RNZ National. 2016-06-01. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

01 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:06 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Insight (RNZ); 1:15 Country Life (RNZ); 2:05 The Forum (BBC); 3:05 Grievous Bodily by Craig Harrison read by John O'Leary (14 of 15, RNZ); 3:30 Diversions (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC) 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Wednesday 1 June 2016
BODY:
Cheap steel imported from China for the Waikato Expressway fails strength tests. Labour and the Greens make a deal but refuse to say what their electoral tactics will be and why is a company director banned from operating in Hong Kong allowed to do business here?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 31'51"

06:06
Sports News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'00"

06:15
WHO advises eight weeks of safe sex
BODY:
Now WHO is advising people returning from areas affected by the Zika virus to follow safe sex practices or abstain from sex for at least eight weeks. That's double its previous recommendation.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: zika virus
Duration: 2'47"

06:20
Early Business News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'30"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'15"

06:38
NZ First says Labour and Green Party deal "worthless"
BODY:
The New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters says the political agreement between the Labour and Green Parties to work together, is worthless.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'53"

06:41
Tide is turning
BODY:
A UK-based anti-corruption NGO says London's property market has been open to corruption for far too long, but the tide is turning.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK, corruption
Duration: 3'18"

06:44
John Key criticised as misguided
BODY:
The Prime Minister's suggestion that Auckland Council could be forced to free up more land for housing once homes became unaffordable in the city, is already being called misguided and unlikely to help the city's housing woes
Topics: politics, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'43"

06:50
NZIER expects RBNZ to cut OCR, average GDP growth of 2.8%
BODY:
The New Zealand economy has momentum, but not enough to keep the Reserve Bank from cutting interest rates this winter, according to the Institute of Economic Research.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'56"

06:52
Business confidence continues to recover
BODY:
The latest business confidence survey suggests the economy has grown at a steady clip in the first part of the year.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Business confidence
Duration: 1'27"

06:53
Economists wonder whether constraints will cap building
BODY:
Economists are wondering whether a lack of builders will cap dwelling consents in housing starved Auckland.
Topics: business, economy, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: construction
Duration: 1'24"

06:55
Health insurer gets US backing
BODY:
The life and health insurer, Partners Life, says a 200 million dollar injection from an overseas investor sets it up nicely on a growth path.
Topics: business, health
Regions:
Tags: Partners Life
Duration: 1'36"

06:56
G3 group in the black but will need further capital.
BODY:
Document management, data technology and business mail provider G3 has reported a modest lift in its full-year profit but says it will need new money to keep expanding.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: G3
Duration: 1'35"

06:58
Morning markets for 1 June 2016
BODY:
Wall Street; consumer stocks softer and some mixed economic data dragging he market lower, Dow is down 130 points 0.7 pct 17745.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'03"

06:59
Air New Zealand tight-lipped over Virgin Australia
BODY:
The national carrier, Air New Zealand, is keeping tight-lipped over a Chinese tie-up with Virgin Australia.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Air NZ
Duration: 27"

07:07
Sports News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'18"

07:11
Steel piles fail on Waikato Expressway
BODY:
Cheap Chinese steel certified as strong enough to hold up four bridges has been exposed as too weak, forcing a major fix-up on a huge new highway.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Chinese steel, bridges
Duration: 4'04"

07:15
Labour and Greens join forces to oust National
BODY:
Labour and the Greens are formalising their relationship.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour, greens
Duration: 6'06"

07:22
West Auckland Maori told to boycott after-hours clinic
BODY:
An after hours medical clinic in a low income part of Auckland is charging nearly $100 for some visits - a cost that has been blasted as outrageous by a high profile social services group.
Topics: health
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Waipareira Trust
Duration: 3'26"

07:25
Tobacco companies fume over plain packaging.
BODY:
Tobacco companies are fuming over the Government's plans to wrap up their cigarettes in plain packets.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: tobacco
Duration: 6'05"

07:35
Iraqi forces ramp up assault against IS in Falluja
BODY:
Iraqi forces battling to retake Falluja have been engaged in fierce fighting with so-called Islamic State militants.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Iraq
Duration: 7'01"

07:43
Latest Panama Papers investigation
BODY:
The latest Panama Papers investigation shows a business woman banned from working in the financial industry in Hong Kong for a decade is a director of a New Zealand company.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Chiu Mui Ng, Panama Papers
Duration: 4'32"

07:48
Murder-accused's love obsession was deadly - Crown
BODY:
The Crown says a man's obsession with a young woman drove him to arm himself with a hammer, creep into her room and hammer her partner to death while she slept beside him.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Jiaxin Tu
Duration: 3'50"

07:52
Winston Peters reacts to Labour Green MoU
BODY:
Labour and the Greens are cosying up to get rid of National - and they're leaving the door wide open for New Zealand First to join them.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour, greens, NZ First
Duration: 7'38"

08:07
Sports News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'14"

08:11
Industry group warns to watch out for dodgy steel
BODY:
An industry lobby group says the failure of cheap imported steel used in piles shows the need for contractors to be extra vigilant.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: steel
Duration: 3'41"

08:15
NZ companies could be in hot water over Panama Papers
BODY:
The directors of New Zealand companies at the centre of the Panama Papers revelations could face up to five years in prison if they helped clients evade taxes.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags: tax, Panama Papers
Duration: 5'58"

08:21
RNZ's Political Editor analyses the MoU
BODY:
New Zealand First will not be joining Labour and the Greens as the parties join forces to push National out of power at the next election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour, greens
Duration: 4'04"

08:25
KiwiRail accused of price gouging farmers
BODY:
KiwiRail is being accused of price gouging and being a bad neighbour after increasing rents to farmers who lease land alongside its railway lines by as much as four hundred percent.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Kiwirail
Duration: 3'27"

08:30
Markets Update for 1 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'09"

08:35
Should TV shows showing smoking be restricted.
BODY:
As the push to make New Zealand smoke free gathers steam a new study is suggesting that TV shows depicting smoking should be given an 'R' rating.
Topics: health, media
Regions:
Tags: tobacco
Duration: 3'23"

08:38
Fewer "Gypsies" on the road as dairy slump bites
BODY:
Today is June the 1st and in the dairy farming world it's known as Gypsy Day -- the day when sharemilkers traditionally take to the roads, heading for new positions on farms all over the country.
Topics: farming
Regions: Northland
Tags: Gypsy Day
Duration: 3'45"

08:42
Some charter schools falling short of targets
BODY:
Charter schools' annual reports have just been published and they're showing wildly different results.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags: charter schools
Duration: 3'05"

08:45
A call for more church groups to help the homeless
BODY:
A woman setting up a soup kitchen to help feed the homeless is laying down the challenge for more church groups to play their part.
Topics: food
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 3'17"

08:50
Expert says croc attack almost inevitable
BODY:
A crocodile expert says the New Zealand woman who was killed by a crocodile north of Cairns did everything wrong.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Crocodiles, Australia
Duration: 2'47"

08:53
Ashburton group continues fight to export water
BODY:
The Ashburton group battling plans to allow water from the town's aquifer to be bottled and sold overseas says it has enough public backing to continue the fight.
Topics: environment
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: water
Duration: 3'00"

08:56
New head of Auckland City Mission starts today
BODY:
Chris Farrelly has always been on a mission to combat injustice and help the disempowered.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Auckland City Mission
Duration: 3'15"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Fitz - The colonial adventures of James Edward Fitzgerald by Jenifer Roberts (8 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:09
Councils picking up the slack for cops say mayors
BODY:
18 local councils are complaining they are being left to pick up the slack from police cutbacks. The Hastings Mayor and head of Local Government New Zealand, Lawrence Yule, says local police have told him they haven't had a funding increase in five years which has forced them to consolidate their focus on more serious crimes. Nine to Noon speaks to Lawrence Yule, as well as Roly Ellis, the Mayor of Tararua District and Police deputy commissioner Grant Nicholls.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 19'24"

09:28
Should life saving adrenaline injectors be publicly funded?
BODY:
There is no public funding for autoinjectors which deliver adrenaline in a single stab into muscle and the cost of 150 to 200 dollars is a significant barrier for many people who need them to have them, especially because they only have a shelf-life of 18 months from time of manufacture. Allergy New Zealand's chief executive is Mark Dixon.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: health, epipen, allergy, adrenaline, adrenaline auto injectors
Duration: 16'50"

09:45
Love Food Hate Waste campaign launches
BODY:
The average Kiwi family wastes more than three shopping trollies of food a year. Jenny Marshall the national co-ordinator of the Love Food Hate Waste campaign wants to put a stop to it with the launch today of a three year campaign.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand is joining the global fight against food waste, with the launch today of a three-year Love Food Hate Waste campaign, a joint collaboration between the Ministry for the Environment and 59 councils from around the country.
In New Zealand, the average family throws away more than three shopping trollies of food each year.
While households throw away nearly 123,000 tonnes of food annually, at a cost of $872 million.
That's enough food to feed the population of Dunedin for two years.
Globally, one-third of the food produced for human consumption is wasted, yet 795 million people worldwide are malnourished.
Jenny Marshall Love Food Hate Waste’s national co-ordinator explains to Kathryn Ryan what the campaign is all about.
Topics: food
Regions:
Tags: waste
Duration: 6'30"

09:51
Australia Correspondent Peter Munroe
BODY:
A report into a 60 Minutes "child recovery" fiasco in Lebanon has found systemic failures at every level, and the election campaign gets interesting.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 8'11"

10:09
Alicia Kozakiewicz: Abductee now advocate
BODY:
American Alicia Kozakiewicz was 13 years old when she was abducted, imprisoned and raped by a man she met online. She now warns others about the risks of the internet and is a campaigner for 'Alicia's Law', passed in 7 states, which creates a dedicated revenue source for law enforcement units combating child sexual exploitation. She's also founder of The Alicia Project.
EXTENDED BODY:
Warning: This interview contains discussion of sexual assault and themes relating to it.
In 2002 Alicia Kozakiewicz was 13 years old, living in her family home with mum and dad in Pennsylvania, when she was abducted by a man she met online.
For four days she was missing, before the FBI got a tip off and she was rescued.
Somehow Alicia managed to return to a sort of normal, going to school, getting involved with study and extra-curricular activities and graduating with high honors.
She's now working towards her masters in Forensic Psychology at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.
But her big focus is campaigning on internet safety, and advocating for "Alicia's Law" - which creates a dedicated revenue source for law enforcement units that combat child sexual exploitation.
The law been passed in nine states - her aim is to get it into all States in the Union.
She says that grooming of children is growing online globally, and that it needs to be addressed.
Alicia has testified before Congress, co-authored a survival guide for returning abductees, trained members of the FBI and founded The Alicia Project to promote her aims.
She talks to Kathryn Ryan.
Read an edited snapshot of their conversation
KR: Can you explain how you have recovered from the events of those four days and what they must have done to you?
Well those four days were a lifetime. And I can honestly say the little girl that I was – was murdered over those four days. But thankfully, I was rescued and I was given back my life and… sort of found a new normal. Which was not easy there are still days where it is not easy of course, but I think it’s really important to note whenever anybody goes through any sort of trauma, and abduction, sexual abuse a bad relationship a horrific childhood whatever it may be that person be given time to heal, and not to be rushed and to be allowed to heal in their own time and in their own way. And that’s what I was allowed. My family really let me grieve for the loss of the little girl that I was. And I think it’s so important to let yourself be hurt and because somebody has hurt you and you have been hurt. And one of the main end points of healing for me was speaking out about what happened to me and taking this awful, horrible disgusting thing and giving it a purpose and a reason, and using it help others.
Your parents had talked to you about stranger danger, but this was the early days of the internet for many people, so the fear of online predators probably hadn’t had that much publicity at that stage had it?
No, my family certainly didn’t hear anything. My mum brings up the fact that there were urban legends she had heard which she took as the sort of ‘claw in the door at Lovers Lane’, it didn’t seem very serious. There were, again, no stories on the news and nothing to bring this to reality, and to be honest my parents didn’t really understand computers or the internet. It’s really hard to look back at where we are today and look back where they were then.
What type of a site were you on when you began a conversation with this person pretending to be someone your age?
This was a yahoo, or am chat room, this was not Facebook or Instagram or Snapchat or kik. This was long before any of those things and those applications even existed. And that’s something that really shocks kids when I speak to them today they’ll say “oh, did you meet them on Instagram, or did you meet them on kik, or Snapchat?” and I’ll tell them no I didn’t, and I’ll think about all the different levels of danger today and how much this has grown. And while the internet can be amazing and these applications can be amazing and so much fun, there are many evils and monsters we have to protect ourselves from.
What has made the life you lived possible right back from when you were rescued?
Truly, it’s time. Time doesn’t heel all wounds, but it can make them fade a little bit and with time you learn to manage the wounds that have been inflicted on you.
How did you learnt to trust again?
It was very difficult to trust others, and to trust myself that I’d made this huge mistake and I’d made it… I didn’t even know I was making it – could that happen again? Could I fall victim again? Could I make another mistake? And that took some time to figure out a good routine of making good decisions and focusing on my studies and working on becoming the best Alicia that I could. In terms of trusting others, that took a long time too for a lot of different reasons. When it came to romantic relationships, especially it was difficult. I could immediately be thrust back to a flashback episode if a gentleman would hold my hand, or hug me it was very difficult. And then the fact of just trusting someone again - but that is also healed by time.
I don’t really know what steps you can take to help you to trust others because it’s really on that other person to be trustworthy too, so you have to have trust in yourself and trust in others and realise that world is a beautiful, wonderful place even though something really awful happened to you, it happened to you, it’s not who you are and not what the world is.
Topics: crime, law, politics
Regions:
Tags: rape, abduction, sexual assault
Duration: 28'11"

10:38
NZ Literature Review - The Blackbird Sings at Dusk
BODY:
'The Blackbird Sings at Dusk' by Linda Olsson, reviewed by Louise O'Brien, published by Penguin.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'46"

11:06
Marty Duda's artist of the week: Into The East
BODY:
Into The East are a duo from Invercargill. They are Liv McBride and Graeme Woller, both of whom sing, write songs and play a myriad of musical instruments. Best of all, their voice blend beautifully when they sing harmonies. Their first album, Fight From The Inside, was release in 2013 and was nominated for a Tui for New Zealand Folk Album of the year. Now they are back with How To Turn A Blind Eye, their stellar-sounding second album. But only briefly…they played their last show ever this week.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'45"

11:26
Real life grim tales
BODY:
Grim tales is the story of how 13 survivors of domestic violence, 13 artists, and 13 writers, joined together to create folk lore style stories about domestic violence. The stories are gritty, powerful and real, but more importantly, they are stories of hope. The book is being launched on Saturday the 25th June at The Historic Village Hall in Tauranga and are available now though the website . All funds raised will be donated to Tauranga Women's Refuge.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: women, domestic violence, Tauranga Women's Refuge
Duration: 17'36"

11:48
Legal Commentator Ursula Cheer
BODY:
Ursula Cheers discusses a recent British case where a married celebrity with children obtained an injunction preventing the UK media from naming him in a 'threesome' romp. What implications will this have on New Zealand's privacy laws?
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'51"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Councils picking up the slack for cops say mayors
18 local councils are complaining they are being left to pick up the slack from police cutbacks. The Hastings Mayor and head of Local Government New Zealand, Lawrence Yule, says local police have told him they haven't had a funding increase in five years which has forced them to consolidate their focus on more serious crimes. Nine to Noon speaks to Lawrence Yule, as well as Roly Ellis, the Mayor of Tararua District and Police deputy commissioner Grant Nicholls.
09:20 Should life saving adrenaline injectors be publicly funded?
[image:70121:half]
There is no public funding for autoinjectors which deliver adrenaline in a single stab into muscle and the cost of 150 to 200 dollars is a significant barrier for many people who need them to have them, especially because they only have a shelf-life of 18 months from time of manufacture. Allergy New Zealand's chief executive is Mark Dixon.
09:30 Love Food Hate Waste campaign launches
The average Kiwi family wastes more than three shopping trollies of food a year. Jenny Marshall the national co-ordinator of the Love Food Hate Waste campaign wants to put a stop to it with the launch today of a three year campaign.
[gallery:2080]
09:45 Australia Correspondent Peter Munroe
10:05 Alicia Kozakiewicz: Abductee now advocate
[image:69683:third] no metadata
American Alicia Kozakiewicz was 13 years old when she was abducted, imprisoned and raped by a man she met online. She now warns others about the risks of the internet and is a campaigner for 'Alicia's Law', passed in 7 states, which creates a dedicated revenue source for law enforcement units combating child sexual exploitation. She's also founder of The Alicia Project
10:35 NZ Literature Review - The Blackbird Sings at Dusk by Linda Olsson
reviewed by Louise O'Brien, published by Penguin
10:45 The Reading
Fitz by Jenifer Roberts, read by Owen Scott. Part 8 of 10.
11:05 Marty Duda's artist of the week: Into The East
Into The East are a duo from Invercargill. They are Liv McBride and Graeme Woller, both of whom sing, write songs and play a myriad of musical instruments. Best of all, their voice blend beautifully when they sing harmonies. Their first album, Fight From The Inside, was release in 2013 and was nominated for a Tui for New Zealand Folk Album of the year. Now they are back with How To Turn A Blind Eye, their stellar-sounding second album. But only briefly…they played their last show ever this week.
11:20 Real life grim tales
Grim tales is the story of how 13 survivors of domestic violence, 13 artists, and 13 writers, joined together to create folk lore style stories about domestic violence.
The stories are gritty, powerful and real, but more importantly, they are stories of hope. The book is being launched on Saturday the 25th June at The Historic Village Hall in Tauranga and are available now though the website . All funds raised will be donated to Tauranga Women's Refuge.
[gallery:2082]
11:45 Legal Commentator Ursula Cheer
New Zealand's hate speech laws.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Jorge Ben
Song: Take It Easy My Brother Charlie
Composer: Ben
Album: Jorge Ben
Label: Outcaste
Played at: 10:38

Artist: Into The East
Song: Quiet Into The Night
Composer: Liv McBride-Graeme Woller
Album: Fight From The Inside (2013)
Label: Self-Sown
Played at: 11:10

Artist: Into The East
Song: Sand Of Stars (3:54)
Composer: Liv McBride-Graeme Woller
Album: How To Turn A Blind Eye (2016)
Label: Self-Sown
Played at: 11:15

Artist: Into The East
Song: Sense Cannot Be Made (2:55)
Composer: Liv McBride-Graeme Woller
Album: Live Recording (2014)
Label: NA
Played at: 11:20

Artist: Netherworld Dancing Toys
Song: Soul Searching
Composer: Black
Album: Painted Years
Label: Columbia
Played at: 11.43

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
Leaders of a major iwi have taken the unusual step of calling for an investigation into a trust responsible for protecting the Waikato River. Eighteen local councils say they are having to do the police's job for them and they don't think they should have to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'15"

12:17
2Degrees makes full year loss, says it has enough cash to grow
BODY:
New Zealand's third-largest telecommunications provider, 2Degrees, has reported a full year net loss, despite a strong increase in revenue associated with its new broadband business.
Topics: business, economy, technology
Regions:
Tags: 2degrees, telecommunications, profits
Duration: 2'10"

12:19
Property market heating up
BODY:
The surge in house prices shows no signs of slowing and what was once a largely Auckland issue is spreading around the country.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: house prices, housing market, QV
Duration: 2'06"

12:21
Terms of trade rise due to cheaper fuel prices
BODY:
The country's purchasing power with the rest of the world has rebounded, thanks to cheaper fuel.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: terms of trade, imports, exports
Duration: 54"

12:24
Midday Markets for 1 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Bryan Shepherd at Macquarie Private Wealth
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'32"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
World Cup winner Sonny Bill Williams says a chat with All Blacks coach Steve Hansen following the tournament convinced him that he wanted to stay with New Zealand Rugby.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby, Isle of Man TT
Duration: 2'19"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 1 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:12
Whale survey canned due to loss of funding
BODY:
The Department of Conservation's annual whale survey in Cook Strait has had to be canned after it lost private funding for the survey. For the past 8 years, the oil and gas company OMV has paid for the month long winter survey but it has told DOC it will no longer fund it.
EXTENDED BODY:
The Department of Conservation's annual whale survey in Cook Strait has had to be canned after it lost private funding for the survey.
For the past 8 years, the oil and gas company OMV has paid for the month long winter survey but it has told DOC it will no longer fund it.
The survey is conducted by marine scientist Nadine Bott, with the vital assistance of a group of former whalers - who perch all day in a special hut atop a hill on Arapawa Island, at the end of the Marlborough sounds - and scan the waters with binoculars. The land is owned by Heather Heberley and her husband Joe. Heather says the team is bitterly disappointed the funding has been lost.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
Why were you survey the whales? What do we get out of recording the whales going past?
Basically I think it was because after the whaling finished - it closed down in New Zealand in 1964 because there were no whales, it just wasn’t economical. It was then realised that they’d been decimated down in the Antarctic waters by the ships down there, so that finished, and then we’ve got two fishing boats and we’d be out fishing, my son and my husband. For years and years they never saw a whale in the Strait. And then, probably over the last 10 years or so they’ve been coming back more. When Nadine Bott approached us about starting a whale survey down here – if it could be feasible, she had all of the scientific stuff – and we just said, ‘Yes, it could work’. So when Joe, my husband, contacted some of the old whalers, because they really needed these people to look through the binoculars. They knew what they were looking for when they were looking for a little black dot that was way out to sea.
Heather, I think some people might be surprised to hear that there are some of the old whalers still alive.
No, well, Joe would be one of the youngest and he’s 73. Over the 12 years that they have done the survey from our place, we’ve had five real hard core of the ones that either were on the boats (gunning, driving), spotting on the hills for the whales and then there were another two who were in the whaling industry and they would come down over that month for one week or a couple of weeks, just what their commitments would let them. But there were five of these old guys, and I’m just saying they’re old in the nicest way! Look, they just couldn’t wait! They’d be ringing each other up through the year, ‘How are your eyes?’. Now, it’s gone. I feel sad for them.
Given your family’s involvement in whaling, it must have been a nice full circle to be involved in the survey.
It was. Even our two sons, when they’d come in from fishing, they’d come up and they’d spot the odd whale. One of my daughter-in-laws, she would stand back from the chairs and the husbands and she’d just see them with a naked eye. It was a whole family thing.
Did they start in a tent?
Yes.
Middle of winter?
Yes, the survey started in 2004, for two weeks then. And from 2004 until 2007, these guys sat in a tent with an open front, although they did rig up… it had a piece of rope across and from their middle, down to their feet they had a tarpaulin across, so they were able to keep a bit of the wind out, but they would sit there, on chairs, with their binoculars fastened to them, and look for these whales from daylight to dark, on good days when they could see. And that was from 2003-2007 and then it was decided that the survey, they wanted it for four weeks, so that’s when some of the whalers decided, well if they’re going to sit for four weeks up there, they’re going to have something a bit more substantial.
I would think so! So you built them a hut?
No, my husband and another one of the whalers, they actually went around places in Blenheim and all of the materials were sponsored for that hut. I had written a little note about what they were doing, and how it was involved in the community. One of the big trade stores in Blenheim said bring your truck around on Sunday morning and take what you want. It was amazing. It was unbelieveable.
Just a real, old-fashioned, community response, eh?
It was, and that was the last part of the survey from 2008 to 2015 they’ve been in the hut. It was very comfortable, they had two gas heaters, a stove, a gas bottle stove.
You’d be lucky to ever get rid of them Heather!
Oh, I think they would have liked to come down and, ‘We’ll just go and look for them again!’, but they’ve got to be DNA’d. the guys in the hut, they would look for the whales and then when they saw one, and it was confirmed… the whales always had to be confirmed before any tally could be taken, and then the research boat with DOC staff would go out, and their job was to DNA it and take a photo of the fluke of their tail, because every whale has got a different pattern on its fluke.
Topics: environment, science
Regions:
Tags: whales, whale survey, Department of Conservation
Duration: 9'37"

13:22
Kiwi cabaret show Daffodils selected for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival
BODY:
Kiwi pop-rock cabaret, Daffodils, has been selected to perform at the 2016 Edinburgh Festival Fringe. It started in 2014 and toured New Zealand for 12 seasons in 2015. Simon Wilson from Metro Mag, described it as 'a play to turn you inside out and set you back, heart pounding and eyes all wet, terribly upset, terribly full of thanks that it could be so good'.
EXTENDED BODY:

Rochelle Bright's cabaret style play Daffodils is based on letters and videos from her parents - it tells the story of 16 year old Rose and 18 year old Eric, who met at the lake by the daffodils.
It features hit songs by many kiwi bands including Crowded House, Bic Runga, Chris Knox, The Mint Chicks and Dave Dobbyn.
Metro magazine described it as "A work of genius. Daffodils should play all over the country. It should play all over the world."

Now it has been selected for the prestigious Edinburgh Fringe.
A benefit concert to raise money for the trip is being held in Auckland on Friday, and the team is also fundraising via Boosted.
Rochelle Bright talks to Jesse Mulligan about taking her production to the world stage.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Daffodils, Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Bullet Heart Club
Duration: 14'42"

13:37
Gems from the Sound Archives, with Sarah Johnston
BODY:
Sarah Johnston from Nga Taonga Sound & Vision is here today for our weekly dip into the sound archives - and today, we have two recordings by young men. Two broadcast recordings which both relate to current events: yesterday and today mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland in World War I and also, this is Samoan Language Week, so we have something from some young Samoan men from 1954 as well.
Topics: history, conflict, language
Regions:
Tags: Battle of Jutland, World War I, navy, Samoan, Samoan Language
Duration: 10'34"

13:47
Favourite Album
BODY:
The Nukes - Each to their Own
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: The Nukes
Duration: 12'07"

14:08
#MenStartTalking - Lance Burdett
BODY:
Men's Health Month kicked off today, with a breakfast at the Auckland Museum, to talk about how much or how little, men talk about their health. It was a fundraiser for the Men's Health Trust New Zealand, and one of the speakers was Lance Burdett.
EXTENDED BODY:
Men's Health Month kicked off today, with a breakfast at the Auckland Museum, to talk about how much or how little, men talk about their health. It was a fundraiser for the Men's Health Trust New Zealand, and one of the speakers was Lance Burdett - who was the national advisor for New Zealand Police Crisis Negotiation Teams.
He specialised in suicide intervention, on predicting violent behaviour, and on managing high-risk incidents as a negotiation instructor.
And he suffered burn-out, from having a high stress high stakes job.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Mens Health Month, Men Talk, mental health
Duration: 14'25"

14:21
Bookmarks: Ian Christie
BODY:
The former head of Saatchi & Saatchi and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Ian Christie loves jazz. He's combined his love of music and business expertise in a book "In the Groove: Applying the Principles of Jazz to Business." He talks to Jesse about his other favourite things and share his music choices with us on Bookmarks.
Topics: life and society, arts
Regions:
Tags: jazz
Duration: 36'45"

15:09
Will Shortz - New York Times Crossword maestro
BODY:
For more than 20 years, New York Times Crossword Puzzle editor Will Shortz has challenged people to fill in the empty black and white grids in with all the right words. He clues us in on his view of the future of crosswords and has some tips for solving puzzles.
EXTENDED BODY:
"Puzzles are an avocation, they are not a vocation" – that's the advice Will Shortz got from his father. All over the world crossword puzzle enthusiasts are grateful Shortz did not take his father's advice.
Will Shortz has been the editor of the crosswords in the New York Times – the gold standard in newspaper crosswords – since 1993. He is a true 14-letter word starting with 'C' and ending with 'T'...
Jesse Mulligan asks him about his passion for puzzles, tips for solving them and the future of crosswords.
Will Shortz says anyone keen on trying to create crosswords should check out Cruciverb.
Topics: life and society, arts, language
Regions:
Tags: crosswords, New York Times
Duration: 24'45"

15:30
Sisters of Swing
BODY:
NZ Society heads to Christchurch for some swing - southern style. The city has a new, all girl big band and its members range in age from 17 to the mid-70s.
EXTENDED BODY:
by Katy Gosset
Take some top jazz musicians, add a little swing and a bit of feminine feistiness and you have the All Girl Big Band.
The Christchurch group formed early this year to put their own spin on classic and contemporary jazz music.
The vocal tutor at Ara Music Arts, Kate Taylor, is the group’s lead singer and one of its founders.
“The fact that we could generate 16 plus good female players in Christchurch, why not celebrate that as a big band?”
She said it was less about flipping gender stereotypes and more about enjoying music with mates.
First Trombone, Charlotte Crone, said she loved the female camaraderie. “Rehearsals have been a blast .. we have some good banter.”
“Not that we’re not mates with the guys.” Pianist and vocalist, Anna Whitaker, was quick to add. She said often female musicians found they were “the only girl in the band” and they were used to that.
But she said the women were enjoying playing together and deciding what direction to take. ”Starting to find our sound, just figuring out what works and what doesn’t.”
The group was still trying to pick a name and they admitted agreement could not always be reached when it came to choosing a costume !
The co-founder and musical director of the All Girl Big Band, Lana Law, said, at that point, the discussion became “very female”. “We can’t decide.”
Ms Taylor said they hoped the name would influence their style as well. “[We’re] finding our feet, finding our sound and finding our look.”
A multi-generational band
Anna Whitaker said she also enjoyed the mix of ages in the band which ranged from 17 to the mid-70s.
“Because we’ve laid down that it will only be girls we’ve ended up with a multi-generational band .. so I think that is more different than just being the only girl in amongst the guys.
Jill Fenton will soon turn 77 but admits she was a “late starter” in music, only picking up the trombone when she was in her late 40s.
“I was brought up with brass but girls didn’t play brass instruments when I was young so I sang in a group instead.”
When she did start she played alongside much younger school students. “They’ve always just accepted me.”
She feels fortunate to be included in the All Girl Big Band. “I think it’s a wonderful experience. I don’t know how many years I’ll keep doing it but it's great fun.”
Lana Law, said Ms Fenton was “pretty impressive” and the younger women appreciated her experience.
She said many of the band’s members were music teachers and gigs were also an opportunity for their female students to see them in action and take inspiration from an all-girl group.
The jazz legacy
Christchurch has a long history of jazz musicians and big bands and, for Kate Taylor, the connection is personal.
As the grand-daughter of renowned Christchurch trumpeter and arranger, Doug Kelly, she grew up with jazz. “If you’ve got a great connection with your players and you’re just loving the music, any gig is a good gig.
But she cites a tribute concert for her grandfather, where she sang from his original handwritten charts, as a career highlight.
“Having my Granddad as an inspiration is pretty special so it’s definitely, definitely number one on the list I’d say.”
However Ms Taylor said the All Girl Big Band had big plans of its own and would tackle a Natalie Cole tribute later this year, as well as performing at the Christchurch Big Band festival in October. She said, down the track, they also hoped to move into new arrangements of contemporary songs, in the style of the American group, Post Modern Juke Box.
Bringing music into the city
With many musical genres to choose from, Charlotte Crone believes jazz is no longer as popular as it once was. She said work was needed to woo audiences to gigs.
“I reckon it’s important to bring it back from yesteryear and bolster it back up with big bands.”
Anna Whitaker said the city had many talented musicians, as she found when she recorded a big band album shortly after the earthquakes.
“I remember.. having one of those moments where I was like “Man, Christchurch is awesome and I’m so, so lucky to be singing with such amazing players.””
Kate Taylor said she was a strong advocate for bringing music back into the inner city and she believed the band had a role to play in that.
“Christchurch is always looking for new and exciting and it’s really important for us to be fueling that as the creatives in the city.”
Topics: arts, music
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: All Girl Big Band, swing music, jazz, Natalie Cole, female musicians, Christchurch Big Band Festival
Duration: 9'50"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 1 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'04"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Annual Cook Strait Whale Survey loses funding
The Department of Conservation's annual whale survey in Cook Strait has had to be canned after it lost private funding for the survey. For the past 8 years, the oil and gas company OMV has paid for the month long winter survey but it has told DOC it will no longer fund it.
The survey is conducted by marine scientist Nadine Bott, with the vital assistance of a group of former whalers - who perch all day in a special hut atop a hill on Arapawa Island, at the end of the Marlborough sounds - and scan the waters with binoculars. The land is owned by Heather Heberley and her husband Joe. Heather says the team is bitterly disappointed the funding has been lost.
[gallery:2085]
1:25 Kiwi pop-rock cabaret show Daffodils selected for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival

Rochelle Bright's cabaret style play Daffodils is based on letters and videos from her parents - it tells the story of 16 year old Rose and 18 year old Eric, who met at the lake by the daffodils.
It eatures hit songs by many kiwi bands including Crowded House, Bic Runga, Chris Knox, The Mint Chicks and Dave Dobbyn.
Metro magazine described it as "A work of genius. Daffodils should play all over the country. It should play all over the world."
[embed] https://vimeo.com/162029715

Now it has been selected for the prestigious Edinburgh Fringe.
Rochelle Bright talks to Jesse Mulligan about taking her production to the world stage.
A benefit concert to raise money for the trip is being held in Auckland on Friday, and the team is also fundraising via Boosted.
1:35 Sound Archives
Sarah Johnston from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision joins Jesse for a weekly dip into the sound archives. Today she has two broadcast recordings which both relate to current events
1:40 Favourite album
[image:70125:quarter]
2:10 Encouraging men to talk about their health
Men's Health Month kicked off today, with a breakfast at the Auckland Museum, to talk about how much or how little, men talk about their health. It was a fundraiser for the Men's Health Trust New Zealand, and one of the speakers was Lance Burdett - who was the national advisor for New Zealand Police Crisis Negotiation Teams.
He specialised in suicide intervention, on predicting violent behaviour, and on managing high-risk incidents as a negotiation instructor.
And he suffered burn-out, from having a high stress high stakes job.
2:20 BOOKMARKS with former Saatchi head, Ian Christie
The former head of Saatchi & Saatchi and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Ian Christie loves jazz. He's combined his love of music and business expertise in a book "In the Groove: Applying the Principles of Jazz to Business." He talks to Jesse about his other favourite things and share his music choices with us on Bookmarks.
3:10 New York times Crossword maestro, Will Shortz
For more than 20 years, New York Times Crossword Puzzle editor Will Shortz has challenged people to fill in the empty black and white grids in with all the right words. He clues us in on his view of the future of crosswords and has some tips for solving puzzles.
[image:69681:full]
Will Shortz says anyone keen on trying to create crosswords should check out Cruciverb.
3:30 Spoken Features
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Wednesday 1st June
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Lips
TITLE: Bliss
COMP: Dave Dobbyn, Ian Morris, Peter Urlich
ALBUM: Single
LABEL: Download
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: The Nukes
TITLE: Each To Their Own
COMP: Ben Collier
ALBUM: Each To Their Own
LABEL: Ode
ARTIST: The Nukes
TITLE: Cape Reinga
COMP: David Parker
ALBUM: Each To Their Own
LABEL: Ode
ARTIST: The Nukes
TITLE: Island Queen
COMP: David Parker
ALBUM: Each To Their Own
LABEL: Ode
BOOKMARKS: Ian Christie
ARTIST: Miles Davis
TITLE: So What
COMP: Miles Davis
ALBUM: Kind of Blue
LABEL: Columbia
ARTIST: Ella Fitzgerald
TITLE: Summertime
COMP: George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, DuBose Heyward
ALBUM: Porgy and Bess
LABEL: Verve
ARTIST: Aaradhna
TITLE: Wake Up
COMP: Aaradna Patel, Peter Wadams, Evan Short
ALBUM: Treble & Reverb
LABEL: Dawn Raid

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 1 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'04"

16:05
The Panel with Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne have been up to. Political commentator Toby Manhire talks about the Labour-Greens combo and if it'll beat National in the next election. Would a world run by scientists be a better one? The Treasury has warned about a risk to jobs from immigrants. Former MP John Tamihere is telling the people of west Auckland to go straight to hospital rather than try to pay a $90 after hours doctors' fee.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'25"

16:06
The Panel with Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne (Part 2)
BODY:
American journalist Katie Couric is facing criticism over creative editing of a current affairs story about guns. What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne have been thinking about. University of Otago resarchers want to see TV programmes with smoking given an R-rating. Robert Aitken talks about whether big companies really care about keeping the customer satisfied. The Panel has another chat about the US presidential election campaign.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'10"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'58"

16:11
GreenLab a marriage of convenience?
BODY:
Political commentator Toby Manhire talks about the Labour-Greens combo and if it'll beat National in the next election.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour, Green Party, National, GreenLab
Duration: 8'09"

16:19
The scientific approach
BODY:
Would a world run by scientists be a better one?
Topics: science, media, politics
Regions:
Tags: scientists, science
Duration: 4'36"

16:24
Treasury immigration job warning
BODY:
The Treasury has warned about a risk to jobs from immigrants.
Topics: refugees and migrants, economy
Regions:
Tags: jobs, Treasury, immigration
Duration: 4'20"

16:28
West Aucklanders told to skip GP and go straight to hospital
BODY:
Former MP John Tamihere is telling the people of west Auckland to go straight to hospital rather than try to pay a $90 after hours doctors' fee.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: healthcare, Living, cost
Duration: 4'14"

16:34
It's all in the editing
BODY:
American journalist Katie Couric is facing criticism over creative editing of a current affairs story about guns.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: guns, interview, editing
Duration: 3'43"

16:38
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Selwyn Manning and Kevin Milne have been thinking about.
Topics: economy, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'12"

16:45
Call to give TV programnmes with smoking an R rating
BODY:
University of Otago resarchers want to see TV programmes with smoking given an R-rating.
Topics: health, arts, media
Regions:
Tags: smoking, Tabacco, censorship, University of Otago
Duration: 4'03"

16:50
Do companies care about customers?
BODY:
Robert Aitken talks about whether big companies really care about keeping the customer satisfied.
Topics: life and society, business
Regions:
Tags: customer service
Duration: 5'54"

16:55
Hillary and Trump the demented pig-demon
BODY:
The Panel has another chat about the US presidential election campaign.
Topics: politics, farming
Regions:
Tags: pigs, Pig-demon, slogans, Us Election
Duration: 4'04"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Wednesday 1st June 2016
BODY:
Watch Wednesday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:09
'If that's not a crisis, then what is?'
BODY:
With 43 families currently staying at Te Puea Memorial Marae, its chairman Hurimoana Dennis is calling for a permanent facility in Auckland to help those in need.
Topics: housing, life and society, te ao Maori, politics
Regions:
Tags: Te Puea marae, housing crisis
Duration: 5'02"

17:14
Kaumatua call for govt involvement in iwi trust accounts
BODY:
The chairman of tribal river trust Te Arawa River Iwi Trust has hit back at elders who are questioning the financial management of the trust.
Topics: environment, te ao Maori, business
Regions:
Tags: Te Arawa kaumatua, Te Arawa River Iwi Trust
Duration: 5'10"

17:19
Crocodile victim's family in Australia
BODY:
The sister and father of New Zealand woman Cindy Waldron feared dead after she was taken by a crocodile in Queensland say they will stay at the site of the attack until the search for her ends.
Topics: life and society, environment
Regions:
Tags: Australia, crocodile, attack
Duration: 4'40"

17:24
WCC's Island Bay cycleway criticised by NZTA
BODY:
A beleaguered Wellington City Council has been told in no uncertain terms the way it conducted the rollout of a controversial cycleway in the suburb of Island Bay has hurt its ambitions for city-wide bike routes.
Topics: transport, politics
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Wellington City Council, Island Bay cycleway
Duration: 3'28"

17:28
SBW to attempt third Rugby World Cup title
BODY:
Lucrative offers from European clubs haven't been enough to lure Sonny Bill Williams away from the All Blacks and a crack at a third Rugby World Cup title.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: rugby
Duration: 4'09"

17:34
Evening business for 1 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 3'23"

17:38
PPTA, SPANZ says charter school should be held to contract
BODY:
The Government is being urged to punish Auckland charter school Vanguard Military School which is breaching its contract by refused to enrol students later than January.
Topics: education, law
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Vanguard Military School, Enrolments
Duration: 3'14"

17:41
1080 blackmailer admits pills charges
BODY:
Auckland businessman Jeremy Hamish Kerr who threatened to spike infant milk formula with 1080, has admitted charges relating to possessing and selling party pills.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: 1080 poison, trial
Duration: 2'48"

17:44
Controversial church leader welcomed by Destiny Church
BODY:
American church leader Eddie Long, who was accused of sexual misconduct against several teenagers, has been welcomed with a powhiri at Auckland airport after being invited to the country by the Destiny Church.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Destiny Church, Sexual misconduct
Duration: 5'29"

17:51
Historic Antarctica NZ site to be inundated by lake level rise
BODY:
An historic Antarctica-New Zealand site is likely to be submerged under water this summer due to climate changes which are causing lake levels to rise in the McMurdo Dry Valleys.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica
Duration: 3'27"

17:56
You can't teach an old Kaka new tricks
BODY:
Research into the wild parrots by a Victoria University PHD student Julia Loepelt has found that when Kaka are faced with a problem juvenile birds will experiment until they solve the puzzle while old Kaka can't find a way around the problems.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: kaka, problem solving
Duration: 2'54"

18:09
PM says building consents not just a piece of paper
BODY:
The Prime Minister says building consents are not just a piece of paper, and do result in houses being built.
Topics: housing, politics
Regions:
Tags: building consents
Duration: 3'16"

18:13
Peter Dunne skeptical on Labour, Green memorandum
BODY:
United Future leader Peter Dunne says there's a lot of water to go under the bridge before the next election in 18 month's time and he hasn't even thought about whether he will stand again in his Ohariu electorate seat.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Labour, Green Party
Duration: 3'07"

18:15
Maori suicide rate more than two times higher than Pakeha
BODY:
The suicide rate for Maori is two-and-a-half times more than for non-Maori and typical of indigenous people around the world.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Sucide, Native Americans, Ngoti Pikiao, World Indigenous Suicide Prevention conference
Duration: 3'55"

18:21
NZ Samoans celebrate independence
BODY:
Samoans around New Zealand celebrated 54 years of independence today with song, dance and festivities.
Topics: life and society, language, history, identity
Regions:
Tags: Samoan Independance, Richmond Road Primary School, Independence day
Duration: 3'24"

18:24
Wgtn City Council scraps burial fee proposal
BODY:
The Wellington City Council has scrapped a proposal to fine people who are over an hour late to burials $50.
Topics: life and society, politics
Regions:
Tags: Wellington City Council, burials, fines
Duration: 1'50"

18:50
Today In Parliament Wednesday 1 June 2016 – evening edition
BODY:
Prime Minister John Key defends his government's anti-smoking policies against further attacks from New Zealand First leader, Winston Peters. Mister Key is also required to defend housing policies and confirms under questioning from Opposition leader, Andrew Little, that the 40 new houses that he claimed were being built every day were actually planning consents. Labour's spokeswoman on Arts, Culture and Heritage, Jacinda Ardern, uses her Budget Debate speech to claim that she would do a better job than the minister, Maggie Barry.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
John Thornley : Songs of the Spirit
BODY:
The Methodist lay-preacher, John Thornley, begins a new series on the spiritual side of pop music.This evening, Paul Simon's "Peace like a River".
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'17"

20:12
Nights' Overseas Reports - Brazil
BODY:
The political crises in Brazil - editor of the International section of Estado de Minas, the main daily newspaper of Minas Gerais, Pablo Pires Fernandes reports from the Federative Republic of Brazil.
Topics: life and society, politics, economy, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Brazil
Duration: 14'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:70198:full] no metadata

7:12 Songs of Spirit - "Peace Like a River" by Paul Simon
John Thornley looks at pop songs through a spiritual lens.
7:30 Spectrum
On Spectrum this week; Auckland food rescue organisation KiwiHarvest collect unused food and then deliver it to 50 different charity groups across the city.
[image:69427:full]
8:12 Nights' Overseas Reports - Brazil
"The greatest challenge for Brazilian democracy in decades". Editor of the International section of Estado de Minas, the main daily newspaper of Minas Gerais, Pablo Pires Fernandes, reports on the political crises sweeping Brazil.

8:30 Windows on the World
Mariachi Plaza - Like day labourers working construction, the mariachis of Boyle Heights in East LA, hang around on Mariachi Plaza to pick up work. You'll see them most days in their dark suits, embroidered jackets, silver buttons running up the sides of their pants. Writer, Evangeline Ordaz spends a night out in the Latino suburbs with the mariachis of Boyle Heights, East LA.

9:07 The Drama Hour
Terror at Tinakore Road - A simple poisoning murder in a boarding house in Tinakore Road in 1893 is anything but simple. It takes all the skill of local Wellington chemist and super sleuth, Anthony Dunbar, to discover what's really what.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
A Short history of Jazz - This eight part series guides listeners on a historical path, tracing the evolution of jazz from its beginnings in the early 1900s, up until the 1990s and beyond. During the course of the series, we hear the story of jazz; learn about how it developed structurally and harmonically, and find out about the social context behind everything. It is brought to you by some of New Zealand's greatest jazz thinkers and players, all lecturers and graduates of the New Zealand School of Music. Tonight - The 1930s - Hear about how jazz improvisation reached new levels of sophistication and the music of Fats Waller and Cole Porter - the pop music of the day - with host Ben Wilcock.

===7:35 PM. | Spectrum===
=DESCRIPTION=

Every year in New Zealand more than $800 million worth of good food goes to waste while families in need go without. When lines for food banks seem to be growing ever longer, what can be done to fix this anomaly? Spectrum producer Justin Gregory spent a day with Auckland food rescue organisation KiwiHarvest. (RNZ)

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A simple poisoning murder in a boarding house in Tinakore Road in 1893 is anything but simple. It takes all the skill of local Wellington chemist and super sleuth, Anthony Dunbar, to discover what's really what. (RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

The 1920s: Lex French hosts a programme unveiling the decade in which jazz began to take shape. The first of four sessions tracing the evolution of jazz from its early beginnings in the 1900s through the 1930s and 1940s to the 1950s. (Part 1 of 4, RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288235

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 01 Jun 2016