RNZ National. 2016-06-07. 00:00-23:59, [Graham Latimer dies].

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

07 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 The Secrets of Songwriting (BBC) 3:05 An Extraordinary Rendition by Steve Danby (2 of 5, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 7 June 2016
BODY:
The pressure is on to review immigration numbers, we talk to the Economic Development Minister, Steven Joyce. The deadliest Queens Birthday on the roads in 27 years and the former heavyweight champ, Larry Holmes talks to us about his lifelong friend Muhammed Ali.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 29'18"

06:06
Sports News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'49"

06:09
Massive storms hit Australia killing at least three people
BODY:
In Australia, at least three people are dead and more are missing after massive storms flooded rivers, uprooted trees and tore into beaches.
Topics: weather
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 4'04"

06:13
China's island building causes insecurity
BODY:
The Defence Minister, Gerry Brownlee, says the pace of China's artificial island building in the South China Sea is causing insecurity in the region.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: China
Duration: 2'27"

06:15
Pressure builds for PNG and Tonga to abolish the death penalty
BODY:
Nauru has abolished the death penalty, leaving just two Pacific nations who still carry it on their law books.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nauru, Tonga, Papua New Guinea, PNG, death penalty
Duration: 2'41"

06:18
UN candidates take the stage
BODY:
With current Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon just six months away from the end of his term, some of the the candidates took the stage in London to field questions curated entirely from the global public.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UN
Duration: 1'43"

06:20
Early Business News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'30"

06:26
Morning Rural News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'02"

06:38
Population expert urges debate over immigration numbers
BODY:
A population expert says a public debate on immigration is needed, as numbers continue to reach record highs.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 1'54"

06:40
Mass attack planned for Euro 2016 football tournament
BODY:
European authorities last month detained a Frenchman who was planning mass attacks during the Euro 2016 football tournament, which starts on Friday.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: terrorism
Duration: 4'03"

06:44
Green Party says it's ready to change the Govt.
BODY:
The Green party believes it has the money, members and momentum to finally change the Government at the next election
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party
Duration: 3'18"

06:50
RBNZ set to hold rates this week
BODY:
Interest rates are most likely to be left unchanged this week by the Reserve Bank, and indeed it's possible we have seen the last cut in the current cycle.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: interest rates
Duration: 2'31"

06:53
RBNZ told to get on and target inflation
BODY:
Meanwhile, the Reserve Bank is being advised to get on with its job and target inflation by delivering another cut this week.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Reseve Bank
Duration: 44"

06:54
Janet Yellen remains upbeat
BODY:
The chair of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, remains upbeat about raising interest rates in the United States soon, despite disappointing jobs' numbers.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 1'18"

06:55
Coop Bank head says time for action on house prices
BODY:
The head of the Cooperative Bank says it's time for policy makers to take action to control the surging housing market.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: house prices
Duration: 1'56"

06:57
Jim Parker in Australia
BODY:
Over now to our correspondent in Sydney, Jim Parker. He reports that the government is facing a backlash over changes to superannuation.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 57"

06:58
Week ahead
BODY:
A look ahead at what's on this shortened week's agenda.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28"

06:58
Morning markets for 7 June 2016
BODY:
Wall Street is stronger after those comments by the chair of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen -- rate rises are still on the table.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 54"

07:07
Sports News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'50"

07:10
Calls for review of immigration policy
BODY:
Calls for a review of New Zealand's immigration settings are widening as the number of people settling here reaches record highs
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 3'39"

07:14
Economy in for shock if immigration figures drastically cut
BODY:
The Economic Development Minister, Steven Joyce, says adjustments to immigration settings are being made constantly, but slashing numbers would harm the economy.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 4'39"

07:19
Worst roll toll in 27 years
BODY:
The official holiday road toll is the highest for Queen's Birthday weekend since 1989
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: road toll
Duration: 2'54"

07:22
Larry Holmes remembers his friend and mentor Muhammad Ali
BODY:
Thousands of people are pouring in to Louisville in Kentucky as the city prepares for the funeral on Friday of its most famous son, Muhammad Ali.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Muhammad Ali
Duration: 3'33"

07:25
Andrew Little - fresh from speaking to the Green party AGM
BODY:
Andrew Little was Labour's first leader to speak at the Green Party's annual general meeting.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party, Labour
Duration: 6'43"

07:45
MPI to give information on kauri trade to conservation group
BODY:
The Ministry for Primary Industries is being forced to hand over information about the trade in kauri timber to a Northland conservation group.
Topics: environment, politics
Regions:
Tags: kauri timber
Duration: 2'46"

07:47
Millennials give Bernie Sanders a boost in California
BODY:
There are reports President Barack Obama is poised to endorse Hillary Clinton as the Democratic presidential contender.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, Clinton
Duration: 4'27"

07:52
The college rape case that's outraged America
BODY:
A six-month sentence for a former Stanford University athlete convicted on multiple charges of sexual assault has been meet with outrage.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, sexual assault
Duration: 4'03"

07:56
Fears wallabies have spread to Southland
BODY:
Environment Southland is investigating the possibility that wild wallabies have spread to their region.
Topics: environment
Regions: Southland
Tags: wallabies
Duration: 3'20"

08:07
Sports News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'11"

08:10
Govt and NZ First both to rethink immigration - fmr minister
BODY:
A former immigration minister wants a consensus of sorts over the numbers of immigrants to New Zealand.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 5'10"

08:15
Muhammad Ali's body flown to hometown of Louisville
BODY:
The body of boxing legend Muhammad Ali has been flown back to his home of Louisville, Kentucky.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Muhammad Ali, US
Duration: 4'03"

08:20
Green party AGM launches clean waterways campaign
BODY:
The Greens have used their annual general meeting to launch a clean waterways campaign.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Green Party
Duration: 5'40"

08:26
Challenges remain for Kiribati and Tuvalu
BODY:
The Foreign Minister, Murray McCully, says New Zealand aid money going into the Pacific is making a real difference, but there are still huge challenges in the region.
Topics: Pacific, politics
Regions:
Tags: Kiribati, Tuvalu
Duration: 3'51"

08:29
Markets Update for 7 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 54"

08:34
Calls to bring home fallen Vietnam War vets
BODY:
There's a renewed effort to bring home the remains of thirty one New Zealand soldiers who were killed in Malaysia and Vietnam and have been lying in non commonwealth war cemeteries ever since.
Topics: defence force
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'25"

08:39
Graeme Hart's US autoparts biz has bankruptcy handbrake applied
BODY:
Graeme Hart has been New Zealand's wealthiest person for a decade, but the handbrake has now been applied to the billionaire's American autoparts business.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: UCI Holdings, Graeme Hart
Duration: 3'46"

08:44
Families move into new village
BODY:
Saturday was moving day for a group of low income Far North families who are now settling into their new homes.
Topics: housing
Regions: Northland
Tags: He Korowai Trust
Duration: 4'28"

08:48
Defence Minister wades in to rising tensions
BODY:
The Defence Minister, Gerry Brownlee is calling on China to explain its island building programme in the South China Sea.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: China, South China Sea
Duration: 3'24"

08:52
Chasing a New Moon
BODY:
Today marks the first day of the muslim month of Ramadan.
Topics: spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags: Ramadan
Duration: 4'16"

08:56
Phil Kafcaloudes with news from Australia
BODY:
Time to chat to our Melbourne correspondent Phil Kafcaloudes.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 3'26"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Cotton-Eyed Joe by Susy Pointon read by Michele Amas - A 14 year old girl in Karori in 1964 is twiddling with her transistor when she happens upon an arresting sound which shakes her to the core. (1 of 4, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Pressure on the front line of mental health
BODY:
New figures show big rises in crisis mental health referrals at many of the country's hospitals, and some health workers are describing it as dangerous. Nine to Noon speaks to Andy Colwell, a mental health worker in the Auckland region who is co-convenor of the PSA's Mental Health committee and Professor Max Abbot - Dean of health sciences at AUT and member of the Waitemata DHB Board of Directors.
EXTENDED BODY:
New figures show big rises in crisis mental health referrals at many of the country's hospitals, and some health workers are describing it as dangerous. Nine to Noon speaks to Andy Colwell, a mental health worker in the Auckland region who is co-convenor of the PSA's Mental Health committee and Professor Max Abbot - Dean of health sciences at AUT and member of the Waitemata DHB Board of Directors.

Source: Figures released under the Official Information Act from the respective DHBs. Some DHBs could not supply useable data.
NOTE: In 2014/15 ADHB changed the way it categorised crisis referrals which means the 2015 figure is not directly comparable with previous years
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'01"

09:36
Sorting your digital footprint before you die
BODY:
One of the growing existential questions of our time is "what happens to my digital footprint when I die?" With many people doing their banking, insurance and other financial business online as well as engagement on social media platforms, what are the legal protocols for ensuring they are shut down or - if you want - accessible to your loved ones? A forum set up by Internet New Zealand in Wellington this Thursday will feature experts to answer such questions. The event is being hosted by the Director of Operations at the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Narelle Clark.
Topics: technology, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Narelle Clark, digital privacy, internet, death and the internet, digital footprint
Duration: 13'15"

09:50
US correspondent Susan Milligan
BODY:
US Correspondent Susan Milligan checks in on a nation mourning Muhammed Ali, and Puerto Rico where primary votes are being counted for the Democratic primary.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: US
Duration: 9'06"

10:06
The NSA whistleblower protector who blew the whistle himself
BODY:
John Crane was a senior Defence Department official responsible for protecting whistleblowers at the NSA but he ended up blowing the whistle himself after seeing his colleagues betray the whistleblowers they were supposed to protect. His claims are outlined in a new book - Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing In The Age Of Snowden by Mark Hertsgaard.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: Mark Hertsgaard.
Duration: 32'19"

10:38
Book review -The Salted Air by Thom Conroy
BODY:
Reviewed by Sonja de Friez, published by Penguin Random House (NZ).
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'19"

11:06
Political commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton
BODY:
How the Green-Labour memorandum of understanding has gone down.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'34"

11:31
Food: Oyster Soup
BODY:
Steven Tutty is manager of the Capri restaurant in Gore, where his signature dish is Tutty's Oyster Soup. That recipe is a jealously guarded secret, but other winter warmers include a hearty vegetable soup, which he will share.
EXTENDED BODY:
Manager of Capri restaurant in Gore Steve Tutty is famous for his oyster soup.
The restaurant has been around for over 40 years and is flat out making his signature dish while oyster season is in full swing.
He not only sells the soup at Capri but it is also starting to be sold in shops across the country.
However, the recipe for Tutty's Oyster Soup is a closely guarded secret.
So instead, Steve shares his recipe for hearty vegetable soup with Kathryn Ryan.
Note: This vegetable soup contains meat products
Vegetable Soup recipe:
Ingredients:
4-5 Soup Bones
1 Tblspn Salt
½ Tspn Pepper
4 Heaped Tblspn beef stock
4 cups soup mix (lentils etc)
Water
One 2ltr ice-cream container full of diced onions (1.7kg)
2.3 kg grated carrot
445 grams chopped celery
Method:
Boil the beef bones and 1 Tblsp salt for a whole day, keeping the pot filled with water.
Leave overnight, skim off the fat, remove all the bones then reheat adding all the dry ingredients including lentils.
Bring to the boil then add vegetables. Cook for around 3 hours, making sure lentils are cooked.
Topics: food
Regions: Southland
Tags: oysters, Gore, The Capri, Vegetable soup
Duration: 11'22"

11:43
Media commentator Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Gavin Ellis on the print media's breach of privacy at the unveiling of Jerry Collins' headstone.
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 16'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Pressure on the front line of mental health.
New figures show big rises in crisis mental health referrals at many of the country's hospitals, and some health workers are describing it as dangerous. Data released to Nine to Noon under the Official Information Act, shows that at Auckland's biggest DHB, crisis referrals - either from GPs, hospital staff, families or self referrals - more than doubled between 2010 and 2014.
What is happening at the front line of mental health and can our hospitals and community based services keep pace with demand and with current funding? Nine to Noon speaks to Andy Colwell, a mental health worker in the Auckland region who is co-convenor of the PSA's Mental Health committee and Professor Max Abbot - Dean of Health sciences at AUT, former president of the World Federation for Mental Health, Founding National Director of the Mental Health Foundation and member of the Waitemata DHB Board of Directors.

NOTE: In 2014/15 ADHB changed the way it categorised crisis referrals which means the 2015 figure is not directly comparable with previous years

Source: Figures released under the Official Information Act from the respective DHBs. Some DHBs could not supply useable data.
09:25 Sorting your digital footprint before you die
One of the growing existential questions of our time is "what happens to my digital footprint when I die?" With many people doing their banking, insurance and other financial business online as well as engagement on social media platforms, what are the legal protocols for ensuring they are shut down or - if you want - accessible to your loved ones?
A forum set up by Internet New Zealand in Wellington this Thursday will feature experts to answer such questions. The event is being hosted by the Deputy CEO of the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network, Narelle Clark.
[image:64315:full] no metadata
09:45 US correspondent Susan Milligan
Susan Milligan checks in from a nation mourning Muhammed Ali, and takes a look at Puerto Rico where primary votes are being counted for the Democratic primary.
[image:70307:half] no metadata
10:05 The NSA whistleblower protector who blew the whistle himself
John Crane was a senior Defence Department official responsible for protecting whistleblowers at the NSA but he ended up blowing the whistle himself after seeing his colleagues betray the whistleblowers they were supposed to protect. His claims are outlined in a new book - Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing In The Age Of Snowden by Mark Hertsgaard.
10:35 Book review -The Salted Air by Thom Conroy
reviewed by Sonja de Friez, published by Penguin Random House (NZ)
10:45 The Reading
Part 1 of Cotton-Eyed Joe by Susy Pointon, read by Michele Amas.
11:05 Political commentators Mike Williams and Matthew Hooton
How the Green-Labour memorandum of understanding has gone down.
11:20 Food: Oyster Soup
Steven Tutty is manager of the Capri restaurant in Gore, where his signature dish is Tutty's Oyster Soup. That recipe is a jealously guarded secret, but other winter warmers include a hearty vegetable soup, which he will share.
[image:70292:half]
Vegetable Soup recipe:
4-5 Soup Bones
1 Tblspn Salt
½ Tspn Pepper
4 Heaped Tblspn beef stock
4 cups soup mix (lentils etc)
Water
One 2ltr ice-cream container full of diced onions (1.7kg)
2.3 kg grated carrot
445 grams chopped celery
Boil the beef bones and 1 Tblsp salt for a whole day, keeping the pot filled with water.
Leave overnight, skim off the fat, remove all the bones then reheat adding all the dry ingredients including lentils.
Bring to the boil then add vegetables. Cook for around 3 hours, making sure lentils are cooked.
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Gavin Ellis on the print media's breach of privacy at the unveiling of Jerry Collins' headstone.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Beck
Song: Burro
Composer: Hansen
Album: Odelay/Sissyneck
Label: Geffen
Played at: 9:34

Artist: The Secret Sisters
Song: Lonely Island
Composer: Bryant
Album: Put Your Needle Down
Label: CBS
Played at: 10:44

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
Immigration New Zealand says ministers are meeting in the next few weeks to consider how many immigrants will be granted residence visas over the next two years. An Auckland mental health worker says colleagues are reporting significant difficulties in coping with rising demand.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'38"

12:17
Truck movements dip in May
BODY:
Economic growth may hit a bit of a pot hole in the second quarter if truck movements are anything to go by.
Topics: business, economy, transport
Regions:
Tags: Truck Movements, Truckometer
Duration: 1'30"

12:19
SkyCity share issues nearly complete
BODY:
The casino operator, SkyCity Entertainment, has almost completed its 263-million dollar share issue to help pay for its big capital projects.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: SkyCity, Casinos
Duration: 54"

12:22
Claims Australian broker consulted psychic
BODY:
Our correspondent in Sydney, Jim Parker, and in the world of finance, it appears you need all the help you can get.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Psychics
Duration: 57"

12:23
Midday Markets for 7 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at First NZ Capital
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'24"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
Canadian-listed oil and gas producer TAG Oil has bought a 70 percent interest in the Puka onshore oil and gas exploration permit in Taranaki for $250,000.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: TAG Oil
Duration: 22"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
The Northern Mystics' Debbie Fuller is stepping down as coach of the trans-Tasman netball side at the end of the season.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Northern Mystics, NBA
Duration: 2'35"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 7 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'58"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Storm and king tides batter Sydney's coast
BODY:
Three people remain missing and three people are known to be dead, as the storm that hammered parts of Australia's east coast, causes record flooding in Tasmania. The king tide produced waves of up to eight meters, destroying homes and washing away beaches, in the northern Sydney suburb of Collaroy after it hit on Monday night. And there are more tides expected, that could destabilise the area further. Dr Mitchell Harley, is a senior research associate from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, at the University of New South Wales.
EXTENDED BODY:
Waves up to 8 metres high have battered Sydney's northern beaches, destroying homes and washing away beaches. One of the worst hit is the suburb of Collaroy.
Coastal Scientist, Dr Mitchell Harley lives in the area and has been closely monitoring the damage, including using a drone camera.
Dr Mitchell Harley says the situation is extremely serious, with entire front yards washed away by the king tides, which have also destroyed beaches.
He talks to Jesse Mulligan about the erosion and what it means for seaside communities like Collaroy.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Australia, Sydney, King Tide, Storm
Duration: 10'15"

13:26
Wild wallabies may have spread to Southland
BODY:
Environment Southland is investigating the possibility that wild wallabies have spread to their region. The wallabies, which have become a widespread pest in South Canterbury, have so far been restricted to a containment area. But high country farmers now say the wallaby population is well over one hundred thousand and spreading well beyond that area. It comes after reports last month, that Southland Regional Council has been left stumped, after a dead wallaby was found near Gore - far from South Canterbury where they usually roam. Bill Nagle is a member of the Invasive Species Specialist Group.
EXTENDED BODY:
The wallabies, which have become a widespread pest in South Canterbury, have so far been restricted to a containment area.
But now Environment Southland is investigating the possibility that wild wallabies have spread to their region. High country farmers now say the wallaby population is well over one hundred thousand and spreading well beyond that area.
It comes after reports last month, that Southland Regional Council has been left stumped, after a dead wallaby was found near Gore - far from South Canterbury where they usually roam.
Bill Nagle, who is a member of the Invasive Species Specialist Group, talks to Jesse Mulligan.
Topics: environment
Regions: Southland
Tags: wallabies
Duration: 9'23"

13:35
Dan Slevin on Muhammad Ali and the movies
BODY:
RNZ's film expert, Dan Slevin looks at the films made about the boxer who died over the weekend.
EXTENDED BODY:
RNZ's film expert, Dan Slevin looks at the films made about the boxer who died over the weekend.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: Muhammad Ali, movies
Duration: 12'13"

13:47
Favourite Album - Cliff Richard
BODY:
"Greatest Hits" by Cliff Richard
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 11'58"

14:10
Remembering Sir Graham Latimer
BODY:
The long term president of the New Zealand Maori Council, Sir Graham Latimer, has died at the age of 90.
Topics: te ao Maori, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Maori, New Zealand Maori Council
Duration: 11'02"

14:21
Book Critic: Mary McCallum
BODY:
Freelance feature writer, former broadcast journalist and television presenter and fiction writer Mary McCullum is our book reviewer this week.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: This Change In The Light, Fits And Starts
Duration: 12'56"

14:34
Great New Zealand Album: Drive
BODY:
It was one of 1997's biggest hit albums, and it came out of the blue from a little-known Christchurch artist. Briolette Kah Bic Runga was fledgling 20 year old singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who cut her teeth as a rock quest winner and proved her self to be a rising star with the release of her first solo album, Drive.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Drive
Duration: 26'11"

15:10
The man who brought down FIFA
BODY:
Disgraced former FIFA executive Chuck Blazer had a flat in Trump Tower just for his cats. He had a bank account padded with bribes from countries desperate to host the World Cup.
EXTENDED BODY:
Disgraced former FIFA executive Chuck Blazer had a flat in Trump Tower just for his cats. He had a bank account padded with bribes from countries desperate to host the World Cup.
When the FBI cornered him for failing to pay taxes, he saved himself by becoming an informant.
Mary Papenfuss and Teri Thompson tell the sordid story in American Huckster: How Chuck Blazer Got Rich From-and Sold Out-the Most Powerful Cabal in World Sports
Topics: sport, author interview
Regions:
Tags: FIFA
Duration: 22'39"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 7 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'49"

21:06
Citizen science: large brown seaweeds
BODY:
Marine scientists are calling on the public to help them get a better idea of the distribution of large brown seaweeds along the coast of New Zealand.
EXTENDED BODY:
Marine scientists are calling on the public to help them get a better idea of the distribution of large brown seaweeds along New Zealand's coast.
Brown seaweeds, including the familiar bull and bladder kelps and Neptune's necklace, are an important part of the coastal ecosystem. They provide shelter for other species and buffer the coast from waves and erosion. But little is known about their distribution, and NIWA scientists have launched a NatureWatch citizen science project to encourage people to post images and GPS location data for their local beaches.
Marine biologist Roberta D'Archino says large brown seaweeds are disappearing from many sites throughout the world, but there is too little data to track their abundance along New Zealand's coastline. Such a baseline is necessary to monitor any changes in the future for any of the 12 species of brown seaweeds found in New Zealand.
Kate Neill, who is also part of NIWA's coast and ocean group, says large brown seaweeds are underrepresented in museum collections because it is difficult to preserve large specimens in a herbarium.
She says the distribution data is only one part of the project. The team also collects the seaweeds to culture them in the laboratory to test them under changing acidity, temperature, light and sedimentation conditions.
They are also developing a camera system to monitor changes in seaweed beds in the shallower waters along the coast. The research is funded by the Ministry for Primary Industries.
You can hear more about New Zealand's seaweeds in this Our Changing World story with NIWA's Wendy Nelson.
Topics: science, environment
Regions:
Tags: brown algae, kelps, NatureWatch
Duration: 8'30"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Storm and king tides batter Sydney's coast
Waves up to 8 metres high have battered Sydney's northern beaches, destroying homes and washing away beaches. One of the worst hit is the suburb of Collaroy.
Coastal Scientist, Dr Mitchell Harley lives in the area and has been closely monitoring the damage - you can see some of his images below.
He says the situation is extremely serious.
[gallery:2103]
1:25 Wild wallabies may have spread to Southland
The wallabies, which have become a widespread pest in South Canterbury, have so far been restricted to a containment area. But now Environment Southland is investigating the possibility that wild wallabies have spread to their region. High country farmers now say the wallaby population is well over one hundred thousand and spreading well beyond that area.
Bill Nagle is a member of the Invasive Species Specialist Group.
1:35 Dan Slevin on Muhammad Ali and the movies
RNZ's film expert, Dan Slevin looks at the films made about the boxer who died over the weekend.
[embed] https://youtu.be/IfUHYUpmTFs
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 Book Critic: Mary McCallum
2:20 Great New Zealand Album: Drive
It was one of 1997's biggest hit albums, and it came out of the blue from a little-known Christchurch artist.
[image:70640:full] no metadata
Briolette Kah Bic Runga was fledgling 20 year old singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who cut her teeth as a rock quest winner and proved her self as a rising star with the release of her first solo album, Drive. It debuted at number one on the New Zealand Top 40 Album charts and produced four hit singles, one even made it to the sound-track of the cult classic movie "American Pie."
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3:10 The man who brought down FIFA
Disgraced former FIFA executive Chuck Blazer had a flat in Trump Tower just for his cats. He had a bank account padded with bribes from countries desperate to host the World Cup.
When the FBI cornered him for failing to pay taxes, he saved himself by becoming an informant.
Mary Papenfuss and Teri Thompson tell the sordid story in American Huckster: How Chuck Blazer Got Rich From-and Sold Out-the Most Powerful Cabal in World Sports
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 7 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'49"

16:05
The Panel with Damon Salesa and Tim Watkin (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Tim Watkin have been up to. Motoring writer Allan Dick joins the conversation on the long weekend appalling road toll. There's mounting concern China is using aid to claim more territory in the South China Sea. Prominent paediatric expert is concerned our child abuse statistics are not going down.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'59"

16:06
The Panel with Damon Salesa and Tim Watkin (Part 2)
BODY:
New research says that chronic tardiness is actually a form of instanity. What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Damon Salesa have been thinking about. Demographer Professor Paul Spoonley says the idea we have too many immigrants is cliche. The Greens have launched a campaign to clean up water ways. Hillary Clinton clinches the Democrats nomination for Presidential candidate making US political history.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'50"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Damon Salesa and Tim Watkin have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'41"

16:12
The weekend road toll's set off debate about who's to blame
BODY:
Motoring writer Allan Dick joins the conversation on the long weekend appalling road toll.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: road safety, motoring
Duration: 9'14"

16:22
China's making more territorial claims in the South China Sea
BODY:
There's mounting concern China is using aid to claim more territory in the South China Sea.
Topics: conflict, environment
Regions:
Tags: China, South China Sea
Duration: 7'16"

16:29
Honour recipient wishes for decrease in child abuse
BODY:
Prominent paediatric expert is concerned our child abuse statistics are not going down.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: child abuse
Duration: 4'28"

16:35
Lateness is now being linked to being clincally insane
BODY:
New research says that chronic tardiness is actually a form of instanity.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Lateness
Duration: 4'00"

16:39
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Damon Salesa have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'51"

16:44
Demographer says Winston Peters cliched in immigrant response
BODY:
Demographer Professor Paul Spoonley says the idea we have too many immigrants is cliche.
Topics: refugees and migrants, politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 10'24"

16:54
Greens say Government should stop protecting water polluters
BODY:
The Greens have launched a campaign to clean up water ways.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags: water, Green Party
Duration: 2'59"

16:57
Hillary becomes the first female presidential candidate
BODY:
Hillary Clinton clinches the Democrats nomination for Presidential candidate making US political history.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Democratic Primary, America
Duration: 2'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 7th June 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:08
Sir Graham Latimer dies
BODY:
Centrally influential Maori leader and former Maori Council president Sir Graham Latimer has died at the age of 90.
Topics: life and society, politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: Maori Council
Duration: 5'31"

17:15
Autistic man's parents fight for his release
BODY:
The parents of an autistic 38-year-old who spends most of his day locked in an isolated mental health unit are demanding his release.
Topics: health, law
Regions:
Tags: Capital and Coast DHB, autism, Tawhirimatea Unit
Duration: 4'11"

17:19
AP declares Clinton secures nomination
BODY:
The Associated Press today declared Hillary Clinton the winner of the Democratic nomination, though Bernie Sanders will still be taking part in tomorrow's primaries.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: America, Democratic Primaries
Duration: 4'17"

17:24
Funding slashed for budgeting services
BODY:
New contracts for the country's budgeting services expect them to deal with the same number of clients, despite slashing funding by 25 percent.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Budgeting services, funding, Work and Income
Duration: 4'03"

17:28
Call for meth tests before house sales
BODY:
After unknowingly purchasing an apartment that was later found to be contaminated with methamphetamine, Taranaki woman Kerryanne Hopkins is calling for vendors to pay for obligatory methamphetamine tests before selling homes.
Topics: housing, health
Regions: Taranaki
Tags: Meth Tests, P Contamination, housing, drugs
Duration: 7'08"

17:39
Evening Business for 7 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'38"

17:41
Tourist escapes prison over road accident
BODY:
After taking part in a restorative justice meeting, an American tourist who killed two people in a road accident has escaped a prison sentence. The victim's sister Leash King joins Checkpoint.
Topics: law, transport, life and society
Regions:
Tags: Raod safety, driving, restorative justice, tourists
Duration: 7'06"

17:48
Mental health referrals balloon
BODY:
As new figures show a massive increase in crisis referrals at hospitals, the Govt maintains it is doing its best to respond to growing pressure on mental health services.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: mental health, Ministry of Health
Duration: 2'50"

17:51
Dr John Carlos reflects on Muhammad Ali and black consciousness
BODY:
Dr John Carlos, who raised a black gloved fist at the 1968 Mexico Olympics, talks about Muhammad Ali and black consciousness.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Black Consciousness, civil rights
Duration: 8'21"

18:08
PM dismisses Labour's call to restrict work visas
BODY:
The Prime Minister, John Key, is dismissing a call by Labour to restrict work visas as the economy starts to slow down.
Topics: refugees and migrants, politics
Regions:
Tags: immigration
Duration: 2'41"

18:11
Gareth Morgan calls for tax reform
BODY:
A report released by the Morgan Foundation suggests that income tax in New Zealand is unfair and favours the rich. Gareth Morgan joins Checkpoint.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: tax, reform
Duration: 6'36"

18:18
Raw milk farmer saves cows despite TB shut-down
BODY:
A Dunedin dairy farmer has decided to keep his remaining herd of cows, despite being shut down by the Ministry for Primary Industries.
Topics: farming
Regions: Otago
Tags: Dairy Cows, Dunedin, Holy Cow, raw milk
Duration: 4'06"

18:22
Families in Nelson struggling to make ends meet
BODY:
Local agencies in Nelson, from the Nelson Food Bank to the Salvation Army, are reporting increasing cases of hardship among a wider range of families.
Topics: inequality, life and society
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: poverty, child poverty
Duration: 4'01"

18:26
Auckland homelessness at all-time high
BODY:
The City Mission has released its latest count of rough sleepers in Auckland, which suggests that homelessness is at an all-time high. Chris Farrelly joins Checkpoint.
Topics: inequality, life and society
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 2'44"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 7 June 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Week begins with MPs (belatedly) wishing the Queen a Happy 90th Birthday before holding her ministers' feet to the fire in Question Time. Social Housing Minister, Paula Bennett, admits responsibility for misinforming her prime minister about the involvement of the Salvation Army in canvassing homeless people in Auckland but insists she has nothing to apologise for. Finance minister, Bill English, answering questions about rising sea levels and storm damage to coastal properties across the Tasman, says the government will publish a document about central and local government sharing the costs of risks from global warming. Associate health minister, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iinga, reveals the role of workshops in discussing government spending on home and community support for the elderly.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'05"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - An Unexpected Journey
BODY:
Hobbit fan Naresh Kumar spent three months walking and running the length of New Zealand in sandals. His motto "Live-small, Adventure-lots"
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel
Duration: 18'13"

20:12
Nights' Pundit - Economics
BODY:
What are the Government's options to ease the housing crisis? Independent economics scholar Brian Easton weighs in.
Topics: economy, business, history, life and society, money
Regions:
Tags: economics
Duration: 19'54"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Our Own Odysseys - An Unexpected Journey
Hobbit fan Naresh Kumar spent three months walking and running the length of New Zealand in sandals. His motto "Live-small, Adventure-lots"
[gallery:2101]
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 6 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead, and discusses how new albums by Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan address their advancing years.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead, and discusses how new albums by Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan address their advancing years.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Grateful Dead, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan
Duration: 28'59"

19:30
Day Of The Dead: an epic tribute to the music and artistry of the Grateful Dead
BODY:
Nick Bollinger surveys an epic five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger surveys an epic five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead.
Bryce and Aaron Dessner like big projects. A few years ago, the twin brothers – who play in the group The National – oversaw Dark Was The Night: a two-disc compilation for AIDS fundraiser the Red Hot Organisation, a celebration of alternative music in the broadest sense, with contributors ranging from Cat Power to the Kronos Quartet. Now they have curated another Red Hot collection on an even grander scale.
The theme is the music of the Grateful Dead, that legendary American band, known among other things for concerts of epic length. In their heyday, a Dead show could last anything up to six hours, which is roughly the length of Day Of The Dead: a staggering 59 tracks, spread over 5 discs. To a Deadhead, that’s obviously an appropriate tribute. For anyone who dislikes the Dead it’s a promise of torture.
(There’s a joke told among the unconverted that goes: What do Deadheads say to each other when the drugs wear off? Answer: What is this horrible music we’re listening to?)
Then there are those who wouldn’t know whether they liked the Grateful Dead or not - after all, it’s more than twenty years since the group disbanded, following the death of its leader and figurehead Jerry Garcia, and there’s a generation for whom the Dead are just some hairy hippie band from the pages of history. For such people, Day Of The Dead makes a good corrective. Though the music here isn’t performed by the Grateful Dead, the Dessners have gone out of their way to show what the Dead were, representing their work in all its facets.
The set seems to be designed to ease you in gradually, opening with ‘Touch Of Grey’, the Grateful Dead’s fluke top ten hit from 1987, the only time in their 30-year career that they ever threatened the pop charts. It’s reworked in an 80s-retro style by the War On Drugs, with frontman Adam Granduciel offering a passable approximation of Garcia’s reedy singing.
In fact, one thing that is established early in this collection is the uncanny number of contemporary singers who can sound like dead ringers for Jerry Garcia, a singer I always thought of as unique in his plaintive, unflashy warble. Jim James of My Morning Jacket does a plausible ‘Candyman’, backed by the album’s house band, which includes the Dessners, fellow Nationals Bryan and Scott Devendorf and drummer Conrad Doucette, while Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste tackles the Garcia solo tune ‘Loser’.
By this point the Grateful Dead neophyte may be getting the impression that the Dead weren’t so psychedelic after all, but rather a mellow country-rock band; and at times that’s exactly what they were. It’s not all they were though, and one of the things that made them interesting, even at their most erratic, was that they could be many things at once. In his pre-Dead days, Garcia had been a jug band and bluegrass musician, elements of which remained a cornerstone of the group’s sound throughout their thirty years. Bass player Phil Lesh, on the other hand, was a trained classical trumpeter and had studied composition under Italian modernist Luciano Berio. Drummer Bill Kreutzmann (kroytsman) had a background in jazz; percussionist Mickey Hart was an ethnomusicologist, and guitarist Bob Weir was the closest thing they had to a conventional rock’n’roller. They came together in San Francisco in the mid-60s, just as the hippie movement was staking its ground, and almost by default became its soundtrack. They played at acid tests, trips festivals and Be-In’s, and what had started out as a fairly stock repertoire of 60s folk-rock began to expand into cosmic opuses, which the Dessners’ nod to here in tracks like ‘Nightfall Of Diamonds’, a long improvisation in which the Dessners capture the spirit of one of the Dead’s psychedelic jams, while creating a whole new piece of music.
At other times, it’s more the classical experimentalism of the Dead that’s being honoured. Pioneering minimalist Terry Riley and his son Gyan rework ‘Estimated Prophet’ using a series of drones, while Bryce Dessner takes transcribed fragments of a live Garcia guitar solo to create a whole new composition.
The peak of the Dead’s own compositional ambitions came in 1977 with the second side of their album Terrapin Station. It’s a suite, composed by Garcia and the band’s lyricist Robert Hunter, as elaborately layered as anything in the catalogues of King Crimson or Yes. And it’s performed here in its seventeen-minute entirety – with full orchestration – by an ensemble that combines members of the National and Grizzly Bear.
If prog-rock epics aren’t to your taste, how about world music? Senegal’s Orchestra Baobab offer a version of ‘Franklin’s Tower’, picking up on the hints of African highlife that ran through the Dead’s Blues For Allah album.
While the Dessners can be heard behind the various guests on most of the 59 tracks, providing a solid continuity, a few acts, like Orchestra Baobab, have been left to their own devices. Wilco – who, in their broad embrace of everything from Americana to the avant-garde, resemble in some ways a modern-day Dead – weigh in with a concert recording of the Dead classic ‘St Stephen’; Courtney Barnett gives the Altamont memoir ‘New Speedway Boogie’ her patented slacker-trio treatment, while Marijuana Deathsquads attack the stoner anthem ‘Truckin’ with electronics.
And New Zealand’s own Ruban and Kody Nielson, as Unknown Mortal Orchestra, turn in a far more funky treatment of ‘Shakedown Street’ than the Dead ever managed.
The one time I actually saw the Dead in concert was in the early 80s, at the University of California Los Angeles. I went with a local who had seen the Dead dozens of times. When I asked him what I could expect, he said, as though he were quoting Desiderata: ‘Dead shows are like snowflakes. No two are the same.’
It was certainly unlike most other rock shows I’d seen. There was little fanfare as they shambled on stage; no costumes, none of the usual arena pyrotechnics. A couple of the band were actually wearing shorts. It was maybe half an hour into the set before I started to hear beautiful flurries of guitar notes cutting across the chords – Garcia, who had been keeping a low-profile to one side of the stage, seemed to have finally woken up.
In some ways this album resembles that show I saw, with all its peaks and a few troughs. Mumford and Sons massacre ‘Friend of the Devil’, one of my favourite Dead songs.
But perhaps more than anything, Day Of The Dead is a tribute to a spirit; a spirit in which the rootsiest folk songs and the most cosmic psychedelia exist on the same plane, and where the best things happen when there is room left for chance. Whether you are a paid-up-and-tie-dyed Deadhead or a complete novice, it would be hard to come away from these six hours of music without thinking how rare and noble that spirit is.
Songs featured: Touch Of Grey, Candyman, Loser, Terrapin Station, Franklin’s Tower, Shakedown Street, Truckin’, Morning Dew, Nightfall Of Diamonds, Gracia Counterpoint.
Day Of The Dead is available on 4AD Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Grateful Dead, The National
Duration: 14'46"

19:30
Fallen Angels by Bob Dylan
BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the new Bob Dylan album.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the new Bob Dylan album.
It’s a funny thing that the Great American Songbook – those pre-rock standards immortalised by the likes of Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra – has been more than one rock star’s answer to the ‘how to age gracefully’ question. In recent years the music rock’n’roll originally chased away has been revived, not just by Clapton but also Rod Stewart, Paul McCartney, Lady Gaga - and Bob Dylan.
On Fallen Angels, his second consecutive volume of interpretations of the Great American Songbook, Dylan sounds his 75 years on a set of songs generally associated with Frank Sinatra, yet sings with far more delicacy than he’s brought to his own songs in recent years.
On one level, it is another of the outrages with which Dylan has peppered his career – like the way he left folk music for rock’n’roll, and later rock’n’roll for gospel. Yet as with all of Dylan’s unforeseen tangents, it has a solid musical foundation. And something Dylan perhaps doesn’t get enough credit for is his musicality. So much attention has been lavished on his extraordinary gift for words and his unconventional voice that his purely musical instincts are often overlooked. But the music he has released since 2001’s Love and Theft, when he began producing his own records and using his own band, have been some of his most sophisticated. And his intimate, small-band arrangements of ‘songs usually performed with full orchestration are masterful.
Dylan makes his reverence for these songs clear in the way he sings them. His pitch may be shaky in places, but he honors the melodies and finds something in the words that evidently speaks to his mood.
Somehow lines like “all I see is grief and gloom, ‘til the crack of doom” (from ‘Melancholy Mood’) sound Dylanesque in a way they never have before. And Dylan’s treatment of the material is more imaginative than the lush approach most singers take with these tunes, though it’s not unique. Willie Nelson took his own countrified tour of this golden age with his beautiful and restrained Stardust album in the 70s.
But beyond the obvious musicality of Fallen Angels, is it really essential? Has Dylan found the way to grow old gracefully, or has he run out of things to say yet can’t find a way to stop? Does Dylan’s career end, as a friend of mine recently asked, not with a bang but a Sinatra? It is certainly odd that this most prolific of lyricists appears, at this point, to have run out of words of his own. On the other hand, he has often recorded other people’s songs; his very first album was full of them, and the hot streak of the past seventeen years was preceded by two discs of old folk covers. Is this just Dylan clearing his throat for another burst of lyrical inspiration? At 75 he is still touring, still recording, still impossible to second-guess.
Songs featured: Maybe You’ll Be There, All The Way, It Had To Be You, Melancholy Mood, Young At Heart.
Fallen Angels is available on Columbia Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Bob Dylan
Duration: 8'29"

19:30
I Still Do by Eric Clapton
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the new album by Eric Clapton.

EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the new album by Eric Clapton.
What does it mean for a rock star to age gracefully? Is such a thing possible or even desirable? We’re living through a time when the stars some of us grew up with are contemplating that question.
Eric Clapton opens his new album with an old blues by Leroy Carr, and my first thought listening to this was that he has gone back to where he started. With his flawless guitar and a tinkling piano, it could almost be a track from Bluesbreakers, the John Mayall album that announced Clapton’s arrival as a guitar hero, fifty years ago, almost to the day. Maybe the association is deliberate; then again, the blues has been a touchstone that Clapton has consistently returned to through a career that has taken detours into unchartered free-form with Cream, mellow country-blues with J.J. Cale, and a spell of unplugged introspection courtesy of MTV. And while the new album kicks off in blues mode, it revisits a few of these other guises as well. On several songs Eric sounds a dead-ringer for J.J. Cale, author of ‘After Midnight’ and ‘Cocaine’, a couple of Clapton’s biggest hits. It’s certainly a long way from the flaming blues-rock of Cream, which for many people was when Clapton was at his creative peak. Perhaps the closest he gets to that here is an electrified take on an old Skip James song, though even this has an undertone of mellow.
The album is called I Still Do, which might be Clapton’s answer to any number of questions. Didn’t you used to play the blues? Didn’t you do a lot of J.J. Cale songs?
And while it offers very little in the way of surprises, it is more convincing than his last album, which was titled Old Sock, and smelt like one. Listening to this, though, I can’t help feeling that, great a musician as Clapton is – and the playing and singing here is, in one sense, perfect – he has lost the will or ability to turn his talents to anything that is ever going to surprise anyone again. If he explores any new direction here at all, it is ironically one as old as the Chicago blues that first inspired him: the Great American Songbook.
Closing the album with ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’, a farewell song most commonly associated with Billie Holiday, is poignant, especially as it makes it clear that the way I’ll always think of Clapton – blazing through albums like Wheels Of Fire, Blind Faith and Layla – is not a side of him we’re ever likely to hear again.
Songs featured: Alabama Woman Blues, Can’t Let You Do It, Cypress Grove, I’ll Be Seeing You.
I Still Do is available on Universal Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Eric Clapton
Duration: 7'27"

7:30 The Sampler
Nick Bollinger reviews a five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead, and discusses how new albums by Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan address their advancing years.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Economics
What are the Government's options to ease the housing crisis? Independent economics scholar Brian Easton weighs in.
[image:69528:full]
8:30 Windows on the World
Tens of thousands of people have been killed in Latin America's violent conflicts. Many are buried in mass graves or as "no names". One team is helping to identify those that have gone missing over the past four decades. The Argentine Team of Forensic Anthropology (EAAF), is a world-renowned scientific squad unearthing the evidence and listening to the stories that the bones of fatal victims of violence have to tell.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Gene Genie #5 Looking at what our DNA, our genes, our genomes mean for conservation and how its changing science.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Global Village -This week in the Global Village we head to Norway for music from two magnificent saxophonists who combine traditional and jazz influences - the pioneering Jan Garbarek and inventive contemporary player Karl Seglem. Also music from the Sweet Sunny North set from David Lindley and Henry Kaiser with over 60 Norwegian musicians, and "Norwegian Wood" from Herbie Hancock. Plus Jamaican sounds from African saxophonist Manu Dibango and roots reggae group Arise Roots.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 6 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead, and discusses how new albums by Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan address their advancing years.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead, and discusses how new albums by Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan address their advancing years.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Grateful Dead, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan
Duration: 28'59"

19:30
Day Of The Dead: an epic tribute to the music and artistry of the Grateful Dead
BODY:
Nick Bollinger surveys an epic five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger surveys an epic five-disc tribute to tie-dyed icons Grateful Dead.
Bryce and Aaron Dessner like big projects. A few years ago, the twin brothers – who play in the group The National – oversaw Dark Was The Night: a two-disc compilation for AIDS fundraiser the Red Hot Organisation, a celebration of alternative music in the broadest sense, with contributors ranging from Cat Power to the Kronos Quartet. Now they have curated another Red Hot collection on an even grander scale.
The theme is the music of the Grateful Dead, that legendary American band, known among other things for concerts of epic length. In their heyday, a Dead show could last anything up to six hours, which is roughly the length of Day Of The Dead: a staggering 59 tracks, spread over 5 discs. To a Deadhead, that’s obviously an appropriate tribute. For anyone who dislikes the Dead it’s a promise of torture.
(There’s a joke told among the unconverted that goes: What do Deadheads say to each other when the drugs wear off? Answer: What is this horrible music we’re listening to?)
Then there are those who wouldn’t know whether they liked the Grateful Dead or not - after all, it’s more than twenty years since the group disbanded, following the death of its leader and figurehead Jerry Garcia, and there’s a generation for whom the Dead are just some hairy hippie band from the pages of history. For such people, Day Of The Dead makes a good corrective. Though the music here isn’t performed by the Grateful Dead, the Dessners have gone out of their way to show what the Dead were, representing their work in all its facets.
The set seems to be designed to ease you in gradually, opening with ‘Touch Of Grey’, the Grateful Dead’s fluke top ten hit from 1987, the only time in their 30-year career that they ever threatened the pop charts. It’s reworked in an 80s-retro style by the War On Drugs, with frontman Adam Granduciel offering a passable approximation of Garcia’s reedy singing.
In fact, one thing that is established early in this collection is the uncanny number of contemporary singers who can sound like dead ringers for Jerry Garcia, a singer I always thought of as unique in his plaintive, unflashy warble. Jim James of My Morning Jacket does a plausible ‘Candyman’, backed by the album’s house band, which includes the Dessners, fellow Nationals Bryan and Scott Devendorf and drummer Conrad Doucette, while Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste tackles the Garcia solo tune ‘Loser’.
By this point the Grateful Dead neophyte may be getting the impression that the Dead weren’t so psychedelic after all, but rather a mellow country-rock band; and at times that’s exactly what they were. It’s not all they were though, and one of the things that made them interesting, even at their most erratic, was that they could be many things at once. In his pre-Dead days, Garcia had been a jug band and bluegrass musician, elements of which remained a cornerstone of the group’s sound throughout their thirty years. Bass player Phil Lesh, on the other hand, was a trained classical trumpeter and had studied composition under Italian modernist Luciano Berio. Drummer Bill Kreutzmann (kroytsman) had a background in jazz; percussionist Mickey Hart was an ethnomusicologist, and guitarist Bob Weir was the closest thing they had to a conventional rock’n’roller. They came together in San Francisco in the mid-60s, just as the hippie movement was staking its ground, and almost by default became its soundtrack. They played at acid tests, trips festivals and Be-In’s, and what had started out as a fairly stock repertoire of 60s folk-rock began to expand into cosmic opuses, which the Dessners’ nod to here in tracks like ‘Nightfall Of Diamonds’, a long improvisation in which the Dessners capture the spirit of one of the Dead’s psychedelic jams, while creating a whole new piece of music.
At other times, it’s more the classical experimentalism of the Dead that’s being honoured. Pioneering minimalist Terry Riley and his son Gyan rework ‘Estimated Prophet’ using a series of drones, while Bryce Dessner takes transcribed fragments of a live Garcia guitar solo to create a whole new composition.
The peak of the Dead’s own compositional ambitions came in 1977 with the second side of their album Terrapin Station. It’s a suite, composed by Garcia and the band’s lyricist Robert Hunter, as elaborately layered as anything in the catalogues of King Crimson or Yes. And it’s performed here in its seventeen-minute entirety – with full orchestration – by an ensemble that combines members of the National and Grizzly Bear.
If prog-rock epics aren’t to your taste, how about world music? Senegal’s Orchestra Baobab offer a version of ‘Franklin’s Tower’, picking up on the hints of African highlife that ran through the Dead’s Blues For Allah album.
While the Dessners can be heard behind the various guests on most of the 59 tracks, providing a solid continuity, a few acts, like Orchestra Baobab, have been left to their own devices. Wilco – who, in their broad embrace of everything from Americana to the avant-garde, resemble in some ways a modern-day Dead – weigh in with a concert recording of the Dead classic ‘St Stephen’; Courtney Barnett gives the Altamont memoir ‘New Speedway Boogie’ her patented slacker-trio treatment, while Marijuana Deathsquads attack the stoner anthem ‘Truckin’ with electronics.
And New Zealand’s own Ruban and Kody Nielson, as Unknown Mortal Orchestra, turn in a far more funky treatment of ‘Shakedown Street’ than the Dead ever managed.
The one time I actually saw the Dead in concert was in the early 80s, at the University of California Los Angeles. I went with a local who had seen the Dead dozens of times. When I asked him what I could expect, he said, as though he were quoting Desiderata: ‘Dead shows are like snowflakes. No two are the same.’
It was certainly unlike most other rock shows I’d seen. There was little fanfare as they shambled on stage; no costumes, none of the usual arena pyrotechnics. A couple of the band were actually wearing shorts. It was maybe half an hour into the set before I started to hear beautiful flurries of guitar notes cutting across the chords – Garcia, who had been keeping a low-profile to one side of the stage, seemed to have finally woken up.
In some ways this album resembles that show I saw, with all its peaks and a few troughs. Mumford and Sons massacre ‘Friend of the Devil’, one of my favourite Dead songs.
But perhaps more than anything, Day Of The Dead is a tribute to a spirit; a spirit in which the rootsiest folk songs and the most cosmic psychedelia exist on the same plane, and where the best things happen when there is room left for chance. Whether you are a paid-up-and-tie-dyed Deadhead or a complete novice, it would be hard to come away from these six hours of music without thinking how rare and noble that spirit is.
Songs featured: Touch Of Grey, Candyman, Loser, Terrapin Station, Franklin’s Tower, Shakedown Street, Truckin’, Morning Dew, Nightfall Of Diamonds, Gracia Counterpoint.
Day Of The Dead is available on 4AD Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Grateful Dead, The National
Duration: 14'46"

19:30
Fallen Angels by Bob Dylan
BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the new Bob Dylan album.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger discusses the new Bob Dylan album.
It’s a funny thing that the Great American Songbook – those pre-rock standards immortalised by the likes of Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra – has been more than one rock star’s answer to the ‘how to age gracefully’ question. In recent years the music rock’n’roll originally chased away has been revived, not just by Clapton but also Rod Stewart, Paul McCartney, Lady Gaga - and Bob Dylan.
On Fallen Angels, his second consecutive volume of interpretations of the Great American Songbook, Dylan sounds his 75 years on a set of songs generally associated with Frank Sinatra, yet sings with far more delicacy than he’s brought to his own songs in recent years.
On one level, it is another of the outrages with which Dylan has peppered his career – like the way he left folk music for rock’n’roll, and later rock’n’roll for gospel. Yet as with all of Dylan’s unforeseen tangents, it has a solid musical foundation. And something Dylan perhaps doesn’t get enough credit for is his musicality. So much attention has been lavished on his extraordinary gift for words and his unconventional voice that his purely musical instincts are often overlooked. But the music he has released since 2001’s Love and Theft, when he began producing his own records and using his own band, have been some of his most sophisticated. And his intimate, small-band arrangements of ‘songs usually performed with full orchestration are masterful.
Dylan makes his reverence for these songs clear in the way he sings them. His pitch may be shaky in places, but he honors the melodies and finds something in the words that evidently speaks to his mood.
Somehow lines like “all I see is grief and gloom, ‘til the crack of doom” (from ‘Melancholy Mood’) sound Dylanesque in a way they never have before. And Dylan’s treatment of the material is more imaginative than the lush approach most singers take with these tunes, though it’s not unique. Willie Nelson took his own countrified tour of this golden age with his beautiful and restrained Stardust album in the 70s.
But beyond the obvious musicality of Fallen Angels, is it really essential? Has Dylan found the way to grow old gracefully, or has he run out of things to say yet can’t find a way to stop? Does Dylan’s career end, as a friend of mine recently asked, not with a bang but a Sinatra? It is certainly odd that this most prolific of lyricists appears, at this point, to have run out of words of his own. On the other hand, he has often recorded other people’s songs; his very first album was full of them, and the hot streak of the past seventeen years was preceded by two discs of old folk covers. Is this just Dylan clearing his throat for another burst of lyrical inspiration? At 75 he is still touring, still recording, still impossible to second-guess.
Songs featured: Maybe You’ll Be There, All The Way, It Had To Be You, Melancholy Mood, Young At Heart.
Fallen Angels is available on Columbia Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Bob Dylan
Duration: 8'29"

19:30
I Still Do by Eric Clapton
BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the new album by Eric Clapton.

EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger samples the new album by Eric Clapton.
What does it mean for a rock star to age gracefully? Is such a thing possible or even desirable? We’re living through a time when the stars some of us grew up with are contemplating that question.
Eric Clapton opens his new album with an old blues by Leroy Carr, and my first thought listening to this was that he has gone back to where he started. With his flawless guitar and a tinkling piano, it could almost be a track from Bluesbreakers, the John Mayall album that announced Clapton’s arrival as a guitar hero, fifty years ago, almost to the day. Maybe the association is deliberate; then again, the blues has been a touchstone that Clapton has consistently returned to through a career that has taken detours into unchartered free-form with Cream, mellow country-blues with J.J. Cale, and a spell of unplugged introspection courtesy of MTV. And while the new album kicks off in blues mode, it revisits a few of these other guises as well. On several songs Eric sounds a dead-ringer for J.J. Cale, author of ‘After Midnight’ and ‘Cocaine’, a couple of Clapton’s biggest hits. It’s certainly a long way from the flaming blues-rock of Cream, which for many people was when Clapton was at his creative peak. Perhaps the closest he gets to that here is an electrified take on an old Skip James song, though even this has an undertone of mellow.
The album is called I Still Do, which might be Clapton’s answer to any number of questions. Didn’t you used to play the blues? Didn’t you do a lot of J.J. Cale songs?
And while it offers very little in the way of surprises, it is more convincing than his last album, which was titled Old Sock, and smelt like one. Listening to this, though, I can’t help feeling that, great a musician as Clapton is – and the playing and singing here is, in one sense, perfect – he has lost the will or ability to turn his talents to anything that is ever going to surprise anyone again. If he explores any new direction here at all, it is ironically one as old as the Chicago blues that first inspired him: the Great American Songbook.
Closing the album with ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’, a farewell song most commonly associated with Billie Holiday, is poignant, especially as it makes it clear that the way I’ll always think of Clapton – blazing through albums like Wheels Of Fire, Blind Faith and Layla – is not a side of him we’re ever likely to hear again.
Songs featured: Alabama Woman Blues, Can’t Let You Do It, Cypress Grove, I’ll Be Seeing You.
I Still Do is available on Universal Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Eric Clapton
Duration: 7'27"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Gene Genie - Conservation genomics: In the final of his series of panels considering the implications of genetic research Dr Adam Rutherford discusses ancient DNA and conservation genomics with University of Otago researchers Dr Catherine Collins, Professor Neil Gemmell and Dr Michael Knapp. (5 of 5, RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (11 of 12, KMUW)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288241

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 07 Jun 2016