Radio New Zealand National. 2015-11-12. 00:00-23:59.

Find out more about this item:
Message us

Rights Information

A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

12 November 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 One in Five (RNZ); 1:05 Discovery (BBC); 2:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 3:05 Bugle Stories byShelley Wilkingon (4of 6, RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ): 5:10 Witness (BBC); 5:45 The Day in Parliament (RNZ)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6.20 and 7.50 Business News
6.26 Rural News
6.48 and 7.45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 12 November 2015
BODY:
The men believed to be the ringleaders of the riot on Christmas Island are flown to a prison in Western Australia. Smashed windows and torched rooms...we detail the extent of the millions of dollars of damage done at the detention centre and Whanganui residents affected by the June floods are the latest to battle EQC... some calling their payouts a joke..
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 34'11"

06:06
Sports News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'10"

06:10
MPs tell own sexual abuse stories as they demand PM apologise
BODY:
Several MPs have revealed in parliament they were have been victims of sexual assault.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: sexual assault
Duration: 3'05"

06:13
Winston Peters decries abrupt resignation of Fiji police chief
BODY:
The New Zealand First leader, Winston Peters, says he's concerned about the the resignation of Fiji's police commissioner and New Zealand and Australia should re-think their stance on Fiji.
Topics: Pacific, politics
Regions:
Tags: Fiji
Duration: 3'26"

06:17
Thousands protest march through Kabul
BODY:
Thousands of people have marched through the streets of Kabul. They've been protesting about the recent abduction and killing of seven civilians from the Hazara ethnic minority in Afghanistan.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Afghanistan
Duration: 2'25"

06:19
Early Business News
BODY:
Our business editor, Gyles Beckford, is in with what's happening in the financial world.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'23"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'14"

06:39
Detained former soldier could be in jail for years
BODY:
The lawyer for a former New Zealand soldier who's in an Australian jail pending deportation, despite never having committed a crime, says his client could be there for years.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australian detention centres
Duration: 3'16"

06:42
Whanganui home owners say EQC payouts leave them out of pocket
BODY:
Whanganui property owners affected by slips in the June floods say unfair EQC rules will leave them tens of thousands of dollars out of pocket.
Topics: housing
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: Whanganui, eqc
Duration: 1'36"

06:50
American Airlines to fly between Auckland and Los Angeles
BODY:
American Airlines and Qantas say the New Zealand-United States aviation market is big enough to accommodate its planned new services between Los Angeles and Auckland.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: American Airlines, Qantas
Duration: 51"

06:51
Aviation expert says NZ's popularity driving airlines' interest
BODY:
An aviation expert says it's not surprising that American Airlines plans to fly to New Zealand, as this country regularly tops the list of places Americans would most like to visit.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Asian Pacific Aviation
Duration: 1'30"

06:52
Returning capital to shareholders not immediate - Infratil
BODY:
The utilities investor, Infratil, says it's leaving the door ajar for returning capital to shareholders, but wants to keep some cash on hand for future purchases.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Infratil
Duration: 1'10"

06:53
Goodman sees property market, economy driving full year profit
BODY:
The property developer, Goodman Property Trust, is confident of delivering a strong full year result, with ongoing strength in the property market and economy.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Goodman Property Trust
Duration: 58"

06:54
RBNZ financial system worries little changed - ANZ Bank
BODY:
An economist says it's possible that rising house prices outside of Auckland may prompt the Reserve Bank to take action to cool them down.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank
Duration: 1'14"

06:56
Low interest rates prompts some reinsurers to take bigger risks
BODY:
The president of one of the world's leading reinsurance companies warns that continued low interest rates are causing some of its competitiors to make risky investments, which might make it diffcult for them to respond to a catastrophic loss.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Gen-Re
Duration: 1'30"

06:58
Morning markets for 12 November 2015
BODY:
Wall Street has a burst of life in a choppy session .. lower oil prices are hurting energy stocks and retailers also knocked by weak results for Macys.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 52"

07:07
Sports News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'59"

07:10
'Extreme risk' New Zealanders removed from Christmas Island
BODY:
Seven men the Australian government holds responsible for this week's riots at the Christmas Island detention centre have been removed from the island and flown to a prison in Perth.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island
Duration: 4'23"

07:15
No NZ rapists or murderers on Christmas Island
BODY:
John Key is continuing to refuse to give specific details of the criminal backgrounds of the New Zealanders incarcerated on Christmas Island.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island
Duration: 3'28"

07:19
'Why doesn't the Prime Minister of New Zealand remember me?'
BODY:
In a seperate case of detention, a former New Zealand soldier who once guarded the Prime Minister in Afghanistan will spend at least another six months in a high security Australian jail in perth.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australian detention centres, Ko Haapu
Duration: 5'17"

07:25
Whanganui property owners fume over EQC payouts
BODY:
Whanganui property owners affected by slips in the June floods say unfair EQC rules will leave them tens of thousands of dollars out of pocket
Topics: housing
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: Whanganu, eqc
Duration: 3'26"

07:28
Otago mine to supply fertiliser
BODY:
The world's largest palm oil producer plans to use fertiliser mined in Otago on its plantations.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Indonesia
Duration: 3'38"

07:36
Aquaponics system wins young scientist big grant
BODY:
The future of New Zealand research was the focus at this year's Prime Minister's Science Prizes, with young scientists and those nurturing them recognised for their work.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: Prime Minister's Science Prizes
Duration: 3'20"

07:39
Fox hits back at Australia's immigration hard man
BODY:
A war of words has broken out between Maori Party Co-leader Marama Fox and hardline Australian Immigration Minister Peter Dutton over the New Zealand detainee issue.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australian detention centres
Duration: 5'03"

07:44
Heat on PM continues over "rapists'' attack on Opposition
BODY:
Green Party co-leader, Metiria Turei led a walk-out women MPs from the House yesterday.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party, Christmas Island
Duration: 4'56"

07:51
Heads roll at English Rugby Union
BODY:
England's rugby coach Stuart Lancaster has fallen on his sword after his team's disastrous performance at the Rugby World Cup.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: England, rugby
Duration: 3'44"

07:54
Govt failing children with special needs
BODY:
The head of the Early Childhood Council Peter Reynolds has delivered a blistering attack on the Education Ministry's lack of support for under-fives with special needs.
EXTENDED BODY:
Head of the Early Childhood Council Peter Reynolds has delivered a blistering attack on the Education Ministry's lack of support for under 5s with special needs.
He told the Education and Science Select Committee inquiry into support for children with autism and dyslexia that thousands of children could be suffering developmental delays because they were not getting enough help.
He said children were waiting too long to be assessed and when they were diagnosed, the amount of specialist help they got was insufficient.
"The problem's right throughout the system, it is a complete failure, unfortunately we've got parents and we've got educators and we've got children who are having to fight for every possible scrap of support they can get."
He said a survey of its members' early childhood services found 80 percent had children who were not getting enough help for their special needs.
Mr Reynolds said that indicated there could be thousands of children who were missing out.
The survey also found children have been punched and kicked and teachers admitted to accident and emergency departments because of a lack of support for children with disabilities.
Related

'It is like factory farming for children'
ECE children speak many languages
Lack of ECE spaces predicted in subdivisions

Topics: politics, education
Regions:
Tags: Early Childhood Council, Peter Reynolds
Duration: 3'33"

08:07
Sports News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'57"

08:11
Whanganui Mayor goes in to bat for homeowners in EQC stoush
BODY:
As we have been reporting this morning owners of 20 Whanganui homes damaged by slips during the June floods say they are being left tens of thousands of dollars out of pocket due to unfair EQC rules.
Topics: housing
Regions: Manawatu
Tags: Whanganui
Duration: 4'34"

08:15
Pacific students' economic disadvantage affecting achievement
BODY:
Financial pressures are being blamed for New Zealand Pacifika students' stagnant achievement at universities and colleges.
Topics: Pacific, education
Regions:
Tags: Pacifika students
Duration: 3'46"

08:19
Australian detention policy becomes political landmine
BODY:
Australia's controversial immigration policy has become a political minefield, both here and across the Tasman.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island, Australian detention centres
Duration: 5'51"

08:25
Families of disabled children battle 'stingy' ACC
BODY:
The ACC is accused of being stingy to families of severely disabled children.
Topics: health, law, politics
Regions:
Tags: ACC
Duration: 3'19"

08:28
Immigration a key talking point in latest candidate debate
BODY:
It was a plan to deport 11 million Mexican immigrants from the United States and build a fence between the two countries which got Republican candidates talking.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, Donald Trump, Republican candidates
Duration: 4'24"

08:33
Markets Update for 12 November 2015
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 51"

08:38
NZ involvement in palm oil industry set to grow
BODY:
New Zealand's connection with the controversial palm oil industry is set to deepen with the world's largest producer set to use fertiliser mined in Otago on its plantations.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Indonesia, palm oil
Duration: 3'19"

08:42
Theft of nearly 100 exam papers - questions being asked
BODY:
A 23-year-old woman has been charged with burglary and will appear in court this morning in relation to a break-in at the University of Otago earlier this week.
Topics: education, crime
Regions: Otago
Tags: exam papers
Duration: 3'17"

08:45
Armed Defender callout - West Auckland
BODY:
Lockdown at Kelston Boys' Hiigh school.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 45"

08:46
Mayor's chief says office good value for money
BODY:
The Christchurch mayor's chief of staff says ratepayers are getting good value for money from the mayor's office which has more than doubled in size under Lianne Dalziel.
Topics: politics
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Lianne Dalziel
Duration: 3'13"

08:50
Plastic Waka finds a new home in Tauranga
BODY:
Tauranga will have a new cultural icon after a local hapu has purchased a giant plastic waka
Topics:
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: plastic waka
Duration: 4'04"

08:54
Update on Armed Defender callout - West Auckland
BODY:
More on the police action near Kelston Boys' Hiigh school.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 41"

08:55
Country's biggest A&P show underway in Christchurch
BODY:
The Canterbury A and P show kicked off yesterday, and is expected to attract around one hundred thousand people by Friday.
Topics: farming
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Canterbury A and P show
Duration: 3'55"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: An Awfully Big Adventure, by Jane Tolerton (4 of 15, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Teachers are the bullies - dyslexic students give testimony
BODY:
Teenagers received a standing ovation from MPs after sharing stories of bulling and mistreatment by teachers because of their learning problems. Parliament's Education Select Committee is hearing submissions on its Inquiry into the identification and support for students with dyslexia, dyspraxia, and autism spectrum disorders in primary and secondary schools. One boy told the committee that his teacher used to throw his work in the bin. Others said they were told they were unteachable and made to feel they were stupid. Nine to Noon speaks to one of those students, along with Guy Pope Mayell from the Dyslexia Foundation - who also addressed the select committee.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: dyslexia, learning, bully, bullies, bullying, select committee
Duration: 15'57"

09:24
Could investigators at last be close to discovering MH370 ?
BODY:
The Australian Transportation Safety Board has begun scouring an area, many aviation experts believe could be the doomed airliner 's final resting place. It follows the publication of precise co-ordinates in a popular aviation magazine, Flightglobal, calculated by pilot and mathematician Captain Simon Hardy.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Australian Transportation Safety Board has begun scouring an area, many aviation experts believe could be the doomed airliner 's final resting place. It follows the publication of precise co-ordinates in a popular aviation magazine, Flightglobal, calculated by pilot and mathematician Captain Simon Hardy.
Malaysian airlines flight MH370 disappeared without a trace - carrying 239 people on board, among them - New Zealanders Paul Weeks and Ximin Wang.
The Boeing 777 lost contact with air traffic control on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing about 40 minutes after take-off then mysteriously veered off course over the South China sea. The disappearance triggered a massive search in the Indian Ocean, first for surface debris, then a far more in-depth search involving planes, radar, mapping, and finally trawling of the seabed.
The only trace so far is a small wing flap that washed up on Reunion Island earlier this year.
Martin Dolan, Chief Commissioner of the Australian Transportation Safety Board and head of the search spoke to Kathryn Ryan
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: MH370, Malaysian Airlines
Duration: 12'33"

09:37
New white paper details extent of gender inequality in NZ
BODY:
The National Council of Women has released a white paper on the current state of inequality in New Zealand. The statistics show that while women achieve 61 percent of tertiary qualifications, they are generally for lower paid industries. The gender pay gap is estimated to be between 11.8 and 14 percent. Only 14 percent of directors on NZX top 100 companies are women. The Council is calling on the government to produce a plan of action to deal with the inequalities, including making the issue a key part of policy and programme design. Nine to Noon speaks to the Council's president, Rae Duff.
Topics: inequality
Regions:
Tags: women, gender inequality
Duration: 9'22"

09:46
Teacher separates science fact from science fiction
BODY:
Tania Lineham is an Invercargill science teacher who became so concerned about a lack of science literacy in her community she decided she had to do something about it. She says social media and cynical marketing means there is huge amount of information out there which looks and sounds real - but isn't. For the last few years she's been teaching students at James Hargest College the skills they need to critically analyse pseudoscience and has just been awarded the Prime Minister's Science Teacher prize for her work.
Topics: science, life and society
Regions: Southland
Tags: pseudoscience, teaching, education
Duration: 6'55"

09:53
UK correspondent, Dame Ann Leslie
BODY:
Political news from the UK.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK.
Duration: 7'47"

10:10
High jinks: Philippe Petit on how to be a daredevil
BODY:
Walking an illegal tightrope between the world's tallest towers might sound unthinkable, but Frenchman Philippe Petit has made a career out of 'cheating the impossible'.
EXTENDED BODY:
Walking an illegal tightrope between the world's tallest towers might sound unthinkable, but Frenchman Philippe Petit has made a career out of 'cheating the impossible'.
Forty-one years ago, Petit walked an illegally-rigged cable that he and his friends had strung between New York's Twin Towers and crossed the space between them eight times over the course of an hour. That 1974 act is the subject of a new Hollywood film, The Walk, which is in cinemas now.
The Twin Towers daredevil has performed nearly 100 high-wire feats in total, and is also a poet, a magician, a street juggler and author. His current project is the Rapa Nui Walk, where he plans to walk on an inclined cable set on Easter Island in homage to the Rapa Nui and their giant stone statues.
Speaking to Nine To Noon this morning, Petit said that it would be "totally impossible" to do a stunt similar to his Twin Towers effort in a major city in the 21st century, but added bad odds had never stopped him before.
"I think everything is possible. Generally speaking, this type of thing would not happen in a big city in the 21st century, yet it is still possible to do the impossible, I am still an advocate of that."
Listen to Kathryn Ryan's interview with Philippe Petit here:
Petit said there were no universal recipes for overcoming a seemingly impossible task, but he was able to "cheat the impossible".
"Basically, the impossible is something that is too big for little human beings, so if we look at a giant wall of granite in front of us, most of us would not be able to attack that wall, they would turn around and be defeated. But if you realise this wall of stone is composed of little grains of sand, you can start digging. So if you take an immense task and if you go one small step at a time, then you forget the immensity of the whole task, and then you go forward, you slowly inch your way through the impossible task."
He said this attitude was something that should be taught in schools.
"We are told to behave and follow the multitude, but we should be encouraged to follow our own calling to shape our destiny. Not to try something twice and say 'oh no, I can't do it', but to keep working on something, because there is always a way to be victorious."
Slowly working through an impossible task might sound easy enough, but it is a different situation when you step out on a wire 415m high, with any failure inevitably leading to certain death.
Despite the danger, Petit said he could only have positive thoughts in his head when he took his first steps out onto the wire.
"This is the price of my survival on the wire. If I were to put my first foot out with doubt in my heart, with trembling in my feet and hands, with question marks all around me, I should not do that step. I should run away and recompose myself. Fear has no room for me on that wire, only majesty and happiness and joie de vivre"
After thousands of hours of practice on the wire, Petit said walking it became deceptively simple, because it was as natural as breathing.
"We naturally breath, and these natural things are not complex, although they can be studied and the actual mechanism and system of walking could be complex. But it has a naturalness that appeals to everybody, except when you look at people on the street, almost nobody knows how to walk, they move their feet in a strange way, not walking fluidly.
"But it's also the most difficult thing in the world, maybe because of its natural simplicity. You have to feel how the cable breathes, you have to breathe in unison with the cable, which I learned from thousands of hours of practising on the wire."
Forty years after the Twin Towers walk, Petit's story has been told in books and documentaries, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt playing him in the new movie. Petit said the latest adaption generally got the details right, even if the filmmakers felt the need to add a few more tiny dramatic moments to his walk.
Petit told Nine to Noon that his plan his walk between the towers began long before they were completed, with his imagination sparked by the first plans for the buildings. But it wasn't the height of the newly-built towers that saw him take on the challenge.
"It was nice that they were the highest towers in the world at that time, but I was actually attracted by the negative space that the Twin Towers were creating in the void. And by venturing into another world of cloud and birds, and to me they were magnificent because of their simplicity and their height, and I got to know them very well as I was preparing my walk."

Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: daredevil, high-wire, Philippe Petit
Duration: 28'15"

10:38
Book review Midnight Sun by Jo Nesbo
BODY:
Reviewed by Graham Beattie, published by Harvill Secker.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'45"

11:11
New technology with Sarah Putt
BODY:
What's up at Yahoo? Google honours Heddy Lamarr and Adult colouring in apps.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12'45"

11:25
Parenting: Wisdom for Dads
BODY:
Hugh Weber started his DudetoDad website as a cry for help from an ordinary "dude" who wanted to be an extraordinary Dad. It has over 100 thousand followers across social media platforms and Hugh Weber's first book Dude to Dad: The First Nine Months was an Amazon bestseller. Wisdom for Dad is a series of helpful tips and advice - and in line with its genesis in social media - each message is 140 characters or less.
EXTENDED BODY:
Hugh Weber started his DudetoDad website as a cry for help from an ordinary "dude" who wanted to be an extraordinary Dad.
It has over 100,000 followers across social media platforms and Hugh Weber's first book Dude to Dad: The First Nine Months was an Amazon bestseller.
Wisdom for Dad is a series of helpful tips and advice - and in line with its genesis in social media - each message is 140 characters or less.
He talks to Kathryn Ryan.

Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: parenting, dads, advice, tweets, Twitter
Duration: 20'48"

11:48
Viewing with Duncan Grieve
BODY:
Duncan has been watching Nathan At Home, 800 words, and looks at 50 years of Days of Our Lives.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 11'43"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:52112:half] no metadata
09:05 The teachers are the bullies - dyslexic students give powerful testimony
Teenagers received a standing ovation from MPs after sharing stories of bullying and mistreatment by teachers because of their learning problems. Parliament's Education Select Committee is hearing submissions on its Inquiry into the identification and support for students with dyslexia, dyspraxia, and autism spectrum disorders in primary and secondary schools. One boy told the committee that his teacher used to throw his work in the bin. Others said they were told they were unteachable and made to feel they were stupid. Nine to Noon speaks to one of those students, along with Guy Pope Mayell from the Dyslexia Foundation - who also addressed the select committee.
09:20 Could investigators at last be close to discovering flight MH370 ?
After 20 months of fruitless searching, the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 could be found in as little as four weeks. The Australian Transportation Safety Board has begun scouring an area, many aviation experts believe could be the doomed airliner 's final resting place. It follows the publication of precise co-ordinates in a popular aviation magazine, Flightglobal, calculated by pilot and mathematician Captain Simon Hardy.
Malaysian airlines flight MH370 disappeared without a trace - carrying 239 people on board, among them - New Zealanders Paul Weeks and Ximin Wang.
The Boeing 777 lost contact with air traffic control on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing about 40 minutes after take-off then mysteriously veered off course over the South China sea. The disappearance triggered a massive search in the Indian Ocean, first for surface debris, then a far more in-depth search involving planes, radar, mapping, and finally trawling of the seabed.
The only trace so far is a small wing flap that washed up on Reunion Island earlier this year.
The head of the search is Martin Dolan - Chief Commissioner of the Australian Transportation Safety Board.
the search area is about 120 thousand square kilometers , roughly the size of New Zealand's North Island
[image:52791:full]
09:30 New white paper details extent of gender inequality in New Zealand
The National Council of Women has released a white paper on the current state of inequality in New Zealand. The statistics show that while women achieve 61 percent of tertiary qualifications, they are generally for lower paid industries. The gender pay gap is estimated to be between 11.8 and 14 percent. Only 14 percent of directors on NZX top 100 companies are women. The Council is calling on the government to produce a plan of action to deal with the inequalities, including making the issue a key part of policy and programme design. Nine to Noon speaks to the Council's president, Rae Duff
09:40 Award winning teacher separates science fact from science fiction
Tania Lineham is an Invercargill science teacher who became so concerned about a lack of science literacy in her community she decided she had to do something about it. She says social media and cynical marketing means there is huge amount of information out there which looks and sounds real - but isn't. For the last few years she's been teaching students at James Hargest College the skills they need to critically analyse pseudoscience and has just been awarded the Prime Minister's Science Teacher prize for her work.
09:45 UK correspondent, Dame Ann Leslie
10:05 High jinks: Philippe Petit on how to be a daredevil
Forty-one years ago, Frenchman, Philippe Petit walked an illegally rigged cable that he and his friends had strung between New York 's twin towers. Over the course of an hour he crossed it eight times. That 1974 act is the subject of a new Hollywood film, The Walk, and is out in cinemas now.
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GR1EmTKAWIw
The Twin Towers daredevil has performed nearly 100 high-wire feats in total, and is also a poet, a magician, a street juggler and author. His most recent project is the Rapa Nui Walk, on an inclined cable set on Easter Island in homage to the Rapa Nui and their giant stone statues known as Moai.
[gallery:1562]
10:35 Book review Midnight Sun by Jo Nesbo
10:45 The Reading
An Awfully Big Adventure by Jane Tolerton
New Zealand World War One veterans tell their stories (Part 4 of 15)
11:05 New technology with Sarah Putt

What's up at Yahoo?
Google honours Heddy Lamarr
Adult colouring in apps

11:25 Parenting: Wisdom for Dads
Hugh Weber started his DudetoDad website as a cry for help from an ordinary "dude" who wanted to be an extraordinary Dad. It has over 100 thousand followers across social media platforms and Hugh Weber's first book Dude to Dad: The First Nine Months was an Amazon bestseller.
Wisdom for Dad is a series of helpful tips and advice - and in line with its genesis in social media - each message is 140 characters or less.
11:45 Viewing with Duncan Grieve
Duncan has been watching Nathan At Home, 800 words, and looks at 50 years of Days of Our Lives
[image:52836:full] no metadata

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including:
12:16 Business News
12:26 Sport
12:34 Rural News
12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
Claims the rule of law has collapsed on Christmas Island and New Zealand is linked to huge Indonesian forest fires.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'13"

12:17
Pace of manufacturing growth eases
BODY:
The pace of growth in the manufacturing sector has eased.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: manufacturing
Duration: 1'21"

12:18
Stride Property's first half profit up, sees strong second half
BODY:
The retail property investor, Stride Property, says its first half profit is up nearly a third on last year and it's expecting further increases in the second half.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Stride Property
Duration: 1'16"

12:20
Collaboration highlighted in KPMG report
BODY:
A number of emerging leaders in the primary sector say better collaboration is needed between industry players..
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: KPMG
Duration: 49"

12:21
NZ air travellers to see cheaper fares
BODY:
An aviation expert says consumers will undoubtedly see cheaper airfares as a result of increasing competition on routes between Auckland and North America
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: American Airlines
Duration: 1'13"

12:23
Midday markets for 12 November 2015
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at First NZ Capital
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'10"

12:24
Business briefs
BODY:
Food prices have fallen, due to milk prices falling to their lowest level in more than seven years.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 30"

12:24
Midday Sports News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
The Australian fast bowler Mitchell Johnson admits they probably underestimated the Black Caps batsman Kane Williamson in the first cricket Test.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'35"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'00"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:09
First Song
BODY:
'Hey Jude' - The Beatles.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'33"

13:18
Gender Neutral Kids Clothing - Rachel Hansen
BODY:
Gendered clothes are part and parcel of a child's upbringing now - and if you're a parent of small children, you'll be only too familiar with the swathes of frilly, sparkly pink and purple clothes on offer for little girls - and the muted blue, grey and green truck and digger tops for boys. Mother of two, Rachel Hansen, was so frustrated by such marketing and stereotypes that she decided to set up a gender-neutral kids clothing company, "Freedom Kids".
Topics: life and society, identity
Regions:
Tags: Freedom Kids, gender-neutral
Duration: 12'56"

13:31
Photography Project - Sakina Ewazi
BODY:
Sakina Ewazi was only five when she and her parents were rescued among 400 others by the Norwegian freighter Tampa from a sinking fishing vessel off Australia's coast. It was their fourth attempt at fleeing Indonesia, each previous boat sank and they'd had to swim for their lives. New Zealand accepted more than 130 Tampa refugees, including Sakina and her parents. Despite being so young, the memories are vivid in her mind. Now a visual arts student, Sakina is drawing on those terrifying childhood experiences for her photography project and telling her story for the first time at AUT's art and design festival.
EXTENDED BODY:
Sakina Ewazi was only five when she and her parents were rescued among 400 others by the Norwegian freighter Tampa from a sinking fishing vessel off Australia's coast.
It was their fourth attempt at fleeing Indonesia, each previous boat sank and they'd had to swim for their lives. New Zealand accepted more than 130 Tampa refugees, including Sakina and her parents.
Despite being so young, the memories are vivid in her mind. Now a visual arts student, Sakina is drawing on those terrifying childhood experiences for her photography project and telling her story for the first time at AUT's art and design festival.
She talks to Jesse Mulligan about her work.
Topics: refugees and migrants, arts
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'56"

13:40
Detector Dogs - Brett Hickman
BODY:
The biosecurity detector dogs and their handlers are celebrating 20 years in the food-and-drug sniffing business today. What started with the purchase of two beagles in 1995 has spread to dozens of dogs perusing airport luggage carousels and ports around the country. They've celebrated with cake at the A and P show in Christchurch today.
Topics: law, history
Regions:
Tags: biosecurity detector dogs
Duration: 5'53"

13:46
Favourite Album
BODY:
'Stone Roses' - Stone Roses, as chosen by Colin Hill.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'01"

14:09
Money - Mary Holm
BODY:
Personal finance columnist and author Mary Holm addresses the question of home ownership. Should you own your own home?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: money, Mary Holm
Duration: 20'46"

14:40
Sam Mannering
BODY:
Auckland's Silo Theatre is putting on a play about the classic cooking duo Hudson and Halls at the Herald Theatre at the moment. Part of the show's run includes a Hudson and Halls dinner experience on the Civic Theatre stage on Saturday night and chef Sam Mannering has been charged with creating a three-course meal of weird and wonderful selections from Hudson and Hall cook books.
Topics: food, arts
Regions:
Tags: Hudson and Halls, Hudson and Hall cook books, theatre
Duration: 8'07"

14:50
Mawera Karetai
BODY:
Mawera Karetai has a weekly cooking column in the Rotorua Daily Post and runs a website espousing the virtues of living off the land.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'21"

15:10
Masterpieces - Karl Maughan
BODY:
In Masterpieces renowned artist Karl Maughan tells us about his favourite New Zealand painting.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: New Zealand paintings, paintings, visual art
Duration: 12'38"

15:20
Expat - Nadeesha Godamunne
BODY:
When Nadeesha Godamunne isn't working as a fashion illustrator for Ralph Lauren, she's capturing the whimsical and stylish characters of New York for her blog, Mokshini.
Topics: arts, media
Regions:
Tags: fashion, visual art, Mokshini, blogs
Duration: 10'21"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 12 November 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'00"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First Song
'Hey Jude' - The Beatles.
1:15 Gender Neutral Kids Clothing - Rachel Hansen
Gendered clothes are part and parcel of a child's upbringing now - and if you're a parent of small children, you'll be only too familiar with the swathes of frilly, sparkly pink and purple clothes on offer for little girls - and the muted blue, grey and green truck and digger tops for boys. Mother of two, Rachel Hansen, was so frustrated by such marketing and stereotypes that she decided to set up a gender-neutral kids clothing company, "Freedom Kids".
[gallery:1565]
1:25 Photography Project - Sakina Ewazi
Sakina Ewazi was only five when she and her parents were rescued among 400 others by the Norwegian freighter Tampa from a sinking fishing vessel off Australia's coast. It was their fourth attempt at fleeing Indonesia, each previous boat sank and they'd had to swim for their lives. New Zealand accepted more than 130 Tampa refugees, including Sakina and her parents. Despite being so young, the memories are vivid in her mind. Now a visual arts student, Sakina is drawing on those terrifying childhood experiences for her photography project and telling her story for the first time at AUT's art and design festival.
1:35 Detector Dogs - Brett Hickman
The biosecurity detector dogs and their handlers are celebrating 20 years in the food-and-drug sniffing business today. What started with the purchase of two beagles in 1995 has spread to dozens of dogs perusing airport luggage carousels and ports around the country. They've celebrated with cake at the A and P show in Christchurch today.
1:40 Favourite Album
Stone Roses - Stone Roses.
2:10 Money - Mary Holm
Personal finance columnist and author Mary Holm addresses the question of home ownership. Should you own your own home?
2:30 Sirocco - Pita Mathias
In today's episode of Sirocco, Peta and her friend Anna take a day trip to Fes, a 1000 year old imperial city, in the train. They've both been warned, but still fall for a typically Moroccan scam.
2:45 Food Guests
Sam Mannering
Auckland's Silo Theatre is putting on a play about the classic cooking duo Hudson and Halls at the Herald Theatre at the moment. Part of the show's run includes a Hudson and Halls dinner experience on the Civic Theatre stage on Saturday night and chef Sam Mannering has been charged with creating a three-course meal of weird and wonderful selections from Hudson and Hall cook books.
Mawera Karetai
Mawera Karetai has a weekly cooking column in the Rotorua DAily Post and runs a website espousing the virtues of living off the land.
3:10 Masterpieces - Karl Maughan
In Masterpieces renowned artist Karl Maughan tells us about his favourite New Zealand painting.
3:25 Expats - Nadeesha Godamunne
When Nadeesha Godamunne isn't working as a fashion illustrator for Ralph Lauren, she's capturing the whimsical and stylish characters of New York for her blog, Mokshini.
3:30 The Mussel Crusher - Katy Gosset
They call it the 'mussel crusher' - a machine that tests the strength of New Zealand mussel shells as part of research to help the local aquaculture industry. Katy Gosset visits the NIWA labs in Christchurch to find out more.
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show
What the world is talking about with Jesse Mulligan, Jim Mora and Zara Potts.

=PLAYLIST=

OPENING SONG:
ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: Hey Jude
COMP: Lennon/McCartney
ALBUM: The Beatles: 1967-1970 (Compilation)
LABEL: Apple
FEATURE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Stone Roses
TITLE: She bangs the drums
COMP: Brown, Squire
ALBUM: Stone Roses
LABEL: Liberation
ARTIST: Stone Roses
TITLE: Made of Stone
COMP: Brown, Squire
ALBUM: Stone Roses
LABEL: Liberation
ARTIST: Stone Roses
TITLE: This is the one
COMP: Brown, Squire
ALBUM: Stone Roses
LABEL: Liberation
ARTIST: Stone Roses
TITLE: I am the resurrection
COMP: Brown, Squire
ALBUM: Stone Roses
LABEL: Liberation
HALFTIME:
ARTIST: The Beatles
TITLE: Penny Lane
COMP: Lennon, McCartney
ALBUM: Magical Mystery Tour
LABEL: Parlophone

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 12 November 2015
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'00"

16:05
The Panel with Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag (Part 1)
BODY:
Topics - Ngaphui leader Sonny Tau has admitted hunting protected kereru and is now facing a charge of conspiring to pervert the course of justice. The politics around the Christmas Island detention centre is heating up. Wanaka resident Quentin Smith talks about his stance against pay and display parking in his town.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'04"

16:06
The Panel with Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag (Part 2)
BODY:
Topics - What makes a suburb a great place to live? We ask Wellington real estate agent Ian Paterson. Joseph Habgood is debating about changing the New Zealand flag this evening in Wellington. We find out what his argument against change is. How do you choose a role model?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'03"

16:10
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'16"

16:12
Sonny Tau pleads guilty to hunting kereru
BODY:
Ngaphui leader Sonny Tau has admitted hunting protected kereru and is now facing a charge of conspiring to pervert the course of justice.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'49"

16:15
Christmas Island
BODY:
The politics around the Christmas Island detention centre is heating up.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'43"

16:30
Small town parking woes
BODY:
Wanaka resident Quentin Smith talks about his stance against pay and display parking in his town.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'02"

16:35
The best suburbs
BODY:
What makes a suburb a great place to live? We ask Wellington real estate agent Ian Paterson.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'11"

16:40
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Brian Edwards and Michelle Boag have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'49"

16:50
Flag debate
BODY:
Joseph Habgood is debating about changing the New Zealand flag this evening in Wellington. We find out what his argument against change is.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'48"

16:58
Role models
BODY:
How do you choose a role model?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 54"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand's two-hour news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:08
Sonny Tau changes plea on hunting kereru
BODY:
Embattled Ngapuhi leader Raniera Sonny Tau has pleaded guilty to hunting an endangered bird. Mr Tau had previously pleaded not guilty to the charge but changed that plea today in the Auckland District Court. Maori issues correspondent Mihingarangi Forbes reports.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Sonny Tau, endangered birds
Duration: 4'15"

17:14
Phillip Smith argues in court he's being treated unfairly
BODY:
The man accused of leaving prison and fleeing to Brazil has given his own evidence about what he says is prejudicial coverage. Phillip John Smith has taken issue with stories in the media, as well as the way the government announced an inquiry.
Topics: crime, media
Regions:
Tags: Phillip John Smith
Duration: 2'11"

17:15
Xmas Island detainees say they've been left without food, water
BODY:
Families and lawyers of Christmas Island detainees say they've been crammed into holding cells and left without enough food or water. In the aftermath of the riots, five New Zealanders are being blamed as ring leaders along with two other men, a Tongan and an Afghan.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island, prisoners, Australia
Duration: 4'06"

17:18
Mother pleads for news of detainee son
BODY:
The mother of one of the New Zealand-born detainees says she is desparate for information about where her son is and whether he's all right.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island, prisoners, Australia
Duration: 2'42"

17:22
NZ inextricably linked to Indonesian fires - Greenpeace
BODY:
Greenpeace says New Zealand is inextricably linked to the Indonesian land-clearing fires that are sending a dense haze across vast expanses of South-East Asia and destroying wildlife habitats.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Greenpeace, Indonesian fires
Duration: 3'29"

17:26
Videoed Napier arrest sparks complaint against police
BODY:
A complaint has been laid against police over an arrest in Napier which was videoed and posted on the internet. The 40 second video appears to show a police officer punching a man in the head as he tries to restrain him at a fast-food outlet carpark in Napier.
Topics:
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Napier Police
Duration: 3'01"

17:35
Evening Business for 12 November 2015
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'00"

17:40
Sex predator jailed for preying on girls via facebook
BODY:
A 21 year old sex predator who befriended young, naive, trusting girls through social media has been jailed for six years.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Karl Sheridan Salmon
Duration: 3'27"

17:47
Law Student takes Government climate change policy to court
BODY:
A law student in the Waikato is going to court to challenge the Government's policy on climate change. Sarah Thomson is seeking a judicial review of the greenhouse gas emission targets the government will commit to at a UN conference in Paris - calling them, unreasonable and irrational.
Topics: politics, environment, climate
Regions:
Tags: climate change, greenhouse gas emission targets
Duration: 3'37"

17:49
Jury watches video interview with murder accuse
BODY:
A Wellington jury today watched a video interview of a man accused of murder describing his wife as a manipulative woman who didn't know how to keep her legs shut. Michael Preston denies fatally stabbing his estranged wife Mei Fan in November 2013. Court reporter Ann Marie May has been at the High Court in Wellington .
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Michael Preston
Duration: 2'49"

17:51
Waitangi Tribunal has grants urgent hearing
BODY:
The Waitangi Tribunal has granted an urgent hearing for a claim alleging the Crown has failed to reduce the number of Māori in prison and their high reoffending rates.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Waitangi Tribunal, prisoners
Duration: 3'16"

17:53
Serco suspends workers in riot's aftermath
BODY:
Serco's management of the Christmas Island detention centre is being investigated and three of its workers have been suspended. The Goverment says it's clear there's been a failing. The ABC political reporter Stephanie Anderson joins us now from Canberra.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Christmas Island detention centre, Serco
Duration: 2'19"

17:54
Greens want 'supermarket referee'
BODY:
A Green Party Member's Bill seeking to establish a supermarket referee to adjudicate between big supermarket chains and suppliers was one of four bills pulled out of the ballot today.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party
Duration: 4'05"

18:00
Checkpoint Top Stories for Thursday 12 November 2015
BODY:
Sonny Tau changes plea on hunting kereru, Phillip Smith argues in court he's being treated unfairly, Xmas Island detainees say they've been left without food, water, Mother pleads for news of detainee son, NZ inextricably linked to Indonesian fires - Greenpeace, Videoed Napier arrest sparks complaint against police, Sex predator jailed for preying on girls via facebook, Law Student takes Government climate change policy to court, Jury watches video interview with murder accuse.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 29'59"

18:08
Sports News for 12 November 2015
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'01"

18:10
John Key says he won't be apologising
BODY:
The Prime Minister remains unapologetic for claiming in Parliament Labour was "backing the rapists" on Australia's Christmas Island detention centre. Demelza Leslie. reports.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: John Key, Christmas Island detention centre
Duration: 3'29"

18:15
Mita Harris gets behind Sonny Tau despite kereru hunting
BODY:
A Northland conservationist has had a change of heart over Sonny Tau, who today changed his plea to guilty of hunting endangered kereru.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Sonny Tau, endangered kereru, endangered birds
Duration: 3'19"

18:20
Forest fires ease with rain
BODY:
The pervasive smoke from fires set to clear land for palm oil planting has abated a little in Indonesia in the face of rain. This comes as a New Zealand link to palm oil was today revealed by RNZ News - the world's largest producer of palm oil, Felda Global Ventures, is planning to use fertiliser mined in Otago on its plantations. Jewel Topsfield is Fairfax Media's correspondent in Jakarta.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Indonesia, Indonesia Fires, Felda Global Ventures
Duration: 3'53"

18:27
College football team tips out university head
BODY:
A boycott by a college football team in the United States has led to the resignation of the president of a major state university.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Ferguson riots, Ferguson, USA
Duration: 4'13"

18:40
Romance across ethnic lines isolates young Asians
BODY:
Young Asians in Auckland who hook up romantically across ethnic lines often become isolated and confused, especially if things turn abusive, researchers from the University of Auckland have found.
Topics: life and society
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'58"

18:46
Fiji watcher says choice of new police commissioner crucial
BODY:
The sudden departure of Fiji's police commissioner has highlighted ongoing tension between the country's military and police. South African Ben Groenewald quit suddenly, and will be replaced by a senior military officer until a replacement is found within months.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Fiji, Fiji police commissioner
Duration: 4'19"

18:48
Drone and plane crash inevitable
BODY:
An aviation writer says a crash between an airliner and a drone is inevitable as the machines become more and more accessible.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: drones
Duration: 3'07"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 12 November 2015 - evening edition
BODY:
Labour and the Speaker disagree on what is and is not considered unparliamentary language; Government Ministers face questions from Opposition MPs about its record on sexual abuse; Commerce Committee holds Annual Review of Crown Fibre Holdings.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'08"

18:55
Otago research explains why Med dried up 5.6 million years ago
BODY:
An international team led by the Otago University believes it's solved the mystery of why the Mediterranean Sea dried up 5 point 6 million years ago.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: Mediterranean Sea
Duration: 3'29"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

Entertainment and information, including: 7:30 At the Movies

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies for 12 November 2015
BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris looks at three films dominated by women - the documentary 'He Named Me Malala', about a Nobel Peace Prize-winning teenage activist, the true-life drama 'Freeheld', about a dying lesbian cop's fight for justice, and even 'Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse', written by three women.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'23"

7:30 At the Movies with Simon Morris: Current film releases and film related topics (RNZ) 8:13 Windows on the World: International public radio features and documentaries 9:06 Our Changing World

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

21:02
Top science prize for myth-busting bone research team
BODY:
The 2015 Prime Minister's Science Prize goes to osteoporosis researchers Ian Reid, Mark Bolland and Andrew Grey. Ian Reid also won the Rutherford Medal and Liley Medal
EXTENDED BODY:
Bone health scientists at the University of Auckland have been awarded the $500,000 Prime Minister’s Science Prize for research that shows that calcium and Vitamin D supplements are not beneficial, and can even cause harm.
Distinguished professor Ian Reid and associate professors Mark Bolland and Andrew Grey, who are all at Auckland University’s School of Medicine, have demonstrated that the supplements are ineffective in treating or preventing osteoporosis, and that taking calcium increases the risk of heart attacks in older people by as much as 30 per cent.
Professor Reid says many people believe that calcium is good for their bones, but that turns out to be a medical myth.
“We didn’t set out to be myth busters,” he says. “The key trial, the Auckland Calcium Study, which triggered our scepticism in this area, I designed with a view to prove once and for all the benefits of calcium on the skeleton and elsewhere … but what we found was quite the opposite.”
Following the Auckland study, Mark Bolland led a project that analysed data from several other clinical trials of calcium supplements, involving thousands of people, which confirmed that the supplements have no beneficial effects, but increase the risk of heart attack and cause several other side effects.
In every trial there’s a side effect that outweighs the benefit you get. In Ian’s trial, there were actually more women who had hip fractures and heart attacks than benefited from taking calcium. There’s an increased risk of kidney stones in another trail, and in another one people were admitted to hospital suffering from stomach complaints, and that was more common than preventing fractures. So when you go through and systematically review the evidence, the risks of calcium supplements in all trials, either individually or collectively, outweigh the benefits from them.

The findings prompted a 70 per cent reduction of calcium supplement prescriptions in New Zealand, which translates to savings of $1.5 million a year. Professor Reid says the response from the medical professions has been varied.
“Cardiologists know that there is calcium deposited in the arteries of their patients who have heart attacks, so they are not particularly surprised. Likewise, doctors who look after patients with kidney disease are very conscious of calcium deposition in arteries as the cause of death of many patients on dialysis.
“Within the bone community, most of us have been reared on the idea that calcium is the cause and cure of osteoporosis and it’s taken people a bit longer to come to terms with this information.”
The team found similar results for Vitamin D supplements, which are also widely used to treat bone disorders. Many studies have found associations between low Vitamin D levels and a wide range of conditions, including depression, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Some have inferred that the low Vitamin D levels cause the medical conditions, but Professor Reid says Vitamin D deficiency is a consequence rather than a cause, because when people are unwell, they spend less time in the sun, which is essential for the body to produce its own Vitamin D.
“Those conditions may be associated with low levels, but giving people extra Vitamin D does not prevent those particular problems.”
The exception, he says, are frail or chronically ill people who stay mostly indoors. “Modest supplementation in hospitals and rest homes remains important to prevent the severe demineralisation of bones that happens with very low Vitamin D levels.”
Osteoporosis remains a risk for post-menopausal women and older men, but the team says the role of calcium in preventing or diminishing bone loss needs to be reviewed.
Most international organisations that provide advice to the public have backed off from endorsements of calcium supplements. Professor Reid says the factors that predict a person’s risk of developing osteoporosis include age, bone density, body weight, smoking and alcohol consumption.
“Perhaps the single most important public health message in terms of osteoporosis prevention is not to be too thin, particularly for women, and that applies from puberty.”
He says post-menopausal women should get a bone density test around the age of 65, and if the results indicate an issue with bone loss or fracture risk, they should consider taking medication to prevent further bone loss. For men he recommends the same, albeit about a decade later.
The team is now investigating why calcium supplements cause heart attacks and doing more research aimed at developing drugs to prevent osteoporosis. They started a trial of people in their 50s and 60s who have an intermediate risk of bone fracture. “They don’t actually have osteoporosis yet, but their bone densities are heading into that direction. We want to see if we can maintain their bone densities and prevent fractures over a 10 to 15 year period.
“Waiting until you’ve got osteoporosis and had fractures is a very short-sighted way of dealing with what is becoming almost a pandemic problem affecting more than 50 per cent of older women."
Professor Reid, who has been researching bone diseases since the 1980s, has also won the Rutherford Medal and the Liley Medal.
Other prize winners are:
The Prime Minister’s 2015 MacDiarmid Emerging Scientist goes to Alex Taylor from the University of Auckland for his work on the cognitive and problem-solving abilities of birds, particularly New Caledonian crows and kea.
The Prime Minister’s 2015 Science Teacher Prize has been won by Tania Lineham who leads the science department at James Hargest College in Invercargill.
The Prime Minister’s 2015 Future Scientist Prize has been won by 18-year-old, Georgia Lala from Auckland’s Diocesan School for Girls for the development of an innovative aquaponics system for growing edible plants indoors.
The Prime Minister’s 2015 Science Media Communication Prize has been presented to Ian Griffin, director of the Otago Museum and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Otago’s Department of Physics.
Topics: science, health
Regions:
Tags: bone health, University of Auckland, science honours, Prime Minister's Science Prize, osteoporosis, endocrinology, Liley Medal, Rutherford medal
Duration: 25'34"

21:03
Smart birds net researcher PM's Emerging Scientist Prize
BODY:
Research into intelligence in New Caledonian crows has won Alex Taylor the 2015 Prime Minister's MacDiarmid Emerging Scientist Prize
EXTENDED BODY:
Working with animals and children is usually a sure recipe for chaos, but for University of Auckland cognitive biologist Alex Taylor it has led to the $200,000 Prime Minister’s MacDiarmid Emerging Scientist Prize.
The 32-year-old is fascinated with one of the greatest mysteries in biology and psychology – the evolution of intelligence. His focus is on trying to understand how humans think differently from the rest of the animal kingdom by studying the cognitive and problem-solving abilities of birds, particularly New Caledonian crows and kea.
Birds are separated from us by millions of years of evolution, but Dr Taylor says that evolutionary distance provides a great way of uncovering what kind of processes have developed, and whether evolution has “carved their minds in the same way as ours to get the same thought processes”.
“We are beginning to realise that birds are feathered apes, rather than being birdbrains.”
Dr Taylor works with New Caledonian crows because they are known for their skill in using and making tools, something usually associated only with humans and apes.
"It’s amazing to see this level of technology in a bird species. This obviously begs the question of what’s going through their mind that allows them to create these behaviours.”
To study just how smart the birds are, he gives them problems to solve and analyses how they tackle the task. Recently, he has also started working with young children to compare their cognitive skills and learning to those processes in the birds.
Essentially we are going to be giving children and crows identical tasks and we’re looking to see what the children do well at, what the crows do well at, do they make the same kinds of mistakes. That’s going to allow us to look for similarities.

As part of the project, he is also working with adults and expects that the results may knock us off our perceived evolutionary perch.
“Humans like to think of themselves as being the top of the tree and very smart, but when it comes to a lot of problems involving causality we actually tend to do really poorly.”
He says chimpanzees, for example, can remember up to 16 numbers that are flashed at them in the right order. “Their working memory is much better than ours.”
One of the challenges for cognitive biologists is to figure out whether intelligence evolved in a linear progression or whether it is a more modular process across the animal kingdom, with some species, including us, developing certain smarts.
If we can map out how the crows are thinking, it might give us an understanding of how we were thinking two million years ago. You can’t rerun history. We have amazing artifacts, including hand axes and bone tools, but we don’t have any idea of how our ancestors were thinking.

He says there is an open debate in the research community between people who prefer to think of different kinds of intelligence, for example social or technical intelligence, and those who favour the notion of a general mechanism behind smart behaviour.
“It’s the idea that species that live in large groups - ourselves, chimps, hyenas for example - they should have quite sophisticated social intelligence for dealing with each other, thinking about what each other is thinking, cooperating with each other. But there is this idea also that there are the more technical problems that requite you to be smart.”
The challenges of getting food from places that are hard to access, of navigating efficiently and making good foraging decisions all exert selective pressures that could lead to the evolution of intelligence, he says.
The research results so far suggest that there are many different types of intelligence.
“We’ve seen the crows solve some problems and fail at others. It’s not the case that they are just generally smart. What we seem to be seeing is that they are particularly smart with particular types of problems. When it comes to social problems, cooperating and maybe a sense of fairness, the crows don’t have these kinds of social smarts.”
Dr Taylor says he will put his prize money towards testing the cognitive skills of one of our smartest birds, the kea.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: birds, crows, intelligence, cognition
Duration: 13'01"

21:06
'Smart' glove
BODY:
The prototype of a haptic feedback glove is being used to control a flight simulator but could have future use in physiotherapy
EXTENDED BODY:
AUT University in Auckland recently hosted a public symposium on wearable technologies and smart textiles. The focus was on nano-fibre applications, responsive textiles and integrated electronics that can be worn on the body as garments. Run by their Textile and Design Lab, the programme included presenters from around the world as well as local researchers and students.
Jacques Foottit studies creative technologies at AUT. He spent his Honours year developing a Haptic Feedback Glove designed to respond to the user’s sense of touch and movement. While he eventually hopes to develop it into a therapeutic tool for physiotherapists, at the prototype stage he’s using it with a flight simulator to demonstrate the possibilities and to invite public response.
"I thought 'what if we could create this childhood experience where you imagine your hand as a plane but instead of it as pure imagination, you’re seeing it come to life in the computer'”.

Jacques says the project began out of a general interest in how humans interact with computers and in particular, how virtual reality technology might develop in response. It was a short step from there to thinking about developing a glove that might allow users to enter and more naturally interact with a virtual world.
The Haptic Feedback Glove on display at the symposium looks like a white, knitted glove with a printed circuit board the size and weight of a large deck of cards on the back of the hand. Initial Measurement Units are stitched into the digits of the glove to respond to finger flexing and may one day allow a therapist to capture motion information from the hand’s movements. 3D printing allows a glove to potentially be made as a custom fit for its user.
Once turned on, the glove provides an interface with flight simulator software. On screen, a futuristic aircraft flies over a landscape, encountering other, hostile aircraft as it does so. Moving the arm forward and back controls the aircraft’s velocity while the orientation of the hand directs the movement. By tucking the thumb under the palm of the hand the user can fire missiles while a slight movement of the fingers operates the guns.
This glove is the second Jacques has built. The prototype, which was developed using existing, repurposed technologies, was frequently taken out of the design lab and shown to the public to both expose its limitations and to obtain feedback on how it might be improved.
"Interestingly, one of the major things people like about (the glove) is the haptic feedback. A lot of the technology I’ve seen out there does everything I’ve done but without haptic feedback. So to hear people say 'it was good and then it started vibrating' was really great…really encouraging."

The limitations identified included functionality as well as user comfort. The second version is lighter and more robust as well as wireless and battery-powered. The portability of the glove means it can be used with mobile devices, potentially allowing a patient to exercise and receive feedback on their progress in their own home or at their place of work.
For the next stage of his study, Jacques plans to refine the glove further, working closely with physiotherapists to find a specific application for the glove that relates to hand rehabilitation.
‘The conversation we’ve had so far is around the potential for it being used…to help the patient to do the exercises in a more encouraging manner. Whether that be having a game which they can play so it’s more fun or some other way I’m not sure.’
"The main step is actually getting the technology into the physiotherapist’s hands so they can see it and go 'Oh I have an idea about how this could be useful for my patient'."

Topics: science, technology
Regions:
Tags: gaming, wearable technology, smart textiles, haptic feedback, glove
Duration: 13'11"

21:20
Crushing mussels, crunching data
BODY:
They call it the 'mussel crusher', a machine developed by NIWA to test the strength of New Zealand mussel shells and help the local aquaculture industry
EXTENDED BODY:
They call it the Mussel Crusher. But the machine designed by staff at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research actually does much more. By applying and then measuring pressure to the shell, it may give mussel farmers a useful insight into the condition of different shellfish around the country.
NIWA scientist, Dr Jeanie Stenton-Dozey, says frozen mussel samples come to the team every two months from three locations: the Firth of Thames, the Marlborough Sounds and Big Glory Bay on Stewart Island. The samples are in three sizes: “babies”, full grown mussels and what Dr Stenton-Dozey likes to call “the teenagers”. But she says shell strength is just one of numerous measurements taken in a bid to better understand the environmental factors that affect mussel growth. Other data include the length, height and weight of the shells as well as the mussel body condition and the state of the reproductive organs.
“Over time we can see seasonally how the mussel condition changes, and we can see that spatially through New Zealand from the North all the way to the South.”

Industry Driven Research
Jeanie Stenton-Dozey says the three year project was prompted by a bad season for mussels in the Firth of Thames in 2011. She believes environmental factors were the predominant reason for the poor mussel condition.
“So, what we’re trying to do in this project is find that link between mussel condition and environmental variability.” She says the study is funded by a core research grant from the Ministry for Primary Industries and is aimed at helping the aquaculture industry. Dr Stenton-Dozey says much of her core-funded work is applied research that needs to tackle issues of concern to mussel farmers.
“We have to use the funds so that industry can grow and become more efficient and benefit from the research we are doing.”
The Right Mussels for the Job
Jeanie Stenton-Dozey says the information collected should help farmers make better decisions about how to process their mussels and, in particular, to decide the right use for different mussels. She says part of what she is looking at in the body tissue are biochemical elements such as fatty acid and amino acid profiles. These could show that particular mussels would be suitable for use in the nutraceutical industry.
“Most of that is for putting into capsules for human consumption for treating arthritis. It’s also used even in dog medication these days and it’s seen to have many health benefits.”

She says if the study succeeds in finding a relationship between mussel condition and environmental variability, the scientists will have established a predictive tool.
“To be able to let the farmers know that 'Look, the conditions are possibly deteriorating. You might need to consider other markets for your products other than human consumption because the mussels won’t have so much flesh in them'”. She says that will enable farmers to better manage their stocks.
Aided by El Nino
Dr Stenton-Dozey says she expects that the El Nino climate conditions predicted this year may have an impact on the study. She says changes in water temperature have an influence on phytoplankton production which is the food of mussels and that will therefore influence the mussels themselves. She thinks this may result in an environmental condition that shows up in the data.
“If this El Nino is as severe as they predict, I’m sure we’re going to find something which, in a way, is fortuitous because then we’re getting a very strong environmental signal which only comes every seven years.”
However, she says, if the El Nino effect is not as strong as predicted, the team may have to wait two years to establish any clear links between the state of the mussels and changing environmental conditions.
Topics: science, climate, technology, farming, food
Regions:
Tags: mussels, aquaculture, NIWA, Ministry for Primary Industries, shellfish
Duration: 12'12"

9:06 Our Changing World: Science and environment news from NZ and the world (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:10
The Flash Measure
BODY:
A new method is being proposed to calculate cosmological distance via bursts of energy also known as fast radio bursts. Dr. Kiyoshi Masui is a post-doc researcher in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: cosmology, universe, how big is space
Duration: 20'07"

20:35
The Cultural Ambassadors - Jamaican Music
BODY:
Placing the needle on the one drop of riddim, rocksteady, ska and roots and culture with deejay and toaster Miles Buckingham. Tonight, Lee 'Scratch' Perry and the Black Ark.
Topics: music, history
Regions:
Tags: Jamaica, reggae, dub, Lee Perry
Duration: 23'14"

20:59
Conundrum Clue 7
BODY:
Conundrum Clue 7.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 12"

21:59
Conundrum Clue 8
BODY:
Listen in tommorrow night for the answer.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 42"

=SHOW NOTES=

NIGHTS on RNZ National
with skipper. Bryan Crump & navigator. Robyn Rockgirl Walker
On the show tonight (Thursday)...

7:12 THE FLASH MEASURE
a new method is being proposed to calculate cosmological distance via bursts of energy also known as fast radio bursts - with Dr. Kiyoshi Masui, post-doc researcher in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia...

7:35 At the Movies
> movie reviews and film industry news with Simon Morris
8:12 Windows on the World - Puerto Rico: The Have Nots and the Have Yachts
> international public radio documentaries
[image:52628:full]
8:43 The Cultural Ambassadors - JAMAICAN MUSIC
placing the needle on the one drop of riddim, rocksteady, ska and roots and culture with deejay and toaster Miles Buckingham... Lee 'Scratch' Perry & the Black Ark

roster: Kate Mead (Contemporary Classical Music); Adrian Kinnaird (Comics & Graphic Novels); Miles Buckingham (Jamaican Music); Cliff Fell (Poetry); Kirsten Zemke (Hip Hop); Andrew Todd (Video Games); Fergus Barrowman (Jazz); Leilani Unasa (Pasifika); Paul Berrington (Electronic Music); & Chris Jannides (Dance)

8:59 conundrum clue 7
9:07 Our Changing World
> science, environment and medical research in New Zealand labs and out in the field
9:59 conundrum clue 8
10:17 Late Edition
> a round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 The Eleventh Hour: Music 101 pocket edition
> a condensed version of RNZ National's Music 101 with Emma Smith
... nights' time is the right time...

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

Radio New Zealand news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from Radio New Zealand National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on NZ (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274512

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits RNZ Collection
Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 12 Nov 2015

We use cookies to help us understand how you use our site, and make your experience better. To find out more read our privacy policy.

Whakamahia ai mātou ngā pihikete ki te rapu māramatanga ki te āhua o tō whakamahi i tēnei paetukutuku, ki te whakapai hoki i tō whai wāhi mai. Ki te rapu kōrero anō pānuitia te kaupapahere tūmataiti.

Accept