanuatu as this Easter they continue to face the enormous challenge of rebuilding in the midst of their grief. May resurrection hope be theirs.
As communities around Aotearoa New Zealand, may resurrection life call us to care for our neighbours, those we know, those we have yet to meet, those in most need – reaching out practically and in peace and friendship, seeking understanding. And may we be generous so that those in our communities who care for the most marginalized have all the resources that they need.
And as individuals, may the truth of the risen Christ challenge us to examine how we live, what we do with what we have and how we live with those with whom we share our lives – that through us also might come justice and peace, hope and love.
Ultimately this Easter St Mark’s Gospel brings us to the heart of the matter. As it began Chapter 1:1 ‘The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God’; so it ends ‘Do not be alarmed; you are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has been raised.’
So was the response of those first witnesses a bad ending after all? I think we would have to say an emphatic No. Rather, it is an exciting one, an unexpected one, a challenging one, one that invites us into the story, and aren’t they, after all, usually the best endings?
AMEN
The Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore
Dean, Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity
Easter 2015
Topics: spiritual practices, music
Regions:
Tags: church service, Easter
Duration: 53'00"

12:01
Eastertide
BODY:
Introit - This joyful Eastertide, arr. Wood
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'05"

12:02
Jesus Christ is risen
BODY:
Hymn - Jesus Christ is risen today, Lyra Davidica (tune Easter Hymn)
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'59"

12:03
Kyrie Eleison
BODY:
Kyrie Eleison - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'39"

12:04
Gloria
BODY:
Gloria - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'23"

12:05
Victimi paschali
BODY:
Gradual - Victimi paschali, Gregorian chant, arr. Jean Revert
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'20"

12:06
At the Lamb's high feast we sing
BODY:
Hymn - At the Lamb's high feast we sing, tr. R Campbell (tune Salzburg).
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'29"

12:07
Sanctus and Benedictus
BODY:
Sanctus and Benedictus - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'37"

12:08
Agnus Dei
BODY:
Agnus Dei - David Briggs
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'44"

12:09
Haec Dies
BODY:
Holy Trinity Choir, Timothy Noon, Philip Smith,
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

12:10
Thine be the Glory
BODY:
Hymn - Thine be the Glory, Budry tr. Hoyle, (tune Maccabeus)
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'14"

12:11
Toccata de la Resurrection
BODY:
Organ Sortie - Toccata de la Resurrection, Saint-Martin
Topics: music, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'23"

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Year 2015

Reference number 274291

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 05 Apr 2015