Radio New Zealand National. 2015-11-03. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

03 November 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:05 From the World (RNZ); 2:05 Club McKenzie: Your 1920s Jazz Speakeasy (12 of 13, PRX) 3:05 Memories of Early Years, by Douglas Lilburn, edited by Robert Hoskins (3 of 8, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6.20 and 7.50 Business News
6.26 Rural News
6.48 and 7.45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 3 November 2015
BODY:
Police are dealing with a huge increase in people with serious mental health problems. We ask what's happening and why? Bars declare extended the drinking hours for the Rugby World Cup a success, and call for licencing laws to be relaxed and major banks in this country make billion dollar profits. Are they making too much money?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'04"

06:06
Sports News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'53"

06:09
Kremlin not ruling out a terrorist attack on plane
BODY:
The Russian airline whose plane crashed in Egypt's Sinai (SIN-eye) peninsula with the loss of two-hundred-and-twenty-four lives, says "an external influence" was the only possible reason for the disaster.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Egypt, Russia
Duration: 3'39"

06:13
Australian anti-republicans unhappy
BODY:
Anti-republicans in Australia have railed against Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's decision to ditch knights and dames
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 2'40"

06:16
Japan's RWC success a boost ahead of next tournament
BODY:
England 2015 is done and dusted but the outbreak of rugby fever which swept Japan in recent weeks means the country is already looking forward to hosting the 2019 tournament.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015
Duration: 3'09"

06:20
Early business news
BODY:
Our business reporter Jonathan Mitchell is in, with what's happening in the financial world, and it sounds like you have a lot on banking today.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'18"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'06"

06:39
Police mental health calls are a budget issue- Labour
BODY:
The police are dealing with more than one-hundred cases every day involving what they call acutely distressed mentally ill people.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health, police
Duration: 4'22"

06:43
WiNZ list of battered beneficiaries is getting longer.
BODY:
The number of beneficiaries telling Work and Income they're victims of domestic abuse is up 50 percent.
Topics: politics, life and society
Regions:
Tags: domestic abuse, WINZ
Duration: 2'56"

06:50
Westpac NZ sees strong growth in business lending
BODY:
Westpac New Zealand says falling interest rates, a weaker economy, lower dairy prices and increasing competition for digital customers is keeping it under pressure.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Westpac
Duration: 1'53"

06:52
Analyst on bank results
BODY:
And staying with banking, it's been a bumper profit season for the country's top four banks, who reported record profits worth around 4-point-5 billion dollars profit between them.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: banks
Duration: 1'37"

06:53
Co-operative money businesses quietly thriving
BODY:
And while the focus has been on the record billions earned by the Australian-owned banks, there's a small band of local minnows operating in the sector -- the credit unions and mutual building societies.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: credit unions
Duration: 2'33"

06:56
Abano Healthcare says its first half earnings may fall
BODY:
Medical and dental businesses operator Abano Healthcare says its first half earnings may fall as much as 14 percent because of the slowing Australian economy.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Abano Healthcare
Duration: 40"

06:57
China, Japan, Sth Korea talk new trade group
BODY:
In the alphabet soup that characterises the global trade sector, a new acronym is emerging - C-J-K.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Asian Trade Centre
Duration: 1'31"

06:58
Morning markets for 3 November 2015
BODY:
Wall Street is higher today after factory activity data came in slightly above expectations.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'03"

07:06
Sports News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'55"

07:10
Police inundated with calls on mental health issues
BODY:
Police officers are having to deal with more than a hundred cases a day involving what they term acutely distressed mentally ill people.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health, police
Duration: 3'04"

07:13
Police struggling to cope with mental health patients
BODY:
Listening to that was the Police Association chief executive Greg O'Connor.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health, police
Duration: 3'59"

07:18
RWC pub punters generally very well behaved
BODY:
Bars are hailing the success of extending drinking hours for the Rugby World Cup and say it shows licencing laws should be relaxed.
Topics: sport, law, politics
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015, alcohol
Duration: 3'20"

07:22
Work and Income 'battered beneficiaries' list growing rapidly
BODY:
The number of beneficiaries telling Work and Income they're victims of domestic abuse is growing rapidly.
Topics: life and society, politics
Regions:
Tags: WINZ, domestic abuse
Duration: 3'06"

07:25
Bank profits hit a record high
BODY:
Bank profits have hit a record high - and there are few signs of retreat.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: banks, profits
Duration: 2'59"

07:38
Investigations continue into downed Russian plane
BODY:
Investigations continue into what caused a Russian passenger jet to crash in Egypt.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Egypt, Russia
Duration: 4'29"

07:42
Dotcom says 'rotten' evidence used at extradition hearing
BODY:
Kim Dotcom's defence has come out swinging at the internet entreprenuer's extradition hearing, accusing prosecutors of presenting "rotten" evidence.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags: Kim Dotcom
Duration: 3'13"

07:47
Review asks: what is education for?
BODY:
The government has begun a review of the Education Act and it is asking the most fundamental question of all - what is education for?
Topics: education, politics, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'15"

07:50
TAB preparing for big Melbourne Cup spend
BODY:
The excitement of the Rugby World Cup doesn't appear to have dampened New Zealanders' enthusiasm for the Melbourne Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: betting, TAB
Duration: 4'15"

07:55
Rimutaka rail tunnel celebrates 60th Anniversary
BODY:
One of New Zealand's engineering marvels is 60 years old today.
Topics: transport
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Rimutaka rail tunnel
Duration: 3'25"

08:07
Sports News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'06"

08:10
Banking sector faces criticism as profits reach record highs
BODY:
The country's biggest banks have been accused of creaming it, as their profits soar.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: banks, profits
Duration: 4'52"

08:16
Mental health advocate 'extremely' concerned
BODY:
A long-time mental health advocate says it is extremely concerning the police are being required to deal with mental health patients when it is not their job.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health, police
Duration: 4'23"

08:20
Climate change likely to cut snow seasons
BODY:
Skiiers and snowboarders could be feeling the heat from global warming as soon as 2040 with rising temperatures reducing snow fall and likely to reduce the length of ski seasons.
Topics: climate
Regions:
Tags: global warming
Duration: 3'21"

08:24
Govt asking question - "What is education for?"
BODY:
The law that dictates our education system does not clearly state what New Zealand's education goals are.
Topics: education, law, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'44"

08:28
PNG Government looks to slash spending as revenue collapses
BODY:
Economists are warning Papua New Guinea faces a collapse in government revenue of historic proportions.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Papua New Guinea, PNG
Duration: 2'32"

08:31
Markets Update for 3 November 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 54"

08:36
Multi-million dollar injection for Māori boarding school
BODY:
Hawke's Bay's Te Aute College is making plans for multi-million dollar makeover after receiving a welcome financial boost from local iwi.
Topics: education, te ao Māori
Regions:
Tags: Te Aute College
Duration: 3'21"

08:40
Operation Katipo underway in the South Island.
BODY:
Imagine this - a rebel militia has seized political power, there are protests on the streets, a giant refugee camp in the Marlborough Sounds and New Zealand's navy, soldiers and air force have been called in to restore law and order.
Topics: defence force
Regions:
Tags: Operation Katipo
Duration: 3'26"

08:43
Commercial fishermen says new campaign alarmist propaganda
BODY:
A commercial fisherman operating from the North Island town of Raglan says a conservation group is using alarmist propaganda to highlight the plight of dolphins.
Topics: business, environment
Regions:
Tags: dolphins
Duration: 5'49"

08:49
Council hoping to claw back costs of failed subdivision
BODY:
The Whangarei mayor Sheryl Mai says her council is hoping to claw back at least some of the costs of a failed subdivision that's lumbered the ratepayers with a huge repair bill.
Topics: politics, environment
Regions: Northland
Tags: Marsden City development, Whangarei, Ruakaka
Duration: 3'51"

08:54
Japanese galloper the favourite in today's Melbourne Cup
BODY:
A Japanese galloper appears to be the one to beat in this afternoon's Melbourne Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 4'30"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The Book of Hat, by Harriet Rowland, told by Issy Stewart (2 of 5, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Solar energy 'biggest challenge' to electricity pricing says EA
BODY:
The Electricity Authority says a massive uptake of solar technology will be bad for other consumers. It wants lines companies to start thinking about changing the way it charges consumers for distributing power from the grid - saying if they don't they will encourage a lot of investment in solar panels - which will be bad for those who don't have them as they'll be picking up more of the cost of maintaining the networks. Carl Hansen is the Authority's chief executive.
Topics: energy
Regions:
Tags: electricity
Duration: 21'55"

09:30
Corporatisation of early childhood education bad for children
BODY:
UK childhood education Professor Emeritus Helen Penn is warning that early education is being undermined by the increasing market orientation and profit of services
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: ECE
Duration: 11'04"

09:41
You've heard of 3D printers.. now comes 3D bar-codes
BODY:
The global market in counterfeit goods, is estimated to be worth $2.6 billion every year and over half of pharmaceuticals sold online are thought to be counterfeit. Engineering company Sofmat, is developing 3D bar-codes, invisible to the naked eye, to help stop this lucrative global market. The codes consist of a series of small indentations with precise, slightly different depths, allowing for billions of different combinations. With four pins making holes at 36 possible heights, the team can produce 1.7 million codes. Next they want to step up to a six-pin system, with more height variation, which will allow 14 billion variations. The Sofmat team hope to launch their barcodes in November 2016. Phillip Harrison is Sofmat's managing director.
EXTENDED BODY:
Products ranging from medicines to brake pads and aeroplane parts are being counterfeited with sometimes fatal consequences - and a UK company is developing a product to help combat the lucrative trade.
British engineering company Sofmat is developing 3D barcodes, invisible to the naked eye.
The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has put the value of international trade in counterfeit and pirated goods at up to $US250 billion in 2007.
The World Health Organisation estimates up to 10 percent of medicines worldwide could be counterfeit, and says in over 50 percent of cases medicines purchased over the internet from illegal sites that conceal their physical address have been found to be counterfeit.
The barcodes being developed consist of a series of minuscule indentations with precise, slightly different depths, allowing for billions of different combinations.
With four pins making holes at 36 possible heights, the team can produce 1.7 million codes.
Next, Sofmat wants to step up to a six-pin system, with more height variation, which will allow 14 billion variations.
Managing director Phillip Harrison told Nine to Noon goods ranging from Viagra to aeroplane parts are counterfeited.
"Basically anywhere in the supply chain things can be integrated. Obviously there are very high value goods that's involved. If you have a manufacturer or a company that wants to make fake goods they can infiltrate them throughout the chain.
"A proper management system can reduce this, but there have been instances where military installations have found counterfeit products actually on their shelves waiting to be integrated into their aeroplanes.
"There was instances in Canada where something like 10 percent of deaths caused by brake failure were counterfeit brake pads which had been made from sawdust."
The system involves putting surface features on an object, and supplying a unique reader which can identify the markings and cross reference them with a database to confirm the product is authentic.
The company would supply the system to "end users" such as hospitals or pharmacists, in the case of medicines, or manufacturers or distributers, in the case of automobiles or aeroplanes.
The Sofmat team are working in conjuction with engineers at the Univerisity of Bradford and hope to launch the barcodes in November 2016.
Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: counterfeit goods
Duration: 9'29"

09:51
US correspondent Susan Milligan
BODY:
Susan Milligan reports on the most recent GOP debate
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: USA
Duration: 8'51"

10:05
Peter Capaldi: Who is Doctor Who?
BODY:
After two seasons playing Doctor Who, Scottish actor Peter Capaldi is still finding out what makes the character tick, but says the Doctor might have more in common with his Malcolm Tucker role than you might think.
EXTENDED BODY:
After two seasons as Doctor Who, Scottish actor Peter Capaldi is still finding out what makes the Time Lord tick, but says the Doctor might have more in common with his other famed character Malcolm Tucker than you might think.
He is the 12th actor to play Dr Who since the character was created in 1963, and came to the role after a long career on stage and screen, including his memorable stint as Malcolm Tucker, the political spin doctor in The Thick of It.
Capaldi, whose second year of time-travel adventures are currently screening on NZ television screens, will be the first ever Doctor to visit New Zealand while still playing the role. He arrives later this month for Peter Capaldi in Conversation, which will be held at The Civic, Auckland on 24 November, and will include footage and stories from behind the scenes of the world's longest running science fiction series.
The coveted part comes with its own unique pressures, including creating a new take on a well-loved character, but Capaldi told Nine to Noon today his starting point was to make the role as personal as possible.
"My approach to it is to bring as much of myself to it as I possibly can. Obviously the scripts arrive and they are beautifully written - Steven Moffat has done a fantastic job in writing the scripts and bring fabulous writers onto the show. They have very specific ideas about who the Doctor is, and I have very specific ideas about that and we try to find a place where that all works and we help each other recreate a doctor that hopefully is engaged with his past and is also looking to the future, and is hopefully a character that people can enjoy.
"But it can be a bit hard because people have so many different opinions about it. The show is so loved and so popular that everybody has got a take on it and you can only do your best and present your own concept of it and see how people like that or not."
For the star of a show created for children, Capaldi's Doctor can be stricter and more biting than his predecessors, but the actor says it was a necessary adjustment to keep him a little other-worldly.
"I know this sounds odd, but I felt it was important to make him less accessible to the audience, because he is a mystery and he is strange. He shouldn't be someone you feel automatically at ease with. It's difficult to generate any mystery about a character when people know so much about that character, but I think part of that was trying to disconnect from being so user friendly, in a way."
Capaldi said the more serious dimension was an inevitable consequence of his age. "Any actor of my age who plays this kind of part has been around a bit longer, and been beaten around a bit more by life. So I think that my Doctor is a bit beaten up a bit more by life. It's a wonderful, wonderful part, because he is both an enthusiast and a clown and is also this haunted figure, because he is surrounded by creatures and people who delight him, but in a way he can see their future."
But the spiky nature of the character was balanced out by a lighter touch, said the actor.
"Even at his most spiky form - which is probably William Hartnell, the first Doctor - he still retained this absolute commitment to looking after people and trying to do the right thing and I think that makes him really interesting. He's a good person, without necessarily being the most popular person in the room, although he is, because he's so clever and funny and witty.
"I think he thinks it's amazing that he has this privilege to fly around in time and space. He thinks that it's absolute fantastic and very enthusiastic about that. He knows so much about what has happened and will happen and that is almost a door to madness, so he has to balance that out. So he has this enormous enthusiasm for the wonders of the universe, but he is also haunted by the knowledge of how bad things can go."
Out of the loop
Capaldi has more of a cult following for his lead role in The Thick of It, with his Malcolm Tucker making a deep mark in popular culture with his expletive ridden rants, acidic wit, and Machiavellian machinations.
Capaldi told Nine to Noon Tucker was a complicated character, but you could not call him cynical.
"I always thought Malcolm was a product of his job. He had found he was in this world that was a tough, cut-throat world in which you had to be a tough guy to survive and to get your work done. So that had hardened him and calcified him and also made him pragmatic.
"I hate the word cynical, I think it's an easy word to bandy around, what I think people who recognise the realities and possibilities of bad things happening are cynical, but they actually can be pragmatic and romantic and committed and wonderful. I'm not saying Malcolm was a wonderful person, but he recognised that his job involved doing bad things, but he thought he was serving a greater good. He understood what he had to do, but he didn't have respect for the people he was serving, which inevitably was a time bomb that was going to go off with him at some point."
The actor's role as Randall Brown, the BBC's head of news during the cold war in the series The Hour, saw him take on another hard-bitten character, but he said the three characters he is known for all shared a softer side.
"I think they are all romantic characters, because they are all pursuing something good. They have to deal pragmatically with what the world throws at them, and the Doctor has to deal with what the universe and all of time and space throws at him.
"But ultimately the Doctor is almost like a cosmic bohemian, he is just in love with the delights that could be discovered by looking into the sky and seeing the stars being born, or sitting in a supermarket carpark and watching the litter being thrown around by the wind at dawn. He can find beauty in all of these things. But unfortunately, when a monster shows him, he is usually the only person who can deal with it."
The Doctor usually deals with monsters in the most imaginative way, and Capaldi said this focus on the imagination was another one of the keys to the 52-year-old series' success.
"It not only respects imagination, it triggers imagination. If you look at the show, if you shine a harsh spotlight on the show, you'll see many cracks in it, the old bits of tin and polishing and sellotape. I'll watch TV and I'll be going through channels and some old episode of Doctor Who will come on and, even though it looks a bit tacky, I'll still watch it because their is something about the show that transcends its actual physical presence.
"It's still full of imagination and ideas and artfulness. It's ambition has often been way beyond its grasp and I think that is its great gift. It lives in the imagination in a way that novels and fairy stories or imaginary creatures do. Doctor Who exists in the imagination and it is almost more powerful in its imagination than it is in its televised form."
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

10:06
Peter Capaldi: Who is Doctor Who?
BODY:
After two seasons playing Doctor Who, Scottish actor Peter Capaldi is still finding out what makes the character tick, but says the Doctor might have more in common with his Malcolm Tucker role than you might think.
EXTENDED BODY:
After two seasons as Doctor Who, Scottish actor Peter Capaldi is still finding out what makes the Time Lord tick, but says the Doctor might have more in common with his other famed character Malcolm Tucker than you might think.
He is the 12th actor to play Dr Who since the character was created in 1963 and came to the role after a long career on stage and screen, including his memorable stint as Malcolm Tucker, the political spin doctor in The Thick of It.
Capaldi, whose second year of time-travel adventures are currently screening on New Zealand television, will be the first ever Doctor to visit New Zealand while still playing the role. He arrives later this month for Peter Capaldi in Conversation, which will be held at The Civic, Auckland on 24 November, and will include footage and stories from behind the scenes of the world's longest running science fiction series.
The coveted part comes with its own unique pressures, including creating a new take on a well-loved character, but Capaldi told Kathryn Ryan on Nine to Noon today his starting point was to make the role as personal as possible.
"My approach to it is to bring as much of myself to it as I possibly can. Obviously the scripts arrive and they are beautifully written - Steven Moffat has done a fantastic job in writing the scripts and bring fabulous writers onto the show. They have very specific ideas about who the Doctor is, and I have very specific ideas about that and we try to find a place where that all works and we help each other recreate a doctor that hopefully is engaged with his past and is also looking to the future, and is hopefully a character that people can enjoy.
"But it can be a bit hard because people have so many different opinions about it. The show is so loved and so popular that everybody has got a take on it and you can only do your best and present your own concept of it and see how people like that or not."
For the star of a show created for children, Capaldi's Doctor can be stricter and more biting than his predecessors, but the actor says it was a necessary adjustment to keep him a little other-worldly.
"I know this sounds odd, but I felt it was important to make him less accessible to the audience, because he is a mystery and he is strange. He shouldn't be someone you feel automatically at ease with. It's difficult to generate any mystery about a character when people know so much about that character, but I think part of that was trying to disconnect from being so user friendly, in a way."
Capaldi said the more serious dimension was an inevitable consequence of his age. "Any actor of my age who plays this kind of part has been around a bit longer, and been beaten around a bit more by life. So I think that my Doctor is a bit beaten up a bit more by life. It's a wonderful, wonderful part, because he is both an enthusiast and a clown and is also this haunted figure, because he is surrounded by creatures and people who delight him, but in a way he can see their future."
But the spiky nature of the character was balanced out by a lighter touch, said the actor.
"Even at his most spiky form - which is probably William Hartnell, the first Doctor - he still retained this absolute commitment to looking after people and trying to do the right thing and I think that makes him really interesting. He's a good person, without necessarily being the most popular person in the room, although he is, because he's so clever and funny and witty.
"I think he thinks it's amazing that he has this privilege to fly around in time and space. He thinks that it's absolute fantastic and very enthusiastic about that. He knows so much about what has happened and will happen and that is almost a door to madness, so he has to balance that out. So he has this enormous enthusiasm for the wonders of the universe, but he is also haunted by the knowledge of how bad things can go."
Out of the loop
Capaldi has a more cult following for his lead role in The Thick of It, with his Malcolm Tucker making a deep mark with his expletive ridden rants, acidic wit, and Machiavellian machinations.
Capaldi told Nine to Noon Tucker was a complicated character, but you could not call him cynical.
"I always thought Malcolm was a product of his job. He had found he was in this world that was a tough, cut-throat world in which you had to be a tough guy to survive and to get your work done. So that had hardened him and calcified him and also made him pragmatic.
"I hate the word cynical, I think it's an easy word to bandy around, what I think people who recognise the realities and possibilities of bad things happening are cynical, but they actually can be pragmatic and romantic and committed and wonderful. I'm not saying Malcolm was a wonderful person, but he recognised that his job involved doing bad things, but he thought he was serving a greater good. He understood what he had to do, but he didn't have respect for the people he was serving, which inevitably was a time bomb that was going to go off with him at some point."
The actor's role as Randall Brown, the BBC's head of news during the cold war in the series The Hour, saw him take on another hard-bitten character, but he said the three characters he is known for all shared a softer side.
"I think they are all romantic characters, because they are all pursuing something good. They have to deal pragmatically with what the world throws at them, and the Doctor has to deal with what the universe and all of time and space throws at him.
"But ultimately the Doctor is almost like a cosmic bohemian, he is just in love with the delights that could be discovered by looking into the sky and seeing the stars being born, or sitting in a supermarket carpark and watching the litter being thrown around by the wind at dawn. He can find beauty in all of these things. But unfortunately, when a monster shows him, he is usually the only person who can deal with it."
The Doctor usually deals with monsters in the most imaginative way, and Capaldi said this focus on the imagination was another one of the keys to the 52-year-old series' success.
"It not only respects imagination, it triggers imagination. If you look at the show, if you shine a harsh spotlight on the show, you'll see many cracks in it, the old bits of tin and polishing and sellotape. I'll watch TV and I'll be going through channels and some old episode of Doctor Who will come on and, even though it looks a bit tacky, I'll still watch it because there is something about the show that transcends its actual physical presence.
"It's still full of imagination and ideas and artfulness. It's ambition has often been way beyond its grasp and I think that is its great gift. It lives in the imagination in a way that novels and fairy stories or imaginary creatures do. Doctor Who exists in the imagination and it is almost more powerful in its imagination than it is in its televised form."
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Dr Who, Peter Capaldi
Duration: 24'00"

10:35
Book review: A Few of the Girls by Maeve Binchy
BODY:
Reviewed by Crystal Beavis, published by Orion.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'41"

11:11
Business commentator Rod Oram
BODY:
Rod Oram discusses - the Technology Investment Network 100 report for 2015 on the growth of tech companies, the departure from NZ of two international investment banks and the NZ-EU trade talks.
Topics: business, technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'47"

11:28
Leo Haks and Colleen Dallimore
BODY:
A look at New Zealand history through postcards which provide a fascinating insight into the roots and evolution of New Zealand culture and reflect the development of our industries and the beauty of our landscapes. Leo Haks is a lifelong collector of culturally significant items. He and his artist-partner, Colleen Dallimore have a large collection of New Zealand postcards. 500 cards are featured in their new book, Post Marks - The Way We Were, which focuses on early New Zealand postcards from 1897-1922 and the story they tell.
EXTENDED BODY:
A look at New Zealand history through postcards which provide a fascinating insight into the roots and evolution of New Zealand culture and reflect the development of our industries and the beauty of our landscapes.
Leo Haks is a lifelong collector of culturally significant items. He and his artist-partner, Colleen Dallimore have a large collection of New Zealand postcards.
Five hundred cards are featured in their new book, Post Marks - The Way We Were, which focuses on early New Zealand postcards from 1897-1922 and the story they tell.
He talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Leo Haks, Colleen Dallimore, Postmarks, postcards, history
Duration: 16'11"

11:45
Media commentator, Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'21"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Warnings that big uptake of solar panels will increase cost of power for those who don't have them
The Electricity Authority says a massive uptake of solar technology will be bad for other consumers. It wants lines companies to start thinking about changing the way it charges consumers for distributing power from the grid - saying if they don't they will encourage a lot of investment in solar panels - which will be bad for those who don't have them as they'll be picking up more of the cost of maintaining the networks. Carl Hansen is the Authority's chief executive.
09:25 Corporatisation of early childhood education bad for children
UK childhood education Professor Emeritus Helen Penn is warning that early education is being undermined by the increasing market orientation and profit of services
09:30 You've heard of 3D printers ..now comes 3D bar-codes!
The global market in counterfeit goods, is estimated to be worth $2.6 billion every year and over half of pharmaceuticals sold online are thought to be counterfeit. Engineering company Sofmat, is developing 3D bar-codes, invisible to the naked eye, to help stop this lucrative global market.
The codes consist of a series of small indentations with precise, slightly different depths, allowing for billions of different combinations. With four pins making holes at 36 possible heights, the team can produce 1.7 million codes. Next they want to step up to a six-pin system, with more height variation, which will allow 14 billion variations. The Sofmat team hope to launch their barcodes in November 2016. Phillip Harrison is Sofmat's managing director
[gallery:1530]
09:45 US correspondent Susan Milligan
Susan Milligan reports on the most recent GOP debate
10:05 From spin doctor Malcolm Tucker, to Dr Who: Scottish actor Peter Capaldi
Peter Capaldi, is a lifelong fan of Dr Who and the 12th actor to take on the coveted time-lord role. He has also played a doctor of a very different sort, the political spin doctor Malcolm Tucker in the series, The Thick of It... a character known for his expletive ridden rants, and acidic wit, and Machiavellian machinations.
Peter Capaldi comes to New Zealand later this month, the first current Doctor to come here.
0:30 Book review: A Few of the Girls by Maeve Binchy
Reviewed by Crystal Beavis, published by Orion
10:45 The Reading: The Book of Hat by Harriet Rowland, told by Issy Stewart
(Part 2 of 5)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
Rod Oram discusses
- The Technology Investment Network 100 report for 2015 on the growth of tech companies
- The departure from NZ of two international investment banks
- NZ-EU trade talks
11:20 Leo Haks and Colleen Dallimore
[gallery:1549]
A look at New Zealand history through postcards which provide a fascinating insight into the roots and evolution of New Zealand culture and reflect the development of our industries and the beauty of our landscapes.
Leo Haks is a lifelong collector of culturally significant items. He and his artist-partner, Colleen Dallimore have a large collection of New Zealand postcards. 500 cards are featured in their new book, Post Marks - The Way We Were, which focuses on early New Zealand postcards from 1897-1922 and the story they tell.

11:45 Media commentator, Gavin Ellis
Gavin Ellis is a media commentator and former editor of the New Zealand Herald. He can be contacted on gavin.ellis@xtra.co.nz

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Cayucas
Song: Dancing at the Blue Lagoon
Composer: Yudin / Yudin
Album: Dancing at the Blue Lagoon
Label: Secretly Canadi
Time: 10:45
Artist: Steve Allan
Song: Life on Mars
Time: 10:31

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including:
12:16 Business News
12:26 Sport
12:34 Rural News
12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
Auckland house prices creep up on the million dollar mark. The Electricity Authority warns consumers against investing in solar power too soon.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'12"

12:16
Trustpower makes takeover offer for King Country Energy
BODY:
Energy company, Trustpower, has made a takeover offer for the central North Island's power supplier, King Country Energy. Tauranga based Trustpower is offering $5 a share, which would value the company at $125 million, providing it receives acceptance for more than 70% of King's shares.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: power, electricity, Trustpower
Duration: 1'39"

12:18
Property prices continue to pick up pace
BODY:
Property prices are rising at their fastest rate in nearly a decade, with Auckland still bubbling away. The QV House Price Index jumped 14% in the year to October, the fastest rate of growth since early 2006.
Topics: business, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'07"

12:21
Credit unions offer community banking
BODY:
Over the past week we've reported on the profit results of the major Australian-owned banks, who between them earned a record $4.5 billion in profit. But there's a small band of local minnows operating in the sector - 14 credit unions and five building societies.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'18"

12:22
Midday Markets for 3 November 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets Nona Pelletier is joined by Melika King at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'50"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
Track conditions at Flemington remain a concern ahead of today's big race.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: horse, racing, Melbourne Cup
Duration: 2'50"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'44"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:10
First Song - I Could Make You Happy
BODY:
The Art Of Sleeping will be supporting Mumford and Sons at Vector Arena in Auckland.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'47"

13:14
Pike River Mine Museum - Cory Devine
BODY:
A West Coast man has designed a tribute, to the 29 men who died at the Pike River mine in 2010. CPIT architecture student, Cory Devine, has designed a museum, and if accepted it will be part of a proposed Pike River Mine memorial and visitor centre, at the former mine. He says is the best way can give back to his community.
Topics: history
Regions: West Coast, Canterbury
Tags: cpit, architecture, Pike River
Duration: 6'42"

13:27
Melbourne Cup - Tony Laker
BODY:
It's Melbourne Cup time again, and Invercargillites are taking to Flemington in style. Invercargill Airport hosted its first chartered international flight, with 150 passengers bound for Australia just after seven am. The trip was organised by House of Travel - Lakers, owner-operator Tony Laker, who's at Flemington.
Topics: sport
Regions: Southland
Tags: Invercargill Airport, Flemington, Melbourne Cup, House of Travel Lakers, Tony Laker
Duration: 7'05"

13:34
Weird Al Yankovic
BODY:
Multiple grammy award winner Alfred Matthew Yankovic - also known as Weird Al - is heading to our shores in January to play two shows in Auckland and Christchurch.
Topics: music, arts
Regions:
Tags: comedy, parody, satire, musical comedy, comedy songs
Duration: 13'07"

13:45
Favourite Album - The Red Back Book
BODY:
Director Gunther Schuller chooses The Red Back Book by the New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'57"

14:10
Scene Of The Crime - Steve Braunias
BODY:
Award-winning journalist, author and columnist, Steve Braunias, has been looking into tales of samurai sword attacks and brutal murders. His new book, The Scene Of The Crime: Twelve Extraordinary Tales of Crime and Punishment in Modern New Zealand, tells the tales of 12 grisly crimes.
EXTENDED BODY:
Award-winning journalist, author and columnist, Steve Braunias, has been looking into tales of samurai sword attacks and brutal murders. His new book, The Scene Of The Crime: Twelve Extraordinary Tales of Crime and Punishment in Modern New Zealand, tells the tales of 12 grisly crimes.
As he tells Jesse, he has spent the past year in court, sometimes "hoofing" up to the Auckland High Court just to see what is happening. He describes the courtroom as "the setting for the banality of evil".
As Wintec's Editor in Residence since 2010, Braunias is teacher and mentor to the next generation of journalists.
"I recommend all students do court reporting, it does something to you as a person as well as a journalist."
Topics: books, author interview, crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Steve Braunias, The Scene Of The Crime: Twelve Extraordinary Tales of Crime and Punishment in Modern New Zealand
Duration: 16'32"

14:22
Great New Zealand Concerts - Nambassa
BODY:
The great New Zealand concert takes a different shape this week, instead of just one, we reflect on a series of festivals from the late 70s and early 80s. Known as Nambassa, the festival ran over a number of days in 78, 79 and 81, in and around Waihi. Its focus was on peace, love and harmony and has been described as New Zealand's Woodstock.
EXTENDED BODY:
The great New Zealand concert takes a different shape this week, instead of just one, we reflect on a series of festivals from the late 70s and early 80s.
Known as Nambassa, the festival ran over a number of days in 1978, 1979 and 1981, in and around Waihi.
Its focus was on peace, love and harmony and has been described as New Zealand's Woodstock.
It attracted a range of local and international musical acts.
It all seemed like peace and love, but it wasn't. In 1981 the show was plagued by bad weather and people being swept downstream after a bridge collapsed. It was also scheduled on the same day as that year's Sweetwaters festival.
Nambassa founder Peter Terry went bankrupt after the 1981 festival fell flat.
Musicians, thinkers, filmmakers and talk to Jesse Muligan about Nambassa and its legacy.
Topics: music
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: Nambassa
Duration: 34'40"

15:10
The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems Of Late Capitalism
BODY:
It's not just martini's shaken but not stirred that are quintessentially James Bond. With each of the 24 Bond films spanning 50 years comes a theme song that sets the scene for the film and the year it was made. Two Stanford University professors have analysed the Bond themes, from Shirley Bassey's classic 'Goldfinger' in 1964 to the new Sam Smith song for Spectre. Their book, The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems Of Late Capitalism argues why theme songs don't just set the mood for a Bond film but also tell a story about the evolution of pop music.
Topics: books, music, arts, author interview
Regions:
Tags: film, James Bond
Duration: 27'20"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 3 November 2015
BODY:
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Julie Moffett.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'50"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 3 November 2015
BODY:
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Julie Moffett.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'50"

21:06
Healthy streams - healthy harbour
BODY:
Whaingaroa Harbour Care have planted more than 1.4 million native plants along streams around Raglan,and the harbour is much cleaner as a result
EXTENDED BODY:
By Alison Ballance
“There’s about 600 kilometres of fences, 1.4 million plants. It’s all about water quality, more whitebait fritters, more snapper fillets. And it’s worked.”
Fred Lichtwark, Whaingaroa Harbour Care

Beef farmer David Peacocke says that about 14 years, ago, when he bought a farm near the Waikato settlement of Raglan, cattle would have been grazing the stream banks and drinking from them. Today, the streams on the farm are securely fenced off from the livestock by two-wire electric fences and the 10-year old riparian planting is tall, lush and providing shade for the stream and good habitat for native birds and fishes. David did the fencing, and paid the not-for-profit nursery Whaingaroa Harbour Care to provide the eco-sourced native plants and the plant them in the ground. David also put in a reticulated water supply so that his stock had a good water supply away from the stream.
This co-operation between farmer and Fred Lichtwark and his Harbour Care team is a ‘recipe’ that has been used successfully for more than 20 years in the catchment around Raglan’s harbour, and as local farmers have seen how successfully it has worked on their neighbour’s farms they have been keen to follow suit.
Neighbouring farmer Craig Rowlandson is another local farmer who is a keen supporter of the Harbour Care group. He, too, has fenced off the streams on his farm and nearly finished planting them.
Retiring streams and waterways from farms, and planting them out with native species, is a basic tenet of environmental management, but few catchments around New Zealand have been as successful as Raglan, where Fred reckons about 60% of the streams are now fenced.
Fred says that 20 years ago Whaingaroa Harbour was in a terrible state – the harbour was full of thick smelly sediment, dead animal carcasses washed up on the shore, and the fishing was terrible. Now, he says, the water flowing into the head of the harbour is clean and silt-free, the mud and animal carcasses have disappeared, and the fishing has improved markedly. Even better, the protected streams are now full of native fish, and his whitebait catching is much more successful.
Whaingaroa Harbour Care employs four workers, who collect local seed, grow up about 120,000 plants each year and plant them out. Fred says he has worked out a good basic planting plan: it includes cabbage trees and flax near the stream, with a thick band of taller manuka near the fence. The cabbage trees, he says, are good at drawing nutrients and pollutants out of the ground and water, while the long leaves of the flax sweep in the water and keep the stream bed clear of nuisance weed growth. The manuka overtop the electric fence without shorting it out, and are a good source of nectar for birds and insects.
All the men agree that ‘being green’ has made great economic sense, both for them as individuals and for the wider community. David and Craig say they now farm more intensively on less land and make more money, while Fred says everyone has benefited from a cleaner harbour, which has attracted growing numbers of visitors and is boosting the local economy.
The wider picture for New Zealand waterways is not so optimistic. The recently released Enviroment Aotearoa 2015 State of the Environment Report says that many streams, rivers and lakes are in poor condition, with intensive farming getting much of the blame.
Topics: environment
Regions: Waikato
Tags: streams, Clean Streams Accord, Raglan, native plants, revegetation, riparian planting
Duration: 14'42"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First Song
'I Could Make You Happy' - Art Of Sleeping
1:15 Pike River Mine Museum - Cory Devine
A West Coast man has designed a tribute, to the 29 men who died at the Pike River mine in 2010. CPIT architecture student, Cory Devine, has designed a museum, and if accepted it will be part of a proposed Pike River Mine memorial and visitor centre, at the former mine. He says is the best way can give back to his community.
1:27 Melbourne Cup - Tony Laker
It's Melbourne Cup time again and Invercargillites are taking to Flemington in style. Invercargill Airport hosted its first chartered international flight with 150 passengers bound for Australia just after seven am. The trip was organised by House of Travel - Lakers, owner-operator Tony Laker, who is at Flemington.
1:34 Feature Interview - Weird Al Yankovic
Multiple grammy award winner Alfred Matthew Yankovic - also known as Weird Al - is heading to our shores in January to play two shows in Auckland and Christchurch.
1:40 Favourite Album
Joplin: The Red Back Book by the New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble, director Gunther Schuller.
2:10 Scene Of The Crime: Twelve Extraordinary Tales Of Crime And Punishment In Modern New Zealand - Steve Braunias
Our next guest has been at the scene of the crime, so to speak. Award-winning journalist, author and columnist, Steve Braunias, has been looking into tales of samurai sword attacks and brutal murders. His new book, The Scene Of The Crime: Twelve Extraordinary Tales of Crime and Punishment in Modern New Zealand, tells the tales of 12 grisly crimes. And he's here in our Auckland studio to talk about the non-fiction work.
[gallery:1550]
2:20 Great New Zealand Concerts - Nambassa
The great New Zealand concert takes a different shape this week, instead of just one, we reflect on a series of festivals from the late 70s and early 80s. Known as Nambassa, the festival ran over a number of days in 78, 79 and 81, in and around Waihi. Its focus was on peace, love and harmony and has been described as New Zealand's Woodstock.
3:10 Feature Interview - James Bond Music
[image:52072:quarter]
It's not just martini's shaken but not stirred that are quintessentially James Bond. With each of the 24 Bond films spanning 50 years comes a theme song that sets the scene for the film and the year it was made. Two Stanford University professors have analysed the Bond themes, from Shirley Bassey's classic "Goldfinger" in 1964 to the new Sam Smith song for Spectre, the newest James Bond movie coming out in New Zealand on November 22nd. Their book, "The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems Of Late Capitalism" argues why theme songs don't just set the mood for a Bond film but also tell a story about the evolution of pop music.
3:30 Our Changing World - Alison Ballance
Every year Whaingaroa Harbour Care grows and plants 120,000 native plants along streams and waterways around Raglan's harbour. Most of these riparian plantings are on local farms, and Alison Ballance meets farmers David Peacocke and Craig Rowlandson, and Harbour Care's Fred Lichtwark, to find out how cleaner streams mean more fish in the harbour and better farming.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Julie Moffett.

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Art of Sleeping
TITLE: I could make you happy
COMP: Art of Sleeping
ALBUM: Shake Shiver
LABEL: Universal
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble
TITLE: Maple Leaf Rag
COMP: Joplin
ALBUM: The Red Back Book
LABEL: Angel
ARTIST: New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble
TITLE: Cascades
COMP: Joplin
ALBUM:The Red Back Book
LABEL: Angel
ARTIST: New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble
TITLE: Easy Winners
COMP: Joplin
ALBUM: The Red Back Book
LABEL: Angel
ARTIST: New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble
TITLE: Elite Syncopations
COMP: Joplin
ALBUM: The Red Back Book
LABEL: Angel
GREAT NEW ZEALAND CONCERT:
ARTIST: Chapman & White
TITLE: Nambassa Song
COMP: Chapman & White
ALBUM: Festival Music: From The 1979 Nambassa Festival [Live]
LABEL: Stetson
ARTIST: Split Enz
TITLE: I see Red
COMP: Finn
ALBUM: Festival Music: From The 1979 Nambassa Festival [Live]
LABEL: Stetson
ARTIST: Barry McGuire
TITLE: Eve Of Destruction
COMP: McGuire
ALBUM: Songs Of Protest
LABEL: Rhino
ARTIST: Little River Band
TITLE: Days on the road
COMP: Goble
ALBUM: Little River Band: Reminiscing, The Twentieth Anniversary (Compilation)
LABEL: Capitol
ARTIST: Split Enz
TITLE: Bold As Brass
COMP: Finn
ALBUM: Festival Music: From The 1979 Nambassa Festival [Live]
LABEL: Stetson
HALF TIME:
ARTIST: Mike Brady
TITLE: That Tuesday in November
COMP: Brady
ALBUM: n/a
LABEL: n/a

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 3 November 2015
BODY:
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Julie Moffett.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'50"

16:06
The Panel with Mai Chen and Ali Jones (Part 1)
BODY:
Convicted criminal Ewen MacDonald has been released on parole. He was acquitted of killing his brother-in-law Scott Guy. Mike White, the author of Who Killed Scott Guy?, talks to the Panel about the case. How much influence do you think the All Blacks Rugby World Cup victory will have on the flag referendum? Sonny Bill Williams gave his RWC medal to a boy who charged onto the Twickenham field who turned out to be 14 and not an 8 year-old as the All Black thought. Does that make any difference to the gesture?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'51"

16:07
The Panel with Mai Chen and Ali Jones (Part 2)
BODY:
Thoroughbred racing expert Mary Mountier joins the Panel to discuss her picks for the race at Flemington. And we go trackside with ABC reporter Guy Stayner. What the Panelists Mai Chen and Ali Jones have been thinking about. John Key mentions the possibility of Ritchie McCaw accepting a knighthood.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'10"

16:09
Panel Intro
BODY:
What today's Panelists Mai Chen and Ali Jones have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'32"

16:14
Ewen MacDonald release
BODY:
Convicted criminal Ewen MacDonald has been released on parole. He was acquitted of killing his brother-in-law Scott Guy. Mike White, the author of Who Killed Scott Guy?, talks to the Panel about the case.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: crime
Duration: 7'59"

16:18
Rugby World Cup could influence the flag vote
BODY:
How much influence do you think the All Blacks Rugby World Cup victory will have on the flag referendum?
Topics: sport, politics
Regions:
Tags: RWC, New Zealand Flag
Duration: 7'02"

16:28
Sonny Bill Williams and the medal
BODY:
Sonny Bill Williams gave his RWC medal to a boy who charged onto the Twickenham field who turned out to be 14 and not an 8 year-old as the All Black thought. Does that make any difference to the gesture?
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015
Duration: 4'09"

16:33
Mary Mountier's Melbourne Cup picks
BODY:
Thoroughbred racing expert Mary Mountier joins the Panel to discuss her picks for the race at Flemington. And we go trackside with ABC reporter Guy Stayner.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 11'53"

16:44
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Mai Chen and Ali Jones have been thinking about.
Topics: identity, inequality
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'53"

16:57
Knights and Dames
BODY:
John Key mentions the possibility of Ritchie McCaw accepting a knighthood.
Topics: sport, politics
Regions:
Tags: honours
Duration: 3'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Tuesday 3 November 2015
BODY:
Father told to go to police during daughter's psychotic episode; Govt gives stretched Canterbury DHB $16 million; NZ-bred horse carries first woman jockey to Melbourne Cup win; New rules for Filipino dairy workers; Wellington has three $1m suburbs with more expected; and New Māori MP for Green Party
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'47"

17:08
TAB on the Melbourne Cup
BODY:
The TAB's Mark Stafford comments on the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 6'26"

17:11
Father told to go to police during daughter's psychotic episode
BODY:
A Hawkes Bay father, who called the local district health board for help, was told to call the police to deal with his daughter who was suffering from a psychotic episode.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: DHB, police
Duration: 5'35"

17:16
Govt gives stretched Canterbury DHB $16 million
BODY:
The cash-strapped Canterbury District Health Board has come out on top today in a battle over finances with the Government. Relations between the DHB and the Ministry have been strained as the DHB's deficit reached $16 million and threatened to hit $19 million.
Topics: health
Regions: Canterbury
Tags:
Duration: 5'03"

17:20
Government won't be reining in record bank profits
BODY:
The Finance Minister, Bill English, says the Government won't be reining in the record profits made by the country's main Australian-owned banks, as long as they pay their tax. BNZ, ANZ, Westpac and ASB made a combined $4.5 billion in the 2015 financial year, sparking claims of excessive profits.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

17:24
Suprise Melbourne cup win
BODY:
New Zealand bred horse Prince of Penzance has won the Melbourne Cup
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 3'46"

17:26
Questions about the economic benefit of solar energy
BODY:
The Electricity Authority is warning that rapid investment in solar technology with back-up batteries could be an expensive mistake. It puts the potential wasted investment at up to $5 billion over the next 10 years, and it argues the real economics of solar technology should properly analysed before people make an expensive purchase of solar cells for their roof top.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: electricity, power
Duration: 3'04"

17:27
Prince of Penzance breeder
BODY:
The New Zealand bred horse and rank outsider Prince of Penzance has carried the first woman jockey to victory in the Melbourne Cup. The gelding burst from the pack in the final straight.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 2'27"

17:30
Sir Owen Glenn toasts Melbourne Cup success
BODY:
New Zealand rich lister Sir Owen Glenn is toasting his Melbourne Cup success. Just a half hour ago his thoroughbred Criterion placed third in Australasia's biggest race.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup
Duration: 1'50"

17:35
Evening Business for 3 November 2015
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'08"

17:38
Wellington has 3 $1m suburbs with more expected
BODY:
Wellington now has three suburbs where properties on average are valued at one million dollars, with more expected to join the club over coming years.
Topics: housing
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 5'19"

17:38
Union not banking a truckload of money from All Blacks
BODY:
The rugby union won't be banking a truckload of money overnight despite having the only back-to-back winners in World Cup history.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: RWC 2015
Duration: 5'19"

17:43
Wellington has three $1m suburbs with more expected
BODY:
Wellington now has three suburbs where properties on average are valued at one million dollars, with more expected to join the club over coming years.
Topics: housing
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'56"

17:52
Dotcom's lawyer argues charges can't be used for extradition
BODY:
Kim Dotcom's lawyer says none of the 13 charges against the internet businessman can be used to extradite him. Mr Dotcom and three other men face being sent to the United States on copyright violation, money-laundering and racketeering charges related to their website, Megaupload.
Topics: crime, law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'24"

17:56
New Māori MP for Green Party
BODY:
The Green Party has sworn in its newest MP, Marama Davidson, who will take on the Māori Development portfolio and become the fourth member of the party's Māori caucus. Her arrival means Parliament 20 per cent of MPs are Māori.
Topics: te ao Māori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party
Duration: 3'00"

17:56
New Māori MP for Green Party
BODY:
The Green Party has sworn in its newest MP, Marama Davidson, who will take on the Māori Development portfolio and become the fourth member of the party's Māori caucus. Her arrival means Parliament 20 per cent of MPs are Māori.
Topics: te ao Māori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party
Duration: 3'00"

17:57
Parliament pays tribute to the All Blacks
BODY:
Parliament has paid tribute to the All Blacks for winning the rugby world cup.
Topics: politics, sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'25"

18:05
Sports News for 3 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'58"

18:08
New rules for Filipino dairy workers
BODY:
Filipino dairy workers who admit they lied when applying for a visa to work in New Zealand are being given another chance. Immigration New Zealand has been reviewing the past year's visa applications from Filipino nationals after a woman was arrested for fraud.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Philippines, diary
Duration: 5'08"

18:12
NZ-bred horse carries first woman jockey to Melbourne Cup win
BODY:
It's a New Zealand bred horse first and one raised here third in the Melbourne Cup, with Prince of Penzance carrying to victory the first ever woman to win Australasia's most famous race.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Melbourne Cup, horse racing
Duration: 3'42"

18:20
Mental health workers unsurprised by police callouts
BODY:
A union representing health workers says it's not surprised that the police are spending more time dealing with accute mental health patients. The public sector union PSA says mental health remains the poor cousin in the health sector, with delays for appointments and increasing assaults on workers, among the consequences.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: unions, PSA
Duration: 4'45"

18:24
Father of marine conservation dies at 78
BODY:
Scientist Bill Ballantine, who's hailed as the father of marine conservation in this country, has died aged 78. The Northlander was a driving force behind the creation of one of the world's first marine reserves and pushing through laws to give reserves protection more than 40 years ago.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: sea, marine biology
Duration: 2'54"

18:28
Speed limits likely to go up, down in Waikato
BODY:
A speed management project being piloted in Waikato could raise the speed limit on the expressway but cut it on other roads.
Topics:
Regions: Waikato
Tags:
Duration: 3'45"

18:35
Westpac predicts slowing house price rises in Auckland
BODY:
One of the country's biggest banks is signalling a slowdown may already be underway in Auckland's rampant house market.
Topics: business
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: housing
Duration: 4'26"

18:41
Dunedin 'gutted' over no All Blacks parade
BODY:
Solar energy enthusists are rejecting a warning from the Electricity Authority that rapid investment in solar technology with back-up batteries could be an expensive mistake.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: electricity, power, solar energy
Duration: 2'53"

18:43
Investing in solar technology called an expensive mistake
BODY:
Solar energy enthusists are rejecting a warning from the Electricity Authority that rapid investment in solar technology with back-up batteries could be an expensive mistake.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: electricity, power, solar energy
Duration: 4'19"

18:45
Speed of acid ocean hurting organisms surprises scientists
BODY:
US researchers have found the Southern Ocean is acidifying so quickly that key organisms in the food chain will struggle to survive as soon as 2030.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'59"

18:52
Today In Parliament for 3 November 2015 - evening edition
BODY:
Marama Davidson takes Russel Norman's seat on the Green benches. MPs stand in silence in memory of Dr Bruce Gregory (Northern Māori 1980-1993) who died on Thursday. Prime Minister moves motion congratulating All Blacks on winning Rugby World Cup final on Sunday.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party, RWC 2015
Duration: 5'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 3 November 2015
BODY:
In this edition of The Sampler, Jim Pickney reviews new releases by Air member Nicolas Godin, Roots Manuva and Jonathan Bree.
EXTENDED BODY:
This week in The Sampler Jim Pinckney reviews, Nicolas Godin’s homage to Bach, Jonathan Bree’s most potent work yet, and the compelling rhymes of Roots Manuva.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, Nicolas Godin, Jonathan Bree, Roots Manuva, Air, hip hop, Lil Chief Records
Duration: 27'11"

19:35
Counterpoint by Nicolas Godin
BODY:
Jim Pinckney's charmed by Nicolas Godin's intriguing homage to Bach.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jim Pinckney's charmed by Nicolas Godin's intriguing homage to Bach.
Contrepoint from Nicolas Godin, the lesser known half of French pop mavericks Air, is a curious concoction that attempts to create something new from the music of Bach, and those the great composer influenced. The record was inspired after Godin suffered a period of depression and listlessness that left him questioning whether he even wanted to continue making music at all, let alone what sort of music. After watching Bruno Monsainge’s documentaries on Glenn Gould, about the life and work of the Canadian pianist, whose Bach performances and recordings still divide opinion to this day, he refound his passion. Discovering that the home recordings he was making inspired by his immersion in Bach, were drawing a line between the great composer and the likes of Ennio Morricone, Dany Elfman or Michel Colombier - his favourite soundtrack masters, Godin followed his nose to create an album of classically inspired, soundtrack pieces that are consummately accomplished.
Songs played: Clara, Bach Off, Wiederstehen doch den Sünde, Orca, Quei Due, Glenn
Listen to more from The Sampler
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Nicolas Godin, Air, Bach
Duration: 7'34"

19:35
Bleeds by Roots Manuva
BODY:
Jim Pinckney welcomes back the compelling rhymes of Roots Manuva.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jim Pinckney welcomes back the compelling rhymes of Roots Manuva.
Words like pioneer are too easily rattled off these days but in the case of South London hiphop artist Rodney Smith, better known as Roots Manuva, it’s hard to escape. Breaking the mould with his 2001 album Run Come Save Me, he has gone on to set a benchmark for the lyrical end of UK rap, that has rarely been challenged. Bleeds is by some margin, his most condensed and unswerving statement to date, and as ever Smiths seemingly irreverent wordplay takes absorption. and consideration, to fully decode and assimilate. There’s plenty of torment and soul searching but like the gospel music that Smith keeps returning to it’s almost always wrapped up in a sense of transcendence, the belief that things can and will get better, and all is not lost. The message seems to be doing the trick, because the ‘grown man’s vernacular’ and relentlessly inventive rhythms on Bleeds, really are the genuine article.
Songs played: Hard Bastards, Fighting For?, Me Up!, Stepping Hard, Facety 2:11, Don’t Breathe Out, Crying, Cargo
Listen to more from The Sampler
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, hip hop, Roots Manuva
Duration: 10'41"

19:35
A Little Night Music by Jonathan Bree
BODY:
Jim Pinckney reviews the potent new album from Auckland musician Jonathan Bree.
EXTENDED BODY:
Jim Pinckney reviews the potent new album from Auckland musician Jonathan Bree.
A Little Night Music is the title of the second album by Auckland musician Jonathan Bree, and it finds him taking his studiously styled, pop machinations on a slightly sinister, nocturnal journey.
Captivated by Russian ballet scores and Béla Bartók’s re-imagined folk compositions Bree has uprooted himself from the familiarity of his ‘bubblegum and beyond’ approach and stepped into darker, more complex and rewarding territory. It’s immediately apparent from Drones & Satellites, the first full length song, following a short introductory instrumental string piece, just how far he has moved on from his impressive solo debut 2013’s Primrose Path and the legacy of the Brunettes. With his shadowy, star gazing, musical movements and musings, Bree has left the field wide open for his next move. If he manages to continue to push himself, and his art, to such interesting places, it should be quite a spectacle.
Songs played: Prelude, Once It Was Nice, Drones & Satellites, Blur, Murder, There Is Sadness
Listen to more from The Sampler

Topics: music
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: music, music review, Jonathan Bree, Lil' Chief Records
Duration: 9'02"

7:30 The Sampler: A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 The Tuesday Feature: City of Shadows A discussion shedding light on Auckland's hidden world. Characters and stories of sex, drugs, crime and politics are revealed from the shadows of K' Road to the opium dens of Greys Avenue (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys: The Reindeer Tribe
BODY:
Adventurer and equestrian athlete Chloe Phillips-Harris along with friends she met at the Mongol Derby, traveled to the furthest north of Mongolia, on the border with Siberia, to search for the last tribe on Earth which rides reindeer, the Dukha...
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: odysseys, Mongolia, horses, reindeer, eagles.
Duration: 20'28"

20:42
Right Thinking
BODY:
The rationales of individual freedom and personal responsibility with Eric Crampton, head of research at The New Zealand Initiative... when we can't be quite sure what will work, what's our best approach, for instance, with special economic zones...
Topics: politics, economy, life and society, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: individual freedom, personal responsibility, Special Economic Zones
Duration: 17'58"

20:59
Conundrum Clue 3
BODY:
Listen in on Friday night for the answer
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22"

21:59
Conundrum Clue 4
BODY:
Listen in on Friday night for the answer
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 51"

=SHOW NOTES=

NIGHTS on RNZ National
with skipper. Bryan Crump & navigator. Robyn Rockgirl Walker
Tonight's rundown (Tuesday)...
[image:52022:full]
7:12pm OUR OWN ODYSSEYS: THE EAGLE HUNTERS
Last year Bryan spoke to Chloe Phillips-Harris about her adventure to north Mongolia, with the reindeer riding Dukha people. Chloe also visited the Eagle Hunters of Kazakhstan. They hunt wolves with the help of Golden Eagles.
7:30pm The Sampler (music album reviews & music discussion with Jim Pinckney a.k.a. Stinky Jim)
8:12pm Windows on the World (international public radio documentaries) - Myanmar's Bright Young Stars
8:43pm NIGHTS Pundits
roster: Ann Kerwin (Philosophy); Eric Crampton (Right Thinking); Damien Fenton (Military History); Deborah Russell (Feminism); Brian Roper (Left Thinking); Ian Mayes (Eco-Living); Gavin McLean (NZ History); Douglas Pratt (Religion); Shannon Haunui-Thompson (Kai-A-Miro, Māori); & Brian Easton (Economics)
RIGHT THINKING
the rationales of individual freedom and personal responsibility with Eric Crampton, head of research at The New Zealand Initiative... when we can't be quite sure what will work, what's our best approach, for instance, with special economic zones...
8:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 3
9:07pm Tuesday Feature - Smart Talk 2015 - City of Shadows
9:59pm NIGHTS conundrum clue 4
10:17pm Late Edition (a round up of today's RNZ news and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International)
11:07pm The Eleventh Hour [World Music] - The Global Village
... nights' time is the right time...

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection of world music along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (6 of 12, KMUW)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274503

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 03 Nov 2015