Radio New Zealand National. 2015-05-01. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

01 May 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 The Food Chain (BBC); 1:05 The Friday Feature; 2:05 NZ Society (RNZ); 2:30 The Sampler; 3:05 The Captive Wife, by Fiona Kidman (3 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 The Why Factor (BBC); 5:10 Witness (BBC); 5:45 The Day in Parliament (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Friday 1 May 2015
BODY:
Joy in Kathmandu as two quake survivors are pulled from the rubble. Protesters vow to keep fighting after the Auckland council agrees to a port extension and dairy farmers come to terms with a near halving of their income.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 32'45"

06:06
Sports News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'56"

06:20
Pacific News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'01"

06:24
Morning Rural News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'59"

06:28
Te Manu Korihi News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Te Rūnanga-Ā-Iwi-O-Ngāpuhi says a proposal to abolish the Māori fisheries body - Te Ohu Kaimoana - is very short-sighted. One of New Zealand's most celebrated authors, Patricia Grace, says New Zealand should not be going to war anywhere, including places in the Middle East such as Afghanistan. An Australian Aboriginal rights movement says tangata whenua around the world are gearing up for what could be the biggest demonstration of indigenous rights her country has ever seen. In the wake of the Teina Pora case, there is renewed focus on an action plan to help counter the impacts of foetal alcohol syndrome disorder.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'34"

06:43
MPs warned about risks of law suits
BODY:
MPs have been warned that a disputes provision in the South Korea trade deal could expose the New Zealand government to multi-million-dollar lawsuits from foreign corporations.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: South Korea, trade deal
Duration: 3'00"

06:49
RBNZ is unlikely to raise the OCR as housing demand continues
BODY:
Economists say the Reserve Bank is unlikely to cut the offical cash rate before the end of the year, unless something is done to cool Auckland's over-heated housing market.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 1'10"

06:50
Building consents in March rise to nine-year high
BODY:
Building consents for March have hit a nine-year high, driven by new townhouses, units and retirement villages.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: building consents
Duration: 53"

06:51
Supply remains sticking point for dairy prices
BODY:
An agricultural analyst says a major sticking point with dairy prices is the global over-supply.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, dairy price
Duration: 59"

06:52
American mining giant sells Waihi, quits NZ
BODY:
Oceana Gold's deal to buy the Waihi open cast mine from Newmont Minining signals an end to Newmont's business in New Zealand.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Newmont, Oceana Gold
Duration: 1'17"

06:53
Tourism Holdings calls for strategic review
BODY:
Tourism Holdings is not ruling out returning cash to shareholders as part of a strategic review of the company.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tourism Holdings
Duration: 1'43"

06:55
TruScreen wins access to $1 billion cervical screening market
BODY:
The cervical cancer screening firm TruScreen has won Chinese authorities' approval to sell its device in China, giving it access to a billion dollar a year market.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: TruScreen
Duration: 1'18"

06:56
Tomizone to list on the ASX: hopes to raise up to A$8 million
BODY:
Auckland-based Tomizone will list on the Australian Stock Exchange later this month in a backdoor listing through PHW Consolidated.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Tomizone
Duration: 1'12"

06:57
Angel investors pour next $56 million into NZ growth companies
BODY:
Angel investors poured a record 56 million dollars into young New Zealand companies last year, powered by enthusiasm for software investment.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Angel investors
Duration: 1'14"

06:59
Morning markets for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Wall street is weaker after a mixed batch of economic figures.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 39"

07:07
Sports News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'46"

07:13
Aid workers mobbed as frustration in Nepal mounts
BODY:
Near the epicentre of the quake, the situation is beyond grim. The United Nations says it will take a five-day trek to reach some of them.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nepal, earthquake
Duration: 6'00"

07:19
Ports of Auckland Chief Executive on wharf compromise
BODY:
The political stand-off between the Auckland Council and its ports company is over but public protest is continuing.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Ports of Auckland, wharves
Duration: 7'53"

07:28
Freddie Gray investigative files go to prosecutors
BODY:
The police investigation into the death of Freddie Gray is now in the hands of the prosecutors office.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Baltimore, Freddie Gray
Duration: 7'08"

07:38
McDonalds agrees to drop zero hour contracts
BODY:
All the major fast food chains have now committed to ending zero hours contracts.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: zero hours contracts
Duration: 4'05"

07:42
Farmers - drops in milk payout will put them in the red
BODY:
Industry experts say the drop in Fonterra's forecast milk payout will take 7 billion dollars out of the economy.
Topics: farming, business
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Fonterra, milk price
Duration: 1'52"

07:44
Falling dairy payout spells end of rockstar economy
BODY:
And that potential seven billion dollar hole from the lower payout could puncture any remaining claim the New Zealand economy has to rockstar status.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Auckland's Devon Funds, Paul Glass
Duration: 5'09"

07:51
Development group to control thousands of state houses
BODY:
The Government is being criticised for handing the ownership and management of 2-thousand-8 hundred state houses in Tamaki to a company that has never been a landlord before.
Topics: housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Tamaki Redevelopment Company
Duration: 4'40"

07:57
Māori meeting house in UK survives major fire
BODY:
The only Māori meeting house in Britain, Hinemihi, has survived a major fire.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags: UK, Māori meeting house
Duration: 3'35"

08:07
Sports News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'01"

08:15
Uneasy compromise reached between Council & Ports of Auckland
BODY:
Auckland's council-owned port company says it will eventually need the second wharf extension which it has had to put on hold after a stand-off with its owner
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Ports of Auckland, wharves
Duration: 3'34"

08:18
Auckland councillor responds to Port stoush
BODY:
Listening to that is the Auckland councillor Chris Darby.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Ports of Auckland, wharves
Duration: 4'14"

08:23
Elders worried protest brewing at Poroti Springs
BODY:
The Waitangi Tribunal's hearings into Māori water rights three years ago began with a Northland hapu challenging the Prime Minister John Key's claim that no one owns water.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags: water
Duration: 3'51"

08:28
Immigration NZ sticking to its guns on privacy 'breach'
BODY:
The Privacy Commission says Immigration New Zealand has breached privacy laws by refusing to give information to foreigners accused of over-staying their visas.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: privacy
Duration: 2'42"

08:30
Markets Update for 1 May 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 56"

08:35
Government accused of dragging its feet
BODY:
The Government is being accused of dragging its feet over foetal alcohol damage, which is said to be creating a huge burden for the education and justice systems, as well familes and individuals.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: foetal alcohol damage, FASD
Duration: 4'29"

08:39
Palestinian Foreign Minister visits New Zealand.
BODY:
The Palestinian Authority wants New Zealand to use its United Nations Security Council seat to help push forward the stalled Middle East peace process.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Palestinian Authority, Palestine
Duration: 7'06"

08:46
Russian spacecraft spinning out of control back to Earth
BODY:
A Russian spacecraft that is tumbling around the Earth after it malfunctioned en route to the International Space Station could remain in orbit for more than a week before crashing down to Earth.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Space Station
Duration: 4'14"

08:51
Te Manu Korihi News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
An Australian Aboriginal rights movement says tangata whenua around the world are gearing up for what could be the biggest demonstration of indigenous rights her country has ever seen. One of New Zealand's most celebrated authors, Patricia Grace, says New Zealand should not be going to war anywhere, including places in the Middle East such as Afghanistan. Te Runanga-Ā-Iwi-O-Ngāpuhi says a proposal to abolish the Māori fisheries body - Te Ohu Kaimoana - is very short-sighted. In the wake of the Teina Pora case, there is renewed focus on an action plan to help counter the impacts of foetal alcohol syndrome disorder.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'38"

08:55
Longterm support for Nepal needed
BODY:
In Christchurch a candle lit vigil is being held in tonight to raise money for Nepal.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nepal, earthquakes
Duration: 1'21"

08:57
Kerry-Anne Walsh with news from Australia
BODY:
Let's have a chat to our Canberra correspondent Kerry-Anne Walsh.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, news
Duration: 2'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Touchstones, by James McNeish (3 of 8, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Auckland deputy mayor on wharf extension stoush
BODY:
The Auckland council has okayed continued work on one of the controversial Bledisloe Wharf extensions. Auckland's Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse.
Topics: economy, business, environment
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Bledisloe Wharf, Ports of Auckland
Duration: 13'39"

09:22
Elderly residents forced to sign up for broadband
BODY:
Elderly and disabled pensioners in Wellington say they've been forced to sign up to and pay for ultrafast broadband when none of them even has a computer. Brian is a resident of a new council housing development in Mirimar. Vicki McLaren is Wellington City Council's Manager of City Housing
Topics: technology, internet
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'12"

09:37
If they're so good, why haven't electric cars taken off yet?
BODY:
Electric vehicles have long been touted as the answer to many environmental problems from the potential to make a serious dent in emissions which harm human health and warm the planet - to reducing the demand on diminishing oil supplies. But after years of being talked up as a great alternative to the combustion engine, so far electric vehicles have yet to take hold in any market in the world, even as prices become more comparable with those of other new vehicles. So when might there be a tipping point for electric vehicles and what kind of infrastructure do countries need to make that happen? Chris Binns is the City of Sydney's manager of strategy and assets who, in 2009 made a plan to cut the city's vehicle fleet emissions by 20 percent in five years. That target's been exceeded by introducing electric cars and hybrid-diesel trucks and Chris Binns is in our Auckland studio. And there with him is the chief executive of Mighty River Power, Fraser Whineray who is leading the corporate charge for adoption of electric vehicles and charging stations
Topics: technology, climate, transport
Regions:
Tags: electric vehicles, emissions, Mighty River Power
Duration: 17'06"

09:55
Asia correspondent Jamil Anderlini
BODY:
News from the Asian region with our correspondent Financial Times Beijing Bureau chief, Jamil Anderlini. Jamil reports on the Nepal earthquake, which killed more than 5,000 people. Some countries have been trying to play politics with the rescue effort; the execution of Australian, Brazilian and other drug dealers in Indonesia by firing squad which has caused a diplomatic incident; and the discovery that smog impedes foetal development in China.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: China, Asia
Duration: 11'07"

10:05
The fight to get back Nazi looted art
BODY:
California Lawyer, Randol Schoenberg fought the Austrian government for the return of five Klimt paintings stolen by the Nazis, a story that was turned into the film The Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren.
EXTENDED BODY:
In many ways, it was simple guidebooks which helped California Lawyer Randol Schoenberg win the return of five Klimt paintings stolen by the Nazis.
The incredible story has just been turned into the film The Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds.
It was 1998 and octogenerian Maria Altmann found out that Austria had passed a restitution act, which included compensation for looted art.
Maria Altman had fled to the United States when Germany annexed Austria as part of its third reich in 1938. She was a member of one of Vienna's most prominent Jewish families, the Bloch-Bauer's, who owned many works of art, including five paintings by Gustav Klimt - one of which was a portrait of her aunt Adele Bloch Bauer.
When Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany, the Bloch Bauer's property was seized, along with their art.
Altmann hired the grandson of a friend to represent her, and try and get the works back.
Schoenberg was 32, and working at a big LA law firm, but had never worked on a case like this before.
He was told by many legal experts that there was no way the Belvedere Museum in Vienna would give up such prized works.
An eight-year legal battle ensued.
"At first we tried to get the Austrians to do the right thing, and they refused. And then we tried to see if there was a way to sue in Austria, but they require you to deposit with the court a percentage of the value at stake in the litigation, so it would have been several million dollars, which was just not possible for Maria."
Instead Schoenberg looked at suing the Austrian government in Los Angeles, which required meeting some complex legal conditions, proving breaches of international law and that the organisation holding the works was involved in commercial activity in the US.
He discovered the museum had published guidebooks in the US.
"So we filed a law suit. I actually left the big law firm and went out on my own, which is a bit crazy I guess, but I filed the lawsuit Maria Altmann against the Republic of Austria and decided to see what would happen"
The Austrian government tried to get the case dismissed, as did the US government, which feared it would open up a can of worms. It went all the way to the Supreme Court, which allowed him to sue the Austrian government.
But rather than taking that legal action, Altmann was 89 at the time, he suggested they go into binding arbitration with Austria.
"It was all or nothing, the Austrians refused to negotiate any type of settlement, they refused to take any other position. They wanted to keep the paintings and not settle in any way, and that forced us to make it an all or nothing issue."
Three Austrian judges took four months to reach their decision, which was that the art works should be returned to Altmann and her family.
"The greatest moment for me was when we brought the paintings to Los Angeles and they were all displayed in one room. And that is how she remembered them, they had all been in one room in her Uncle's home... You could see that she had become a hero for the rest of her family and she had reunited them with their history, with their legacy."
The Altmann family eventually sold the works for more than $US300 milllion. Schoenberg received a large cut and now specialises in legal cases related to the recovery of looted or stolen artworks.
Topics: history, arts
Regions:
Tags: WW2, Nazis, Gustav Klimt
Duration: 28'38"

10:36
Book review: 'The Green Road' by Anne Enright
BODY:
Published by Jonathan Cape. Reviewed by Tilly Lloyd.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'42"

11:10
New music with Jeremy Taylor
BODY:
Jeremy Taylor investigates the reformed Blur's first album since 2003, a new album from British pastoral folk ensemble The Lilac Time, plus the frankly bizarre sophomore album from oddball Wellington supergroup Labcoats.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'37"

11:35
Sports commentator, Brendan Telfer
BODY:
Lydia Ko turns 18 and keeps on winning. Extreme seat prices of an upcoming boxing match in the USA.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'10"

11:47
The Week That Was
BODY:
With James Elliot and Gemma Gracewood.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: comedy, humour
Duration: 11'34"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 News and current affairs
09:20 If they're so good, why haven't electric cars taken off yet?
Electric vehicles have long been touted as the answer to many environmental problems from the potential to make a serious dent in emissions which harm human health and warm the planet - to reducing the demand on diminishing oil supplies.
But after years of being talked up as a great alternative to the combustion engine, so far electric vehicles have yet to take hold in any market in the world, even as prices become more comparable with those of other new vehicles. So when might there be a tipping point for electric vehicles and what kind of infrastructure do countries need to make that happen? Chris Binns is the City of Sydney's manager of strategy and assets who, in 2009 made a plan to cut the city's vehicle fleet emissions by 20 percent in five years.
That target's been exceeded by introducing electric cars and hybrid-diesel trucks and Chris Binns is in our Auckland studio.
And there with him is the chief executive of Mighty River Power, Fraser Whineray who is leading the corporate charge for adoption of electric vehicles and charging stations
09:45 Asia correspondent Jamil Anderlini
News from the Asian region with our correspondent Financial Times Beijing Bureau chief, Jamil Anderlini. Jamil reports on the Nepal earthquake, which killed more than 5,000 people. Some countries have been trying to play politics with the rescue effort; the execution of Australian, Brazilian and other drug dealers in Indonesia by firing squad which has caused a diplomatic incident; and the discovery that smog impedes foetal development in China.
10:05 The fight to get back Nazi looted art
Randol Schoenberg successfully fought the Austrian government for the return of five Klimt paintings stolen by the Nazis. It was an eight-year legal battle, taken on behalf of his client, octogenerian Maria Altmann. She grew up in Vienna, a member of the prominent Jewish family, the Bloch-Bauers. One of the works, which adorned their walls, was a portrait of Maria Altmann's aunt, Adele Bloch Bauer. When Austria was annexed by the third reich in 1938, all the family's possessions, including the art works, were taken by the Nazis. The story was turned into the film The Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds. Randol Schoenberg talks to Kathryn Ryan about the long legal battle and his continuing work to recover artworks stolen by the Nazi's from Jewish families.

Left: Randol Schoenberg, Right: Portrait of Adele Bloch Bauer by Gustav Klimt, 1907
10:35 Book review: 'The Green Road' by Anne Enright
Published by Jonathan Cape. Reviewed by Tilly Lloyd.
10:45 The Reading: 'Touchstones' by James McNeish
We continue the memoir of James McNeish, about the people in his life who shaped his perspective: “a gallery of people – rebels, outsiders, romantics, enlightened misfits and illiterates – who have touched me in life.” (Part 10 of 15, RNZ).
11:05 New music with Jeremy Taylor
Jeremy Taylor investigates the reformed Blur's first album since 2003, a new album from British pastoral folk ensemble The Lilac Time, plus the frankly bizarre sophomore album from oddball Wellington supergroup Labcoats.
11:30 Sports commentator, Brendan Telfer
11:45 The week that was with James Elliot and Gemma Gracewood
Twitter: @JamesElliott8 / @gemmagracewood

=PLAYLIST=

Jeremy Taylor's music selection:
Artist: Blur
Song: There Are Too Many Of Us, Track 8
Comp: Albarn/Coxon/James/Rowntree
Album: The Magic Whip
Label: Parlophone

Song: My Terracotta Heart, Track 7
Composer: Albarn/Coxon/James/Rowntree
Album: The Magic Whip
Label: Parlophone
Artist: The Lilac Time
Song: She Writes A Symphony, Track 2
Composer: Stephen Duffy
Album: No Sad Songs
Label: Tapete
Artist: Labcoats
Song: The Lost Cause, Track 12
Composer: Labcoats
Album: O, Potassium!!
Label: RPM/Braille

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
The government in Nepal is urging adventurers to return to the Himalayas and Parliament passes legislation cracking down on employers who exploit migrant workers.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'27"

12:18
House asking prices reach new record
BODY:
The latest figures from Realestate.co.nz show the average national asking price for homes has hit a new high of nearly 522-thousand dollars in April.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'00"

12:19
Tower expects Christchurch earthquake claims to rise
BODY:
Tower's share price is down 2 % this morning, as claims from the Canterbury eartquakes continue to mount.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: insurance
Duration: 1'13"

12:21
Serko buys Australia's Arnold Travel for an undisclosed sum
BODY:
Serko has bought Australia's Arnold Travel Technology, which will increase the volume of its transactions by at least 20 %.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia, travel
Duration: 1'09"

12:22
Australian watchdog takes no further action on mining magnate
BODY:
Australia's competition watchdog has decided not to pursue the mining magnate Andrew Forrest for appearing to suggest that big resource companies collude to cap the iron ore price.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia, iron ore
Duration: 1'22"

12:23
Midday Markets for 1 May 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Melika King at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'34"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
The former New Zealand rugby league coach Graham Lowe says the forecast wet weather will favour Australia in tonight's Anzac Test and New Zealand golfer Lydia Ko has struggled to a tie for 117th, after the opening round of the latest LPGA event in Texas.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'47"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: farming, rural
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'32"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

Information and debate, people and places around NZ

=AUDIO=

13:09
Your song - All Night Long
BODY:
Bec Deacon of Mapua has chosen "All Night Long" by Lionel Ritchie.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Lionel Ritchie
Duration: 11'45"

13:17
NZ Live - Hannah In The Wars
BODY:
Today Hannah Curwood is 'Hannah in the Wars' and she joins us live from the Dunedin studio.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Hannah Curwood, Hannah in the Wars, NZ Live
Duration: 39'58"

14:10
Full flight circle for Southland man
BODY:
John McDougall was on the first passenger flight out of Invercargill in 1944 - now more than 70 years later he's booked to fly on the first international flight out of the city.
Topics: technology, transport
Regions:
Tags: international flight, flight
Duration: 9'41"

14:20
Save the Crystal Palace
BODY:
She's eighty-six years old and looking a bit down at heel. But a group of film makers is hoping they can resurrect Mt Eden's old, if they can only find her a champion.
EXTENDED BODY:

She’s 86-years old and looking a bit down at heel. But a group of film makers is hoping they can resurrect Mt Eden’s old Crystal Palace Picture Theatre, if they can only find her a champion.

The Crystal Palace was built in 1928 for the Hippodrome Theatre Company and opened in 1929 with the Crystal Wintergarden cabaret downstairs and the theatre above. Initially it was designed for live shows but that soon gave way to silent movies followed quickly by the talkies.
By August 1929 the Crystal Palace was the first suburban cinema to be equipped for sound, vast wooden-cased speakers imported from the United States. They’re actually still there.

Left: detail of the ceiling. Right: detail of the floor
In its heyday the building was lit up like a chandelier and came with a waterfall curtain and chaser lights. The local power supplier had to install an extra substation to cope. On opening day the Mayor of Mount Eden had to conduct the ceremony twice because so many people turned up.
The downstairs cabaret was a popular dance venue, particularly when Epi Shalfoon and his band played there every Saturday night for almost twenty years. Shalfoon died there on the dance floor in 1953.
Filmmaker Robin Gee has spent several weeks camping at the Crystal Palace, inviting folk in to tell their stories about the old place. All this is in preparation for the start of filming.
Robin is part of Auckland’s Monster Valley Creative Agency which is producing the short documentary, as part Loading Docs 2015. That’s an initiative supported by the Film Commission and New Zealand on Air to raise the profiles of kiwi documentary makers. Robin’s team is one of ten making the docos, which will be released in July.
Robin Gee says there are many stunning art deco, glass and decorative features hiding away behind a 1970’s makeover waiting to be revealed, as is the original orchestra pit. He says the building needs someone to champion its cause and he hopes the documentary will ignite the cause. He says suburban cinemas may no longer be popular but the Crystal Palace has always kept its cool by reinventing itself
Related

Loading Docs: Please Open

Left: detail of door. Right: From the old days

Archival audio supplied by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.
Topics: history, life and society
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Epi Shalfoon, Phil Warren, The Crystal Palace Cinema, carbon arc projectors, Monster Valley Creative, Crystal Palace Wintergarden, Loading Docs 2015, talkies
Duration: 10'00"

14:45
Feature album - Full Moon Fever
BODY:
Tom Petty's debut solo album Full Moon Fever was first released on April 24, 1989 and went five times platinum in the States and six times platinum in Canada.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Tom Petty, Full Moon Fever, solo album
Duration: 17'27"

15:08
Fresh fast food with Geoff Scott
BODY:
The talented Geoff Scott from Vinnies in Herne Bay, Auckland, shares his Chocolate Fudge Slice
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: Chocolate Fudge Slice, cooking, Geoff Scott
Duration: 10'45"

15:20
Wine with Belinda Jackson
BODY:
Wine consultant Belinda Jackson has some intriguing wine suggestions for a still, sunny weekend in May.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: wine
Duration: 12'41"

15:30
Film review with Sarah McMullan
BODY:
Sarah McMullan reviews It Follows, Lucky Them, and Cobain: Montage of Heck.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film review, entertainment, film
Duration: 10'28"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 Your Song
All Night Long by Lionel Ritchie. Chosen by Bec Deacon of Mapua
1:20 NZ Live - Hannah In The Wars
Hannah Curwood live in the Dunedin studio.

2:10 Full flight circle for Southland man
John McDougall was on the first passenger flight out of Invercargill in 1944 - now more than 70 years later he's booked to fly on the first international flight out of the city.
2:20 Save The Crystal Palace - David Steemson
She's eighty six years old and looking a bit down at heel. But a group of film makers is hoping they can resurrect Mt Eden's old Crystal Palace Picture Theatre, if they can only find her a Champion. David Steemson reports.
New Zealand Society
2:30 NZ Reading - Milk by Susy Pointon
Can you find love in a milking shed? Tanya escapes her past and drags her kids and alcoholic ex north to the Hokianga, where she soon finds herself living and working on a dairy farm.
2:45 Feature album
Tom Petty. Full Moon Fever.
3:10 Food, Wine and Movies
Geoff Scott's Chocolate Fudge Slice
Belinda Jackson's wine picks:
Escarpment The Edge Pinot Gris 2013 $14.99
This is from one of New Zealand's leading wine personalities and the man behind much of New Zealand's success with Pinot Noir, Larry McKenna. As with all of Larry's Escarpment wines, this Pinot Gris is from Martinborough. It's a serious style - just off dry with aromas and flavours of white peach, apricot, quince and pear. A textural, satisfying wine and amazing value for money.
Taylors Promised Land Shiraz Cabernet 2013 $17 but under $15 on special
A nice little winter warmer for those who prefer their reds smooth with a good dollop of sweet, ripe fruit. This is a very easy to enjoy style - bright cherry red with a leafy aroma and also ripe plums then this mouthful of smoothness - quite dense, dark fruits that coat the mouth. A real crowd-pleaser.
Saint Clair Pioneer Block 3, 43 Degrees 2014 Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc $27ish
Aromas were escaping out of the bottle before I even poured the wine into a glass! Lime zest, lemon barley, pineapple aromas, then a big succulent mouthful of juicy fruit balanced with a fresh acidity. This is a big version of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc! Not a wine to hang on to for too long in my opinion, rather it's great to enjoy while bursting with aroma and flavour.
Sarah McMullan reviews: It Follows, Lucky Them and Cobain: Montage Of Heck.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about. With Simon Mercep, Julie Moffett, Catherine Robertson and Steve McCabe.

MUSIC DETAILS
Friday 1 May

YOUR SONG:

ARTIST: Lionel Richie
TITLE: All Night Long
COMP: Richie
ALBUM: Can't Slow Down
LABEL: MOTOWN 106059

FEATURE ALBUM:

ARTIST: Tom Petty
TITLE: Free Falling
COMP: Jeff Lynne / Tom Petty
ALBUM: Full Moon Fever
LABEL: MCA 116253

ARTIST: Tom Petty
TITLE: I Won't Back Down
COMP: Jeff Lynne / Tom Petty
ALBUM: Full Moon Fever
LABEL: MCA 116253

ARTIST: Tom Petty
TITLE: Running Down A Dream
COMP: Mike Campbell / Jeff Lynne / Tom Petty
ALBUM: Full Moon Fever
LABEL: MCA 116253

ARTIST: Tom Petty
TITLE: Zombie Zoo
COMP: Jeff Lynne / Tom Petty
ALBUM: Full Moon Fever
LABEL: MCA 116253

PANEL HALF-TIME:

ARTIST: James Brown
TITLE: Don't Be A Drop Out
COMP: Burt Jones
ALBUM: James Brown Sings Raw Soul
LABEL: King 6056

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'41"

16:05
The Panel with Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson (Part 1)
BODY:
Latest poll on choosing a new flag shows waning support. Should the referendum be dropped altogether? We ask Prof Andrew Geddis of Oago University. Pain medicine experts want to see popular pain killers like Nurofen Plus and Panadeine banned from sales over the counter. Wairarapa iwi want to see the Rimutaka Range renamed Remutaka Range.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'00"

16:06
The Panel with Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson (Part 2)
BODY:
British educator wants to allow pupils to use the internet during exams, saying it's inevitable. Residents of a new block of Wellington Council flats just want a phone line. But they are having to pay for ultra fast broadband as well. Can anything be done so these elderly people don't have to pay for a service they don't use? We ask Craig Young of the Telecommunications Users Association. The Mayor of Auckland Len Brown has again raised the subject of a transport levy of $99 for ratepayers and $159 for businesses.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'46"

16:10
The Panel intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Steve McCabe have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'24"

16:14
NZ flag
BODY:
Latest poll on choosing a new flag shows waning support. Should the referendum be dropped altogether? We ask Prof Andrew Geddis of Oago University.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand Flag
Duration: 6'54"

16:19
Call for codeine to be prescription only
BODY:
Pain medicine experts want to see popular pain killers like Nurofen Plus and Panadeine banned from sales over the counter. The Panel talks to Professor Stephan Schug who is a member of the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: codiene, Pain Medicine
Duration: 6'38"

16:25
Rimu/Remutaka
BODY:
Wairarapa iwi want to see the Rimutaka Range renamed Remutaka Range.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Rimutaka Range, Wairarapa, Wairarapa iwi
Duration: 3'20"

16:33
Internet in exams
BODY:
British educator wants to allow pupils to use the internet during exams, saying it's inevitable.
Topics: technology, education
Regions:
Tags: exams, internet
Duration: 4'41"

16:39
Panel says
BODY:
What the Panelists Steve McCabe and Catherine Roberston have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'48"

16:47
Broadband forced on residents
BODY:
Residents of a new block of Wellington Council flats just want a phone line. But they are having to pay for ultra fast broadband as well. Can anything be done so these elderly people don't have to pay for a service they don't use? We ask Craig Young of the Telecommunications Users Association.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: telecommunications, broadband
Duration: 6'14"

16:54
Transport levy
BODY:
The Mayor of Auckland Len Brown has again raised the subject of a transport levy of $99 for ratepayers and $159 for businesses.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 4'37"

16:55
Occupations and drinking
BODY:
New research out of the United States Department of Health has listed the jobs in which people drink the most.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Occupations, drinking
Duration: 1'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme 6:35 Focus on Politics Analysis of significant political issues presented by Radio New Zealand's parliamentary reporting team (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Friday 1 May 2015
BODY:
Finance Minister confirms surplus unlikely, Ruataniwha ruling a nail in coffin - Forest and Bird, AA says fuel companies too quick to put prices back up, NZ importer investigating flammable cladding, Hipsters may have to choose between fashion and function, Evidence about the injuries of Blessie Gotingco, Tauranga oil spill costs $200,000 and rising and Maui consent should be withheld - campaigners.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30'15"

17:07
Finance Minister confirms surplus unlikely
BODY:
Three weeks out from the budget, the Finance Minister has confirmed the Government is unlikely to meet its surplus target.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: budget, surplus, Bill English
Duration: 2'43"

17:10
Ruataniwha ruling a nail in coffin - Forest and Bird
BODY:
A Board of Inquiry has upheld enforceable nitrogen limits for the Ruataniwha Dam, a ruling Forest and Bird says is another nail in the irrigation scheme's coffin.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Ruataniwha Dam, irrigation scheme
Duration: 3'57"

17:14
AA says fuel companies too quick to put prices back up
BODY:
After a summer of low petrol prices, the cost of fuel is on its way back up, breaking through the two-dollar mark for the first time since December.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: petrol, petrol prices, fuel
Duration: 3'46"

17:24
NZ importer investigating flammable cladding
BODY:
A company importing aluminium cladding of the type blamed for a catastrophic blaze in Melbourne is investigating whether it may have been used incorrectly in buildings here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: fire, fire safety, aluminium cladding
Duration: 3'39"

17:28
Hipsters may have to choose between fashion and function
BODY:
Tattoos might be getting in the way of a less permanent body accessory, the Apple Smart Watch.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Apple Smart Watch, tattoos
Duration: 2'57"

17:34
Evening Business for 1 May 2015
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'13"

17:37
Evidence about the injuries of Blessie Gotingco
BODY:
Blessie Gotingco's body showed signs of being hit by a car, being strangled and stabbed before she was dumped in a North Shore cemetery.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Blessie Gotingco
Duration: 2'50"

17:40
Tauranga oil spill costs $200,000 and rising
BODY:
The oil spill in Tauranga harbour has so far cost 200-thousand dollars to clean-up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Tauranga, Tauranga harbour, oil spill
Duration: 3'09"

17:42
Maui consent should be withheld - campaigners
BODY:
Enviromental campaigners have told a hearing that a consent to operate the Maui gasfield should not be granted.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Maui gasfield
Duration: 2'41"

17:46
CCTV at home to police domestic violence
BODY:
To Australia now, where women at risk from violent partners are getting CCTV in their homes as a deterrent under a trial announced in Victoria.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, domestic violence, CCTV
Duration: 5'33"

17:54
Te Manu Korihi News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Thousands of Aboriginal rights campaigners demonstrated their opposition across Australia today over the Western Australian Government's plans to close down their rural communities. A Māori advisor says the only wharenui in Britain - which escaped being destroyed by fire - is a sign for it to come back home to New Zealand. The number of Māori and Pasifika children going to pre-school is rising.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

17:56
Tamaki residents blindsided
BODY:
Some Housing New Zealand tenants in Tamaki are feeling blindsided by the Government's move to transfer two thousand eight hundred homes to a redevelopment company it owns.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Housing New Zealand, Tamaki
Duration: 2'36"

18:07
Sports News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'00"

18:11
NZ company says it's too risky to return to return to Nepal
BODY:
A New Zealand adventure company which lost five Nepalese guides in avalanches on Mt Everest six days ago says it's still too risky to return, despite the government in Kathmandu urging climbers to come back.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nepal, Nepal earthquake, Kathmandu
Duration: 3'42"

18:15
Former Kiwi league coach predicts Anzac test win
BODY:
The former New Zealand rugby league coach Graham Lowe says the forecast wet weather will favour Australia in tonight's Anzac Test in Brisbane, but he's backing the Kiwis to win.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby, rugby league
Duration: 3'09"

18:19
UN finds Iranian sheikh deported from Australia unlawfully
BODY:
The lawyer for an Iranian sheikh deported from Australia says Canberra should accept a United Nations ruling that it breached the man's human rights.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Iran, Australia, human rights, deportation, United Nations
Duration: 3'33"

18:22
Criticism mounts over lack of convention centre info
BODY:
Criticism of Christchurch's planned convention centre is mounting, but the city's recovery authority is refusing to give details about the full cost and who will actually own it
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch convention centre
Duration: 3'19"

18:23
Asian students see questions before they sit tests
BODY:
Millions of Asian students sitting American university entrance tests this weekend may have already seen the questions
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: American university entrance test, America, Asian students
Duration: 4'39"

18:33
Focus on Politics for 1 May 2015
BODY:
The past week should have been a good one for the Prime Minister John Key. He attended a peace conference in Istanbul, the Anzac centennary ceremonies at Gallipoli and then visited the Gulf states to try to break a deadlock in free trade negotiations.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'40"

18:52
Te Manu Korihi News for 1 May 2015
BODY:
Thousands of Aboriginal rights campaigners demonstrated their opposition across Australia today over the Western Australian Government's plans to close down their rural communities; A Māori advisor says the only wharenui in Britain that escaped being destroyed by fire is a sign for it to come back home to New Zealand; The number of Māori and Pasifika children going to pre-school is rising.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'33"

18:56
US supreme court divided on same sex marriage
BODY:
The US Supreme Court appears sharply divided on whether to allow same-sex marriage in all states.
Topics: life and society, law
Regions:
Tags: US Supreme Court, USA, same-sex marriage
Duration: 3'32"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 9:06 Country Life: Memorable scenes, people and places in rural NZ (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:10
Boxing: Mayweather vs Pacquiao
BODY:
Bangkok-based sports reporter (and sometimes fighter) James Goyder rolls with the punches - the most anticipated boxing match of the decade.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: boxing. Mayweather, Pacquiao
Duration: 19'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:06 Sonic Tonic
8:10 Boxing: Mayweather vs Pacquiao
Bangkok-based sports reporter (and sometimes fighter) James Goyder rolls with the punches – the most anticipated boxing match of the decade.
8:25 Early Electronic Music
Electronic music is often viewed as a musical genre that stands separate from other genres. However, since the invention of the Telharmonium, electronic instruments have been integrated into various styles of music as well as our lives in general. Learn about the early development of electronic music with Thom Holmes, as he explains his collection of electronic music that spans from 1930 – 1985, electronic instruments, tape composition, and Motown’s neglected Moog synthesizer. (PRX)
9:06 Country Life

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:05
Demo Dairy Farm in Colombia
BODY:
Dairy Solutionz, a Hamilton based company, has worked in Colombia since 2012. In the past 18 months they've developed a demonstration dairy farm to show how a low cost dairy model could help small herd owners to stay in business as more European dairy imports threaten their livelihoods. Colombia's President opened the farm at the end of April.
EXTENDED BODY:
Dairy Solutionz, a Hamilton based company, has worked in Colombia since 2012. In the past 18 months they've developed a demonstration dairy farm to show how a low cost dairy model could help small herd owners to stay in business as more European dairy imports threaten their livelihoods. Colombia's President opened the farm at the end of April.
Topics: farming, rural
Regions:
Tags: Colombia, demonstration dairy farm, low cost
Duration: 3'58"

21:10
Regional Wrap
BODY:
Dairy farmers are reeling from this week's drop in the milk payout, while weatherwise Friday was a glorious day in the North Island. In the South Island Canterbury and Marlborough received welcome rain, and Nelson's apple harvest is pretty well over.
EXTENDED BODY:
Dairy farmers are reeling from this week's drop in the milk payout, while weatherwise Friday was a glorious day in the North Island. In the South Island Canterbury and Marlborough received welcome rain, and Nelson's apple harvest is pretty well over.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags: farming conditions
Duration: 5'39"

21:13
Take A Bow
BODY:
James Saunders is a secondary school teacher during the day, but in his spare time he makes bows and arrows for hunting. He says luckily for him his bow making, often out of kanuka, is better than his aim in the bush when goats often continue on their merry way undisturbed. While some native woods work well, his favourite bow wood is osage orange, a tree brought to New Zealand by American gold prospectors, it's dense and springy.
EXTENDED BODY:
James Saunders is a secondary school teacher during the day, but in his spare time he makes bows and arrows for hunting. He says luckily for him his bow making, often out of kanuka, is better than his aim in the bush when goats often continue on their merry way undisturbed. His favourite bow wood is osage orange, a tree brought to New Zealand by Amercian gold prospectors.

Topics: rural, farming
Regions: Waikato
Tags: bow maker, hunting, osage orange, kanuka
Duration: 9'33"

21:30
100 Years 100 Horses
BODY:
The Anzac Day remembrance in North Canterbury celebrated the 100 year anniversary of the Gallipoli landings. At dawn a company of 100 horses and riders dressed in replica World War I uniforms rode in formation from Peaks Hall near Hawarden to the Waikari War Memorial to place crosses at the cenotaph to commemorate the fallen. The idea behind the Anzac 100 Years 100 Horses event came from local resident and ex-serviceman Terry King, whose great-grandfather won a medal for his part in the conflict.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Peaks Hall is well off the beaten track. It sits beside a gravel crossroad in the heart of North Canterbury’s dryland sheep farming country. A cenotaph in front of the hall is dedicated to the men who left their farms to go and fight in the Great War. Many of them never returned.
The cenotaph was the focal point of the Anzac 100 Years 100 Horses Event organised by Hawarden resident and ex-serviceman Terry King and supported wholeheartedly by the local community.
After a dawn ANZAC service in front of the cenotaph, 100 horses and riders, who had been practicing for three days in a paddock behind the hall, rode in formation for 20 kilometres to the Waikari War Memorial to place crosses at the cenotaph to commemorate the fallen.
The riders were dressed in replica World War I uniforms to pay tribute to the Canterbury Mounted Rifles, which left Lyttelton in 1914 for the conflict in Turkey with nearly 2000 men and 2000 horses.
Terry says “My passion was to remember the men and the horses and the bond they shared because they slept together, they ate together, they fought together and they died together.”

Topics: rural
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Anzac, horses, Peaks Hall, soldiers, troops, WW1, dawn service, Gallipoli
Duration: 29'42"

9:06 Country Life
Rural news and features.
10:17 Late Edition
A review of the leading news from Morning Report, Nine to Noon, Afternoons and Checkpoint. Also hear the latest news from around the Pacific on Radio New Zealand International's Dateline Pacific.
11:06 The Lit Crawl

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274317

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 01 May 2015