Radio New Zealand National. 2015-10-15. 00:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

15 October 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature: Playing Favourites (RNZ); 3:05 Blackball 08, by Eric Bearsley (4 of 10, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ): 5:10 Witness (BBC); 5:45 The Day in Parliament (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 15 October 2015
BODY:
Banned book back on shelves, Tasman already feeling the heat, Violence breaks out near Jerusalem, Timaru water supply safe despite discovery of granules of DDT, Labour MP crosses the ditch to advocate for NZ detainees, Prisoners aid charity struggling in face of Australian influx, Woodhouse ignored advice from officials over worm farms, Children with rotten teeth likely to get rheutmatic fever, and Five years to cut emissions or see Antarctica's ice cap melt.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 37'24"

06:06
Sports News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'15"

06:09
Banned book back on shelves
BODY:
School librarians around the country will be returning banned book "Into The River" to their shelves this morning. The School Librarian Association's President, Miriam Tuohy, is welcoming the decision.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: Into the River
Duration: 3'56"

06:14
Tasman already feeling the heat
BODY:
El Nino is already starting to bite in the South Island, wDennis Bush King is the Environment and Planning Manager for the Tasman District Council. Water restrictions are being considered in the Tasman District, and could be introduced within a fortnight.
Topics: weather, climate
Regions:
Tags: El Nino
Duration: 2'28"

06:19
Pacific News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
The latest from the Pacific region.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'47"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'16"

06:27
Te Manu Korihi News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
The Turakina Māori Girls' College Old Girls Association says the interim decision that the kura should close has come as a surprise; The rate of hospitalisation as a result of assault or attempted homicide was nearly six times as high for Māori women as non-Māori women over the past three years; The National Māori Broadband Working Group is welcoming the announcement made by the Government to appoint members to the Māori ICT Development Fund Advisory Group.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'07"

06:33
Violence breaks out near Jerusalem
BODY:
Violence has once again broken out near in Jerusalem, Israel, where police have shot and killed a man dressed in combat fatigues and armed with a knife.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Israel
Duration: 5'48"

06:46
First steps towards a free trade agreement
BODY:
The first steps towards a free trade agreement with the European Union have been taken, and it's come from Europe.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'01"

06:48
Govt finances seen back in the red this year
BODY:
The government's achievement of a long awaited budget surplus is expected to be short lived as a slowing economy, and uncertain global environment combine to dent the outlook.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'01"

06:51
Stable outlook for NZ continues
BODY:
And credit rating agency Standard and Poor's says there's no prospect of a lift to New Zealand's double-A rating any time soon even with an unexpected surplus.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 55"

06:53
Credit rating drop overshadows recent rise in dairy prices
BODY:
The recent rebound in international dairy prices has now been overshadowed by Fonterra's credit downgrade.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, dairy
Duration: 1'56"

06:55
Online auctions improving at Trade Me
BODY:
The online trading website, Trade Me, says the number of auctions on the site is improving and it is confident about the general growth outlook for the business.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Trade Me
Duration: 2'20"

06:57
Corporate governance expert says small biz directors at risk
BODY:
A corporate governance consultant says a large number of directors of small companies don't have the skills they need to adequately do the job.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'29"

06:58
Morning Markets for 15 October 2015
BODY:
The Dow Jones index is about half a percent lower after retailer Wal-Mart put oiut a weak forecast which has spooked investors.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'01"

07:06
Sports News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'45"

07:08
Timaru water supply safe despite discovery of granules of DDT
BODY:
Police have been called in after DDT and arsenic granules were discovered on a section of the Opuha riverbed in South Canterbury.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Opuha River
Duration: 5'07"

07:14
Labour MP crosses the ditch to advocate for NZ detainees
BODY:
Nearly two hundred New Zealanders are in detention centres pending a decision on deportation, and Mr Key has said about a thousand could be in line to be sent home. The Labour MP Kelvin Davis says he has been told the total could be more like five thousand.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Australia, deportation, Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'13"

07:16
Prisoners aid charity struggling in face of Australian influx
BODY:
Australia's policy has already resulted in a massive increase in the numbers arriving back in this country. Auckland based prisoners' aid charity PARS Incorporated says it is struggling to keep up with demand for its services. Its executive director Tui Ah Loo joins Morning Report
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Australia, deportation, Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'01"

07:18
Woodhouse ignored advice from officials over worm farms
BODY:
The Government repeatedly ignored the advice and concerns of officials and used data it was told could be "highly misleading" when it brought in new health and safety rules.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: health and safety
Duration: 3'51"

07:22
Children with rotten teeth likely to get rheumatic fever
BODY:
A new study shows children with several rotten teeth are almost twice as likely to get rheumatic fever.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: teeth, rheumatic fever
Duration: 3'50"

07:35
Five years to cut emissions or see Antarctica's ice cap melt
BODY:
A major international study published in Nature today, shows only the most ambitious effort to slow climate change will stop Antarctica's ice cap from melting.
Topics: climate, environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'32"

07:38
Lou Vincent tells court of being cornered in bar by Fleming
BODY:
The former Black Cap Lou Vincent has told the jury in Chris Cairns' perjury trial the former New Zealand captain Stephen Fleming cornered him in a bar and told him he knew he and Cairns were "dirty".
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Black Caps, Chris Cairns, Lou Vincent
Duration: 3'59"

07:50
English outlines options following return to surplus
BODY:
The Finance Minister Bill English has achieved a goal he set himself in 2011 - to return the Crown accounts to surplus.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Bill English
Duration: 4'38"

07:57
Fight not over for lobby group despite victory for author
BODY:
The fight is not over for a Christian lobby group wanting to stop people under 18 reading a previously banned book.
Topics: books, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'24"

08:06
Sports News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

08:10
Locals concerned about DDT and arsenic found near water supply
BODY:
As we have been reporting this morning police have been called in after the discovery of DDT and arsenic granules on the Opuha riverbed in South Canterbury. Simon Gibb is the vice president of the South Canterbury Anglers' Club.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: arsenic, Opuha River
Duration: 3'19"

08:15
Locals concerned about DDT, arsenic found near water
BODY:
Allan Campbell is Chair of the Opihi Catchment Environment Protection Society.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: arsenic, Opuha River
Duration: 5'03"

08:20
NZ detainees claim most are being unfairly villified
BODY:
Morning Report speaks to a New Zealand born man currently detained on Christmas Island.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian detention centres
Duration: 4'20"

08:25
Australian Human Rights Commission to hear case on NZ detainees
BODY:
Australia's Human Rights Commission will soon hear a case arguing that New Zealand detainees awaiting deportation deserve better treatment.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'24"

08:27
Brian Fallow on English's surplus
BODY:
The National Government and its Finance Minister Bill English yesterday made good on their 2011 promise to bring the Crown's finances back into the black this year.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: surplus
Duration: 4'40"

08:30
Markets Update for 15 October 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'08"

08:35
Israeli police establish East Jerusalem checkpoints
BODY:
Police in Jerusalem have shot dead two Palestinians in separate stabbing attacks on Israelis. The BBC's Jonny Dymond in Jerusalem is reporting from Jerusalem.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Israel
Duration: 3'21"

08:40
Family First looks at legal options after ban lifted
BODY:
Family First is looking at its legal options, after the Film and Literature review board voted yesterday four-to-one to remove all restrictions on Ted Dawe's book "Into The River".
Topics: books, law
Regions:
Tags: Into the River
Duration: 3'50"

08:44
ACT leader claims Labour's targeting him with bill
BODY:
The ACT Party leader, David Seymour, has accused the Labour Party of trying to target him with a private member's bill.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'44"

08:50
Te Manu Korihi News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
The Crown is trying to block submissions made by Māori Land Court Judges from being used in a Waitangi Tribunal hearing against its review of Māori land laws; The Turakina Māori Girls' College Old Girls Association says the interim decision that the kura should close took them by surprise; An anti-violence network says statistics showing Māori are more likely to be hospitalised or die from violence reflect a lack of response from government agencies; The National Māori Broadband Working Group is welcoming the announcement made by the Government to appoint members to the Māori ICT Development Fund Advisory Group.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'39"

08:54
Big jump in new early childhood services in Auckland
BODY:
New figures show a boom in the number of home-based early childhood services being set up in Auckland.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'05"

08:56
Customers flick from supplier to supplier
BODY:
The quick-fire shuffle of consumers from one product to another, and then to a third, appears to be a growing habit.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'06"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Writer's Festival, by Stephanie Johnson (2 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:10
Calls for national strategy to deal with rising sea levels
BODY:
With new research showing the melting Antarctic ice sheets will see sea levels rise much higher than predicted, Local Government New Zealand says the country's coastlines need to be redrawn. Richard Kempthorne is the Tasman Mayor, and a member of the Local Government New Zealand National Council, which has been grappling with how to deal with the big changes ahead. Mark Munroe is the chair of Christchurch Coastal Residents United a newly created group s concerned about the impact any new hazard zoning connected to the report would have on their property values.
EXTENDED BODY:
With new research showing the melting Antarctic ice sheets will see sea levels rise much higher than predicted, Local Government New Zealand says the country's coastlines need to be redrawn.
Richard Kempthorne is the Tasman Mayor, and a member of the Local Government New Zealand National Council, which has been grappling with how to deal with the big changes ahead.
Mark Munroe is the chair of Christchurch Coastal Residents United a newly created group concerned about the impact any new hazard zoning connected to the report would have on their property values.
They both talk to Kathryn Ryan about the threat of rising sea levels.

Topics: climate, environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 19'13"

09:39
Where is Islamic State getting its guns?
BODY:
IS captured colossal amounts of United States made weapons, armoured vehicles and ammunition from the Iraqi army when it erupted from Syria into Iraq in early 2014. But most analysis agree that only accounts for a quarter of the weapons in IS hands. So where is the rest coming from? Conflict Armaments Research is an NGO working under a European Union mandate to investigate the supply chains which bring weapons and ammunition the the world's worst conflict zones. Nine to Noon speaks to its managing director, Marcus Wilson.
EXTENDED BODY:
IS captured colossal amounts of United States made weapons, armoured vehicles and ammunition from the Iraqi army when it erupted from Syria into Iraq in early 2014. But most analysis agree that only accounts for a quarter of the weapons in IS hands. So where is the rest coming from? Conflict Armaments Research is an NGO working under a European Union mandate to investigate the supply chains which bring weapons and ammunition the the world's worst conflict zones. Nine to Noon speaks to its managing director, Marcus Wilson.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Islamic State, arms
Duration: 12'45"

09:52
UK correspondent Jon Dennis
BODY:
The latest news and politics from the UK.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 7'43"

10:10
From activism on the streets of Ferguson ... To the White House
BODY:
Brittany Packnett is the Executive Director of Teach For America, St. Louis. Her dedication to empowering young people in marginalized communities has taken her all the way to the White House. Last August we spoke to her in the midst of public protest, ten days after the shooting of the unarmed black teenager, Micheal Brown. She is now an appointed member of the Ferguson Commission as well as a member of a presidential task force to study "21st century policing" and ways to increase the public's trust in police officers.
EXTENDED BODY:
Brittany Packnett is the Executive Director of Teach For America, St. Louis.
Her dedication to empowering young people in marginalized communities has taken her all the way to the White House.
Last August we spoke to her in the midst of public protest, ten days after the shooting of the unarmed black teenager, Micheal Brown.
She is now an appointed member of the Ferguson Commission as well as a member of a presidential task force to study "21st century policing" and ways to increase the public's trust in police officers.
Brittany Packnett talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Micheal Brown, Fergusson, USA
Duration: 26'16"

10:30
Book Review: Wild Roads: A New Zealand Journey by Bruce Ansley
BODY:
Reviewed by David Hill, published by Random House (NZ).
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'15"

11:06
New Technology with Robbie Allan
BODY:
Enterprise computing. A possible merger between EMC and Dell. Internet data and privacy laws.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'52"

11:25
Widower parenting daughters - Joseph Wakim
BODY:
Australian widower, Joseph Wakim talks about raising his three daughters after their Mum died. Nadia Wakim lost her battle with breast cancer 12 years ago, when the girls were 11, nine and four years old. In his memoir What My Daughters Taught Me, Joseph Wakim tells how despite friends and family giving well intentioned advice on parenting, he followed his heart and relied on humour and honesty to help his children cope. BOOK: What My Daughters Taught Me by Joseph Wakim, published by Allen and Unwin
Topics: life and society, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Joseph Wakim, parenting, widower, raising girls, breast cancer
Duration: 24'26"

11:49
Viewing - with Sarah McMullan
BODY:
Crimson Peak. MacBeth. The DNA Detectives. Turbo Kid.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: television, film
Duration: 10'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Calls for national strategy to deal with impact of rising sea levels on NZ's coastline
With new research showing the melting Antarctic ice sheets will see sea levels rise much higher than predicted, Local Government New Zealand says the country's coastlines need to be redrawn. A new study published in the journal Nature has used computer modelling to simulate the Antarctic Ice sheet's response to a warming climate
Which finds that even if emissions are significantly reduced, large parts of the Antarctic ice-sheet will still melt, resulting in a substantial rise in global sea-levels.
Richard Kempthorne is the Tasman Mayor, and a member of the Local Government New Zealand National Council, which has been grappling with how to deal with the big changes ahead.
Mark Munroe is the chair of Christchurch Coastal Residents United a newly created group s concerned about the impact any new hazard zoning connected to the report would have on their property values.
09:20 Where is Islamic State getting its guns?
IS captured colossal amounts of United States made weapons, armoured vehicles and ammunition from the Iraqi army when it erupted from Syria into Iraq in early 2014. But most analysis agree that only accounts for a quarter of the weapons in IS hands. So where is the rest coming from? Conflict Armaments Research is an NGO working under a European Union mandate to investigate the supply chains which bring weapons and ammunition the the world's worst conflict zones. In the four years since it's establishment CAR's team of arms experts, investigative journalists and policy advisors have worked in 24 countries including Sudan, Algeria, Egypt, Myanmar and the Philipines. Most recently CAR has been in Syria and Iraq trying to locate the source of weapons being supplied to IS. Nine to Noon speaks to its managing director, Marcus Wilson
[gallery:1495]
09:45 UK correspondent Jon Dennis
10:05 From activism on the streets of Ferguson ....to the White House
Brittany Packnett is the Executive Director of Teach For America, St. Louis. Her dedication to empowering young people in marginalized communities has taken her all the way to the White House.
Last August we spoke to her in the midst of public protest, ten days after the shooting of the unarmed black teenager, Micheal Brown. She is now an appointed member of the Ferguson Commission as well as a member of a presidential task force to study "21st century policing" and ways to increase the public's trust in police officers.
[image:50312:half]
10:30 Book Review: Wild Roads: A New Zealand Journey by Bruce Ansley
Reviewed by David Hill, published by Random House (NZ)
10:45 The Reading: The Writers' Festival by Stephanie Johnson read by Judith Gibson and Nigel Collins (Part 2 of 12)
11:05 New Technology with Robbie Allan
11:30 Widower parenting daughters, ' I wear the pants, they choose them'
Australian widower, Joseph Wakim talks about raising his three daughters after their Mum died. Nadia Wakim lost her battle with breast cancer 12 years ago, when the girls were 11, nine and four years old. In his memoir What My Daughters Taught Me, Joseph Wakim tells how despite friends and family giving well intentioned advice on parenting, he followed his heart and relied on humour and honesty to help his children cope.
BOOK: What My Daughters Taught Me by Joseph Wakim, published by Allen and Unwin
11:45 Viewing - with Sarah McMullan

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Streets of Laredo
Song: Slow Train
Composer: D Gibson/D Gibson/S Gibson
Album: Volume 1 & 2
Label: Dinealone
Time: 09:09
Artist: Vampire Weekend
Song: Everlasting Arms
Composer: Batmanlij / Koenig
Album: Modern Vampires of the City
Label: XL
Time: 09:35
Artist: The Mamaku Project
Song: Feeling Good
Composer: Newley/Bricusse
Album: Karekare
Time: 10:05
Artist: Tami Neilson
Song: Loco Mama
Composer: Neilson
Album: Don't be Afraid
Label: Neilson
Time: 10:38
Artist: Nadia Reid
Song: Call the Days
Composer: Reid
Album: Listen to the Formation, Look for the Signs
Label: Spunk
Time: 11:20

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
Another man is shot dead in a hunting accident and the Government faces legal action after blocking the sale of Lochinver Station.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'47"

12:17
Manufacturing sector grows in Sept
BODY:
Growth in the manufacturing sector has risen to its highest level in seven months driven by a lift in production, new orders and deliveries.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: manufacturing sector
Duration: 1'20"

12:19
Trade Me says digital changes important
BODY:
The online website, Trade Me, says it's continuing to focus on developing its digital offerings as auction numbers improve.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Trade Me
Duration: 1'33"

12:20
Small business owners should look for outside help
BODY:
Owners of small businesses are being advised not to be afraid of getting outside help in running their companies to avoid costly mistakes that might threaten their firms.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: small businesses
Duration: 1'44"

12:23
Midday Markets for 15 October 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Andrew Cathie at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'32"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The digital measurement developer ikeGPS says first half sales have more than doubled, and has confirmed it expects to reach its annual revenue forecast of $14-point-3 million.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'15"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
The Joseph Parker camp believe the use of his Polish sparring partner's massive reach has him set to continue his unbeaten run when he takes on Kali Meehan in Auckland tonight.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'34"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:10
First song
BODY:
Guy Garvey - 'Angela's Eyes'
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'23"

13:15
Radio Masts - Paul Thompson
BODY:
Radio New Zealand (RNZ) is to remove two of its Porirua-based transmission masts after an engineer's report recommended their urgent decommissioning to protect the public.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Radio NZ, aerials
Duration: 7'48"

13:23
Science Award Winner - John Innes
BODY:
John Innes won a science award last night for his work in helping to bring tui back to the city - he joins Jesse in the Hamilton studio to discuss his project, and his three decades worth of experience working with native birds and their arch nemesis, the rats and stoats.
EXTENDED BODY:
Hamiltonian John Innes recently won a science award for his work in helping to bring tui back to the city.
He joins Jesse Mulligan to discuss his project, and his three decades working with native birds and their archnemeses – rats and stoats.

Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: John Innes, awards
Duration: 12'20"

13:35
Early Roman Architecture - Prof Robert Hannah
BODY:
Rome wasn't built in a day - in fact, new research shows that Roman architects spent up to a year monitoring the sunlight and where it falls on certain important dates in the Roman calendar before designing a building. Professor Robert Hannah has been in Italy studying ancient Roman buildings, and has also featured in a documentary about the subject on the History channel.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: architecture, Romans
Duration: 10'34"

13:46
Favourite Album
BODY:
Led Zepplin II. Chosen by Lance.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'59"

14:10
Shake It Out - Sarah Stuart-Black
BODY:
Today is International ShakeOut day - did you participate in an earthquake drill this morning? We speak to Civil Defence to get the most up-to-date advice on what to do when disaster strikes.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: ShakeOut day
Duration: 4'54"

14:15
Money with Mary Holm
BODY:
The first in a new series about personal finance with the well-known and prolific financial author Mary Holm. Today's discussion is about mortgages.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Mary Holm, mortgages
Duration: 17'31"

14:46
Food - Brian Campbell
BODY:
Brian Campbell is a pastry chef and creates the desserts dreams are made of. His dessert bar Milse was one of the most popular night spots in central Auckland when he was at the helm, and now he's about to open something even bigger and better. he joins me now.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: Brian Campbell, desserts
Duration: 9'04"

15:08
The Expats - Dr Richard Davis
BODY:
This week we're in Fiji talking to Dr Richard Davis, a Lecturer in Theology and Ethics at the Pacific Theological College.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: expats
Duration: 9'25"

15:18
Masterpieces - Richard Easther
BODY:
Scientist Richard Easther discusses his favourite New Zealand scientist and her work.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: cosmology, Richard Easther
Duration: 12'56"

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 15 October 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'19"

21:06
Kaika Energy - from food waste to fertiliser and biogas
BODY:
A group of Year 13 students from Kaikorai Valley College in Dunedin have created a biotechnology company and installed a biodigestor at school
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“It was a very stinky process – and a messy one.”

That’s sales director Paige Gilder’s memory of scraping up 900 litres of fresh cow poo at a milking shed on a dairy farm. The cow manure was destined for a biodigestor that had just been installed in the grounds of Kaikorai Valley College, in Dunedin, and Paige was one of the six Year 13 students who had had the bright idea of creating a company based around the biodigestor.
Setting up the biodigestor – which is essentially a large cow’s stomach – is just one of the messy and smelly jobs that the young directors of the fledging biotechnology company Kaika Energy have had to come to grips with.
Dealing with mouldy, wilting and sometimes rotting food is another one of the regular and less appealing parts of the process, and Kaika Energy’s operations Deanna Teremoana says it’s a job they’ve learned to do outside, in the fresh air, especially during hot weather.
Kaika Energy is a company that takes food waste and uses it to produce biogas and liquid fertiliser. It was created by students taking part in Kaikorai Valley College’s Young Enterprise Scheme, and was inspired by research from the Love Food Hate Waste NZ campaign, showing that nearly $900 million worth of food is thrown away in New Zealand each year, with thousands of tonnes ending up in landfills. The students thought they could use food waste from the school and nearby businesses to instead create some useful products.
Technology tutor Peter Dodds is technical advisor to Kaika Energy. He has helped them out in many ways, from helping arrange for an Urban Biodigestor to be imported from China, to tracking down YouTube videos to help with its installation, and using his car to collect waste food from the dairies and supermarkets that have agreed to take part.
Deanna explains that once Peter has delivered the waste food to the school, it goes into the macerator, which is essentially an industrial-size waste disposal unit that smashes the food into a wet slurry.
“One of the things we’ve got ensure is that the biodigestor gets a balanced diet,” says Peter. “Basically we’re feeding a big cow and it needs to get a good mix. So we don’t give it a whole lot of brassica I one go, but try to mix vegetables, fruit and bread.”

The resulting slurry is then fed into the biodigestor – filled with those 900 kilograms of cow manure - which is housed in a small heated greenhouse. At the moment the heating pad for the greenhouse uses mains electricity, but in future the Kaika Energy team are planning to make the entire process self-sufficient by using the biogas to provide heating. They need to buy a biogas generator that can produce power to run a hotwater cylinder and a pump to circulate hot water.
The biodigestor has just come up to full production, after a 21-day settling in process during which the microbes from the cow dung established a viable population; it is now given new feedstock every day or couple of days. As new food waste is put in the biodigestor pushes out an equal volume of fertiliser, and it also produces large volumes of a 60:40 methane-carbon dioxide mix that is collected in a large inflatable bag. At the moment the gas – which has a sulphurous smell – is safely neutralised by being piped into a large bark filtration box filled with damp bark, which contains enzymes that absorb the methane. The next step will be to flare off the methane.
Paige and Deanna say the idea is to eventually use some of the biogas to run the school tractor, for example, either directly or to use the biodiesel generator to charge an electric vehicle. They also plan to set up a greenhouse as part of the school’s urban farm. The aim is to use some of the fertiliser on the school’s urban farm and in the greenhouse, and to sell some to raise money for the company’s operational costs. But before that can happen the fertiliser needs to be scientifically tested.
Kaika Energy is featuring in cross-curricular activity across the school, and the fertiliser, for example, will be tested by science students. The students involved all earn NCEA credits.
“We could either make things grow really well or kill them, and we’re not quite sure where we are at the moment,” says Peter. “That’s our main concern,” adds Paige. “We don’t want angry customers.”

Kaika Energy’s six directors are full of praise for the many Dunedin – and even national – companies that have provided them with equipment, business and mentoring advice, and help with the installation of the biodigestor.
Deanna says the routine of running the company is taking up a lot of time, but both she and Paige are adamant that the effort has been worth it. They are in their final year at school, and when they leave they are hoping that next year’s Year 13 students will become directors and keep the company running.
Kaika Energy are the youngest-ever and the first secondary school finalists in the 2015 New Zealand Innovator’s Awards, being held in Auckland on the 21st of October. They’re finalists in the Young New Zealand Innovator and People’s Choice Awards.
Topics: science, environment, technology, education
Regions:
Tags: biodigestor, food waste, New Zealand Innovator's Awards, biogas, fertiliser, biotechnology
Duration: 13'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
Guy Garvey - 'Angela's Eyes'
1:15 Radio Masts - Paul Thompson
Radio New Zealand (RNZ) is to remove two of its Porirua-based transmission masts after an engineer's report recommended their urgent decommissioning to protect the public.
1:25 Science Award Winner - John Innes
John Innes won a science award last night for his work in helping to bring tui back to the city - he joins Jesse in the Hamilton studio to discuss his project, and his three decades worth of experience working with native birds and their arch nemesis, the rats and stoats.
1:34 Early Roman Architecture - Prof Robert Hannah
Rome wasn't built in a day - in fact, new research shows that Roman architects spent up to a year monitoring the sunlight and where it falls on certain important dates in the Roman calendar before designing a building. Professor Robert Hannah has been in Italy studying ancient Roman buildings, and has also featured in a documentary about the subject on the History channel.
1:40 Favourite Album
Led Zepplin II. Chosen by Lance.
2:10 Shake It Out - Sarah Stuart-Black
Today is International ShakeOut day - did you participate in an earthquake drill this morning? We speak to Civil Defence to get the most up-to-date advice on what to do when disaster strikes.
2:20 Money with Mary Holm
The first in a new series about personal finance with the well-known and prolific financial author Mary Holm. Today's discussion is about mortgages.
2:20 Food - Brian Campbell
Brian Campbell is a pastry chef and creates the desserts dreams are made of. His dessert bar Milse was one of the most popular night spots in central Auckland when he was at the helm, and now he's about to open something even bigger and better. he joins me now.
2:24 Sirocco - Peta Mathias
In today's reading of Peta Mathias's book 'Sirocco', we move on from pretty Portugal to splendid Spain.
3:10 The Expats - Dr Richard Davis
This week we're in Fiji talking to Dr Richard Davis, a Lecturer in Theology and Ethics at the Pacific Theological College.
3:25 Masterpieces - Richard Easther
Scientist Richard Easther discusses his favourite New Zealand scientist and her work.
3:30 Our Changing World.
Biotechnology company Kaika Energy is the brain-child of a group of students from Dunedin's Kaikorai Valley College. They have set up a biodigestor on the school grounds that converts food waste to fertiliser and biogas, and Alison Ballance meets some of the directors, and their technology teacher, to see (and smell!) the process in action. They are youngest-ever finalists at the New Zealand Innovator's Awards, to be announced next week.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about, with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.

=PLAYLIST=

Music details
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Guy Garvey
TITLE: Angela's Eyes
COMP: Garvey
ALBUM: Courting the Squall
LABEL: n/a
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Whole Lotta love
COMP: Bonham / Willie Dixon / John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin ii
LABEL: Atlantic
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Heartbreaker
COMP: Bonham / John Paul Jones / Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin ii
LABEL: Atlantic
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Living Loving maid
COMP: Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin ii
LABEL: Atlantic
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Ramble On
COMP: Jimmy Page / Robert Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin ii
LABEL: Atlantic
FOOD:
ARTIST: Weird Al Yankovic
TITLE: Eat it
COMP: Yankovic
ALBUM: Weird Al Yankovic: The Essential (Compilation)
LABEL: Sony
HALF TIME:
ARTIST: London Philharmonic Orchestra
TITLE: Legend of Zelda
COMP: Kondo
ALBUM: The Greatest Video Game Music
LABEL: Xfive

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 15 October 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'19"

16:03
The Panel with Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson have been up to. Being prepared for all possible dangers. First it was Labour MP Maryan Street's Bill now this one from Act's David Seymour. Are we ready to legislate on euthanasia? The mayor of Whakatane Tony Bonne joins the Panel to talk dangerous dogs, changing laws and banning breeds.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'14"

16:05
The Panel with Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson (Part 2)
BODY:
Orchestras are attracting a new generation of fans. This is being put down visual extravaganzas many are incorporating in their performances. What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Steve McCabe have been thinking about. Transparency International rates New Zealand at #2 on its list of corruption. Ian Tuke of Deloitte talks about if we're as squeaky clean as it seems. Chaplain John McDonald talks about how a grant given to his inner city Auckland organisation is not based on "waffle" as claimed by the Taxpayers Union.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'45"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Steve McCabe and Catherine Robertson have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'10"

16:11
Be prepared
BODY:
Being prepared for all possible dangers.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'04"

16:15
Acts voluntary euthanasia bill
BODY:
First it was Labour MP Maryan Street's Bill now this one from Act's David Seymour. Are we ready to legislate on euthanasia?
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: assisted dying
Duration: 7'21"

16:22
Dog attacks
BODY:
The mayor of Whakatane Tony Bonne joins the Panel to talk dangerous dogs, changing laws and banning breeds.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: dangerous dogs
Duration: 9'17"

16:33
New orchestra fans
BODY:
Orchestras are attracting a new generation of fans. This is being put down visual extravaganzas many are incorporating in their performances.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: video games, Orchestras
Duration: 5'10"

16:38
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Steve McCabe have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'06"

16:43
NZ amongst the world's least corrupt
BODY:
Transparency International rates New Zealand at #2 on its list of corruption. Ian Tuke of Deloitte talks about if we're as squeaky clean as it seems.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: corruption
Duration: 9'16"

16:54
$80k grant for waffle?
BODY:
Chaplain John McDonald talks about how a grant given to his inner city Auckland organisation is not based on "waffle" as claimed by the Taxpayers Union.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Taxpayers Union, grant
Duration: 4'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 15 October 2015
BODY:
Another hunter is shot dead - the second in a week. A big fine for a dangerous fireworks display at a rugby test match and a ban on car window washers.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'53"

17:08
Whanau shocked by the latest shooting accident
BODY:
The whanau of a young father shot while hunting with friends says it's a tragic accident.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: hunting death, hunting accident, hunting
Duration: 1'44"

17:10
Fireworks display mistakes cost firm more than $100,000
BODY:
A fireworks display that went badly wrong, shooting shrapnel into a 50 thousand-strong crowd, at a Bledisloe Cup game last year has cost an Auckland firm more than 100 thousand dollars
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: fireworks, injuries, Bledisloe Cup
Duration: 3'45"

17:14
Using dodgy data proved "problematic" - Woodhouse
BODY:
The Workplace Safety Minister says his decision to use highly misleading health and safety data proved to be problematic, and that the Government has subsequently ditched it.
Topics: business, politics, law
Regions:
Tags: workplace safety
Duration: 2'34"

17:16
PM promising to obey law if Lochinver Station sale wrong.
BODY:
The Prime Minister is promising to obey the law if the Government is found to have wrongly stopped the Chinese-owned company Shanghai Pengxin from buying Lochinver Station near Taupo.
Topics: politics, business, economy, law
Regions:
Tags: Lochinver Station, Shanghai Pengxin
Duration: 2'41"

17:19
Greens' promise for more women shot down
BODY:
Top executives have slammed a Green Party promise to put together a Cabinet that's half female is misguided.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party, gender
Duration: 3'31"

17:26
Window Washers banned in Christchurch
BODY:
The Christchurch City Council has banned window washers from working intersections.
Topics: crime
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: window washers
Duration: 3'15"

17:33
Today's market update
BODY:
Consumers are playing a happier tune with confidence levels rising to a four month high.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'24"

17:36
Government has no plans to repatriate remains
BODY:
The Government says it has no plans to bring home the remains of soldiers who died in wars in Vietnam and Malaysia, despite renewed pressure to look again at this.
Topics: defence force, politics
Regions:
Tags: Vietnam, Malaysia, war dead
Duration: 2'45"

17:39
Australia's top police chief warns of worsening terror threat
BODY:
The head of Australia's Federal Police is warning that the country is facing a worsening threat from terrorism.
Topics: security
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, Australia
Duration: 5'02"

17:44
Why the DDT test delay?
BODY:
The Canterbury Regional Council says test results took longer than expected, which is why DDT and arsenic sat beside a river bank for over a month.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: DDT, Opuha River
Duration: 3'48"

17:48
Lawyer accuses a teenage boy of making up allegations
BODY:
A defence lawyer has suggested to a teenage boy he made up allegations his social worker took him to a motel, and had sex with him when he was 15.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Alexia Joseph
Duration: 3'40"

17:52
Te Manu Korihi News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An international study shows Māori have a higher chance of getting cancer than non-Māori, but the same is not true for other countries' indigenous peoples. It shows that inequalities for cancer is higher in New Zealand than it is in Australia, Canada and the United States. But Te Manu Korihi reporter Leigh Marama McLachlan found experts here dispute the overseas data and are more concerned about the divide within Aotearoa.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'18"

18:07
Sports News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'09"

18:11
Green Party women quota is slammed
BODY:
Top executives have slammed a Green Party quota promise to put together a Cabinet that's half female as misguided.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party, gender
Duration: 4'41"

18:16
Timaru avoiding drinking water from river where DDT dumped
BODY:
Timaru is still not taking drinking water from a catchment where DDT and arsenic were dumped beside a river.
Topics: environment, politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: DDT
Duration: 3'46"

18:25
Cunning rat dodging traps for over a month
BODY:
The hunt is under way for a cunning rat that's been dodging traps for more than a month on the predator free Ulva Island.
Topics:
Regions: Southland
Tags: rat eradication, DOC, rat
Duration: 3'37"

18:28
Houses flooded for the sake of science
BODY:
Three small houses have been deliberately deluged to try to understand how floodwater damages buildings and materials.
Topics: housing, science
Regions:
Tags: flooding, testing
Duration: 2'28"

18:35
NZ research offers safer treatment ofr hypoglycemic babies
BODY:
Research carried out at Waikato Hospital looks to have found the surest way of treating one of the commonest causes of brain damage in babies.
Topics: health
Regions: Waikato
Tags: babies, brain damage, Waikato Hospital
Duration: 3'40"

18:41
Council boss rejects DDT claim
BODY:
A regional council is dismissing claims it's been too slow to act over DDT and arsenic which sat beside a South Canterbury river for over a month.
Topics: environment, politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: DDT, arsenic
Duration: 3'49"

18:49
Te Manu Korihi News for 15 October 2015
BODY:
An international study shows Māori have a higher chance of getting cancer than non-Māori, but the same is not true for other countries' indigenous peoples; The National Urban Māori Authority is urging the Government to come-up with a fresh approach to stop the high rate of Māori dying on the road.
Topics: te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'47"

18:53
Today In Parliament for 15 October 2015 - evening edition
BODY:
Finance minister, Bill English, rejects claims from his Labour shadow, Grant Robertson, that his first operating surplus since taking office was won at the expense of repairs to Canterbury earthquake damage. Mr English also faces questions from the Greens' Jan Logie about the number of women in National's Cabinet. In the committee rooms, the Justice and Electoral Committee hears a submission from Mai Chen on the need to cater more for Asian and other ethnic groups voting in the next General Election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies for 15 October 2015
BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris reviews Johnny Depp starring as real-life gangster Whitey Bulger in Black Mass. Miss You Already is a tear-jerker, graced by a star performance from Toni Collette, while Queen and Country is a long-delayed follow-up to John Boorman's wartime memoir, Hope and Glory.
EXTENDED BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris reviews Johnny Depp starring as real-life gangster Whitey Bulger in Black Mass. Miss You Already is a tear-jerker, graced by a star performance from Toni Collette, while Queen and Country is a long-delayed follow-up to John Boorman's wartime memoir, Hope and Glory.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: films, movies
Duration: 23'36"

19:31
Black Mass Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews Johnny Depp starring as real-life gangster Whitey Bulger in Black Mass.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film, movies
Duration: 7'03"

19:32
Miss You Already - Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews 'Miss You Already' - a tear-jerker, graced by a star performance from Toni Collette.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: filmsd, movies
Duration: 5'46"

19:33
Queen and Country - Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews 'Queen and Countr'y is a long-delayed follow-up to John Boorman's wartime memoir, Hope and Glory. opics] arts
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: films, moives
Duration: 5'53"

7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

06:00
Antarctica's contribution to sea level rise
BODY:
New research confirms that Antarctica will contribute sigificantly to future sea level rise unless greenhouse gas emissions are curbed from 2020 onwards.
EXTENDED BODY:
New research published today confirms that Antarctica’s icy cap will add significantly to future sea level rise, unless ambitious action is taken to start reducing greenhouse gas emissions from 2020 onwards.
An international team, led by Victoria University researcher Nick Golledge, published results in Nature which show that only the most ambitious effort to curb emissions will stop Antarctica’s ice shelves from collapsing.
While melting ice shelves don’t contribute directly to rising sea levels because they float on the surface of the ocean, they play a crucial role in keeping the polar ice cap in place by acting as a break on the ice sheet.
Dr Golledge says the team’s research shows that a warming of 2°C or more locks in the disintegration of ice shelves, which in turn exposes the ice sheets to a warming ocean and precipitates melting.
He says Antarctica’s contribution to future sea levels could be as much as 40 centimetres by the end of this century – and, combined with the impact of an expanding ocean and the melting of Greenland’s ice and land-based glaciers, this could lift sea levels by 1.5 metres by 2100.
The team used a state-of-the-art model to simulate Antarctica’s ice sheets under different scenarios, from a business-as-usual situation of unchecked emissions to an ambitious effort to start reducing emissions from 2020 onwards. The latter scenario would keep average temperatures below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, but unmitigated climate change would warm the world by almost 5°C by 2100, and by 8-10°C by 2300.
The oceans play a critical role in Antarctica’s melting, Dr Golledge says. “Water holds a lot more heat energy than air and over the years that we’ve now had global warming, most of the heat, 93 per cent, has gone into the oceans. That heat is now very hard to get rid of.”
The warming oceans have the potential to melt the floating ice shelves from below and to destroy their buttressing effect on the ice sheets.
Think of it as the chocks under a wheel of an airplane, Dr Golledge says. “If you spin up the propellers on the airplane, your plane is not going anywhere as long as the chocks are there. That’s the ice shelves. When you take the chocks away, the ice shelves are gone and the ice sheet will respond and it will start to flow faster into the ocean. Because the oceans are warmer it will melt.”
The Ross Ice Shelf is the world’s largest floating slab of ice and a key part of the Antarctic system. Dr Golledge says a determined effort to reduce emissions would maintain the ice shelf at more or less its present state. “The problem comes under higher emissions scenarios where we start to lose part of that ice shelf. Under the most extreme scenario we considered [in the model] we lose the entire ice shelf within the next century and that has pretty dire consequences for the ice sheet.”
If we lose Antarctica’s ice shelves, he says, the impact is irreversible. “It’s a one-way step change. We lose the ice shelves because the ocean is warmer. Even if the atmosphere cools, which in itself is a difficult thing to do, it’s very hard to get the heat out of the ocean. And if you can’t get the heat out of the ocean, then the ice shelves aren’t going to re-form."
He says the only way to keep Antarctica’s ice shelves is not to lose them in the first place.
The study of Antarctica’s contribution to future sea levels is a fast-moving area of research, but both modelling and observations in the field are suggesting that it will be significant and long-lasting unless greenhouse gas emissions are curbed soon.
“The reality is that what we’re doing now in terms of greenhouse gas emissions is essentially setting up the climate for warming that will persist for centuries and probably millennia. The thing about ice sheets is that they respond to long-term changes like this and it’s very hard to reverse that change.”
Dr Gollege says if emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are successfully reduced from 2020, temperatures could be maintained as they are now. But because carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for a very long time, ongoing emissions will continue the warming effect. “The ice sheets will start absorbing all that heat and once you’ve made the ice warmer, it’s softer and flows faster, and it’s very hard to get that heat out again.”
He says, to avoid the loss of Antarctic ice shelves, and an associated commitment to many metres of sea-level rise, the study shows atmospheric warming needs to be kept below 2°C. “Beyond that we’re going to be in a territory of propagating changes that we can’t really reverse.”
Topics: science, environment, climate
Regions:
Tags: Antarctica, sea level rise, ice sheets, Ross Ice Shelf, climate change, greenhouse gas emissions
Duration: 11'58"

21:06
Kaika Energy - from food waste to fertiliser and biogas
BODY:
A group of Year 13 students from Kaikorai Valley College in Dunedin have created a biotechnology company and installed a biodigestor at school
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“It was a very stinky process – and a messy one.”

That’s sales director Paige Gilder’s memory of scraping up 900 litres of fresh cow poo at a milking shed on a dairy farm. The cow manure was destined for a biodigestor that had just been installed in the grounds of Kaikorai Valley College, in Dunedin, and Paige was one of the six Year 13 students who had had the bright idea of creating a company based around the biodigestor.
Setting up the biodigestor – which is essentially a large cow’s stomach – is just one of the messy and smelly jobs that the young directors of the fledging biotechnology company Kaika Energy have had to come to grips with.
Dealing with mouldy, wilting and sometimes rotting food is another one of the regular and less appealing parts of the process, and Kaika Energy’s operations Deanna Teremoana says it’s a job they’ve learned to do outside, in the fresh air, especially during hot weather.
Kaika Energy is a company that takes food waste and uses it to produce biogas and liquid fertiliser. It was created by students taking part in Kaikorai Valley College’s Young Enterprise Scheme, and was inspired by research from the Love Food Hate Waste NZ campaign, showing that nearly $900 million worth of food is thrown away in New Zealand each year, with thousands of tonnes ending up in landfills. The students thought they could use food waste from the school and nearby businesses to instead create some useful products.
Technology tutor Peter Dodds is technical advisor to Kaika Energy. He has helped them out in many ways, from helping arrange for an Urban Biodigestor to be imported from China, to tracking down YouTube videos to help with its installation, and using his car to collect waste food from the dairies and supermarkets that have agreed to take part.
Deanna explains that once Peter has delivered the waste food to the school, it goes into the macerator, which is essentially an industrial-size waste disposal unit that smashes the food into a wet slurry.
“One of the things we’ve got ensure is that the biodigestor gets a balanced diet,” says Peter. “Basically we’re feeding a big cow and it needs to get a good mix. So we don’t give it a whole lot of brassica I one go, but try to mix vegetables, fruit and bread.”

The resulting slurry is then fed into the biodigestor – filled with those 900 kilograms of cow manure - which is housed in a small heated greenhouse. At the moment the heating pad for the greenhouse uses mains electricity, but in future the Kaika Energy team are planning to make the entire process self-sufficient by using the biogas to provide heating. They need to buy a biogas generator that can produce power to run a hotwater cylinder and a pump to circulate hot water.
The biodigestor has just come up to full production, after a 21-day settling in process during which the microbes from the cow dung established a viable population; it is now given new feedstock every day or couple of days. As new food waste is put in the biodigestor pushes out an equal volume of fertiliser, and it also produces large volumes of a 60:40 methane-carbon dioxide mix that is collected in a large inflatable bag. At the moment the gas – which has a sulphurous smell – is safely neutralised by being piped into a large bark filtration box filled with damp bark, which contains enzymes that absorb the methane. The next step will be to flare off the methane.
Paige and Deanna say the idea is to eventually use some of the biogas to run the school tractor, for example, either directly or to use the biodiesel generator to charge an electric vehicle. They also plan to set up a greenhouse as part of the school’s urban farm. The aim is to use some of the fertiliser on the school’s urban farm and in the greenhouse, and to sell some to raise money for the company’s operational costs. But before that can happen the fertiliser needs to be scientifically tested.
Kaika Energy is featuring in cross-curricular activity across the school, and the fertiliser, for example, will be tested by science students. The students involved all earn NCEA credits.
“We could either make things grow really well or kill them, and we’re not quite sure where we are at the moment,” says Peter. “That’s our main concern,” adds Paige. “We don’t want angry customers.”

Kaika Energy’s six directors are full of praise for the many Dunedin – and even national – companies that have provided them with equipment, business and mentoring advice, and help with the installation of the biodigestor.
Deanna says the routine of running the company is taking up a lot of time, but both she and Paige are adamant that the effort has been worth it. They are in their final year at school, and when they leave they are hoping that next year’s Year 13 students will become directors and keep the company running.
Kaika Energy are the youngest-ever and the first secondary school finalists in the 2015 New Zealand Innovator’s Awards, being held in Auckland on the 21st of October. They’re finalists in the Young New Zealand Innovator and People’s Choice Awards.
Topics: science, environment, technology, education
Regions:
Tags: biodigestor, food waste, New Zealand Innovator's Awards, biogas, fertiliser, biotechnology
Duration: 13'41"

21:20
Subtidal currents in Cook Strait
BODY:
Cook Strait is known for its strong tidal currents, but NIWA oceanographers have completed comprehensive measurements of subtidal residual currents.
EXTENDED BODY:
From a fluid mechanical perspective, Cook Strait is just a work of beauty.
Craig Stevens, NIWA

Cook Strait is known as one of the most turbulent and unpredictable bodies of water in the world. It is a bottleneck for winds and strong tidal currents, but it is also unusual in that the tidal elevations at either end of the strait are almost exactly out of phase, which means that high water on one side meets low water on the other.
Craig Stevens, an oceanographer at NIWA and the University of Auckland, recently completed the first comprehensive measurement which used moored autonomous instruments to track transport across the strait.
He says the difference in tidal heights and the narrowing of the strait means that unremarkable currents that might only be a metre per second “get pushed to something that’s around three to four metres per second at its fastest, and that’s actually comparable to French Pass, which is the iconic bit of New Zealand water that we think about in terms of energy and excitement.”
Tidal currents are an important component of the strait’s energy budget, and some of Craig Stevens' work has focused on the potential of tidal energy. “Working out the tides is the obvious one because we see it, it’s fast, it’s the sort of thing that is relevant to marine energy and relevant to the longevity of power cables that go along the seabed”, he says.
“But as soon as you’re thinking about things that happen at longer time scales, like the transport of fish larvae or pollution, … then you have to look at the residual or subtidal transport, the little bit that’s left over after the tide has washed back and forth.”
The results from the latest measurements are rewriting our understanding of water movements across Cook Strait.
The current understanding of the strength of residual transport across Cook Strait comes from limited data. Back in the 1970s, when the first current measurements were made, oceanographers put a railway wheel on the seabed at a depth of 300 metres and ran cables from it with floats that rose up to about 30 metres. Current meters were attached along the wires, and the whole contraption was left in the water for months.
“But what happened is that the speed of the tide pushed it all down and the current meters were measuring near the seabed.”
The latest technology uses acoustic methods – like an undersea police speed radar – pinging from autonomous instruments that can be left on the seabed for more than two years. The instrument pings out acoustic waves in a range of different directions, analyses the Doppler shift that comes back and calculates the speed of the water.
“We haven’t deconstructed the paradigm,” says Craig Stevens. “But the residual flow is quite a bit slower than we thought, so there is less flux through Cook Strait and actually some of it is in the direction opposite to the arrows you’d draw on a chalk board in a simple picture of the strait.”
The results bring two surprises. The absolute tidal speeds, at around four metres per second, are much faster than any of the velocities that had been identified before, but the residual flows are less than previously thought.
That’s quite important for understanding the circulation in the central New Zealand continental shelf. We’ve got much bigger transport fluxes to the north and to the south, but what happens in the middle is this delicate balance between the two, so quite a small transport through Cook Strait can have a big effects on how that balance goes.

Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Cook Strait, tidal currents, residual currents, nutrients
Duration: 14'34"

21:34
Ultra-fast lasers
BODY:
Ultra-fast lasers - or more properly ultra short-pulsed lasers - are very accurate, which makes them useful in industry and research
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“An optical frequency comb allows you to do measurements more precisely than any other technique in existence.”
Miro Erkintalo, 2015 Rutherford Discovery Fellow, University of Auckland

Bar code scanners, CD and DVD players, blu-ray players, laser printers – lasers are everywhere.
“Laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation,” explains University of Auckland physicist Miro Erkintalo. “So essentially a laser is a device that is capable of laser light. And laser light is very unique form of light that is essentially coherent – both spatially and temporally – and it’s basically much brighter than ordinary light.
Although the physics of lasers is well understood, Miro says there is always a push to develop new kinds of lasers and that’s a key part of his research. He says it’s often the case that the development of a new kind of laser will lead to new applications, and he cites how the development of a cheap blue laser led to blu-ray technology
Miro works on ultra-fast lasers, although he says they’re more accurately described as ultra short pulsed lasers since they emit vast numbers of ultra short pulses per second (and since the speed of light can’t actually go faster than itself).
"A single one of these short pulses lasts just hundreds of femtoseconds, and one femtosecond is to one second what one second is to 32 million years,” says Miro. “Basically these pulses are the shortest things that humans have ever created."

Miro says they try to create ultra short-pulsed lasers that are robust and can be used for micro-machining, for example, in industrial environments where there is a lot of noise, high temperatures and mechanical vibrations.
“Because you are packing a certain amount of energy in a short duration, it means these lasers have very high peak power and that allows you to leverage non-linear optical effects. You can use it, for example, for high-resolution microscopy, and it is used in biomedical imaging to allow you to see further into tissue. You can also use ultra short-pulsed lasers to look at the dynamics of very short chemical reactions”.
University of Auckland researchers have already developed ultra-fast laser technology, with pulses of about 140 femtoseconds, that has been licensed to Southern Photonics and is sold internationally. Miro says the resulting piece of equipment, which is portable, is worth more per gram than gold, which makes it an excellent export commodity.
Miro’s lab works on optical frequency combs, which is a light source whose spectrum consists of equi-distantly spaced spectral components. Because the distance between each of the colours - or frequencies - is known it can be used as a ruler to measure unknown optical frequencies.
Optical frequency combs can also be used to create optical atomic clocks, which are so precise they won’t gain or lose a second, even over billions of years. This area of research, using optical frequency combs, was awarded a Nobel Prize in 2005.
Mira says that an exciting new development in the field of ultra-fast lasers is the use of microresonators, which allow you to put in a single laser light and create all the colours of the rainbow, in other words an optical frequency comb. In 2013 Miro was awarded a Faststart Marsden Fund award for research into 'Microresonator frequency combs: Fiber-optic physics to the rescue.'
Miro Erkintalo is talking about “Rulers of light” as part of the Royal Society of New Zealand’s International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies Ten by Ten lecture series. His talk is in Dunedin at 5.30pm on Thursday 22 October.
Also next week Justin Hodgkiss talks on ‘The solar revolution’ in Rotorua 5.30pm Thursday 22 October, and Cather Simpson is talking on ‘Making light work’ in Wanaka at 6pm Friday 23 October.
You can hear Cather and Justin in an Our Changing World feature from 2013 marking 50 years of the laser.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: lasers, ultra-fast lasers, light, physics
Duration: 13'04"

21:46
Global census of methane-producing microbes
BODY:
A team of AgResearch scientists had analysed the rumen microbiome in different animals across the world and found similar methane-producing micro-organisms.
EXTENDED BODY:
What we found is that methanogens, which are the methane-producing microbes, the same one were dominant everywhere. One particular group which makes up about half of all of the methane-producing microbes was dominant in just about every single sample, from all over the world.
Peter Janssen, AgResearch

Giraffes in Africa, buffalo in China, bison in America, cattle and sheep in New Zealand – all these animals have one thing in common: they ruminate.
They all eat grass or leaves, but to digest the plant matter, they need the help of microbes that live in their multi-chambered stomach. The first chamber is called the rumen, and it is an ecosystem in its own right, teeming with microbes that ferment the feed. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is a by-product of this process.
Methane emissions from ruminant animals account for more than a third of New Zealand’s total greenhouse gas emissions, and scientists have been looking for ways of reducing the emissions, both here and worldwide.
A New Zealand-led study has now found that a global effort is feasible because the microbes that produce the greenhouse gas are similar in ruminant animals around the world.
AgResearch scientist Peter Janssen, who led the Global Rumen Census project together with Gemma Henderson, says the team analysed hundreds of samples from the fore-stomachs of a wide range of ruminant animals and found similar micro-organisms present in nearly all rumens across a wide variety of species and animal diets.
The majority of the samples are from cattle, sheep and goats from different countries, but the project also included other farmed ruminants, such as buffaloes and reindeer, as well as wild animals, including giraffes, mountain chamois and bison.
“For every single one of those animals we knew the breed, what it was eating and where it was from, and that allowed us to explore patterns across all of this information,” says Peter Janssen.
Gemma Henderson says the rumen teems with microbes, including methanogens, which are responsible for the methane production, and bacteria and larger protozoa. The team found that the methanogens were surprisingly similar across all animals “no matter where the animals were, which species they were and what they were eating”.
From a methanogen’s perspective, the results are perhaps less surprising. “These methane-producing microbes grow on the products from the bacteria and protozoa that ferment the feed. They grow on the hydrogen that’s produced, and they convert the hydrogen to methane. They just down care where the hydrogen comes from.”
The results mean that any technology developed to reduce methane emissions from ruminants should be applicable across the globe.
If it had turned out that the methanogens were different everywhere, it means you’d need a local solution for the problem everywhere, but if they are very similar, as they turned out to be, it means that a global collaboration or a product developed in one place can result in something that everyone can use.

Earlier this year, the AgResearch team developed chemical inhibitors that could potentially significantly lower methane emissions, in a project that was carried out in sheep, cattle and deer in New Zealand.
Peter Janssen says the latest findings don’t take away the technical challenge of controlling the methanogens. “You still have to find a way of intervening, but what it does tell us is that something that’s developed in one place could be applicable everywhere and that’s really useful if we have a global effort to try and solve the problem.”
The results of the Global Rumen Census were released in the open-access journal Scientific Reports. The team has made the database and a summary of the results openly available so that other researchers can pursue their own investigations, and Peter Janssen says there are a few questions he would like to continue exploring. So far the methanogens have been grouped on a species level, but he says he would like to “drill deeper to investigate different strains”.
“In New Zealand, for example, it’s not only the same species of methanogen everywhere, it’s the same dominant strains and we’d love to know if that’s on a global level as well.”
Topics: science, climate, environment, farming
Regions:
Tags: ruminant animals, rumen, methanogens, methane emissions, greenhouse gas emissions
Duration: 17'18"

9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:12
Caught in Chile
BODY:
Kiwi photographer Derek Paterson returns to talk about his time in Chile post-Pinochet and then returning later in life as the husband of the NZ ambassador in Chile, his book is titled Second Time Lucky...
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Chile, Pinochet, photography
Duration: 19'02"

20:40
Electronic Music with DJ B.Lo - part four
BODY:
ELECTRONIC MUSIC: The evolution of music made with devices powered by electricity and/or computers, with Paul Berrington aka DJ B.Lo... that point when electronic music started entering the clubs, and taking on some the identity we still have with it in the contemporary scene.
EXTENDED BODY:
Connisseur of electronic music Paul Berrington (aka DJ B.Lo) takes Bryan Crump back to the late '70s and early '80s when electronic instruments were becoming more affordable and electronic music entered the clubs and started to find its contemporary identity.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: electronic music, computers, contemporary music, Synthesiser, clubs, DJ B.Lo
Duration: 21'20"

20:59
Nights Conundrum
BODY:
Clue 7
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13"

21:59
Nights Conundrum
BODY:
Clue 8
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 40"

=SHOW NOTES=

NIGHTS on Radio New Zealand National
host. Bryan Crump & producer. Robyn Rockgirl Walker
Thursday rundown...
7:12pm CAUGHT IN CHILE
Kiwi photographer Derek Paterson returns to talk about his time in Chile post-Pinochet and then returning later in life as the husband of the NZ ambassador in Chile, his book is titled Second Time Lucky...

7:35pm At the Movies with Simon Morris
8:12pm Windows on the World (international public radio documentaries) - A New Day and New Life in Germany
8:43pm NIGHTS Cultural Ambassadors
roster: Kate Mead (Contemporary Classical Music), Adrian Kinnaird (Comics & Graphic Novels), Miles Buckingham (Jamaican Music), Cliff Fell (Poetry), Kirsten Zemke (Hip Hop), Andrew Todd (Video Games), Fergus Barrowman (Jazz), Leilani Unasa (Pasifika), Paul Berrington (Electronic Music) & Chris Jannides (Dance)
ELECTRONIC MUSIC
The evolution of music made with devices powered by electricity and/or computers, with Paul Berrington aka DJ B.Lo... that point when electronic music started entering the clubs, and taking on some the identity we still have with it in the contemporary scene.
tunes:
Technopolis - Yellow Magic Orchestra
Hot on the Heels of Love - Throbbing Gristle
Moskow Diskow - Telex
Go Bang - Dinosaur L
8:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 7
9:07pm Our Changing World - a secondary school biotechnology company, sub-tidal currents in Cook Strait, ultra-fast lasers, and micro-organisms found in ruminant animals around the world...

9:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 8
10:17pm Late Edition (a round up of today's Radio New Zealand news and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International)
11:07pm Eleventh Hour Music: Music 101 pocket edition with Emma Smith
... nights' time is the right time...

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274484

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 15 Oct 2015

We use cookies to help us understand how you use our site, and make your experience better. To find out more read our privacy policy.

Whakamahia ai mātou ngā pihikete ki te rapu māramatanga ki te āhua o tō whakamahi i tēnei paetukutuku, ki te whakapai hoki i tō whai wāhi mai. Ki te rapu kōrero anō pānuitia te kaupapahere tūmataiti.

Accept