Spectrum 820. A park in the city heart

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Tono kōrero mai

Christchurch's Hagley Park is larger than the central city. Public land of this size adjoining a city is unique in New Zealand and invites a variety of activities. Jack YPerkins interviews a number of people in the park [most participants are not identified by name].

The Christchurch Town Crier, Stephen Symons talks about Hagley Park’s layout and public uses. Two unidentified male runners talk about why they’ve liked jogging in the park for the last 30 years. An unidentified policewoman from Hagley Park’s Horse Patrol talks about park crime and horse training.

Gail, a dog walker, shares an unpleasant encounter she had with a young man indecently exposing himself to her one morning. A group of unidentified, English tourists from Somerset discuss what they enjoy about Hagley Park’s gardens and an unidentified mother and child talk about ducks.

An unidentified young woman from the horse-riding school, The Stables talks about riding in the park. She’s accompanied by Sana, a Japanese man learning to trot in the park and the owner of the school, Mary-Rose Leversedge who explains her inspiration for the business and how it’s evolved.

Hugh and Malcom talk about their hobby, sailing model craft on Victoria Lake next to the Christchurch Model Yacht Club. Gavin, an Avon river punts man plays requests from his limited 78rpm record collection, talks about his job, the traditional attire and amusing incidents.

The programme draws to a close with a song from the punts man’s gramophone, playing "Old Man River".

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Year 1994

Reference number 15089

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Genre Documentary radio programs
Nonfiction radio programs
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
Perkins, Jack (b.1940), Producer
Symons, Stephen, Speaker/Kaikōrero
Leversedge, Mary-Rose, Speaker/Kaikōrero
Radio New Zealand (estab. 1989), Broadcaster

Duration 00:31:20

Date 12 Mar 1994

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