Radio New Zealand National. 2015-12-20. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of Radio New Zealand National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

20 December 2015

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 History Repeated (RNZ); 1:05 Our Changing World (RNZ); 2:05 Spiritual Outlook (RNZ); 2:35 Hymns on Sunday; 3:05 Antarctic Souvenir, by J Edward Brown (RNZ); 3:30 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi (RNZ); 4:30 Science in Action (BBC); 5:10 Go Ahead Caller; 5:45 NZ Society (RNZ)

===6:08 AM. | Storytime===
=DESCRIPTION=

Shining Stars, by Philippa Werry, told by Madeleine Sami; Christmas Caravan, by Jennifer Beck, told by Jeremy Randerson; Slinki Malinki's Christmas Crackers, by Lynley Dodd, told by Miranda Harcourt; Christmas Capers, by Willie Davis, told by Willie Davis; Biggest Christmas Tree in the World, by Ruth Corrin, told by Prue Langbein; Piggity Wiggity Jiggity Jig and the Christmas Baby, by Diana Neild, told by Peter Land; Two Cans of Corned Beef & a Manulele in a Mango Tree, by Sarona Aiono-Iosefa, St Anne's; Sam, Max, Harold & Jane Roberts meet the Mad Surgeon, by Roger Hall, told by Bruce Phillips

===7:08 AM. | Sunday Morning===
=DESCRIPTION=

A fresh attitude on current affairs, the news behind the news, documentaries, sport from the outfield, music and including:
7:43 The Year in Parliament: A review of the past 12 months in the house (RNZ)
8:10 Insight: An award-winning documentary programme providing comprehensive coverage of national and international current affairs (RNZ)
9:06 Mediawatch: Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:10
Auckland City Missioner calls for support
BODY:
This week we heard that the child poverty figures had increased steadily over the last decade, and this has also been reflected in the number of parcels the Auckland City Mission has been handing out. A third of families requiring assistance are asking for the first time. Auckland City Missioner Dame Diane Robertson says it is also a crucial time of year for the mission because the organisation itself is under pressure.
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Duration: 9'49"

07:20
Blurring of the line between PNG and Indonesia
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Papua New Guinea communities along the border with Indonesia say growing links with the other side are inevitable.
Topics: Pacific
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Tags: PNG, West Papua, Indonesia
Duration: 5'17"

07:25
New Zealand academic to deliver prestigious speech
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An outspoken academic for the rights of sexual and gender minorities will be the first New Zealand social work scholar to deliver the prestigious Eileen Younghusband Memorial Lecture at next year's World Social Work Conference in Korea.
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Duration: 8'08"

07:30
The Year In Parliament for 20 December 2015
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What a difference one MP makes - Mike Sabin and Peter Dunne and the year in a House divided.
Topics: politics
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Duration: 14'57"

07:51
Report from the World Darts Championship
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Are we living in the golden age of darts? You look at the crowds, the cheering, the dressing up, the dramatic tension. It's a far cry from a quiet game over a pint in the pub or a darts board in the garage. So what is the appeal, and why it has become so huge?
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Tags: darts, World Darts Championship 2015
Duration: 7'45"

08:12
Insight for 20 December 2015 - More Pay for Living in Auckland?
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Elizabeth Brown weighs up the pros and cons of extra payments to make up for high living costs in Auckland
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Russell Anderson is a first year PE teacher working at a high school in Auckland, but he doesn't think he can afford to live in the city for long.
Despite the fact he's on a salary, he's giving up his flat for the summer and heading back to his hometown in Southland to earn extra money working on a farm, just so he can afford to return to Auckland next year.
Listen to Insight - More Pay for Living in Auckland?
He loves his job and city life, but knows he will have to leave both in the next few years if he is to ever going to get ahead.
"Here, I'm paying for a fortnight for rent about $600 which is half my pay," he says.
"Then, on top of that is water, which you don't have to pay for anywhere else in New Zealand apart from Auckland, and then there's power on top of that, internet, food and living.
"Basically at the end of my fortnight's pay I maybe have $5 left, whereas if I was working in the country where I'm from - and I've got a friend who's working in the country who I was talking to the other day - she saves roughly about $600 a pay which is about what I pay for rent."
If Mr Anderson lived and worked as a teacher in London, the UK system would provide him with extra allowances to help cover the much higher costs he would face living in the big city.
In 1974, the British government formally introduced what is known as the London weighting - an extra allowance paid to public sector workers like nurses, university staff, police and teachers to offset the high costs of living in the country's capital and to help with recruitment and retention.
It is worth anywhere between a few hundred pounds, to £6000.
With the cost of housing in Auckland now more expensive than it is in London, teachers and principals are beginning to agitate for a similar New Zealand scheme.
A possible Auckland weighting was a hot topic of debate at the Post Primary Teachers' Association (PPTA) conference in Wellington this year. Teachers were saying they could no longer afford to buy houses in Auckland and it was subsequently becoming harder to find teachers to fill new jobs in the city's growing schools.
PPTA President Angela Roberts agrees housing affordability in Auckland is causing growing frustration.
"It doesn't matter whether you're a nurse or a teacher or a cop," she says. "I think it's fair to be able to expect to be able to live in the community that you serve."
The Auckland Primary Principals' Association is in no doubt skyrocketing house prices in Auckland, coupled with long commutes and high travel costs, are causing staffing problems, and it's calling for an Auckland allowance to be considered.
"What we're seeing over time is roughly 50 percent of the teachers who are leaving schools are also leaving Auckland," says Association President Frances Nelson.
"They are going to get jobs where housing is more affordable, the lifestyle is more pleasant, the travel times are not the same, but the money is."
The pressure is set to build
Professor Paul Spoonley, the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Massey University's College of Humanities and Social Sciences, says the public sector is locating more people in Auckland and he believes it's inevitable that pressure will fall on the government and employers to find ways of incentivising people to move there.
For Dr Spoonley, it's a question of fairness. "Given that you might be living in Whangarei and you're earning the same as someone in Auckland but your costs are so much cheaper then it does feel a bit unfair, and I think there has to be some way for employers, whether in the public or private sector, to recruit people into Auckland and to recognise that the cost of living in Auckland is so much higher."
Independent economist Shamubeel Eaqub also predicts demands for an Auckland weighting or a targeted regional payment will gather pace, but what's really needed is a long-term fix for Auckland's housing crisis and transport problems, he says.
Unions don't back an Auckland weighting
In Britain, the public sector union, Unison, has actively campaigned for increases to London allowances, with its members even taking strike action, but in New Zealand trade unions are not keen to promote an Auckland allowance.
Public Service Association National Secretary Erin Polaczuk says while wages in the public sector have risen just 1.2 percent in the past year, an Auckland weighting is not the answer.
"More money across the board is what is needed. We're worried that New Zealand has a low wage economy and we think everyone needs a pay rise, actually, not just Aucklanders."

The PPTA's Angela Roberts say while some teachers may want a blanket Auckland allowance, other options, such as providing school housing, should be looked at to take the sting out of the Auckland housing market for teachers.

The Nurse Organisation union would be reluctant to push for an Auckland loading for its members, saying nurses have the same terms and conditions across all District Health Boards and they would not want to see that change.
And the Council of Trade Unions warns putting more money in the pockets of Aucklanders is not the way to address the city's overheated housing market, and workers outside of Auckland could end up paying the price.
What about the private sector?
In the UK, it is widely accepted that private sector employers pay a London premium.
In New Zealand, there is no information on whether employers are already paying some sort of unofficial Auckland weighting, or whether people are demanding a special Auckland payment when they go for a job. But in terms of wage and salary growth in Auckland, there is nothing to suggest this is happening.
Christian has just moved to Auckland from Hamilton to take a job in a private company in the inner city.
He is living for free in the garage at a friend's place but is looking for a room in a flat for between $200 $250 a week - a far cry from the $130 a week he paid in Hamilton - and that included power and internet.
Christian feels employers need to consider the extra expenses workers face when they live in Auckland.
"I think the biggest thing that I'm hearing is that there are some people, some of my friends are choosing to take jobs in other places because it's expensive to live here. And then I have friends as well who live in Auckland currently who want to leave and perhaps go to ...Wellington."

According to the head of the Employers and Manufacturers Association Kim Campbell, some employers may well be offering higher salary packages in Auckland but he believes most would resist any moves towards paying premium Auckland rates.
In the UK, the government took introduced a London weighting through the centrally-controlled Pay Board, but New Zealand's Minister of State Services, Paula Bennett, said the government is not considering an Auckland weighting.
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Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: Auckland, Auckland weighting, public sector, teachers, nurses
Duration: 25'42"

08:42
Nordic Cooking
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Ever fancied knocking up a proper Viking meal? Well, chef Magnus Nilsson knows exactly what you'll need. His new book is a compendium of Nordic cooking, outlining each culture's food specialty - including dishes from the controversial Faroe Island's annual whale slaughter. He talks to Wallace about how he came to write this enormous tome, The Nordic Cookbook, and the culinary similarities he found between the Scandanavian countries.
EXTENDED BODY:
Ever fancied knocking up a proper Viking meal? Well, chef Magnus Nilsson knows exactly what you'll need. His new book is a compendium of Nordic cooking, outlining each culture's food specialty - including dishes from the controversial Faroe Island's annual whale slaughter. He talks to Wallace about how he came to write this enormous tome, The Nordic Cookbook, and the culinary similarities he found between the Scandanavian countries.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: Nordic Cuisine, author interview, Magnus Nilsson
Duration: 17'47"

09:39
Brother Peter Bray of Bethlehem
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For the world's Christians, at this time of year the world's focus turns to Bethlehem - a Palestinian city with a mixed Christian Muslim community lying in the West Bank. Brother Peter Bray is a New Zealander. He is Vice Chancellor of Bethlehem University - the first university established in Palestine and the only Catholic University in the Holy Land.
EXTENDED BODY:
For the world's Christians, at this time of year the world's focus turns to Bethlehem – a Palestinian city with a mixed Christian Muslim community lying in the West Bank.
Brother Peter Bray is a New Zealander who is now Vice Chancellor of Bethlehem University – the first university established in Palestine and the only Catholic University in the Holy Land.
He tells Wallace Chapman that he sometimes finds it difficult to believe he gets to spend Christmas in the birthplace of Christ.
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Duration: 19'42"

10:07
Molly Crabapple
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Molly Crabbapple is an artist and author - her work has appeared in the New York Times and Vice where she is now a contributing editor. Molly has travelled the world and documented events such as the trials in Guantanamo, the Ferguson protests, and the war in Syria. Her memoir, 'Drawing Blood' traces Molly Crabapple's evolution as an artist, from burlesque dancer to Occupy activist. The Daily Beast called it 'the Sexiest memoir of the year'.
EXTENDED BODY:
Molly Crabapple has been called the unofficial artist of the occupy movement - one of her posters from the time is now in New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Her distinctive drawings bring to mind the works of Toulouse-Lautrec, Goya, and the pioneering graphic journalist Joe Sacco. Crabapple has documented everything from the decadent nightlife of pre-Global Financial Crisis New York to the despair of Guantanamo Bay and the refugee camps of Lebanon. Her memoir, Drawing Blood, has just been published by HarperCollins.
Topics: arts, conflict
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Tags: comics, Lebanon, Molly Crabapple
Duration: 29'36"

10:36
Desiree Burch
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Desiree Burch is a comedian, performer and educator from New York. She is one of NY magazine's Ten New Comedians and just recently won the Funny Women awards in the UK.
Topics: arts
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Tags: Desiree Burch, Auckland Arts Festival, race, comedy
Duration: 23'26"

11:06
Nick Schofield - championing the world's rivers
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Nick Schofield is the CEO of the International Rivers Foundation. From the Avon to the Zambezi, locals are banding together to clean up their rivers after years - sometimes centuries - of neglect. Nick Schofield has seen their efforts first-hand and is, on balance, optimistic about the future of the world's waterways.
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Duration: 20'17"

11:25
The Foxton Everglades
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The Horowhenua town of Foxton was once home to a bustling port with steamers and sailing ships carting away the region's flax fibre. Rowing races and swimming competitions were regularly held in the Manawatu River which flowed through the town. All that changed in the 1940s with the Whirokino Cut - originally designed as a flood spillway but which ended up diverting the river entirely and cutting off the so-called Foxton Loop from the river. Now a group of environmental organisations is calling for the loop and the river to be reconnected and they have visions of the region's wetlands being restored to a point where the "Foxton Everglades" become a major tourist attraction. Jeremy Rose visits the economically-depressed town to talk to some of those behind the proposal.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Horowhenua town of Foxton was once home to a bustling port with steamers and sailing ships carting away the region's flax fibre. Rowing races and swimming competitions were regularly held in the Manawatu River which flowed through the town. All that changed in the 1940s with the Whirokino Cut - originally designed as a flood spillway but which ended up diverting the river entirely and cutting off the so-called Foxton Loop from the river. Now a group of environmental organisations is calling for the loop and the river to be reconnected and they have visions of the region's wetlands being restored to a point where the "Foxton Everglades" become a major tourist attraction.
Jeremy Rose visits the economically-depressed town to talk to some of those behind the proposal.
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Duration: 17'41"

11:45
Avon River
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When you think of the Avon-Ōtākaro river in Christchurch, it's likely to be an image of a meandering stream making its way through the city, fish swimming lazily, round stones on the bottom - boats punting along. The reality is very different, with much of the Avon, outside the CBD area, polluted with stormwater, sewage overflow and illegal dumping. Wallace talks to kaumatua Teoti Jardine and Prof Bryan Jenkins, who are both part of the Avon-Ōtākaro Network Strategic Steering Group.
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Duration: 14'53"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:55958:full]
7:08 Current affairs
[image:55947:third]
Auckland city missioner Dame Diane Robertson issued a call for help earlier this week as queues for food parcels continued to grow. Dame Diane talks about the need and the response - and what's next for her as she prepares to leave the city mission. Plus: Associate Professor Mark Henrickson from Massey University has been selected to speak at an international forum about how social workers deal with the issues of gender and sexual minorities around the world; RNZ International's Johnny Blades reports on the 750km land border between Indonesia and Papua New Guinea - it has long been problematic but there's an increased blurring of the line as links between the two sides grow; Dan Dawson joins us from the World Darts Championship in London; and Tom Frewen reflects on The Year in Parliament.
8:12 Insight More Pay for Living in Auckland?
Forty years ago the British government formally introduced an extra allowance paid to public sector workers to offset the high costs of living in the country's capital. It is known as the London weighting. Elizabeth Brown asks if it's now time for an Auckland weighting.
Produced by Philippa Tolley.
8:40 Magnus Nilsson - Nordic Cooking
Ever fancied knocking up a proper Viking meal? Well, chef Magnus Nilsson knows exactly what you'll need. His new book is a compendium of Nordic cooking, outlining each culture's food specialty - including dishes from the controversial Faroe Island's annual whale slaughter. He talks to Wallace about how he came to write this enormous tome, The Nordic Cookbook, and the culinary similarities he found between the Scandanavian countries.
9:06 Mediawatch
What's the demand for the growing supply of on-demand video? Also: Nicky Hager's police search ruling; mixed messages on drinking; and a Mediawatch mash-up of 2015.
Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Jeremy Rose.
9:40 Peter Bray - Christmas in Bethlehem
[image:55946:full]
New Zealander Peter Bray is the vice-chancellor of Bethlehem University. The Catholic university was founded in 1973 and has been closed 12 times since then by Israeli military orders - the longest of which was for three years. Peter Bray reflects on Christmas in Bethlehem and how the birth of Jesus is marked in a city under occupation.
10:06 Molly Crabapple - Occupying a New Artistic Space
[gallery:1639]
Molly Crabapple has been called the unofficial artist of the occupy movement - one of her posters from the time is now in New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Her distinctive drawings bring to mind the works of Toulouse-Lautrec, Goya, and the pioneering graphic journalist Joe Sacco. Crabapple has documented everything from the decadent nightlife of pre-Global Financial Crisis New York to the despair of Guantanamo Bay and the refugee camps of Lebanon. Her memoir, Drawing Blood, has just been published by HarperCollins.
10:35 Desiree Burch - Finding the Funny
Desiree Burch is a comedian, actor, writer and storyteller. This year, she won the 2015 Funny Women Stage Award for her stand up comedy, and her solo play Tar Baby won the 2015 Fringe First for new writing at the Edinburgh International Fringe Festival. She will be bringing her comedy to New Zealand next year for the New Zealand Festival and she speaks to Wallace about finding the funny in politics, race and gender.
11:05 Nick Schofield - Championing the World’s Rivers
Nick Schofield is the CEO of the International Rivers Foundation. From the Avon to the Zambezi, locals are banding together to clean up their rivers after years - sometimes centuries - of neglect. Nick Schofield has seen their efforts first-hand and is, on balance, optimistic about the future of the world’s waterways.
11:25 The Foxton Everglades
[gallery:1640]
The Horowhenua town of Foxton was once home to a bustling port with steamers and sailing ships carting away the region’s flax fibre. Rowing races and swimming competitions were regularly held in the Manawatu River which flowed through the town. All that changed in the 1940s with the Whirokino Cut - originally designed as a flood spillway but which ended up diverting the river entirely and cutting off the so-called Foxton Loop from the river. Now a group of environmental organisations is calling for the loop and the river to be reconnected and they have visions of the region’s wetlands being restored to a point where the “Foxton Everglades” become a major tourist attraction. Jeremy Rose visits the economically-depressed town to talk to some of those behind the proposal.

Wildlife Foxton Trust - Foxton Save Our River Trust - NZ Landcare Trust
11:45 Hope for the Avon
[gallery:1645]
When you think of the Avon-Ōtākaro river in Christchurch, it's likely to be an image of a meandering stream making its way through the city, fish swimming lazily, round stones on the bottom - boats punting along. The reality is very different, with much of the Avon, outside the CBD area, polluted with stormwater, sewage overflow and illegal dumping. Wallace talks to kaumatua Teoti Jardine and Prof Bryan Jenkins, who are both part of the Avon-Ōtākaro Network Strategic Steering Group.

===12:11 PM. | Spectrum===
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People, places and events in NZ (RNZ)

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12:10
An Alcoholic's Christmas
BODY:
Christmas tales from Alcoholics Anonymous
EXTENDED BODY:
“God grant me the serenity,
To accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And the wisdom to know the difference”.

The Sobriety Prayer; said before each meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous.
Patrick is an alcoholic. He’s been sober for fourteen years.
He remembers his first Christmas as a sober man was only a little better than his last Christmas as a drunk. His marriage was failing, and his children were sick of both their parents.His then wife told him that he was a bastard when he drank, but an even bigger bastard when he was sober. He reckons that was probably true because even though he may have got rid of the alcohol, he still had to face up to the monster he had become.
Patrick stopped drinking on the 15th of November, a day he marks as his “sobriety birthday”. But five weeks later, on his first sober Christmas Day his wife busily poured alcoholic drinks and left them around the house for him to find and to drink. Unknown to either of them, his daughter was busily tipping them out. So Patrick was not tempted.He spent the entire Christmas season going to as many Alcoholics Anonymous meetings as he could fit in.
There are almost two million people who belong to Alcoholics Anonymous around the world. Quite a few of them will be going to their regular AA meetings even on Christmas Day. Alcoholics Anonymous is a self-help group for those addicted to alcohol and the so called “festive season” can be a particularly hard time for them.
I have been able to go to a regular AA meeting in Auckland to meet the regulars. And they are just a group of regular folks, in a suburban hall. Its half past seven on a pleasant summer evening in a pleasant suburb. Tonight there are Ronald, Allen, Patrick, Paul, Mary, Charlie, George and Steve. Some are their real names, some are not. Priscilla and her friend are here not to talk, but to give their moral support to their AA mates.
The international fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr Bob Smith in Ohio in 1935. They developed the now famous twelve step programme. Members declare that they’re powerless over alcohol, and need help from a higher power… be that the Christian God or some other. The organisation’s name comes from part of the title of the first book written by the founders and early AA members. These days that publication’s known as the “Big Book”, and this evening it sits there on the desk for all the read. It’s well worn.
Each week those who come, come to share their experiences… around the table the participants some maybe here for the first time … will hear echoes of their own stories… in other words they’re not alone.
Patrick started drinking when he was about nine and raided his dad’s drinks cabinet. He successfully kept it up for decades with a job that came with a large expense account.
“ I was actually a shy and nervous person , but alcohol gave me wings “

He prided himself that he only ever had the best wine in crystal glasses, and never drank before 11.00 in the morning. thereby proving he was a gentleman. Except when things fell apart.Patrick remembers his last Christmas as a drinker. He was cooking for twenty four dinner guests and drinking steadily. He thought he was more creative with some wines in him.
“When it came time to check the turkey, I was so fed up because the cooking was interrupting my drinking. I wrenched open the oven door with such force, that the turkey flew out across the floor and sprayed scalding hot fat around the kitchen.”
“I just looked at it “, he chuckles ruefully,” grabbed a bottle of wine and went to bed”.
He has no idea what happened to the dinner. He says people were used to his drinking after 30-years, and no one said anything. His family just carried on without him.
Christmas 2015, Patrick thinks he might cook a turkey again for his now adult daughter and son. He says they may bring some wine and have a drink, but he won’t.
Mary is an alcoholic. She’s sober now, but she had her first drink when she was thirteen.
“I couldn’t wait to do it again. I used to choose my friends based on the contents of their parents liquor cabinet. If booze went missing, the friends got the blame, not me”.
Mary says because she’s tall she was able to go into night clubs by the time she was fourteen , and could buy alcohol at bottle stores too.At twenty one she was in Sydney working where she discovered heroin. That did away with the need for any alcohol. Six years later she came home a bit the worse for wear.
“ I know what it’s like to realise that no one on this earth cares whether you live or die, and probably would prefer it if you were dead. Any relationships that I had just got in the way of how I wanted to drink.”

This Christmas Mary says she may join the pot luck party that AA throws each year. She might spend time with a friend who has a birthday on Christmas Day, or she may stay at home and cook some of the fresh vegetables she’s got growing in her “paradise by the sea” garden.
Is life easy for Mary now?
“Yeh, very easy" she grins." I don’t have to sniff every pile of dog shit to know that it stinks”.
Topics: life and society, health
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Tags: Alcoholics Anonymous, AA, Bill Wilson, Bob Smith, Ohio, 1935, The Big Book, Christmas
Duration: 24'18"

=SHOW NOTES=

===12:37 PM. | Standing Room Only===
=DESCRIPTION=

It's an 'all access pass' to what's happening in the worlds of arts and entertainment, including: 1:10 At the Movies with Simon Morris 3:04 The Drama Hour: Voices of Gallipoli, by Maurice Shadbolt Gallipoli: the campaign said to have been the true birthplace of ANZAC identity - recalled in stinging clarity seventy-five years after - by the men who were there.

=AUDIO=

12:40
NZ On Screen - Christmas On Screen
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There's no escaping the fact that Christmas is now just days away, so Irene Gardiner has been rummaging through NZ on Screen's Christmas Collection on our behalf.
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There's no escaping the fact that Christmas is now just days away, so Irene Gardiner has been rummaging through NZ on Screen's Christmas Collection on our behalf.
Topics: arts, history
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: television, Christmas, Paul Holmes, Shortland Street, Merv Smith, McPhail and Gadsby
Duration: 8'52"

12:50
The Great South Road revisited
BODY:
Previously Standing Room Only interviewed a filmmaker and historian who were just about to start their 200-kilometre walk along the Great South Road, from the edge of the King Country to Central Auckland. By the time we spoke to them Paul Janman and Scott Hamilton had already met strangers with stories to share about the historic road. While Paul works on the documentary which he hopes will be ready for 2016's New Zealand International Film Festival, Scott is writing a book about their trip.
EXTENDED BODY:
Previously Standing Room Only interviewed a filmmaker and historian who were just about to start their 200 kilometre walk along the Great South Road, from the edge of the King Country to Central Auckland. By the time we spoke to them Paul Janman and Scott Hamilton had already met strangers with stories to share about the historic road. While Paul works on the documentary which he hopes will be ready for 2016's New Zealand International Film Festival, Scott is writing a book about their trip.
Topics: arts, books, history, technology, author interview
Regions: Auckland Region, Waikato
Tags: Great South Road, film, NZIFF
Duration: 9'30"

13:35
Dancer to dancer
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Second year New Zealand Dance School student Georgia Powley has been awarded a scholarship that allows her to become part of the Royal New Zealand Ballet in 2016. The company will convene in mid-January to prepare for their next show Speed of Light which will tour Dunedin, Wellington, Christchurch, and Auckland. Lynn Freeman spoke to Georgia along with her fellow Royal New Zealand Ballet dancer Laura Jones; who won the same Todd Scholarship prize back in 2012.
EXTENDED BODY:
Second year New Zealand Dance School student Georgia Powley has been awarded a scholarship that allows her to become part of the Royal New Zealand Ballet in 2016. The company will convene in mid-January to prepare for their next show Speed of Light which will tour Dunedin, Wellington, Christchurch, and Auckland. Lynn Freeman spoke to Georgia along with her fellow Royal New Zealand Ballet dancer Laura Jones; who won the same Todd Scholarship prize back in 2012.
Topics: arts
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Tags: RNZB, Todd Scholarship, dance, ballet, Australia, Royal New Zealand ballet
Duration: 10'34"

13:45
New Zealand performers entertain festive memories
BODY:
Life on the road brings with it unexpected circumstances for musician Laughton Kora; stage and screen actor Miriama McDowell tells us how a little gigantic Pukeko got caught in a trap, and DJ Sticky Fingaz shares some memories of his Christchurch days that have gone down in dance floor history. Sonia Sly finds out more…
EXTENDED BODY:
Chances are you’ve attended Christmas or New Year’s functions, events or gigs. Some are good, some are great and others leave you with unfortunate memories that you’d rather forget.
For these New Zealand entertainers, the festive season brings up a mixed bag of memories and offerings...
Brad Warrington A.K.A DJ Sticky Fingaz (Wellington) – DJ and RNZ National sound engineer
There’s definitely folklore things that have happened in Christchurch. Like at the Civic, there was a drum n’ bass gig that I was at and apparently someone pooed on the dance floor, so this is like a legendary tale.
They turned on the lights afterwards and there was a poo on the floor. Strange, really strange. It’s folklore now, it’s like, at least people don’t poo on the dance floor in Wellington.
There is a brown note on the note scale... look it up.

Laughton Kora (Orewa/ Hibiscus Coast) – Musician and actor
I haven’t had a new years for thirteen years [and] I haven’t had a Christmas lunch for the same. Whenever there’s a holiday people want a party, a band or DJ…
The worst gigs are when the kids are too drunk and it’s sort of dangerous. We’ve seen girls get crushed up against the fence in front of the stage and fences fall over and crush kids. Those are the ones that I don’t particularly like.
One of the best gigs we ever did was in Japan. It was in a cigar bar, so [it was] really small and it only fit 30 people. We couldn’t fit on the stage, so we ended up having to be on the dance floor as well. It was so small that nobody could dance. We went to the green room and opened the door—it was actually a wardrobe, so we had nowhere to go. [But] stuff like that, it’s quite cool.
Miriama McDowell (Auckland) – Actor for stage and screen
Christmas time for actors is the worst time of year, [so] I was very lucky to win the coveted role of Pukeko at Te Papa for their Christmas season.
I had to walk around in a Pukeko suit and meet all the children [so] I got into a service lift at Te Papa and all I had to do was get from floor two, down to the ground floor.
The size of me as a Pukeko was pretty much the size of the lift, and I should have backed into the lift, so I got stuck. I couldn’t push the buttons.
It was the height of summer [and] I just had sweat pouring down into a puddle onto the floor. I had to stay there until someone had to use the lift, which was about 40 minutes. It was hilarious! I think in the end I played a cooked Pukeko.

Kevin Williams (Thames) – Podcaster and formerly an actor host for an events company
We had to greet people in costume [and] make up games for them.
We had the old fashioned stocks that they used to have [in the medieval market squares]. I had the name of the person who they were going to put in the stocks. What I didn’t realise is that this person must have been particularly unpopular at work, so instead of the nice, sedate two or three people gently dipping soft white rolls and lobbing them [at the person in the stocks] we had practically everyone, well over 150 people scrambling over tables to get to him with salad, tomato eggs and gravy. The half corn cob was a particularly vicious missile. All of this was happening inside this beautiful church.
Topics: arts, life and society, business
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: travel, DJ, battling, Christchurch, Mahana, entertainment, DJ Stick Fingaz, acting, Christmas, Kora
Duration: 26'58"

14:10
The Laugh Track - Summer Report's Teresa Cowie & Ian Telfer
BODY:
On The Laugh Track are the hosts of Summer Report. For the rest of the year Ian Telfer is RNZ News' Otago Regional Reporter, while Teresa Cowie is a Journalist in the RNZ Wellington Newsroom. Their comedy choices are Tom Lehrer, sketch duo Armstrong and Miller, standups Adam Hills and Sarah Silverman, and Flight of The Conchords.
EXTENDED BODY:
On The Laugh Track are the hosts of Summer Report. For the rest of the year Ian Telfer is RNZ News’ Otago Regional Reporter, while Teresa Cowie is a Journalist in the RNZ Wellington Newsroom. Their comedy choices are Tom Lehrer, sketch duo Armstrong and Miller, standups Adam Hills and Sarah Silverman, and Flight of The Conchords.
Topics: arts, media
Regions: Otago, Wellington Region
Tags: comedy, Australia, broadcasting, journalism, summer report, Tom Lehrer, Armstrong and Miller, Adam Hills Sarah Silverman, Flight of the Conchords, RNZ
Duration: 26'19"

14:35
Teching out museums
BODY:
Museums and galleries around America are experimenting with technology in an effort to keep visitors coming in while also getting them hooked on snazzy websites. The Dowse Art Museum's director Courtney Johnston visited several of the big name galleries there while on a Winston Churchill Fellowship, to find out what's working and what's not. Courtney Johnston recently visited several big name American galleries and took plenty of pictures of their tech innovations.
EXTENDED BODY:
Museums and galleries around America are experimenting with technology in an effort to keep visitors coming in while also getting them hooked on snazzy websites.
The Dowse Art Museum's director Courtney Johnston visited several of the big name galleries there while on a Winston Churchill Fellowship, to find out what's working and what's not.
Topics: arts, technology
Regions:
Tags: USA, museums, Dowse Art Museum, galleries
Duration: 10'10"

14:42
Entangled Islands
BODY:
A revealing collection of poems and ultra-short stories introduces us to many characters in the life of writer Serie Barford. Most are real, some are hybrids of people she's known, and together they look at what it means to be a Samoan New Zealander. Serie Barford's Entangled Islands is published by Anahera Press.
EXTENDED BODY:
A revealing collection of poems and ultra-short stories introduces us to many characters in the life of writer Serie Barford. Most are real, some are hybrids of people she's known, and together they look at what it means to be a Samoan New Zealander. Serie Barford’s Entangled Islands is published by Anahera Press.
Topics: arts, author interview, books, Pacific
Regions:
Tags: poetry, short stories, literature
Duration: 9'59"

15:52
Objectspace's crafty plans
BODY:
A big push against technology, stress and mass production has seen the rise of movements like slow cooking, adult colouring, and the demand for handmade and bespoke arts and crafts. Craft remains a loaded work in the art world, but Auckland's Objectspace is this country's only public gallery dedicated to exhibiting craft, applied arts and design. The gallery's new director Kim Paton has big plans to take Objectspace into new territory. She's keen to push innovation and that includes the way work is exhibited and the kind of work being commissioned.
EXTENDED BODY:
A big push against technology, stress and mass production has seen the rise of movements like slow cooking, adult colouring, and the demand for handmade and bespoke arts and crafts. Craft remains a loaded work in the art world, but Auckland's Objectspace is this country's only public gallery dedicated to exhibiting craft, applied arts and design. The gallery's new director Kim Paton has big plans to take Objectspace into new territory. She's keen to push innovation and that includes the way work is exhibited and the kind of work being commissioned.
Topics: arts, technology
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: craft, museums, galleries, design
Duration: 8'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

12:40 NZ On Screen - Christmas On Screen
There's no escaping the fact that Christmas is now just days away, so Irene Gardiner has been rummaging through NZ on Screen's Christmas Collection on our behalf.
12:50 The Great South Road Revisited
Previously we interviewed a filmmaker and historian who were just about to start their 200 kilometre walk along the Great South Road, from the edge of the King Country to Central Auckland. By the time we spoke to them Paul Janman and Scott Hamilton had already met strangers with stories to share about the historic road. While Paul works on the documentary which he hopes will be ready for 2016's New Zealand International Film Festival, Scott is writing a book about their trip.
[embed] https://vimeo.com/147221428
1:10 At The Movies
Simon Morris looks back on 2015 - a year of blokey triumphs at the start, followed by a surprising number of films led by, and aimed at, women. It was the year of the Franchise, though two of the most successful ended their run this year. And it was also a year of some intriguing one-offs, new faces and the year's smallest super-hero.
[image:56012:third]
1:35 Dancer to dancer
Second year New Zealand Dance School student Georgia Powley has been awarded a scholarship that will allow her to become part of the Royal New Zealand Ballet in 2016. The company will convene in in mid-January to prepare for their next show Speed of Light which will tour Dunedin, Wellington, Christchurch, and Auckland. Lynn Freeman spoke to Georgia along with her fellow Royal New Zealand Ballet dancer Laura Jones; who won the same Todd Scholarship prize back in 2012.
1:45 New Zealand performers entertain festive memories
The festive season is a time to let your hair out. But spare a thought for the entertainers who take the opportunity to make hay while the sun shines and for whom the festive season brings a mixed bag of offerings.
Life on the road brings with it unexpected circumstances for musician Laughton Kora; stage and screen actor Miriama McDowell tells us how a little gigantic Pukeko got caught in a trap, and DJ Sticky Fingaz shares some memories of his Christchurch days that have gone down in dance floor history. Sonia Sly finds out more.
[gallery:1648]
2:06 The Laugh Track - Summer Report's Teresa Cowie & Ian Telfer
On The Laugh Track are the hosts of Summer Report. For the rest of the year Ian Telfer is RNZ News’ Otago Regional Reporter, while Teresa Cowie is a Journalist in the RNZ Wellington Newsroom. Their comedy choices are Tom Lehrer, sketch duo Armstrong and Miller, standups Adam Hills and Sarah Silverman, and Flight of The Conchords.
[image:55996:full]
2:30 Teching out museums
Museums and galleries around America are experimenting with technology in an effort to keep visitors coming in while also getting them hooked on snazzy websites.
The Dowse Art Museum's director Courtney Johnston visited several of the big name galleries there while on a Winston Churchill Fellowship, to find out what's working and what's not.
[gallery:1649]
[image:56004:third]
2:40 Entangled Islands
A revealing collection of poems and ultra-short stories introduces us to many characters in the life of writer Serie Barford. Most are real, some are hybrids of people she's known, and together they look at what it means to be a Samoan New Zealander. Serie Barford’s Entangled Islands is published by Anahera Press.
2:52 Objectspace's crafty plans
A big push against technology, stress and mass production has seen the rise of movements like slow cooking, adult colouring, and the demand for handmade and bespoke arts and crafts. Craft remains a loaded work in the art world, but Auckland's Objectspace is this country's only public gallery dedicated to exhibiting craft, applied arts and design. The gallery's new director Kim Paton has big plans to take Objectspace into new territory. She's keen to push innovation and that includes the way work is exhibited and the kind of work being commissioned.
[image:56005:full]
3:06 The Drama Hour - Voices of Gallipoli
The Drama Hour is Voices of Gallipoli by Maurice Shadbolt adapted for radio by Antony Grocer. One hundred years ago today the last NZ soldier was evacuated from Gallipoli.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: The Killers
Song: The Cowboys' Christmas Ball
Composer: Michael Martin Murphey, William Lawrence Chittenden
Album: (Red) Christmas EP
Label: Island Records
Played at: 12:12
Artist: The Darkness
Song: Christmas Time (Don't Let The Bells End)
Composer: J. Hawkins, D. Hawkins, Poullain, Graham
Album: Christmas Time (Don't Let The Bells End)
Label: Warner 708812
Played at: 12:38
Artist: Ghostface Killah
Song: Ghostface X-Mas
Composer: Coles, Simmons
Album: GhostDeini The Great
Label: Def Jam B0012442
Played at: 12:58
Artist: The Brunettes
Song: Christmas In The Summertime
Composer: J. Bree
Album: Christmas In The Summertime
Label: Zero Xmas 1
Played at: 1:10
Artist: Dick Hormer and the Comerader
Song: Futuristic Christmas Tree
Played at: 1:46
Artist: James Brown
Song: Santa Claus Go Straight To The Ghetto
Composer: Hank Ballard, James Brown, Alfred Ellis
Album: The Complete James Brown Christmas
Label: Hip-O Select, Polydor, Universal Music
Played at: 1:59
Artist: Ariana Grande
Song: Santa Tell Me
Composer: Grande, Saven Kotecha, Ilya Salmanzadech
Album: Christmas Kisses
Label: Republic
Played at: 2:04
Artist: Tom Lehrer
Song: The Elements
Composer: Tom Lehrer, Arthur Sullivan
Album: An Evening Wasted with Tom Lehrer
Label: Reprise 927435
Played at: 2:10
Artist: Sarah Silverman
Song: That's What I Do
Composer: Sarah Silverman
Album: Jesus Is Magic
Label: Interscope B0003932
Played at: 2:16
Artist: Flanders & Swann
Song: First and Second Law
Composer: Flanders & Swann
Album: At The Drop Of Another Hat
Label: Parlophone
Played at: 2:20
Artist: Flight of The Conchords
Song: The Most Beautiful Girl (In The Room)
Composer: Jermaine Clement, Bret McKenzie
Album: Flight of The Conchords
Label: Sub Pop 870715
Played at: 2:25
Artist: Rufus Wainwright
Song: Spotlight On Christmas
Composer: Rufus Wainwright
Album: Maybe This Christmas Too?
Label: Nettwerk 303272
Played at: 3:59

===4:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Selfies in the Galleries: 'Selfie' was the 2014 word of the year, and people love taking selfies in front of artworks. But is it a crime to photograph someone else's work, and then send it into cyberspace unbeknownst to the artist? And are people really taking in the experience that art offers - or have they invented a new experience? Kim Hill chairs a panel called "Selfies in Galleries" to discuss these and other questions.

===5:00 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A roundup of today's news and sport

===5:11 PM. | Spiritual Outlook===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring different spiritual, moral and ethical issues and topics (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

17:11
Spiritual Outlook for 20 December 2015
BODY:
Mike Gourley marks fifty years on after Vatican Two.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'53"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:55760:full]
In Spiritual Outlook this week, Mike Gourley marks the fifty years since Pope Paul the 6th concluded the second Vatican Council in 1965, a process of discussion and debate invoked by his predecessor, John XXIII.
The Council was a Pastoral one, not a doctrinal one, so, according to Wellington’s Catholic Vicar-general, Father Gerard Burns, it was concerned with the life of the Church, and how to present the message of Christ in a modern world, addressing modern concerns of science, politics and culture.
It produced some profound changes within the Church, including the abandoning of the Latin Liturgy, in favour of the people’s common language; it sought to democratise the Church, by re-balancing the power relationships between priesthood and Laity. It asserted that all baptised members of the Church should be responsible for the life of the church, rather than leaving that to the various “Holy Orders” of Popes, bishops, nuns and priests.
Father Gerard Burns says his first memories of the changes instigated by Vatican 2, as a youngster of nine, were of the length of the nun’s habits shortened. He realised nuns had ankles. Lives and dress were simplified, meaning there was less distinction between nuns as an Order, and women working to serve their communities, which in Kathryn Hanan’s case is to work in the Suzanne Aubert Compassion Centre’s Soup kitchen, and with Wellington homeless women.
Another aspect of Vatican Two, was its emphasis on being more ecumenical, and reaching out to other Faiths, including Judaism. At a Wellington forum organised by the Bishops’ inter-faith committee, to mark the fiftieth anniversary, Rabbi Fred Morgan, a Melbourne based Jewish theologian, historian, and inter-faith expert, delivered a lecture on the outreach to Jews, encapsulated by Vatican Two’s “Nostro Aetate, or “In Our Time”. The Reverend Jenny Chalmers, vicar at St. Mark’s Church in Carterton provided a Christian response to Rabbi Fred Morgan’s lecture. Mike Gourley talked both with her and the Rabbi.
Needless to say, not everyone remains happy with the changes instigated by Vatican Two. Father Andrew Cranshaw is a priest with the Society of Saint Pius the tenth, based in Whanganui. He argues that Vatican Two diluted the traditional teachings of the Church, and weakened its authority.

===5:40 PM. | Te Manu Korihi===
=DESCRIPTION=

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

===6:06 PM. | Te Ahi Kaa===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

18:06
Te Ahi Kaa 2015 - The Year That Was
BODY:
A few highlights from stories featured on Te Ahi Kaa this year.
EXTENDED BODY:
E aku manu taki, E aku manu taiko, i rere mai ki tēnei peka o te rākau, nei ra ka mihi ki a koutou katoa.
Ko te tūmanako ka pai te haere o ā koutou wā o te raumati.
Tauti mai ano ki te hōtaka whakamutunga mo tēnei tau.
As the show wraps up for another year, we present a few highlights from stories featured on Te Ahi Kaa. Have a lovely Summer break.
Kapahaka groups from here and Australia gathered en masse at this year's Te Matatini performing arts festival at Christchurch's Hagley Park. Ngai Tahu hosted the three day event, and used the platform to say thanks to the nation who helped out after the 2011 earthquakes. Chairperson of the Waitaha Cultural Council Ranui Ngarimu talks about the history of performing arts in the region.
The next Te Matatini is hosted by Ngāti Kahungunu in 2017.
When Dr Tony Ruakere attended Medical School at Otago University in the 1960's he clocked up thirty one return hitchhiking trips from Taranaki to Dunedin. While school had it's challenges, it was Urenui born Te Rangi Hiroa that would inspire a career in medicine.
A highlight during his career was establishing the Te Ati Awa Medical clinic with around seven thousand patients on the books.
Now well retired, In 2014 he was made a member of the NZ Order of Merit for his services to Māori Health. Dr Ruakere talks about his life spent at Puniho.
Rianna Hautapu is a young mum that lives in the heart of Cannons Creek, Porirua. The area is made up of mostly State housing flats, but there's a kaupapa that is practiced at a community level every week. The Koha Table is run under the auspice of The Koha Shed, Porirua. Rianna, along with Paula McEwan and Daisy Lancaster collect donated goods and lay it out at the front of their home or shop, free to anyone, It's a garage sale without the coin, as described by Paula.
The local Arise Church donate boxes of Weetbix, and a nearby supermarket donate bread. Paula explains the concept of The Koha Table.
Songwriters and Brothers Regan and Sasha Perry grew up in Te Kuiti. They remember the musical talents of certain Māori families and took notice. As young kids, the brothers busked down the mainstreet and performed at the local school gala days.
Regan went on to study music in Hamilton and headed overseas, at one point he played Flamenco guitar at a 'flash' hotel in Japan, before making contacts and creating music in the states.
In 2009 Regan released his first self-titled album. The close brothers have gone through their fair share of struggle and were both were homeless at one point in their lives. Sasha has overcome drug addiction.
From their local pub at Mount Maunganui, the brother's share their story.
Hip Hop artist and rapper Tipene Harmer writes about a myriad of things. There's his hometown, his family and his honest and frank lyrics about his childhood:
On West Side Hori he raps:

I was raised on the West Side of Flaxmere
And when I'm in the hood I reminesce on how we were back then
It's where everybody's stuck in the same rut
We didn't have much but it was always just enough
It's where everybody knows your name
The place I call home where we all learned to grow through the pain

This year, Tipene helped set up Flaxmere Music Academy, a platform for young kids to be involved with music production, writing and performing. Although many people in the recording business have urged Tipene to move to Auckland or overseas to advance his career, he disagrees with that notion and chooses to live and work from Hawkes Bay.
E Tu, Stand Proud, Kia Kaha, Say it Loud was the catch cry of Upper Hutt Posse's first single release. E Tu was released in 1988 on the show Radio With Pictures. According to the bands front man and lyricist Te Kupu (Dean Hapeta) the song changed their lives almost overnight.

Thirty years on, Upper Hutt Posse has a few less members, and while Te Kupu is still the front man, in recent years he has travelled the world collecting indigenous stories that relate to the Hip Hop culture. At his house in Raumati, Te Kupu spends time recording at his home based Matakahi studios.

Under the cloak of darkness, iwi, politicians, and dignitaries gathered to officially open the Pukeahu National War Memorial Park. The development began in 2012 and was built above the Arras Tunnel. The park includes more open space for recreational activity.
The design of the park tells the dark history of Māori and Pākeha conflict. Bricks made by the prisoners of Parihaka in the late nineteenth century, were purposely set and displayed inside the walls at the front of the park. Chairman of the Wellington Tenths Trust, Morrie Love explains the design of Pukeahu National War Memorial Park.
Taaniko Nordstrom and her sister in law Vienna Nordstrom run their portraiture business Soldiers Road Portraits from their home in Papamoa. The pair photograph people styled in the likeness of Māori portraits reminisent of the Victorian period. Kirituhi (stenciled moko sans whakapapa), Kakahu (cloaks), or pendants are usually worn, along with colonial clothing influences such as top hats, high neck white blouses and balloons skirts.

Taaniko and Vienna's work has featured in national publications and social media. The pair have taken their business kaupapa and philosophy to America, Australia and Europe.
Te Ahuru Mowai is a two part series that looked at issues of suicide and Māori. Dr Hauata was a keynote speaker at a conference held in Tauranga earlier this year where he addressed issues of tikanga practices carried out at some marae.
From his home on Matakana Island, Justine Murray talks to Dr Palmer.

George Gershwins musical Porgy and Bess toured successfully to NewZealand in 1965, the show featured famous baritone Inia Te Wiata (1915 -1971). Inia played Porgy and his cast mates included Don Selwyn (1935 - 2007), Hannah Stappard, and Apirana Taylor.
Before the tour kicked off, drama unfolded behind the scenes with the hard line New York producer Ella Gerber took with the cast. At the high point of the drama, Inia Te Wiata called the cast into his dressing room to give them words of encouragement in the midst of the storm. Contributor Steve Danby presents an insight into the 50th anniversary since Porgy and Bess toured the country.
During the New Zealand tour of Porgy and Bess, some members of the core Māori cast spent one week recording the Bruce Mason play, Awatea commissioned by New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation. Awatea was re-broadcast on Te Ahi Kaa.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions: Bay of Plenty, Northland, Hawkes Bay
Tags: Dr Tony Ruakere, Ranui Ngarimu, Tipene Harmer, Puawai Cairns, Dr Hauata Palmer, Morrie Love
Duration: 42'35"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:05 PM. | One In Five===
=DESCRIPTION=

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

07:06
A Year of Disability Issues
BODY:
The final One in Five programme. From accessibility in the Christchurch rebuild to herding sheep with a disability. And from the IPC Athletics World Championships in Doha to running the New York marathon. We look back on the year's disability issues and revisit some of the individuals who shared their stories. Katy Gosset compiles a selection of programmes from the One in Five team.
Topics: disability, education, health, sport, rural, environment
Regions: Waikato, Auckland Region, Taranaki, Canterbury, Otago, Wellington Region, Nelson Region
Tags: Christchurch Rebuild, Auckland City Council, Disability Advisors, Rugby Foundation, Cochlear Cup, Deaf Blacks, Silent Knights, Achilles, New York Marathon, Paralympic Athletes, IPC Athletics World Championships, Doha, Thumbs Up, Disability support services, Salisbury School, intellectual disability Down Syndrome, behavioural issues, Otago University, dyslexia, Tourettes Syndrome, mental health, Chinese Community, Hearing Dog Training School, King Country farming, Sanfilippo Syndrome.
Duration: 27'58"

19:05
A Year of Disability Issues
BODY:
The final One in Five programme. From accessibility in the Christchurch rebuild to herding sheep with a disability. And from the IPC Athletics World Championships in Doha to running the New York marathon. We look back on the year's disability issues and revisit some of the individuals who shared their stories. Katy Gosset compiles a selection of programmes from the One in Five team.
EXTENDED BODY:
From accessibility in the Christchurch Rebuild ...
..to herding sheep with a disability.
And from the IPC Athletics World Championships in Doha...
..to running the New York marathon.

We look back on the year's disability issues and revisit some of the individuals who shared their stories.
Katy Gosset compiles some of the best programmes from the One in Five team.
More Disability Stories From 2015
A New Approach to Disability Coverage
RNZ National is moving to a new way of reporting on disability issues. In the New Year we'll be mainstreaming our disability coverage, to bring stories to a wider audience across both our radio and digital platforms. You'll see more of our disability stories here and hear them on Spectrum, New Zealand Society and within our award-winning News programmes, Checkpoint and Morning Report. We still want you to get in touch to share your stories and tell us the kind of issues you want to see examined. You can email us at our new, dedicated address: disability@radionz.co.nz
Topics: disability, education, health, sport, rural, environment
Regions: Waikato, Auckland Region, Taranaki, Canterbury, Otago, Wellington Region, Nelson Region
Tags: Christchurch Rebuild, Auckland City Council, Disability Advisors, Rugby Foundation, Cochlear Cup, Deaf Blacks, Silent Knights, Achilles, New York Marathon, Paralympic Athletes, IPC Athletics World Championships, Doha, Thumbs Up, Disability support services, Salisbury School, intellectual disability Down Syndrome, behavioural issues, Otago University, dyslexia, Tourettes Syndrome, mental health, Chinese Community, Hearing Dog Training School, King Country farming, Sanfilippo Syndrome.
Duration: 27'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===7:45 PM. | 20 Years Out!===
=DESCRIPTION=

A review of the past 12 months in the house.

===8:06 PM. | Sounds Historical===
=DESCRIPTION=

NZ stories from the past (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

20:06
Sounds Historical Hour One - 20 December 2015
BODY:
Jim Sullivan offers listeners a chance to learn about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 55'19"

21:05
Sounds Historical Hour Two - 20 December 2015
BODY:
Sounds Historical with Jim Sullivan is the programme that gives listeners their chance to learn about the colourful, dramatic and often remarkable events and people of New Zealand's past.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 57'59"

=SHOW NOTES=

8:09 Today in New Zealand History.
First South Island Mission, 20 December 1840.
8:14 Music Track: The Kerry Dance
Artist: Peter Dawson
Composer: Molloy
Album: A Song For You and Me
Label: ASV CD AJA 5431
8:18 The First NZBC Archivist
In 1978 the first archivist employed by the New Zealand Broadcasting Service, Asquith Thomson, retired after 25 years in the job. In this retirement interview he talks to Elizabeth Spratt about his work.
8:31 Music Track: SH-Boom
Artist: Stan Freberg
Composer: Feaster/Keyes
Album: 1000 Original Hits 1954
8:37 From the Back Country
Elaine Low talks about Christmas at Ohope in the 1950s.
8:52 War Report 67
Four veterans recall the evacuation of troops from Gallipoli during December 1915. William Meldrum, Sgt Walter Cobb; Doug Dibley and an unidentified man.
Music Track: There’s a Long Long Trail A Winding
Artist: John McCormack
Composer: King/Elliott
Album: Oh, It’s a Lovely War Vol 2
Label: CD41 486309
8:58: Music Track : Lucky Me
Artist: Radio New Zealand Studio Orchestra
Composer: Black/Bourke
Album: Orchestral Gold
Label: Tartar TRL 005

9:05 As I Remember.
Graham Stewart, then a Weekly News and New Zealand Herald photographer, talks to Rob Webb about being sent to Tangiwai to cover the disaster on 24 December 1953
9:16 Seeking Father Christmas.
A New Zealand at Large programme from 1995 in which Jim Sullivan talks about writing to Santa Claus and going to the Dunedin mail room handling the letters to Santa. He talks to Morgan Thompson in the mailroom. He also looks into the more modern methods used to request Christmas presents from Santa but reverts to the old-fashioned personal visit
9:26 Music Track: They Can’t Take that Away From Me
Artist: Murray Tanner
Composer: Gershwin
Album: A Night on the Town
Label:Stebbing Zodiac
9:30 The Wedding Dance
An Open Country story from 1964 written and narrated by Asquith Thomson.
9:44 Music Track: My Old Flame
Artist: Spike Jones and his City Slickers
Composer: Colsow/Johnson
Album: Spike Jones: Greatest Hits
Label:RCA 367814
9:48 More on Sound Archives
This time an extract from an interview with Radio New Zealand Chief Archivist Jim Sullivan who discusses with Robin Harrison of 3ZB the role and future of sound archives and plays an extract from “Dad and Dave”.

===10:12 PM. | Mediawatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

Critical examination and analysis of recent performance and trends in NZ's news media (RNZ)

===11:04 PM. | Hidden Treasures===
=DESCRIPTION=

Trevor Reekie seeks out musical gems from niche markets around the globe, re-releases, and interesting sounds from the shallow end of the bit stream.

=AUDIO=

=SHOW NOTES=

Artist: Smokeshop (opening theme)
Song: Fusion at Room Temperature
Composer: Watson
Album: Fusion at Room Temperature
Label: Pagan Records
Artist: Miguel Czachowski & India lucía
Song: Indialucía (Zambra)
Composer: Miguel Czachowski
Album: India lucía
Label: Rasa Music 2007
Artist: José González
Song: This Is How We Walk On the Moon
Composer: Arthur Russell
Album: Master Mix: Red Hot + Arthur Russell
Label: 2014 Yep Roc Records
Artist: Darondo
Song: Didn't I (Florent F rework)
Composer: Darondo
Album: Didn't I - EP
Label: Ubiquity Records
Artist: Guitar Slim
Song: You Give Me Nothin' But The Blues
Composer: Eddie Lee “Guitar Slim” Jones
Album: PLEASE DON'T FREEZE! Early Black Rock'n Roll III
Label: Trikont Records
Artist: Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros
Song: Redemption Song
Composer: Bob Marley
Album: Streetcore
Label: Hellcat Records
Artist: Mel Parsons
Song: Get Out Alive
Composer: Mel Parsons
Album: Drylands
Label: 2015 Mel Parsons
Artist: St Germain
Song: Real Blues
Composer: Ludovic Navarre.
Album: St Germain
Label: Warner Music France
Artist: Billy Cobham
Song: Stratus
Composer: Billy Cobham
Album: Spectrum
Label: Atlantic Records
Artist: Sonny Parker with Lionel Hampton Orchestra
Song: Boogie Woogie Santa Claus
Composer: Sonny Parker, Lionel Hampton
Album: Blues, Blues Christmas (1925-1955)
Label: Document Records
Artist: Tiny Ruins
Song: Carriages
Composer: Hollie Fullbrook
Album: Brightly Painted One
Label: Spunk Records Pty Ltd
Artist: C.U.B.A & Rodrigo y Gabriela
Song: Xtapa (Area 52 version) feat. Anoushka Shankar
Composer:
Album: Area 52
Label: Rubyworks Ltd

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2015

Reference number 274550

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Credits Radio New Zealand National, Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 20 Dec 2015