Radio New Zealand National. 2015-10-29. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

29 October 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature: Playing Favourites (RNZ); 3:05 The Book of Job, by Elisabeth Easther (4 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ): 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6.20 and 7.50 Business News
6.26 Rural News
6.48 and 7.45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Monday 29 October 2015
BODY:
Labour demanding assurances Govt not involved in Aust boat-crew payments, No end in sight for long-running battle to clean up Lake Horowhenua, Christmas Island detainee's brother waits for his return, Cluster of quakes felt in Central North Island, By hook or by crook - report into Australia's border control, Chris Cairns' anger in police interview, Iran will take part in Syria talks, Coroner's Inquest into wife run over and killed by husband, and Disability Rights Commissioner calls for law change.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 35'30"

06:06
Sports News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'05"

06:10
Labour demanding assurances Govt not involved in Aust boat-crew payments
BODY:
The Labour Party will be seeking assurances from the Government that it was not in any way involved in the alleged payments Australian officials made to people smugglers this year.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: people smugglers, Australian border control, Australia
Duration: 2'43"

06:16
No end in sight for long-running battle to clean up Lake Horowhenua
BODY:
The conflict over ownership at Lake Horowhenua has almost reached a new boiling point.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Lake Horowhenua
Duration: 2'43"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'07"

06:36
Christmas Island detainee's brother waits for his return
BODY:
A New Zealand man, who is suffering from a brain tumour, has been moved off Christmas Island to another detention centre in Western Australia.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island, Australian detention centres, Australia
Duration: 4'09"

06:43
Cluster of quakes felt in Central North Island
BODY:
A swarm of at least 10 earthquakes of around magnitude 3 has been felt in the Turangi area in the Central North Island early this morning. John Ristau is the duty seismologist at GNS Science.
Topics:
Regions: Waikato
Tags: earthquakes, Turangi
Duration: 2'31"

06:50
BNZ upbeat about year ahead
BODY:
The Bank of New Zealand is upbeat about its prospects for the coming year after it reported a record net profit of just over one billion dollars in the year to September.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: BNZ
Duration: 2'20"

06:52
PGG Wrightson expects up to 12% fall in FY operating profit
BODY:
Shares in rural services firm, PGG Wrightson, eased more than 2% yesterday after it warned its full-year operating profit could be as much as 12% down on the previous year, as weak dairy prices and the risk of drought weigh on the rural economy.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: PGG Wrightson
Duration: 1'20"

06:53
NZ Oil & Gas's developed Kupe reserves up by a third
BODY:
New Zealand Oil and Gas says a marked rise in the estimates of the developed reserves in the Kupe oil and gas field off the Taranaki coast will save the owners an estimated $180 million in capital spending over the next couple of years.
Topics: business, economy, energy
Regions:
Tags: oil, gas
Duration: 1'29"

06:55
NZ tech exports at record highs
BODY:
The dairy sector may be going through a soft patch, but it's not so with the country's IT sector whose exports have grown strongly in the past year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: IT, IT sector
Duration: 1'20"

06:56
NZ exporter confidence rises
BODY:
A survey of the export sector shows a lift in sentiment with more companies expecting higher overseas orders and earnings.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 50"

06:57
Morning Markets for 29 October 2015
BODY:
American stocks are up as investors await the minutes from the Federal Reserve. It's expected rates will stay on hold until next year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'08"

07:06
Sports News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'52"

07:12
By hook or by crook - report into Australia's border control
BODY:
Amnesty International says it now has proof Australia's maritime border control operations are nothing more than a lawless venture. Grant Bayldon is the Executive Director of Amnesty New Zealand.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Amnesty International, Australian border control
Duration: 6'21"

07:17
Chris Cairns' anger in police interview
BODY:
The jury in the Chris Cairns perjury trial has today for the first time heard the voice of the accused himself.
Topics: sport, law
Regions:
Tags: Chris Cairns, perjury trial, Black Caps
Duration: 4'04"

07:23
Iran will take part in Syria talks
BODY:
Iran will take part in talks aimed at finding an end to Syria's catastophic civil war. Daniel Ryntjes is our correspondent in Washington
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Iran, Syria, Syrian war
Duration: 2'33"

07:25
Coroner's Inquest into wife run over and killed by husband
BODY:
A coroners inquest has been told a Christchurch man had been having an affair just months before running over and killing his wife in 2013.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 2'51"

07:27
Disability Rights Commissioner calls for law change
BODY:
The Disability Rights Commissioner has waded into a debate on a controversial hormone therapy used to stunt the growth of severely disabled children.
Topics: disability
Regions:
Tags: disability rights, disabled children
Duration: 6'56"

07:38
OCR not expected to change when Reserve Bank reviews it
BODY:
In just over an hour the Reserve Bank will review the cost of borrowing. It's not expected to change the official cash rate, but the central bank's governor Graeme Wheeler has said another cut is likely at some stage.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, Graeme Wheeler
Duration: 2'45"

07:41
Wellington City Council extends living wage to security guards
BODY:
The Wellington City Council's voted in favour of extending the living wage to its contracted security guards.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: living wage, Wellington City Council, Wellington City Council security
Duration: 3'25"

07:46
Recreational fishermen happy with fishing giant's Hauraki Gulf offer
BODY:
One of the largest fishing companies in New Zealand is offering to stop fishing in Hauraki Gulf, but there is one catch. Keith Ingram is the former president of the Recreational Fishing Council
Topics:
Regions: Northland
Tags: recreational fishing, Hauraki Gulf
Duration: 5'03"

07:50
HPV vaccine change mulled, amid moves to lift use by girls
BODY:
The Health Ministry is considering moving to a two-dose vaccine to protect girls against cervical cancer and genital warts. Our Health Correspondent, Karen Brown, reports.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: vaccines, HPV vaccine, cervical cancer
Duration: 3'18"

07:55
Potential Auckland mayoral doesn't want partisan politics
BODY:
The Labour MP widely tipped to run for the Auckland mayoralty next year is against the city's partisan politics. Phil Goff, who's expected to announce soon just whether he plans to run for mayor, thinks neutrality is the key.
Topics:
Regions: Northland
Tags: Auckland mayoralty
Duration: 4'23"

08:06
Sports News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'02"

08:09
Hope a new Amnesty International report helps refugee case
BODY:
A Bangladeshi refugee who is being detained in Indonesia after his groups' failed attempt to sail to New Zealand hopes a new report by Amnesty International will help his group's case. Guyon Espiner speaks to a refugee who was on board that boat.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Amnesty International, Australia, Australian border control, asylum seekers
Duration: 3'35"

08:14
"by hook or by crook" - political fallout
BODY:
In June, the former Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbot told his nation that Australia would stop the people smuggling boats "by hook or by crook."Michelle Grattan is The Conversation's chief political correspondent.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Australia, people smuggling
Duration: 4'21"

08:16
Third body recovered from sunken fishing boat
BODY:
The body of a third man has been recovered from the wreck of the FV Jubilee.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: FV Jubilee
Duration: 37"

08:19
Police staff to blame for over 60% of police car crashes
BODY:
New figures show police staff were to blame for 5-hundred out of just over 8-hundred police car crashes in the past year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: police staff, car crashes
Duration: 2'14"

08:24
A massive US military blimp has come loose from its moorings
BODY:
A massive US military blimp has come loose from its moorings and is floating across Pennsylvania.
Topics: identity
Regions:
Tags: USA, military blimp
Duration: 3'16"

08:26
No end in sight for long-running Lake Horowhenua battle
BODY:
A long running dispute between Lake Horowhenua's rowing club and the lake's Maori owners has been reignited.
Topics: environment
Regions: Waikato
Tags: Lake Horowhenua
Duration: 3'44"

08:29
Markets Update for 29 October 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 59"

08:41
Indonesian fires "tragic humanitarian crisis"
BODY:
Indonesia is considering declaring a state of emergency because of intense haze from fires which have been raging since August.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Indonesia, Indonesian haze, respitory problems
Duration: 4'01"

08:45
Pacific nations meet before Paris climate change conference
BODY:
It's hoped the outcomes of a climate resilience conference in Fiji will give the region a strong platform before next month's global climate change conference in Paris.
Topics: environment, climate, Pacific
Regions:
Tags: climate change, Paris climate change conference
Duration: 3'33"

08:55
Maui Dolphin tops a new list of NZ's most endangered species
BODY:
Weevils, seaweed and skinks have joined the Māui's Dolphin in a new list of New Zealand's top ten most endangered species. Our conservation reporter Alexa Cook reports.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: endangered species
Duration: 3'41"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Writers' Festival, by Stephanie Johnson, read by Judith Gibson and Nigel Collins (11 of 12, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:10
Westpac will ask for warrants in future
BODY:
Westpac says it will ask police for a warrant in future before releasing private information about its customers. The bank has come under fire after it gave the police 10 months of private transaction records belonging to journalist and author Nicky Hager. The police officers who made the request were investigating the alleged hacking of Cameron Slater's email and private social media messages - which were given to Mr Hager and formed the basis of his book, Dirty Politics. Nine to Noon speaks to privacy lawyer Hayden Wilson.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Westpac, warrents, Nicky Hager
Duration: 19'48"

09:30
Backtrack on major parts of Fox Glacier crash investigation
BODY:
The Transport Accident Investigation Commission backtracks on major parts of Fox Glacier crash investigation.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Transport Accident Investigation Commission has backtracked on some of its main findings on the 2010 Fox Glacier sky diving plane crash which killed nine people including four overseas tourists.
The original report from the Commission said that the weight and balance of the aircraft was the most likely cause.
But a new TAIC addendum to the report has just been released, which says that's changed and the aircraft was probably controllable before the crash.
Eight parachutists and the pilot died when the Walter Fletcher plane plunged to the ground on 4 September 2010. Four tourists - from Ireland, Australia, Germany and England - were among those killed.
The commission also said that its decision to allow key parts of the plane wreckage to be buried, just three days after the crash, had limited its ability to determine the true cause of the accident.
The review said that the possibility of a mechanical failure could not be ruled out, but the state of the control structure parts, which were buried for three and half years, was such that the true cause may never be found.
The commission said in the review that additional damage to the plane wreckage was caused by it being moved by three times during the course of the investigation.
Serious questions about the conduct of the investigation were raised at the inquest into the crash.
Independent air crash investigators highlighted a number of problems with the investigation and its original conclusions.
Overseas relatives of the crash victims have also been highly critical of the Commission's handling of the crash investigation.
The father of one victim, Chris Coker, called today's investigation review a "betrayal". Mr Coker's son Bradley died in the accident.
RNZ's Queenstown report, Peter Newport has been following this story and was part of the team that dug up the aircraft wreckage last year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Transport Accident Investigation, Fox Glacier crash
Duration: 26'49"

10:10
Stevan Riley on his documentary about Marlon Brando
BODY:
To mark the 10th anniversary of his death, the Brando family allowed film-maker Stevan Riley unprecedented access to Marlon Brando's personal archive, including hundreds of hours of audio recorded over the course of his life. Stevan Riley is a British film director, producer, editor and writer. His films include Blue Blood (2006); Fire in Babylon (2010); Everything or Nothing (2012).
EXTENDED BODY:
He was one of the world's most influential actors, acclaimed for his seminal roles in On the Waterfront, A Streetcar Named Desire and The Godfather. But Marlon Brando is also remembered as a tormented man, who resented his own fame and eventually became a recluse.
To mark the 10th anniversary of his death, the Brando family allowed film-maker Stevan Riley unprecedented access to Marlon Brando's personal archive, including hundreds of hours of audio recorded over the course of his life.
The result is the film Listen to Me Marlon, which is currently screening here. In it, Brando shares his views on acting, on fame and his disillusionment with Hollywood, as well as opening up about his own shortcomings.
Stevan Riley is a British film director, producer, editor and writer. His films include Blue Blood (2006); Fire in Babylon (2010); Everything or Nothing (2012).
Topics: history, arts
Regions:
Tags: Marlon Brando, film, Stevan Riley
Duration: 28'46"

10:40
Book review: Ted Hughes: The Unauthorised Life
BODY:
Ted Hughes: The Unauthorised Life by Jonathan Bate. Reviewed by Jane Westaway, published by Fourth Estate.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'37"

11:10
New Technology with Paul Matthews
BODY:
Paul Matthews is the chief executive of the Institute of IT Professionals.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'25"

11:25
Animals helping children to heal
BODY:
New Zealand photographer, Rachael Hale McKenna has built a career around capturing the essence of childhood through portrait photography and she also is adept at getting wonderful shots of animals. Books of her images have sold millions of copies worldwide and her photographs have featured on greeting cards and in calendars. It's not all cute kids and their pets, there are stories, some quite emotional behind the pictures.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand photographer, Rachael Hale McKenna has built a career around capturing the essence of childhood through portrait photography and she also is adept at getting wonderful shots of animals. Books of her images have sold millions of copies worldwide and her photographs have featured on greeting cards and in calendars.A range of titles, including The New York Dog, The French Cat and 101 Salivations has keep Rachael and her family living out of suitcases for six years. Her latest project has been shot throughout New Zealand. Little Loves, New Zealand children and their favourite animals is her 16th title and was shot throughout the country over six months. It's not all cute kids and their pets, there are stories, some quite emotional behind the pictures.
Rachel Hale McKenna talks with Kathryn Ryan.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: photography, animal therapy, children, healing
Duration: 19'30"

11:45
Viewing review with Paul Casserly
BODY:
TV and Film writer Paul Casserly on the new Noah Baumbach film Mistress America and binge watching the paranoid thriller Mr Robot.
Topics: media, arts
Regions:
Tags: TV, film
Duration: 10'27"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Westpac will ask for warrants in future
Westpac says it will ask police for a warrant in future before releasing private information about its customers. The bank has come under fire after it gave the police 10 months of private transaction records belonging to journalist and author Nicky Hager. The police officers who made the request were investigating the alleged hacking of Cameron Slater's email and private social media messages - which were given to Mr Hager and formed the basis of his book, Dirty Politics. Nine to Noon speaks to privacy lawyer Hayden Wilson.
09:30 TAIC finds original conclusions into 2010 Fox Glacier crash 'probably wrong'.
[image:51652:half]
The Transport Accident Investigation Commission has backtracked on some of its main findings on the 2010 Fox Glacier sky diving plane crash which killed nine people including four overseas tourists. RNZ's Queenstown report, Peter Newport has been following this story and lead the team that dug up the aircraft wreckage last year.
09:40 Father of crash victim reacts to TAIC crash re-examination findings
Chris Coker's 24 year old son Bradley was one of nine people killed in the Fox Glacier plane crash.
10:05 Stevan Riley on his documentary about the reclusive actor, Marlon Brando
He was one of the world's most influential actors, acclaimed for his seminal roles in On the Waterfront, A Streetcar Named Desire and The Godfather. But Marlon Brando is also remembered as a tormented man, who resented his own fame and eventually became a recluse.
[gallery:1528]
To mark the 10th anniversary of his death, the Brando family allowed film-maker Stevan Riley unprecedented access to Marlon Brando's personal archive, including hundreds of hours of audio recorded over the course of his life.
The result is the film Listen to Me Marlon, which is currently screening here. In ithe shares his views on acting, on fame and his disillusionment with Hollywood, as well as opening up about his own shortcomings.
Stevan Riley is a British film director, producer, editor and writer. His films include Blue Blood (2006); Fire in Babylon (2010); Everything or Nothing (2012).
[embed] https://youtu.be/JgoFFzy0z8k
10:30 Book review: Ted Hughes: The Unauthorised Life by Jonathan Bate
Reviewed by Jane Westaway, published by Fourth Estate
10:45 The Reading: The Final Episode of The Writers' Festival by Stephanie Johnson read by Judith Gibson and Nigel Collins (Part 11 of 12)
11:05 New Technology with Paul Matthews
Paul Matthews is the chief executive of the Institute of IT Professionals.
11:25 Animals helping children to heal
[gallery:1531]
New Zealand photographer, Rachael Hale McKenna has built a career around capturing the essence of childhood through portrait photography and she also is adept at getting wonderful shots of animals. Books of her images have sold millions of copies worldwide and her photographs have featured on greeting cards and in calendars.A range of titles, including The New York Dog, The French Cat and 101 Salivations has keep Rachael and her family living out of suitcases for six years. Her latest project has been shot throughout New Zealand. Little Loves, New Zealand children and their favourite animals is her 16th title and was shot throughout the country over six months. It's not all cute kids and their pets, there are stories, some quite emotional behind the pictures.
11:45 Viewing review with Paul Casserly
TV and Film writer Paul Casserly on the new Noah Baumbach film Mistress America and binge watching the paranoid thriller Mr Robot.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Dusty Springfield
Song: Son Of A Preacher Man
Composer: Hurley/Wilkins
Album: n/a
Label: Rhino 271035
Time: 9.28
Artist: Paul McLaney
Song: Once Upon A Time
Composer: McLaney
Album: Diamond Side
Label: Loop 182407
Time: 10.00
Artist: SJD
Song: Little Pieces
Composer: Donelly
Album: Saint John Devine
Label: Round Trip Mars
Time: 11.20
Artist: The Decemberists
Song: Rise To Me
Composer: Meloy
Album: The King Is Dead
Label: Capitol 947547
Time: 11.43

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including:
12:16 Business News
12:26 Sport
12:34 Rural News
12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
The cause of the 2010 Fox Glacier sky dive plane crash remains a mystery and the Reserve Bank says further interest rate cuts are likely.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'28"

12:17
ANZ profit nudges higher
BODY:
The country's biggest bank - ANZ - has reported a slight lift in its annual profit to 1-point-77 billion dollars driven by growth in mortgage and business lending.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: ANZ Bank
Duration: 1'15"

12:18
Rates on hold in US and NZ
BODY:
It's been a day to stop and pause after two central banks left interest rates unchanged.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rates
Duration: 1'39"

12:20
Restaurant Brands net profit up 17% , KFC drives sales up 14%
BODY:
A craving for KFC has helped drive Restaurant Brands' first half net profit almost 17 percent higher, with positive growth across all its fast food brands, except Pizza Hut.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Restaurant Brands, KFC
Duration: 1'13"

12:21
Freightways sees steady growth: positioned for expansion
BODY:
The courier and information management company, Freightways, says its first quarter result reflects the success of its growth strategy and reslience to softer economic conditions in Australia and New Zealand.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Freightways
Duration: 1'24"

12:23
Kiwirail pushes land transport strategy
BODY:
Meanwhile, Kiwirail says it's pushing for an integrated land transport strategy to achieve the best mix of transport modes for the economy.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Kiwirail
Duration: 55"

12:24
Midday Markets for 29 October 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by James Grigor at Macquarie Private Wealth
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'00"

12:27
Midday Sports News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
The New Zealand under-17 football team has been beaten by Brazil with the last kick of the game in their World Cup round of 16 game in Chile.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

12:36
Midday Rural News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:09
First song
BODY:
'Play it On My Radio' - Niki and the Dove.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'00"

13:14
Pocket Neighbourhoods - Ross Chapin
BODY:
Urban sprawl to accommodate increasing populations of people has often come at a cost to small neighbourhoods and communities. But many forward-thinking town planners around the world and here in New Zealand are beginning to see small clusters of homes - or "pocket neighbourhoods" - as a more desirable way to build homes while limiting sprawl. American architect Ross Chapin coined the phrase "pocket neighbourhoods" and has spent 20-years working on the concept of more communal living spaces.
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Pocket Neighbourhoods
Duration: 9'54"

13:19
Vision Testing - Jason Turuwhenua
BODY:
How do you test how well a toddler can see - when they can't exactly read out numbers and letters from a chart? A new research project, led by Dr Jason Turuwhenua, is developing a device that will test small children's sight, catching problems early so they can be treated more effectively.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: toddler, eyesight
Duration: 8'04"

13:32
The Broken Heartbreakers - Rachel Bailey
BODY:
Rachel Bailey, one half of the song-writing duo behind the Dunedin-based Broken Heartbreakers, talks about their new album.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Broken Heartbreakers
Duration: 9'17"

13:42
Favourite album
BODY:
August And Everything After - Counting Crows.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'51"

14:10
Money - Mary Holm
BODY:
This week: Investing in rental property - the pluses and minuses.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Mary Holm, rental property, money, investment
Duration: 22'19"

14:47
Upper Hutt bridge failure
BODY:
As you'll have heard in the news, heavy rain is causing havoc in the lower North Island and has even caused a bridge to slump and become impassable across the Hutt River in Upper Hutt. About 70 properties are cut off, and Naomi Hutchinson is home stranded there at the moment.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags: Upper Hutt, Bridgeville
Duration: 4'54"

14:51
Food Guest - Tama Toki
BODY:
Today's foodie is Tama Toki, founder of Ahi Ka Tonics.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: Ahi Ka Tonics
Duration: 7'59"

15:08
The Expats
BODY:
Lower Hutt-based artist on a residency in Vietnam
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Mat Logan
Duration: 9'43"

15:18
Masterpieces - Lynda Hallinan
BODY:
Famous gardener Lynda Hallinan discusses her favourite garden.
Topics: arts
Regions: Waikato
Tags: gardens, Hamilton
Duration: 13'15"

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 29 October 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'17"

21:46
Kokopu condos and tuna townhouse
BODY:
A housing project for native fish in suburban streams is hoping to provide safe refuges for giant kokopu and long-finned eels
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“In the Mangakotukutuku Stream we know there are good numbers of long-finned eels, so we’ve put in tuna townhouses, which are multi-level apartment blocks.”
Bruno David, freshwater scientist, Waikato Regional Council

Tuna townhouses are houses designed with native long-finned eels in mind. Then there are kokopu condos, designed as a hang-out for large numbers of giant kokopu. These houses for native freshwater fish are designed to make the lives of suburban fish a little easier.
The tuna or eel townhouses are a u-shaped tunnel – with two entrances – made from a piece of flexible pipe that’s dug into the stream bank. Waikato Regional Council freshwater scientist Bruno David and colleagues came up with the concept and have installed some trial townhouses in the Mangakotukutuku Stream. The thinking behind the two entracnes is that if a giant kokopu takes up residence it will be able to make a quick escape if a larger, hungry long-finned eel decides to move in.
Bruno says this stream, which has its headwaters in a swamp, has good water quality. But like many suburban streams much of the woody debris - fallen trees and branches that provide structure and fish habitat on the stream bed – has been removed, as part of regular council maintenance to ensure flood waters have easy passage down the stream. The tuna townhouses, then, are an attempt to replace this lost structure.
“When water flows come up really rapidly and there’s no structure in the stream you can provide refuge for the fish ‘offline’, out of the flow and away from contaminants,” says Bruno.

Suburban streams are unfriendly places for native fish, prone to flooding with warm contaminated water running off impervious surfaces such as roofs, roads and driveways. So Bruno also developed the idea for the kokopu condo - a 6-metre-long pipe with a wide diameter – that would stay filled with cool, clean water, even during a flood. Not everything has gone quite to plan, however.
“It was designed to be a giant kokopu condo, but a really large female long-finned eel decided she liked it a lot better, so she’s occupied this thing for over two years now.”

At the moment Bruno and colleagues are still experimenting with the best designs, to ensure that tunnels don’t fill with silt, for instance. And he’s not sure how many refuges they might need to install before there are enough eel-free ones for giant kokopu to move into.
The Mangakotukutuku Stream Care group has done a lot of riparian planting along the stream as well as taking advantage of a spring to create a wetland habitat into which mudfish have been introduced. NIWA and the Waikato Regional Council have done a lot of research into the stream's fish, most of which carry tiny PIT tags that can be detected on special aerials, allowing the movement of the fish to be monitored.
Topics: environment, science
Regions:
Tags: native fish, long-finned eel, streams, freshwater, freshwater fish
Duration: 16'33"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
'Play it On My Radio' - Niki and the Dove.
1:15 Pocket Neighbourhoods - Ross Chapin
Urban sprawl to accommodate increasing populations of people has often come at a cost to small neighbourhoods and communities. But many forward-thinking town planners around the world and here in New Zealand are beginning to see small clusters of homes - or "pocket neighbourhoods" - as a more desirable way to build homes while limiting sprawl. American architect Ross Chapin coined the phrase "pocket neighbourhoods" and has spent 20-years working on the concept of more communal living spaces.
1:25 Vision Testing - Jason Turuwhenua
How do you test how well a toddler can see - when they can't exactly read out numbers and letters from a chart?
A new research project, led by Dr Jason Turuwhenua, is developing a device that will test small children's sight, catching problems early so they can be treated more effectively.
1:30 The Broken Heartbreakers - Rachel Bailey
Rachel Bailey, one half of the song-writing duo behind the Dunedin-based Broken Heartbreakers, talks about their new album.
1:40 Favourite album
August And Everything After - Counting Crows.
2:10 Money - Mary Holm
This week: Investing in rental property - the pluses and minuses.
2:30 Sirocco - Peta Mathias
In today's episode of 'Sirocco', Peta Mathias takes to the hills to experience some gypsy entertainment, in some of the most interesting real estate around.
2:45 Food Guest - Tama Toki
Today's foodie is Tama Toki, founder of Ahi Ka Tonics.
3:10 The Expats
3:25 Masterpieces - Lynda Hallinan
Famous gardener Lynda Hallinan discusses her favourite garden.
3:30 Our Changing World: Kokopu condos and tuna townhouse
Suburban streams can be unfriendly places for native fish, prone to flooding with warm contaminated water running off roads and driveways, and cleared of vegetation and woody debris. Waikato Regional Council freshwater scientist Bruno David takes Alison Ballance to a Hamilton stream where he is trialling designs for fish houses, permanently built into the stream banks: u-shaped tunnel townhouses for tuna or eels, and a large pipe condominium for giant kokopu.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan and Zara Potts.

=PLAYLIST=

Thursday 29th October
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Counting Crows
TITLE: Round Here
COMP: Bryson, Duritz, Janusko, Jewett
ALBUM: August And Everything After
LABEL: Geffen
ARTIST: Counting Crows
TITLE: Raining in Baltimore
COMP: Duritz
ALBUM: August And Everything After
LABEL: Geffen
ARTIST: Counting Crows
TITLE: Omaha
COMP: Duritz
ALBUM: August And Everything After
LABEL: Geffen
ARTIST: Counting Crows
TITLE: A Murder of One
COMP: Bryson, Duritz, Malley
ALBUM: August And Everything After
LABEL: Geffen

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:47
The Panel pre-show for 29 October 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'17"

16:03
The Panel with Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson have been up to. Inspector Steve Darroch of the Police Training College talks about driver training in light of revelations about the number of crashes officers are responsible for. Has the gentle past-time of whitebaiting lost its innocence? If you get the right answer does it matter how you get there?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'24"

16:05
The Panel with Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson (Part 2)
BODY:
Thames Valley Police in the Uk has made a video using the analogy of offering a cup of tea to gaining consent for sex. What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson have been thinking about. The Principal of Wellington College Roger Moses talks about food vending machines in schools. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has listed 116 things and circumstances that cause cancer. The capital of Spain Madrid has been named as the world's most segregated city. Australia and New Zealand could soon be trialling "cloud passports". Where your biometric information is stored in the cloud - spelling the end to paper passports.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'37"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'54"

16:15
Police crashes
BODY:
Inspector Steve Darroch of the Police Training College talks about driver training in light of revelations about the number of crashes officers are responsible for.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: police, driver training
Duration: 8'35"

16:24
Whitebait netting big bucks
BODY:
Has the gentle past-time of whitebaiting lost its innocence?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: whitebaiting
Duration: 2'37"

16:27
Different equations equals maths debate
BODY:
If you get the right answer does it matter how you get there?
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: maths
Duration: 3'49"

16:33
Tea analogy for sexual consent
BODY:
Thames Valley Police in the Uk has made a video using the analogy of offering a cup of tea to gaining consent for sex.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: consent
Duration: 2'49"

16:35
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Jock Anderson have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'22"

16:41
School vending machines
BODY:
The Principal of Wellington College Roger Moses talks about food vending machines in schools.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: vending machines
Duration: 6'30"

16:50
116 ways to get cancer
BODY:
The International Agency for Research on Cancer has listed 116 things and circumstances that cause cancer.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: cancer
Duration: 2'47"

16:53
World's most segregated cities
BODY:
The capital of Spain Madrid has been named as the world's most segregated city.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: segregration
Duration: 4'40"

16:58
Cloud-based passports
BODY:
Australia and New Zealand could soon be trialling "cloud passports". Where your biometric information is stored in the cloud - spelling the end to paper passports.
Topics: politics, security
Regions:
Tags: passports
Duration: 1'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 29 October 2015
BODY:
The bungled investigation, into the Fox Glacier skydiving crash. Flood waters buckle a bridge and sixty people are cut off and first a two million dollar french painting and now he's stolen a rare motorbike.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 20'19"

17:08
No apology despite skydiving crash investigation falling short
BODY:
Victims' families feel betrayed but the Transport Accident Investigation Commission is refusing to apologise to them over its investigation into the Fox Glacier skydive crash
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: TAIC, Fox Glacier skydive crash
Duration: 3'19"

17:11
TAIC's chief investigator
BODY:
Tim Burfoot is TAIC's Chief Investigator says it's not the best outcome but is defending the original investigation as thorough and useful.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: TAIC, Fox Glacier skydive crash
Duration: 1'43"

17:13
Our Queenstown reporter has more
BODY:
Our Queenstown reporter Peter Newport has been following the case from the beginning and was part of the team which dug up the wreckage.sh
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: TAIC, Fox Glacier skydive crash
Duration: 2'42"

17:17
Valley residents stranded as flood waters take out bridge
BODY:
Sixty people in Akatarawa near Upper Hutt in Wellington are cut off tonight because floodwaters have taken out their local bridge.
Topics: weather
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: floods, Upper Hutt, slumped bridge
Duration: 2'30"

17:19
Reporter at scene of flooding
BODY:
Our reporter, Tom Furley, is next to the slumped bridge in Upper Hutt.
Topics: weather
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: floods, Upper Hutt, slumped bridge
Duration: 2'00"

17:23
Art thief turned motorbike thief
BODY:
The man who stole a two million dollar French painting at gunpoint in 1998 has today been sentenced for stealing a rare motorbike described as a mechanical piece of art.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Ricardo Romanov
Duration: 3'55"

17:27
Dying woman pleads for her NZ partner
BODY:
Carmel Stanwell is dying from lung cancer while her partner wrestles to get out of immigration detention to care for her.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: deportation, Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'47"

17:34
Today's market update
BODY:
The country's biggest bank - ANZ - has reported a slight lift in its annual profit to 1-point-7-7 billion dollars, driven by growth in mortgage and business lending.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'15"

17:36
Catholic church closes Hato Petera to boarders
BODY:
At an emergency meeting held today at the Māori boarding school Hato Petera the Bishop of Auckland Pat Dunn has closed the boarding halls once and for all.
Topics: te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Hato Petera
Duration: 2'36"

17:39
Kiwirail makes impassioned plea for support from Government
BODY:
Kiwirail has made an impassioned plea for support from the Government and from the the public.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Kiwirail
Duration: 2'41"

17:43
Somali sex offender in holding pattern
BODY:
A Somalian refugee with a long list of convictions since he arrived in New Zealand in 1999, is to be held as a special patient in a secure psychiatric unit, while attempts continue to deport him.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: sex offender, Somalian refugee
Duration: 2'55"

17:45
Anti-oil campaigners unhappy with Auckland vote
BODY:
Anti-oil campaigners say they've been let down by the Auckland Mayor for not taking a stance against the government's plan for deep sea oil exploration off the west coast.
Topics: environment, business
Regions:
Tags: oil, Anti-oil campaigners
Duration: 3'58"

17:49
Police inquiry into farmer's wife being run over questioned
BODY:
A lawyer for the children of a Lincoln woman run over by her farmer husband says the police dropped the ball when they looked into her death.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: police, enquiry
Duration: 3'12"

17:52
Reserve Bank leaves interest rates at 2.75%
BODY:
The Reserve Bank has left the cost of borrowing on hold at 2 point 75 percent - at least for now.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, interest rates
Duration: 2'39"

17:55
NZ U-17 Football team loses to Brazil in final moments
BODY:
The New Zealand under-17 football team has suffered a heartbreaking 1-nil loss to Brazil in their World Cup round of 16 game in Chile.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: under-17 football team
Duration: 3'32"

18:07
Sports News for 29 October 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'32"

18:13
Air crash investigators have admit errors
BODY:
TAIC does concede its original conclusion that weight and balance issues caused the crash is probably wrong.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Fox Glacier skydive crash, TAIC
Duration: 3'17"

18:16
Accident Consultant says TAIC investigation result is poor
BODY:
Andrew Mc Gregor is a consultant accident investigator who wrote a report for the families of the skydiving crash victims.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Fox Glacier skydive crash, TAIC
Duration: 2'39"

18:19
Valley residents stranded as flood waters take out bridge
BODY:
Sixty people in Akatarawa near Upper Hutt in Wellington are cut off tonight because floodwaters have taken out their local bridge.
Topics: weather
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Upper Hutt, floods, slumped bridge
Duration: 3'38"

18:22
AgResearch confirms 21% of science technician jobs to go
BODY:
AgResearch says it's confident the work it's currently doing won't be stopped or slowed after making 21-percent of its science technicians redundant.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: AgResearch, science technicians
Duration: 4'24"

18:27
Drone footage shows native forests like skeletons in Northland
BODY:
Forest and Bird have release drone footage showing extensive damage to Northland's native forests.
Topics: environment
Regions: Northland
Tags: Forest and Bird, native forests
Duration: 3'44"

18:36
NZ detainee in plea to be at his dying partner's side
BODY:
A New Zealander is fighting to get out of immigration detention in Sydney to look after his partner who's dying of lung cancer.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'43"

18:39
Live-alones are the fastest growing segment of population
BODY:
People living alone are the fastest growing households in the country according to new projections.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: living alone
Duration: 3'23"

18:39
Moderators dodge punches in Republican debate
BODY:
The moderators of the third Republican debate had to dodge just as many swings as the candidates in Boulder, Colorado this afternoon.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Republicans, USA
Duration: 4'10"

18:43
Supplement developed for people with chronic kidney disease
BODY:
Thousands of patients with chronic kidney disease who struggle to get the nutrients they need from food now have another option.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: supplement, kidney disease
Duration: 3'43"

18:51
Kapa haka expert and cultural entrepreneur wins Laureate Award.
BODY:
A Kapa haka exponent and cultural entrepreneur is one of five artist recognised with the Arts Foundation Laureate Award.
Topics: te ao Maori, arts
Regions:
Tags: kapa haka, Arts Foundation Laureate Award
Duration: 3'23"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
At the Movies for 29 October 2015
BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris reviews the Steven Spielberg collaboration with the Coen Brothers, Bridge of Spies, and a comedy-drama about celebrity chefs, Burnt. And, straight from the Film Festival, a fascinating documentary about acting legend Marlon Brando - Listen To Me Marlon.
EXTENDED BODY:
Simon Morris reviews the Steven Spielberg collaboration with the Coen Brothers Bridge of Spies and a comedy-drama about celebrity chefs, Burnt. And, straight from the New Zealand International Film Festival, a fascinating documentary about acting legend Marlon Brando – Listen To Me Marlon.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 23'05"

19:30
Bridge of Spies - Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris reviews a real-life Cold War drama, directed by Steven Spielberg, and starring Tom Hanks as a man charged with negotiating a spy swap.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 6'53"

19:31
Listen to me Marlon - Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris looks at a fascinating documentary of the late Marlon Brando - often cited as one of the best movie actors ever - entirely in his own words.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 6'19"

19:32
Burnt - Movie Review
BODY:
Simon Morris finds this comedy-drama - starring Bradley Cooper as a bad-boy, celebrity chef - a little over-cooked.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: film
Duration: 5'58"

7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:06
Saving the rarest of the rare - Endangered Species Foundation
BODY:
The newly launched Endangered Species Foundation has identified some key threatened species that need urgent conservation work
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“The endangered species problem here is huge. New Zealand is the ‘extinction capital’ of the world, along with some other island systems. We have thousands of endangered species, and we really can only work on a handful with the intensity that’s needed.”
Phil Seddon, zoologist, University of Otago

“There are a whole range of things – particularly smaller, harder to see things – that are just as endangered as cute things like kiwi and kakapo. They also need conservation work, and they have the added bonus that they’re cheaper to save than the big spectacular species.”
Mike Thorsen, founder, Endangered Species Foundation

The world’s rarest dolphin, a weevil that was thought to be extinct, a plant that now cannot survive in the wild, and a primitive seaweed the size of an eyelash are just some of the highly threatened species that the New Zealand Endangered Species Foundation is hoping to save.
Several decades ago, when Mike Thorsen embarked on his conservation career, his father remarked that it wouldn’t be hard to raise a million dollars for conservation. The idea remained in the back of Mike’s mind until recently, when he decided to take that idea and put it to practical use, although as he remarks, a little ironically, that today it needs more than a million dollars to establish a useful philanthropic conservation fund.
Several years ago Mike decided to do something practical for conservation, and what he had in mind was identifying the neediest – but often overlooked - species among the nearly 4000 species that are threatened.
The Endangered Species Foundation was officially launched in Wellington this week. It already has well over a million dollars in its trust fund, and is aiming for $35 million,
The goal of the Trust is “protecting New Zealand’s rarest of the rare,” by giving out grants for what they call ‘results oriented’ conservation projects.
Phil says there is a big taxonomic bias in current conservation work. “What we choose to work on is just a tiny subset of what we should work on, and often they’re not even the most endangered or at risk.”
The Foundation have drawn up a Top Ten Most Endangered List that will be their initial focus; they have also got a list of a further 50 species of very high concern.
The Top Ten Most Endangered
Māui dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui)
Māui dolphins are one of the world’s smallest and most rare dolphins. An endemic sub-species closely related to the Hector’s dolphin, they are now found only in the shallow coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island. Investigating additional conservation opportunities.
Mokohinau stag beetle (Geodorcus ithaginis)
The Mokohinau stag beetle is one of New Zealand’s few remaining large (25-32mm long) beetles. Known only from the Mokohinau Islands east of Auckland, it owes its name to the large antler-like mandibles on the head of male beetles, which they are thought to use when fighting for mates. Investigating captive breeding and translocation.
Canterbury knobbled weevil (Hadramphus tuberculatus)
Thought extinct since 1924, the Canterbury knobbled weevil was rediscovered in 2004 inhabiting golden speargrass plants in Burkes Pass. Whilst the spiky speargrass leaves are thought to provide some protection for this large weevil from introduced predators, the total population probably numbers less than 100 adults. Predator trapping and possible captive breeding.
Isoetes aff. kirkii (CHR 247118A; Lake Omapere)
The quillwort (an aquatic primitive fern) Isoetes aff. kirkii (CHR 247118A; Lake Omapere) was historically found in several Northland lakes, but it is now considered extinct in the wild after it disappeared from its last known home at Lake Omapere following a dramatic decline in water quality. Luckily, searches had uncovered a few plants, and now 12 plants are carefully tended in a Landcare Research aquarium.
New Zealand fairy tern (Sternula nereis davisae)
The delicate NZ fairy tern is the most endangered of New Zealand’s endemic birds, with only about a dozen pairs surviving on beaches between Whangarei and Auckland. Helping with current protection measures.
Limestone cress (Pachycladon exilis)
Limestone cress has apparently always been a rare plant, only inhabiting limestone outcrops in the South Island’s Waitaki Valley. Now it is found on just one limestone outcrop at Awahokomo, where about 50 plants are known. Control weeds, fencing and possible seed spreading to new sites.
Chesterfield skink (Oligosoma aff. Infrapunctatum)
Research over the past two decades has discovered many new species of lizard in New Zealand. The Chesterfield skink was discovered in the late 1990’s at only one location, near Chesterfield between Hokitika and Greymouth on the West Coast, and only one animal has been seen in the last 5 years.
Coastal peppercress (Lepidium banksii)
Short-lived coastal peppercress has only ever been found around the Nelson coastline from the Marlborough Sounds to Karamea. Despite much conservation effort, this species has proved nearly impossible to conserve in the wild, and is now classified as “Extinct in the Wild”. All surviving plants are now grown hydroponically and require constant care.
Eyelash seaweed (Dione arcuate)
Eyelash seaweed is very unusual: it is a tiny seaweed the size and shape of a human eyelash, it is very similar to some of the oldest known fossils of multicellular organisms, and it is known from only two boulders, each at separate sites on the Kaikoura coast. Here the number of plants fluctuates for unknown reasons.
Pimelea actea
Pimelea actea is a small shrub relative of daphne that used to inhabit moist sand flats on the Manawatu and Wanganui coast, and near Christchurch. Recently it has disappeared from nearly all known sites. The only plants known are descended from a few plants collected from one site in 1991, but it is possible that a few plants survive on private land. Weeding, fencing and predator control.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: conservation, threatened species, endangered species, Maui's dolphin, Endangered Species Foundation, philanthropy
Duration: 00"

21:06
Saving the rarest of the rare - Endangered Species Foundation
BODY:
The newly launched Endangered Species Foundation has identified some key threatened species that need urgent conservation work
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“The endangered species problem here is huge. New Zealand is the ‘extinction capital’ of the world, along with some other island systems. We have thousands of endangered species, and we really can only work on a handful with the intensity that’s needed.”
Phil Seddon, zoologist, University of Otago

“There are a whole range of things – particularly smaller, harder to see things – that are just as endangered as cute things like kiwi and kakapo. They also need conservation work, and they have the added bonus that they’re cheaper to save than the big spectacular species.”
Mike Thorsen, founder, Endangered Species Foundation

The world’s rarest dolphin, a weevil that was thought to be extinct, a plant that now cannot survive in the wild, and a primitive seaweed the size of an eyelash are just some of the highly threatened species that the New Zealand Endangered Species Foundation is hoping to save.
Several decades ago, when Mike Thorsen embarked on his conservation career, his father remarked that it wouldn’t be hard to raise a million dollars for conservation. The idea remained in the back of Mike’s mind until recently, when he decided to take that idea and put it to practical use, although as he remarks, a little ironically, that today it needs more than a million dollars to establish a useful philanthropic conservation fund.
Several years ago Mike decided to do something practical for conservation, and what he had in mind was identifying the neediest – but often overlooked - species among the nearly 4000 species that are threatened.
The Endangered Species Foundation was officially launched in Wellington this week. It already has well over a million dollars in its trust fund, and is aiming for $35 million,
The goal of the Trust is “protecting New Zealand’s rarest of the rare,” by giving out grants for what they call ‘results oriented’ conservation projects.
Phil says there is a big taxonomic bias in current conservation work. “What we choose to work on is just a tiny subset of what we should work on, and often they’re not even the most endangered or at risk.”
The Foundation have drawn up a Top Ten Most Endangered List that will be their initial focus; they have also got a list of a further 50 species of very high concern.
The Top Ten Most Endangered
Māui dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui)
Māui dolphins are one of the world’s smallest and most rare dolphins. An endemic sub-species closely related to the Hector’s dolphin, they are now found only in the shallow coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island. Investigating additional conservation opportunities.
Mokohinau stag beetle (Geodorcus ithaginis)
The Mokohinau stag beetle is one of New Zealand’s few remaining large (25-32mm long) beetles. Known only from the Mokohinau Islands east of Auckland, it owes its name to the large antler-like mandibles on the head of male beetles, which they are thought to use when fighting for mates. Investigating captive breeding and translocation.
Canterbury knobbled weevil (Hadramphus tuberculatus)
Thought extinct since 1924, the Canterbury knobbled weevil was rediscovered in 2004 inhabiting golden speargrass plants in Burkes Pass. Whilst the spiky speargrass leaves are thought to provide some protection for this large weevil from introduced predators, the total population probably numbers less than 100 adults. Predator trapping and possible captive breeding.
Isoetes aff. kirkii (CHR 247118A; Lake Omapere)
The quillwort (an aquatic primitive fern) Isoetes aff. kirkii (CHR 247118A; Lake Omapere) was historically found in several Northland lakes, but it is now considered extinct in the wild after it disappeared from its last known home at Lake Omapere following a dramatic decline in water quality. Luckily, searches had uncovered a few plants, and now 12 plants are carefully tended in a Landcare Research aquarium.
New Zealand fairy tern (Sternula nereis davisae)
The delicate NZ fairy tern is the most endangered of New Zealand’s endemic birds, with only about a dozen pairs surviving on beaches between Whangarei and Auckland. Helping with current protection measures.
Limestone cress (Pachycladon exilis)
Limestone cress has apparently always been a rare plant, only inhabiting limestone outcrops in the South Island’s Waitaki Valley. Now it is found on just one limestone outcrop at Awahokomo, where about 50 plants are known. Control weeds, fencing and possible seed spreading to new sites.
Chesterfield skink (Oligosoma aff. Infrapunctatum)
Research over the past two decades has discovered many new species of lizard in New Zealand. The Chesterfield skink was discovered in the late 1990’s at only one location, near Chesterfield between Hokitika and Greymouth on the West Coast, and only one animal has been seen in the last 5 years.
Coastal peppercress (Lepidium banksii)
Short-lived coastal peppercress has only ever been found around the Nelson coastline from the Marlborough Sounds to Karamea. Despite much conservation effort, this species has proved nearly impossible to conserve in the wild, and is now classified as “Extinct in the Wild”. All surviving plants are now grown hydroponically and require constant care.
Eyelash seaweed (Dione arcuate)
Eyelash seaweed is very unusual: it is a tiny seaweed the size and shape of a human eyelash, it is very similar to some of the oldest known fossils of multicellular organisms, and it is known from only two boulders, each at separate sites on the Kaikoura coast. Here the number of plants fluctuates for unknown reasons.
Pimelea actea
Pimelea actea is a small shrub relative of daphne that used to inhabit moist sand flats on the Manawatu and Wanganui coast, and near Christchurch. Recently it has disappeared from nearly all known sites. The only plants known are descended from a few plants collected from one site in 1991, but it is possible that a few plants survive on private land. Weeding, fencing and predator control.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: conservation, threatened species, endangered species, Maui's dolphin, Endangered Species Foundation, philanthropy
Duration: 17'27"

21:20
Bending light in search for alien planets
BODY:
Light has helped astronomers to discover many of the almost 2000 planets that orbit around stars outside our own solar system, thanks to Einstein.
EXTENDED BODY:
We want to find Earth 2.0. We want to find another Earth out there to convince ourselves that this is not the only planet on which there are conditions sufficient for harbouring life like us.
Nick Rattenbury, University of Auckland

Is there life elsewhere in the Universe?
It’s an ancient question, but over the last two decades, astronomers have gone a long way towards delivering an answer as they identified nearly 2000 planets that orbit around stars outside our own solar system.
One of the detection tools they have used in this quest is based on a prediction by Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, which describes how gravity can change the path of light.
Nick Rattenbury, an astrophysicist at the University of Auckland, says a massive object like a star can bend the light coming from behind it and essentially act as a magnifying glass in a process called gravitational microlensing.
There is a one-in-a-million chance that two stars align with Earth in a way that the light from the background star is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. When that happens, the light coming from the background star briefly appears brighter.
“If that foreground object is a single object like a star then the way the light appears to get brighter and fainter is very smooth, very predictable and symmetric. If on the other hand, the foreground object consists of several objects, things get interesting.
“The apparent brightening and fading of that background star is no longer smooth and symmetric. We see glitches, extra little signals that may be due to a planet going around in the foreground of the system.”
Einstein himself thought that the chances of this happening are so remote that we’d never see it, but he could not foresee the power of modern computers, which now allow astronomers to monitor millions of stars, night after night, simultaneously.
New Zealand is making a significant contribution to the quest of tracking down extra-solar planets with the help of gravitational microlensing. One of the large telescopes at the Mt John Observatory at Lake Tekapo is dedicated to this task, scanning a particular section of the Southern Hemisphere skies during clear nights.
Whenever the 1.8 metre MOA (Microlensing Observations in Astronomy) telescope detects anything of interest, other astronomers are alerted to turn their own telescopes to that position and take their own observations.
These observations are combined with those made with telescopes in other places around the world, operated by other microlensing collaborations. The data from these projects need to be analysed and Nick Rattenbury’s task has been to develop a planetary model to help characterise any signals, and ultimately identify which kind of planet has been detected.
Our Changing World has previously featured the MOA project and several interviews with astronomers involved in the search for alien planets.
Nick Rattenbury says the quest is motivated partly by the tantalising possibility that there might be another Earth-like planet that could harbour alien lifeforms. “We want to know whether Earth is in fact unique or if there are millions of other Earths out in the galaxy.”
He remembers the 1995 discovery of the first extra-solar planet as a “seismic shift in thinking”.
Gravitational microlensing has so far detected 41 of the almost 2000 planets, but it is an important method because it usually picks up planets that occupy a space around their star that cannot easily be accessed by other techniques, such as the transit method used by the Kepler space telescope. “This helps to fill the gaps in our knowledge of how planets form around their host stars. We have a couple of competing theories and the more we know the better we’ll be able to distinguish between the predictions we’re getting.”
However, the Kepler telescope has a better chance of identifying Earth-like planets at the present time.
“The stars that act as gravitational lenses are going to be the most common stars in the galaxy and that tends to be red dwarves – small cool stars. Because of that and because microlensing tends to find planets further out than Earth orbits around our sun, the planets it finds are far too cool to have liquid water – and that after all is something we think of as essential for life.”
Nick Rattenbury is one of the speakers in the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Luminaries lecture series to mark the International Year of Light. He will give his lecture about “Gravity’s Telescope” in Hamilton this Thursday, at 7pm, and it will also be live-streamed.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: astronomy, extra-solar planets, microlensing, moa, Lake Tekapo, Einstein's general theory of relativity
Duration: 15'37"

21:34
Eat better, think better - diet and the brain
BODY:
Psychologists and nutritionists at the University of Otago are studying how diet can have a positive impact on heart and brain health
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“We’re looking into ways that people might be able to improve their brain functioning, focusing on lifestyle choices such as exercise and diet.”
Liana Machado, psychologist, University of Otago

Breads made with beetroot, hazelnuts or low salt are part of a study currently underway at the University of Otago to see if a better diet is good for our brain. The study involves 200 people, both young and old, who are randomly assigned to eat four to six slices of either a control bread or one of the three supplemented breads daily. Participants have their cognitive function tested before, during and after 12 weeks of eating the bread.
The researchers anticipate that the extra nutrients and the lower salt will benefit blood supply to the brain. The hazelnuts are a good source of unsaturated fats, while the beetroot is high in nitrates and is good for endothelial function.
Previous international research has shown health benefits from eating beetroot juice and nuts, and the novel aspect of this research is including them in a commonly eaten, economical food item. The study is also testing the palatability of the various breads.
“We’re trying to make an alteration in something that’s already a habit, rather than trying to form a new habit,” says psychologist Liana Machado.

“We don’t know yet if we’ll see improvements in cognitive function,” says Liana, “but reducing your salt intake should also lower your risk factor for having a stroke. So even if we don’t see better cognitive function there’ll be huge benefits from reducing salt intake.”
The current dietary intervention is a collaboration between Liana Machado in the Psychology Department, and Katherine Black from the Nutrition Department.
Previous research by Liana and her students has found a correlation between levels of exercise and the ability to perform well at a cognitive level. People who exercised more regularly had improved oxygenation of their blood, and better regulation of their blood flow. The surprising aspect of this work was that the benefit occurred in young people, as well as older people.
“It’s not just your grandparents that need to get out there and exercise. Young adults should be as well.”

Topics: health, food, science
Regions:
Tags: brain, heart, diet, health, cognitive thinking
Duration: 00"

21:34
Eat better, think better - diet and the brain
BODY:
Psychologists and nutritionists at the University of Otago are studying how diet can have a positive impact on heart and brain health
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“We’re looking into ways that people might be able to improve their brain functioning, focusing on lifestyle choices such as exercise and diet.”
Liana Machado, psychologist, University of Otago

Breads made with beetroot, hazelnuts or low salt are part of a study currently underway at the University of Otago to see if a better diet is good for our brain. The study involves 200 people, both young and old, who are randomly assigned to eat four to six slices of either a control bread or one of the three supplemented breads daily. Participants have their cognitive function tested before, during and after 12 weeks of eating the bread.
The researchers anticipate that the extra nutrients and the lower salt will benefit blood supply to the brain. The hazelnuts are a good source of unsaturated fats, while the beetroot is high in nitrates and is good for endothelial function.
Previous international research has shown health benefits from eating beetroot juice and nuts, and the novel aspect of this research is including them in a commonly eaten, economical food item. The study is also testing the palatability of the various breads.
“We’re trying to make an alteration in something that’s already a habit, rather than trying to form a new habit,” says psychologist Liana Machado.

“We don’t know yet if we’ll see improvements in cognitive function,” says Liana, “but reducing your salt intake should also lower your risk factor for having a stroke. So even if we don’t see better cognitive function there’ll be huge benefits from reducing salt intake.”
The current dietary intervention is a collaboration between Liana Machado in the Psychology Department, and Katherine Black from the Nutrition Department.
Previous research by Liana and her students has found a correlation between levels of exercise and the ability to perform well at a cognitive level. People who exercised more regularly had improved oxygenation of their blood, and better regulation of their blood flow. The surprising aspect of this work was that the benefit occurred in young people, as well as older people.
“It’s not just your grandparents that need to get out there and exercise. Young adults should be as well.”

Topics: science, health, food
Regions:
Tags: brain, heart, diet, cognitive thinking
Duration: 10'05"

21:46
Kokopu condos and tuna townhouses
BODY:
A housing project for native fish in suburban streams is hoping to provide safe refuges for giant kokopu and long-finned eels
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“In the Mangakotukutuku Stream we know there are good numbers of long-finned eels, so we’ve put in tuna townhouses, which are multi-level apartment blocks.”
Bruno David, freshwater scientist, Waikato Regional Council

Tuna townhouses are houses designed with native long-finned eels in mind. Then there are kokopu condos, designed as a hang-out for large numbers of giant kokopu. These houses for native freshwater fish are designed to make the lives of suburban fish a little easier.
The tuna or eel townhouses are a u-shaped tunnel – with two entrances – made from a piece of flexible pipe that’s dug into the stream bank. Waikato Regional Council freshwater scientist Bruno David and colleagues came up with the concept and have installed some trial townhouses in the Mangakotukutuku Stream. The thinking behind the two entracnes is that if a giant kokopu takes up residence it will be able to make a quick escape if a larger, hungry long-finned eel decides to move in.
Bruno says this stream, which has its headwaters in a swamp, has good water quality. But like many suburban streams much of the woody debris - fallen trees and branches that provide structure and fish habitat on the stream bed – has been removed, as part of regular council maintenance to ensure flood waters have easy passage down the stream. The tuna townhouses, then, are an attempt to replace this lost structure.
“When water flows come up really rapidly and there’s no structure in the stream you can provide refuge for the fish ‘offline’, out of the flow and away from contaminants,” says Bruno.

Suburban streams are unfriendly places for native fish, prone to flooding with warm contaminated water running off impervious surfaces such as roofs, roads and driveways. So Bruno also developed the idea for the kokopu condo - a 6-metre-long pipe with a wide diameter – that would stay filled with cool, clean water, even during a flood. Not everything has gone quite to plan, however.
“It was designed to be a giant kokopu condo, but a really large female long-finned eel decided she liked it a lot better, so she’s occupied this thing for over two years now.”

At the moment Bruno and colleagues are still experimenting with the best designs, to ensure that tunnels don’t fill with silt, for instance. And he’s not sure how many refuges they might need to install before there are enough eel-free ones for giant kokopu to move into.
The Mangakotukutuku Stream Care group has done a lot of riparian planting along the stream as well as taking advantage of a spring to create a wetland habitat into which mudfish have been introduced. NIWA and the Waikato Regional Council have done a lot of research into the stream's fish, most of which carry tiny PIT tags that can be detected on special aerials, allowing the movement of the fish to be monitored.
Topics: environment, science
Regions:
Tags: native fish, long-finned eel, streams, freshwater, freshwater fish
Duration: 00"

21:46
Kokopu condos and tuna townhouse
BODY:
A housing project for native fish in suburban streams is hoping to provide safe refuges for giant kokopu and long-finned eels
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“In the Mangakotukutuku Stream we know there are good numbers of long-finned eels, so we’ve put in tuna townhouses, which are multi-level apartment blocks.”
Bruno David, freshwater scientist, Waikato Regional Council

Tuna townhouses are houses designed with native long-finned eels in mind. Then there are kokopu condos, designed as a hang-out for large numbers of giant kokopu. These houses for native freshwater fish are designed to make the lives of suburban fish a little easier.
The tuna or eel townhouses are a u-shaped tunnel – with two entrances – made from a piece of flexible pipe that’s dug into the stream bank. Waikato Regional Council freshwater scientist Bruno David and colleagues came up with the concept and have installed some trial townhouses in the Mangakotukutuku Stream. The thinking behind the two entracnes is that if a giant kokopu takes up residence it will be able to make a quick escape if a larger, hungry long-finned eel decides to move in.
Bruno says this stream, which has its headwaters in a swamp, has good water quality. But like many suburban streams much of the woody debris - fallen trees and branches that provide structure and fish habitat on the stream bed – has been removed, as part of regular council maintenance to ensure flood waters have easy passage down the stream. The tuna townhouses, then, are an attempt to replace this lost structure.
“When water flows come up really rapidly and there’s no structure in the stream you can provide refuge for the fish ‘offline’, out of the flow and away from contaminants,” says Bruno.

Suburban streams are unfriendly places for native fish, prone to flooding with warm contaminated water running off impervious surfaces such as roofs, roads and driveways. So Bruno also developed the idea for the kokopu condo - a 6-metre-long pipe with a wide diameter – that would stay filled with cool, clean water, even during a flood. Not everything has gone quite to plan, however.
“It was designed to be a giant kokopu condo, but a really large female long-finned eel decided she liked it a lot better, so she’s occupied this thing for over two years now.”

At the moment Bruno and colleagues are still experimenting with the best designs, to ensure that tunnels don’t fill with silt, for instance. And he’s not sure how many refuges they might need to install before there are enough eel-free ones for giant kokopu to move into.
The Mangakotukutuku Stream Care group has done a lot of riparian planting along the stream as well as taking advantage of a spring to create a wetland habitat into which mudfish have been introduced. NIWA and the Waikato Regional Council have done a lot of research into the stream's fish, most of which carry tiny PIT tags that can be detected on special aerials, allowing the movement of the fish to be monitored.
Topics: environment, science
Regions:
Tags: native fish, long-finned eel, streams, freshwater, freshwater fish
Duration: 16'33"

9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:12
Rugby analysis from Sri Lanka
BODY:
The thoughts of Colombo based Kiwi ex-pat and author of Return to Rugbyland, David Scott, as we hurtle towards the final between New Zealand and Australia at this year's English-hosted Rugby World Cup.
Topics: sport, books
Regions:
Tags: Sri Lanka, rugby, RWC
Duration: 22'48"

20:40
Contemporary Classical Music
BODY:
RNZ Concert's Sound Lounge host Kate Mead raises the baton on both contemporary classical music plus recent releases of old masters.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: classical music
Duration: 21'54"

20:59
Conundrum Clue 5
BODY:
Conundrum clue 5.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 09"

21:59
Conundrum Clue 6
BODY:
Conundrum clue 6.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 09"

=SHOW NOTES=

NIGHTS on RNZ National
with skipper. Bryan Crump & navigator. Robyn Rockgirl Walker
Tonight's rundown (Thursday)...
[image:51647:full]
[image:51641:half]
7:12pm RUGBY ANALYSIS FROM SRI LANKA
the thoughts of Colombo based Kiwi ex-pat and author of Return to Rugbyland, David Scott, as we hurtle towards the final between Australia and New Zealand at this year's English-hosted Rugby World Cup...
7:35pm At the Movies with Simon Morris
8:12pm Windows on the World (international public radio documentaries) - Hanging Around
8:43pm NIGHTS Cultural Ambassadors
roster: Kate Mead (Contemporary Classical Music); Adrian Kinnaird (Comics & Graphic Novels); Miles Buckingham (Jamaican Music); Cliff Fell (Poetry); Kirsten Zemke (Hip Hop); Andrew Todd (Video Games); Fergus Barrowman (Jazz); Leilani Unasa (Pasifika); Paul Berrington (Electronic Music); & Chris Jannides (Dance)
CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL MUSIC
RNZ Concert's Sound Lounge host Kate Mead raises the baton on both contemporary classical music plus recent releases of old masters...
8:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 5
9:07pm Our Changing World
9:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 6
10:17pm Late Edition (a round up of today's RNZ news and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International)
11:07pm The Eleventh Hour: Music 101 pocket edition with Emma Smith
[image:51147:half]
... nights' time is the right time...

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274498

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 29 Oct 2015

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