RNZ National. 2016-06-14. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

14 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 New Jazz Archive (PRX) 3:05 The Cave of Winds by Elspeth Sandys (2 of 4, RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 14 June 2016
BODY:
Trump doubles down on proposal to ban all Muslims entering US; FBI trying to determine killer's motive in mass shooting; Should refugees have to sign a "values statement"; Minister on raising the number of refugees NZ will resettle; and a $450 million methamphetamine seizure.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'17"

06:06
Sports News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'41"

06:17
Government to launch community sponsorship
BODY:
The Government has agreed to trial a programme for community groups to sponsor additional refugees. The Government announced it will increase New Zealand's refugee quota from 750 to 1,000 places from 2018.
Topics: refugees and migrants, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'07"

06:20
Early Business News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'34"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'00"

06:32
Sports News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'41"

06:39
Vigils held for Orlando victims in New Zealand
BODY:
Wellington's rainbow community came out in force last night for a candlelight vigil to support the victims of the Orlando shooting. More than 200 people helped light up the night sky and spoke of solidarity and love.
Topics:
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: orlando shooting, sexualiy
Duration: 2'26"

06:42
ACT party wants refugees to sign a NZ 'values statement'
BODY:
The ACT party wants refugees coming to New Zealand to have to sign up to New Zealand values before they're allowed into the country. The Government has said it will increase New Zealand's refugee quota from 750 to 1000 places from 2018. The ACT leader David Seymour told our political editor Jane Patterson New Zealand should follow Australia's lead in requiring refugees to sign up to societal values.
Topics: politics, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: ACT
Duration: 2'10"

06:45
Oscar Pistorius faces sentencing
BODY:
A hearing is being held to decide Oscar Pistorius' sentence for murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. A psychologist for the defence says Pistorius is unable to testify because of his mental state. Pistorius shot Ms Steenkamp on Valentines day in 2013 and said he mistook her for an intruder.
Topics: crime, sport
Regions:
Tags: South Africa
Duration: 3'12"

06:47
Upbeat hiring intentions in the labour market
BODY:
The employment group, Manpower, says companies' hiring intentions remain strong but there are skills shortages in the manufacturing and construction sectors. The latest Manpower quarterly outlook survey of more than 650 businesses has found a net 12% expect to hire more staff in the third quarter, while most are expecting to stick with the status quo.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'02"

06:52
Nuplex says voter turnout critical to takeover success
BODY:
The resins maker, Nuplex Industries, says the billion-dollar takeover offer from Allnex, won't go ahead unless it can get a large majority of shareholders to approve the deal. The deal needs 75% of the votes cast to be in favour of the scheme, and the yes votes must represent more than half of the total number of Nuplex shares, for the takeover to go ahead .. so the hurdle's quite high.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'59"

06:54
Fliway confident of winning more business after losing customer
BODY:
The freight transport company, Fliway Group, has seen its share price fall more than 9 percent, yesterday after losing a major customer in a competitive bid. The managing director of Fliway, Duncan Hawkesby, says it's disappointing to lose a long-term customer, but he's confident the company can win more business, even though the transport sector has slowed down a bit over the past few months.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Fliway Group
Duration: 1'19"

06:57
Speaker, fmr Ag Min Carter sees trouble ahead with Brexit
BODY:
The former agriculture minister and current speaker of Parliament, David Carter, forsees significant financial and trade issues if Britain decides to leave the EU. New Zealand is in the preliminary stages of negotiating a free trade deal with the EU, but a British exit would probably mean having to go back the drawing board to make new arrangements with Britain.
Topics: rural, business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, EU, UK
Duration: 1'04"

07:06
Sports News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'58"

07:10
More details emerge about Orlando shooting emerge
BODY:
More details are emerging about the man responsible for killing 49 people on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. It is the worst mass shooting in modern US history.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: orlando shooting
Duration: 7'44"

07:20
One sailor aboard Platino is dead, search resumes for another
BODY:
One man is dead and another is missing at sea after being knocked overboard from a New Zealand yacht in atrocious weather in the Pacific.
Topics: Pacific, weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'59"

07:23
Should refugees have to sign a "values statement"?
BODY:
The government's being told it should make refugees sign up to New Zealand values before they allowed into the country. In two years the refugee quota will go up from 750 to a thousand; the first rise since 1987. Now there's debate not only about who should be allowed here but also whether the new limit goes far enough.
Topics: politics, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'37"

07:27
Minister on raising the number of refugees NZ will resettle
BODY:
Minister of Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse on raising the number of refugees New Zealand will resettle.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'23"

07:37
Immigration lock-up akin to preventive detention, academic says
BODY:
A visiting Australian professor says detained New Zealanders across the Tasman are being held in the sort of preventive detention usually reserved for serial killers and rapists. Professor Patrick Keyzer is aiming to debunk the test that keeps the New Zealand citizens incarcerated - a test he says is administered by a total of three people for the whole of Australia, none of whom have proper training.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 3'25"

07:40
Little sets out case for raising refugee quota
BODY:
The government's announcement it will lift New Zealand's refugee quota by two hundred and fifty a year to to 1000 annually has left the Opposition unimpressed. The Labour Leader Andrew Little said the increase was "less than the bare minimum'' which he puts at a minimum of eleven hundred a year.
Topics: politics, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'28"

07:45
Unions oppose trainee teacher plan
BODY:
Teacher unions are calling a government plan to reserve jobs in schools for trainee teachers sneaky and say it'll open a can of worms. The Government wants to give the Education Ministry the power to create positions only student teachers can apply for.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'56"

07:54
Dire warnings for UK if it quits the EU - but not all agree
BODY:
The President of the European Council is warning of dire consequences if Britain chooses next week to leave the EU. In an interview with German newspaper Bild, Donald Tusk said it could be the beginning of the end for the 28-nation bloc and for western political civilisation more generally. And he says a so-called Brexit vote would provide a major boost to radical anti-European forces who he said would be "drinking champagne". But not everybody agrees. Margot Parker is the small business spokesperson for Britain's UK Independence Party, Ukip.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, EU, UKIP
Duration: 5'05"

07:57
Led Zeppelin head to court over Stairway to Heaven law suit
BODY:
It's one of the most recognisable songs in rock music, but who really created it? Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page and Robert Plant are expected to head to a Los Angeles court to defend Stairway to Heaven from accusations of plagiarism. The trustees for the estate of guitarist Randy Wolfe from the band Spirit argue his song "Taurus" has been copied.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'29"

08:06
Sports News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'50"

08:10
Trump doubles down on proposal to ban all Muslims entering US
BODY:
Speaking on the mass killing in Orlando, presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump, has launched into an assault on the Obama administration's immigration policies. Mr Trump reiterated his proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the country and the backed the right of Americans to bear arms.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, orlando shooting
Duration: 5'56"

08:21
FBI trying to determine killer's motive in mass shooting
BODY:
The FBI Director James Comey says authorities are still trying to determine the killer's motives, but there is no indication he was part of an organised terror network, although he may have been inspired by them. Coleen Rowley is a former FBI special agent and division counsel whose May 2002 memo to the FBI Director exposed some of the FBI's pre-9/11 failures, and was named one of TIME magazine's "Persons of the Year" that year.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: FBI, USA, orlando shooting
Duration: 6'50"

08:25
Owners of stricken yacht Platino still have
BODY:
The search has resumed for a sailor missing at sea after being knocked overboard from the yacht Platino. Another man on the 20-metre yacht, Platino, is dead after he was struck by the yacht's rigging. The yacht was halfway between Fiji and New Zealand when the rigging was damaged.
Topics: Pacific, weather
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'23"

08:31
Markets Update for 14 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'12"

08:41
$450 million methamphetamine seizure
BODY:
The police in Northland say they've made a record methamphetamine seizure in Kaitaia; 448 kilos, thought to have an approximate street value of $450 million.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 5'44"

08:43
Govt looks to Canada for solutions on refugees
BODY:
The Government says it is looking closely at the way Canada deals with its new refugees. Canada's model sees private individuals and community groups sponsor refugees and cover their costs for their first 12 months in the country.
Topics: politics, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: Canada
Duration: 3'20"

08:45
Education Minister hits back at criticism of legislation
BODY:
The Education Minister Hekia Parata has hit back at claims that a legislative change will allow unqualified teacher trainees to go solo in secondary school classrooms. The amendment to the Education Act would give Teach First trainees access to some jobs ahead of qualified teachers and comes after the Employment Relations Authority ruled against the Government over the plan.
Topics: education, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'22"

08:45
Asbestos-contaminated trains disputes heads to ERA
BODY:
The arguments over KiwiRail's purchase of asbestos-contaminated trains head to the Employment Relations Authority. The union representing workers at Kiwirail say their members, not employees of the trains' Chinese manufacturers should have been the ones to clean the trains up.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags: Kiwirail
Duration: 2'41"

08:56
Special Housing Area in Nelson testing boundaries of new system
BODY:
Some Nelson residents are upset a carpark in the central city has been deemed a special housing area and is earmarked for a four storey apartment building. They say they have been taken by surprise at the speed of the process to fast track the development and the precedent it could set for unbridled development in the city.
Topics: housing, transport
Regions: Tasman
Tags:
Duration: 3'37"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: The War in Sardinia, by Lloyd Jones, read by William Kircher. The story of a New Zealander with German parents interned on Somes Island in Wellington harbour during World War II. (2 of 5)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Ticking time bombs in NZ economy?
BODY:
Housing booms and dairy busts - what are the vulnerabilities in New Zealand's economy and what role has the government played in setting policy? Nine to Noon speaks to Kerry McDonald, former Chief Economist at the Comalco Group who's written a thinkpiece critical of the government's current approach and director of the NZIE and Kim Campbell, the Auckland Chair of the Employers and Manufacturers Association.
Topics: politics, economy, refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags: housing, tourism, dairy
Duration: 29'59"

09:40
Wine reviews: should money change hands?
BODY:
Many wine bottles on supermarket or wine shop shelves carry gold stickers other than those earned from a recognised wine competition. The Wine Writers Association says this is misleading for consumers and New Zealand needs to follow Australia's lead and only allow stickers that have been won in open and independent wine competitions. Kathryn talks to the Association chair, Jo Burzynska, Michael Glover - winemaker at Nelson's Mahana Wines and wine consultant Sam Kim.
EXTENDED BODY:
http://www.wineorbit.co.nz/
Topics: rural, business
Regions:
Tags: wine
Duration: 15'34"

09:54
USA correspondent - Steve Almond
BODY:
Steve Almond reports from the US on the Orlando shooting, and how Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson could be the rising US election 'spoiler'.
Topics: politics, crime, refugees and migrants, conflict
Regions:
Tags: USA, United States, orlando shooting, Gary Johnson, Donald Trump, Barack Obama
Duration: 5'56"

10:08
Roger Thurow: The First 1,000 Days
BODY:
During Pulitzer prize nominee and Wall Street Journal reporter of three decades Roger Thurow’s time as a foreign correspondent he covered famines in Africa. Now he advocates for better nutrition around the world. His book The First 1,000 Days: a Crucial time for Mothers and Children – and the World tells the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition from conception to a child's second birthday through experiences of families in Uganda, India, Guatemala and his home town of Chicago.
EXTENDED BODY:
Former Wall Street Journal reporter and Pulitzer prize nominee Roger Thurow believes getting the right food in our first 1000 days of existence can set us up for life.
Famine reporter turned nutrition campaigner, Thurow has been to the four corners of the world reporting on communities hoping to transform their children's prospects during a window of opportunity from conception to our 2nd birthday.
According to the World Health Organisation 1 in 4 children are stunted because of malnutrition during this period.
In his book The First 1,000 Days he takes us into the lives of families in Ethiopia, India, Guatemala and Chicago - where there is either a lack of food, or in Chicago's case a predilection for junk food -to illuminate the science, economics, and politics of malnutrition.
In 2003, he and Journal colleague Scott Kilman wrote a series of stories on famine in Africa that was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting.
Their reporting on humanitarian and development issues was also honoured by the United Nations. Thurow and Kilman are authors of the book, ENOUGH: Why the World's Poorest Starve in an Age of Plenty.
Thurow also joined The Chicago Council on Global Affairs as a senior fellow for global agriculture and food policy in January 2010; he is the columnist of the Council's Global Food for Thought blog.
In 2012, he also became a Fellow at the ONE Campaign.
He was also a former reporter for The Wall Street Journal for 30 years – 20 of them as a foreign correspondent based in Europe and Africa.
Topics: media, inequality, food, books
Regions:
Tags: famine, Africa, USA, US
Duration: 28'20"

10:39
Book review - The Watercolourist
BODY:
The Watercolourist by Beatrice Masini is reviewed by Anne Else, and published by Macmillan.
Topics: books, history
Regions:
Tags: Italy
Duration: 3'13"

11:07
Business with Rod Oram
BODY:
The SKY television/Vodafone NZ merger, a NZ round of negotiations begins on the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership trade talks, led by China, and Air New Zealand sells most of its stake in Virgin Australia.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Air New Zealand
Duration: 15'43"

11:22
Empowering single Indonesian women
BODY:
Nani Zulminarni is on a mission to empower women in her home country of Indonesia, especially those marginalised by the status of being single, widowed, abandoned or divorced. Despite there being about 6 and a half million women heads of households in Indonesia, they have no social or legal recognition. After her divorce in 2000 Nani found that she often faced discrimination and stereotyping as a divorcee, which led her to projects to empower poor women heads of households. She then founded PEKKA, an organization that supports over 30,000 rural widows, abandoned and divorced women in more than 800 villages throughout Indonesia, assisting its members and leaders with access to livelihood resources, decision-making processes, social protection and justice.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nani Zulminarni is on a mission to empower women in her home country of Indonesia, especially those marginalised by the status of being single, widowed, abandoned or divorced.
Despite there being about 6 and a half million women heads of households in Indonesia, they have no social or legal recognition. After her divorce in 2000 Nani found that she often faced discrimination and stereotyping as a divorcee, which led her to projects to empower poor women heads of households.
She then founded PEKKA, an organization that supports over 30,000 rural widows, abandoned and divorced women in more than 800 villages throughout Indonesia, assisting its members and leaders with access to livelihood resources, decision-making processes, social protection and justice.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
30,000 rural widows or abandoned or divorced women, 800 villages throughout Indonesia – this is a big organisation. How quickly has it built?
Fifteen years. It’s very slow actually. We wish we could reach more but it’s very difficult because the members of this group are really the poorest of the poor and to really bring them into this organisation is not easy. We have to go house by house.
What kind of resistance do you come across?
The first is from the community themselves. We start organising and they come, ‘What are you doing?’ and they spread rumours that we will traffic them, that we will sell them into prostitution, because the women don’t have husbands. For the first three years we were rejected by many villagers and also by traditional leaders. They’re male usually, do not like what we are doing. Local government as well… but after, maybe starting the fifth year, we slowly started to get some recognition.
Are they starting to see some of those entrenched interests, starting to see that you’re solving some problems?
Yes, also they see the leadership of the women grow and even we in the Eastern part of Indonesia we have seen a few women become village head, elected by the whole village. It’s a huge transformation because they were being discriminated against but they’re now becoming the village head.
While it’s solving problems and upsetting the status quo, I can see that it’s getting wider support, but is it going to get to a wider point where there is more of a democratic element to it and some of the entrenched interests might say, ‘Hang on a minute’. Do you think about that or do you see it as an important building block towards more broader rights and leadership roles?
We do, yes. We think it is a building block and also we try to really use the PAKKA association to really modify other marginalised groups to do the same, to take the broader leadership in the community because they understand how being the poorest of the poor and how to facilitate the other community members.
That 15 years coincides with your own personal circumstances almost exactly. What was your own experience being a married woman and socially acceptable and then what was your experience after your divorce, how dramatic was it?
Well it is very bad. I never imagined, because before when people would say, ‘It’s very difficult’, being a divorced woman, single woman, I never imagine about that. So when I experience this, it’s real.
So I had experience when I started organising this and I had meetings in this conflict area and behind us were several mens village head. When I introduced myself and said that my name is Nani and I am divorced and I have three sons, suddenly this man stands up and points his finger to my face and said, ‘Did you say that you’re divorced? How dare you come to my village and want to work with my women while you can’t even take care of your husband.’ So that made me aware of how bad people see divorced women while they don't even understand why we get divorced. Nobody wants to get divorced, especially when you have children. I reject to be in a polygamous marriage and I do not want to be betraying my marriage, so that is why I get divorced.
It is really difficult and at the same time I was with a women’s organisation at the time and I felt embarrassed. How can a leader of the women’s’ organisation get divorced? So that is why then I resigned from this organisation and I started my own organisation called PAKKA, because I thought I had to heal myself. I got divorced and I have three small children and I lost my income. It was very difficult even for me; I have a good education background, I have my friends, I have all of my connections and network. It’s difficult.
I travelled around several places in Indonesia and I found these poor women living alone with five small children in the middle of nowhere, with nothing, and yet she can smile and she can survive. It makes me feel like something must be organised with these women to get all of their energy and spirit to fight this.
Topics: inequality
Regions:
Tags: Nani Zulminarni, Indonesia, marriage, relationships, divorce
Duration: 17'22"

11:50
Media with Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Gavin Ellis on a damning report on kickbacks in the U.S. advertising industry is leading to calls for greater transparency in our part of the world; The PWC outlook for New Zealand media over the next five years spells bad news for newspapers good news for broadcast television, and journalists as photographers and videographers - does this cost-cutting trend also spells major cuts in quality?
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: advertising, video, journalism, television, US, USA
Duration: 15'57"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 New Zealand Inc - what's the plan?
Housing booms and dairy busts - what's the long term plan for New Zealand's economy? Nine to Noon speaks to Kerry McDonald, former managing director and chief economist at the Comalco Group and Kim Campbell, the Auckland Chair of the Employers and Manufacturers Association
09:20 Wine reviews: should money change hands?
[image:59129:half]
Many wine bottles on supermarket or wine shop shelves carry gold stickers other than those earned from a recognised wine competition. The Wine Writers Association says this is misleading for consumers and New Zealand needs to follow Australia's lead and only allow stickers that have been won in open and independent wine competitions. Kathryn talks to the Association chair, Jo Burzynska, Michael Glover - winemaker at Nelson's Mahana Wines and wine consultant Sam Kim.
09:45 US correspondent Steve Almond
Steve Almond reports from the US on the Orlando shooting, Senator Elizabeth Warren emerging as the most ferocious anti-Trump surrogate, and a possible VP choice for Clinton and how Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson could be the rising US election 'spoiler'.
10:05 Roger Thurow: The First 1,000 Days
Wall Street Journal reporter of 30 years, Pulitzer prize nominee Roger Thurow talks about the importance of good nutrition in the first 1,000 days of life. In his book The First 1,000 Days Roger takes us into the lives of families in Ethiopia, India, Guatemala and Chicago - where there is either a lack of food, or in Chicago's case a predilection for junk food - to illuminate the science, economics, and politics of malnutrition.
[gallery:2129]
10:35 Book review - The Watercolourist by Beatrice Masini
reviewed by Anne Else, published by Macmillan
10:45 The Reading
The War in Sardinia by Lloyd Jones read by William Kircher (Part 2 of 5)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
The SKY television/Vodafone NZ merger, a NZ round of negotiations begins on the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership trade talks, led by China, and Air New Zealand sells most of its stake in Virgin Australia.
11:20 Empowering single Indonesian women
[image:71264:quarter]
Nani Zulminarni is on a mission to empower women in her home country of Indonesia, especially those marginalised by the status of being single, widowed, abandoned or divorced. Despite there being about 6 and a half million women heads of households in Indonesia, they have no social or legal recognition. After her divorce in 2000 Nani found that she often faced discrimination and stereotyping as a divorcee, which led her to projects to empower poor women heads of households. She then founded PEKKA, an organization that supports over 30,000 rural widows, abandoned and divorced women in more than 800 villages throughout Indonesia, assisting its members and leaders with access to livelihood resources, decision-making processes, social protection and justice.
11:45 Media commentator
Gavin Ellis on a damning report on kickbacks in the U.S. advertising industry is leading to calls for greater transparency in our part of the world; The PWC outlook for New Zealand media over the next five years spells bad news for newspapers good news for broadcast television, and journalists as photographers and videographers - does this cost-cutting trend also spells major cuts in quality?

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: Eilen Jewell
Song: Hooked
Composer: Jewell
Album: Queen of the Minor Key
Label: Signature
Played at: 10:07

Artist: Ardijah
Song: Watching You
Composer: Monga
Album: Kiwi Gold Vol 1
Label: NZ on Air
Played at: 10:36
Artist: JJ Cale & Eric Clapton
Song: It's Easy
Composer: JJ Cale
Album: The Road to Escondido
Label: Reprise
Played at: 11:22

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
Northland Police seize a record amount of methamphetamine and America's presidential hopefuls clash on how to stop shooting massacres.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'06"

12:17
Competition watchdog outlines media merger inquiry
BODY:
Changes in the media sector including whether there are different print, broadcast and online markets look set to figure prominently in the Commerce Commission's investigation into the proposed merger between Fairfax and NZME.
Topics: business, media
Regions:
Tags: Fairfax, NZME
Duration: 1'25"

12:17
Kerry McDonald says merit in trans-Tasman stock exchange
BODY:
A prominent businessman says New Zealand's reluctance to invest in fledgling technology companies is leading to a loss of good quality businesses overseas.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 57"

12:21
Nuplex shareholders have 200-page takeover offer to consider
BODY:
The shareholders of the resins manufacturer, Nuplex Industries, will be recieving a near 200-page document in the mail this week as part of the billion-dollar takeover offer from Allnex.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Nuplex Industries
Duration: 1'27"

12:23
Midday Markets for 14 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Belinda Stanley at Craigs Investment Partners.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'31"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The cervical testing equipment company, TruScreen, has made a full year loss - almost twice as much as its loss the year earlier, impacted by a lack of inventory to sell.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'04"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
The international retirement of Nathan and Brendon McCullum has opened the door for two new faces in the Black Caps.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'22"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 14 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
Could Google results change an election ?
BODY:
If you've seen the show House of Cards you'll know the storyline about the presidential candidate using the search engine PollyHop to find out what the voters think and believe. That show is fiction but is the storyline plausible? In recent weeks Google has been accused of favouring Hillary Clinton's campaign, and Facebook has been criticised by conservatives for hiding their point of view from news feeds. Dr Robert Epstein is, a San Diego-based psychologist who has done extensive research into human-adjusted search engines and how they shape what we see and what we don't.
EXTENDED BODY:
If you've seen the show House of Cards you'll know the storyline about the presidential candidate using the search engine PollyHop to find out what the voters think and believe. That show is fiction but is the storyline plausible?
In recent weeks Google has been accused of favouring Hillary Clinton's campaign, and Facebook has been criticised by conservatives for hiding their point of view from news feeds.
Dr Robert Epstein is, a San Diego-based psychologist who has done extensive research into human-adjusted search engines and how they shape what we see and what we don't.
He talks to Jesse Mulligan.
Topics: internet
Regions:
Tags: Google, Facebook
Duration: 16'22"

13:32
Mapping the Marlborough Sounds Seabed
BODY:
A new project has been green lit, to map the seabed of the Marlborough Sounds. It will be the first time in 70 years, any mapping has been done in the area. It's a multi-million dollar marine project between the Marlborough District Council and Land Information New Zealand. Adam Greenland, is a national hydrographer, at Land Information New Zealand.
Topics: environment
Regions: Marlborough
Tags: Marlborough Sounds
Duration: 5'44"

13:37
Film reviewer - Dan Slevin
BODY:
Football in the movies.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: films
Duration: 8'48"

13:46
Favourite album
BODY:
'The Sound Inside' by Breaks Co-op.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 13'18"

14:08
Critic: Paul Little talks books
BODY:
"City on Fire" by Garth Risk Hallberg
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'21"

14:16
Auckland Dogs are losing their colour
BODY:
If you live in Auckland, and you're a dog owner, your ginger dog could now simply be called red. Your silver, sand, ash and pepper... a simple grey. Auckland Council is culling the 46 colours used to describe dogs, and will be using a mere 11. Albert-Eden-Roskill Councillor, Dr Cathy Casey, is here to talk dogs!
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: dogs, colour
Duration: 5'17"

14:21
Great New Zealand Album: Mark Williams by Mark Williams
BODY:
Today, the debut album from a shy, slight young lad from Dargaville whose high school band The Face achieved some notoriety, taking third place in a national Battle of the Bands contest. His solo career was launched on the TV show "Free Ride." That bought him to the attention of the wider public and led to a recording contract with EMI New Zealand which, in turn, resulted in the release of his self titled first album in 1975. It stayed n the charts for 30 weeks became the biggest New Zealand Pop/Rock album of the 70's. Mark Williams speaks to us from Sydney this afternoon and the album's producer Alan Galbraith also joins us from Carterton.
EXTENDED BODY:
Today, the debut album from a shy, slight young lad from Dargaville whose high school band The Face achieved some notoriety, taking third place in a national Battle of the Bands contest. His solo career was launched on the TV show "Free Ride." That bought him to the attention of the wider public and led to a recording contract with EMI New Zealand which, in turn, resulted in the release of his self titled first album in 1975. It stayed n the charts for 30 weeks became the biggest New Zealand Pop/Rock album of the 70's.
Mark Williams speaks to us from Sydney this afternoon and the album's producer Alan Galbraith also joins us from Carterton.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 38'24"

15:07
London Bombing survivor, Dr Gill Hicks
BODY:
Dr Gill Hicks could be forgiven for choosing not to forgive the terrorists who carried out the bombings on the London Underground in 2005, killing 52 people and injuring 700 others. She lost her legs and nearly lost her life. But she has forgiven the people responsible. She says the cycle of hate has to stop. She's now an advocate non-violent solutions to conflict. Dr Gill Hicks will be in our Auckland Studio.
EXTENDED BODY:
Dr Gill Hicks could be forgiven for choosing not to forgive the terrorists who carried out the bombings on the London Underground in 2005, killing 52 people and injuring 700 others.
She lost her legs and nearly lost her life.
But she has forgiven the people responsible. She says the cycle of hate has to stop. She's now an advocate non-violent solutions to conflict.
She spoke with Jesse Mulligan in our Auckland studio
Dr Gill Hicks also released a M.A.D. For Peace APP

Topics: conflict
Regions:
Tags: Dr Gill Hicks
Duration: 27'26"

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 14 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'35"

21:46
Gotta have skin
BODY:
A tougher artificial skin, that is quick to grow in the lab, could revolutionise the treament of burn victims and increase their chance of survival.
EXTENDED BODY:
University of Auckland scientists should soon be able to grow new skin, faster and tougher than ever before. It could revolutionise ways of treating burn victims and boost their chances of survival.
The new technique is the brainchild of Dr Vaughan Feisst and Professor Rod Dunbar at the University of Auckland’s School of Biological Sciences. After seven years work they will soon be ready to start clinical trials.
When David Steemson visited the pair in the lab, Vaughan let him look into the incubator machine, where donated skin was being broken down as the first step of creating new skin.
The separated cells are placed on a newly developed synthetic substrate, and after being fed the right kind of food, those cells start reproducing.
Scientists have made skin before, but the Auckland researchers have developed a way to grow more than just one layer of skin, just like the real thing. That makes the finished product a whole lot stronger than previous fragile iterations.
Skin is the body’s biggest organ. Each human carries around about four kilograms of it.
Rod says that in severe burn cases the body effectively leaks, and it has to be sealed off if the patient is to be saved. At present, if the patient does not have enough of their own skin for grafts, the surgeon can use donated skin from deceased donors.
But he says rejection kicks in rapidly, once the immune system realises the skin is from somebody else. The donor skin then has to be scraped off in a series of operations that have been likened to medieval torture. With luck, more skin from the patient’s own body can then be grafted.
All this could change though, if the Auckland scientists’ techniques to produce a lot of new skin from a tiny number of the patient’s skin cells goes into commercial use.
“Now we want to develop a manufacturing system that’s so simple to use we could put into any lab in the world,” says Rod. “It could be in a burns unit at a disaster site or in a war situation. The easier we make it the more likely it is for the technology to be picked up.”

Vaughan says other scientists have tried to grow new skin on a substrate made from animal product but he says that means there’s a danger of disease or rejection.
“We’ve found a synthetic substrate that we can make lots of, and is easy to manipulate if we change the properties of the skin”.

It is special material that will dissolve once the new skin is put in place. It’s the same product used in dissolvable sutures.
Rod says his team has come up with a dozen innovations to get the new product to work. The techniques are being kept under wraps, while the University applies for world patents. That could be achieved by the end of the year.
“It could be a fully automatic skin-making machine,” says Vaughan. “This is my baby. I’ve been working on it so long.”

Topics: science, health
Regions:
Tags: skin, artificial skin, Burns
Duration: 16'17"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
[image:71380:half]
1:15 Could Google results change an election ?
If you've seen the show House of Cards you'll know the storyline about the presidential candidate using the search engine PollyHop to find out what the voters think and believe. That show is fiction but is the storyline plausible?
In recent weeks Google has been accused of favouring Hillary Clinton's campaign, and Facebook has been criticised by conservatives for hiding their point of view from news feeds.
Dr Robert Epstein is, a San Diego-based psychologist who has done extensive research into human-adjusted search engines and how they shape what we see and what we don't.
1:25 Mapping the Marlborough Sounds Seabed
A new project has been green lit, to map the seabed of the Marlborough Sounds. It will be the first time in 70 years, any mapping has been done in the area. It's a multi-million dollar marine project between the Marlborough District Council and Land Information New Zealand. Adam Greenland, is a national hydrographer, at Land Information New Zealand.
1:35 Dan Slevin: football in the movies
1:40 Favourite album: The Sound Inside by Breaks Co-op.
2:10 Critic: Paul Little talks books
[image:71395:half]
2:20 Auckland Dogs are losing their colour
If you live in Auckland, and you're a dog owner, your ginger dog could now simply be called red. Your silver, sand, ash and pepper... a simple grey.
Auckland Council is culling the 46 colours used to describe dogs, and will be using a mere 11. Albert-Eden-Roskill Councillor, Dr Cathy Casey, is here to talk dogs!
2:25 Great New Zealand Album: Mark Williams by Mark Williams
Today, the debut album from a shy, slight young lad from Dargaville whose high school band The Face achieved some notoriety, taking third place in a national Battle of the Bands contest. His solo career was launched on the TV show "Free Ride." That bought him to the attention of the wider public and led to a recording contract with EMI New Zealand which, in turn, resulted in the release of his self titled first album in 1975. It stayed n the charts for 30 weeks became the biggest New Zealand Pop/Rock album of the 70's.
[gallery:2134]
Mark Williams speaks to us from Sydney this afternoon and the album's producer Alan Galbraith also joins us from Carterton.
[image:70904:half] no metadata
3:10 London Bombing survivor, Dr Gill Hicks
Dr Gill Hicks could be forgiven for choosing not to forgive the terrorists who carried out the bombings on the London Underground in 2005, killing 52 people and injuring 700 others.
She lost her legs and nearly lost her life.
But she has forgiven the people responsible. She says the cycle of hate has to stop. She's now an advocate non-violent solutions to conflict.
Dr Gill Hicks will be in our Auckland Studio.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1- 4pm
Tuesday 14th June
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Band of Horses
TITLE: Casual Party
COMP: Ben Bridwell, Bill Reynolds
ALBUM: Why Are You OK
LABEL: Columbia
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Breaks Co-Op
TITLE: The Otherside
COMP: Breaks Co-op
ALBUM: The Sound Inside
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Breaks Co-Op
TITLE: Question of Freedom
COMP: Breaks Co-op
ALBUM: The Sound Inside
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Breaks Co-Op
TITLE: Beats Interlude
COMP: Breaks Co-op
ALBUM: The Sound Inside
LABEL: EMI
THE GREAT NEW ZEALAND ALBUM: Mark Williams
ARTIST: Mark Williams
TITLE: Celebration
COMP: Tony Ashton, Jon Lord
ALBUM: Mark Williams
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Mark Williams
TITLE: Yesterday Was Just The Beginning of My Life
COMP: Harry Vanda, George Young
ALBUM: Mark Williams
LABEL: EMI
ARTIST: Mark Williams
TITLE: Gimmie Little Sign
COMP: Alfred Smith, Joe Hooven, Jerry Winn
ALBUM: Mark Williams
LABEL: EMI
PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: Beyoncé (Feat: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)
TITLE: Flawless
COMP: Beyoncé Knowles, Terius Nash, Chauncey Hollis, Raymond DeAndre Martin, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
ALBUM: Beyoncé
LABEL: Columbia

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:45
The Panel pre-show for 14 June 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 14'35"

16:03
The Panel with Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen (Part 1)
BODY:
What the panelists Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen have been up to. There are more conflicting views about the reason the gunman went on the ramapge in Orlando. ACT Party leader David Seymour's under fire for suggesting that refugees should sign up to our "values" if they want to come here, as they do in Australia. President of Muslim Progressive Association Reem Sweid talks about Islam and homosexuality.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'15"

16:05
The Panel with Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen (Part 2)
BODY:
.London's mayor decides that images promoting weight loss are body shaming women. What Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen have been thinking about. .Lawyer Graeme Edgler is on the panel to discuss extending laws on cyber bullying and the questionable questions being asked of potential candidates for the job of Auckland museum director. More New Zealanders are staying in the workforce after they've reached the age of superannuation entitlement. The use of taxpayer funded crown cars during the Northland by election campaign being questioned.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 29'06"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the panelists Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'07"

16:13
More views on the Orlando shooting and the root cause
BODY:
There are more conflicting views about the reason the gunman went on the ramapge in Orlando.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: terrorism, US, Florida
Duration: 2'57"

16:16
ACT leader slammed for suggesting values pledge
BODY:
ACT Party leader David Seymour's under fire for suggesting that refugees should sign up to our "values" if they want to come here, as they do in Australia.
Topics: refugees and migrants, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'09"

16:20
President of Muslim Progressive Association Reem Sweid
BODY:
Talks about Islam and homosexuality.
Topics: refugees and migrants, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 9'14"

16:33
Body shaming linked to women's weight loss ads
BODY:
London's mayor decides that images promoting weight loss are body shaming women.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 3'32"

16:36
Panel Says
BODY:
What Gary McCormack and Jeremy Hansen have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 5'50"

16:40
Cyberbullying and privacy laws
BODY:
Lawyer Graeme Edgler is on the panel to discuss extending laws on cyber bullying and the questionable questions being asked of potential candidates for the job of Auckland museum director.
Topics: law
Regions:
Tags: cyberbullying
Duration: 11'37"

16:52
More NZers are working past their retirement entitlement ages
BODY:
More New Zealanders are staying in the workforce after they've reached the age of superannuation entitlement.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: older workers
Duration: 5'07"

16:57
Crown cars used during byelection campaign in Northland
BODY:
The use of taxpayer funded crown cars during the Northland by election campaign being questioned.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: crown cars
Duration: 1'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

12:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 14th June 2016
BODY:
Watch Tuesday's full programme here. It begins 5 minutes in.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:11
Paula Bennett standup outside Te Puea
BODY:
Paula Bennett visited Te Puea marae this morning after increasing pressure from media and members of the public, and was given a tour of the facilities and accommodation.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 7'55"

17:16
Bennett apologises to Te Puea chairman
BODY:
Paula Bennett was this afternoon forced to apologise to Hurimoana Dennis from Te Puea Marae, after one of her staff members told a journalist he was under police investigation.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'37"

17:18
Hurimoana Dennis under investigation
BODY:
Mokotini Templeton, from Te Puea marae, joins Checkpoint to discuss the police investigation involving chairman Hurimoana Dennis and Paula Bennett's related apology.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Hurimoana Dennis
Duration: 4'43"

17:23
Florida gunman a regular at gay nightclub
BODY:
Media organisations around the world are reporting that Orlando gunman Omar Mateen was a regular at the Pulse nightclub where he murdered 49 people and injured at least 53.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, terrorism, Florida, omar mateen
Duration: 7'10"

17:34
Evening Business for 14 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'45"

17:36
Three rescued from stricken yacht
BODY:
Three people have been rescued from their stricken yacht in the Pacific Ocean but the body of one of their crewmates has been left on the vessel.
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: rescue
Duration: 4'10"

17:40
NZ's largest ever meth bust seized in Northland
BODY:
An abandoned boat, a mysterious campervan and two unidentified men have led police to net New Zealand's biggest ever seizure of methaphetmine.
Topics: crime
Regions: Northland
Tags: methaphetmine
Duration: 4'02"

17:44
Kaitaia community leader on meth bust
BODY:
Te Oneroa a Tōhe board chair Haami Piripi joins Checkpoint to discuss the enormous meth bust around Ninety Mile Beach.
Topics: crime
Regions: Northland
Tags: methaphetmine
Duration: 2'40"

17:47
Boy tells inquest he regrets fighting Stephen Dudley
BODY:
One of Stephen Dudley's attackers has told an inquest into the Auckland teenager's death that they both felt pressured to fight each other, even through neither wanted to.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Stephen Dudley
Duration: 2'24"

17:50
Scope to help more refugees - advocates
BODY:
Advocates say there's plenty of scope to further increase the number of refugees accepted by New Zealand, but the Government has to step up and support them.
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'25"

17:53
Opinion diverse on what constitutes Kiwi Values
BODY:
Meanwhile the ACT Party leader is demanding refugees sign up to Kiwi values before being allowed into the country but what exactly are they?
Topics: refugees and migrants
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'15"

17:56
Chiefs set to take on Wales in Hamilton
BODY:
The Super Rugby side the Chiefs take on Wales in Hamilton tonight, in a one-off match against the visiting internationals.
Topics: sport
Regions: Waikato
Tags: Chiefs, rugby
Duration: 3'14"

18:09
Bennet apologises to marae chair
BODY:
Social Housing Minister Paula Bennett has been forced to apologise to the chair of an Auckland marae that's sheltering the homeless.
Topics: politics
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Hurimoana Dennis
Duration: 5'27"

18:19
Couch calls for more blood donation
BODY:
After surviving William Bell's attack on the Mt Wellington RSA in 2001, Susan Couch is appealing to people who can donate blood to do so, on World Blood Donor Day.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: blood donation, blood
Duration: 4'33"

18:23
Health board warning over pharmacy charges
BODY:
The Nelson Marlborough District Health Board is warning that some pharmacies in the region are charging people more for prescriptions than is allowed under their contract.
Topics: health
Regions: Nelson Region
Tags: pharmacies
Duration: 2'59"

18:26
3 people rescued from yacht as search continues for missing man
BODY:
Three people stranded on a yacht in the middle of the Pacific have now been rescued, but the search for one man who fell overboard is continuing
Topics: Pacific
Regions:
Tags: rescue
Duration: 2'46"

18:55
Today In Parliament for 14 June 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Prime Minister leads MPs in expressing sympathy for the victims of Sunday’s massacre in a gay night club in Orlando, Florida. The debate raises issue of homophobia. gun control and immigration. Speaker declines a request for a snap debate on the Government’s decision to raise the annual refugee quota from 750 to 1000 in 2018. Health minister, Jonathan Coleman, and his Labour shadow, Annette King, go another round in their never-ending sparring match on health spending. She calls him “a nasty little man” and he accuses her of making things up.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'08"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | Worldwatch===
=DESCRIPTION=

The stories behind the international headlines

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:10
Our Own Odysseys - China's Hidden Coast
BODY:
Peter Kerr shares his 3 month trip exploring the south east coast of China by bicycle.
Topics: language, life and society
Regions:
Tags: China, Biking, travel
Duration: 17'37"

20:10
Nights' Pundit - Philosophy
BODY:
What makes for a good life? Philosopher at large Ann Kerwin looks at Todd May's book A Significant Life - Human Meaning in a Silent Universe.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: philosophy, meaning, the meaning of life
Duration: 17'23"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image:71424:half]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - China's Hidden Coast
Peter Kerr shares his 3 month trip exploring the south east coast of China by bicycle.
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 14 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada; the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria; and a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty’s first band, Mudcrutch.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada; the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria; and a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty’s first band, Mudcrutch.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Kaytranada, Adia Victoria, Mudcrutch, music, music review
Duration: 30'00"

19:30
99.9% by Kaytranada
BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada.
Until recently, the name Kaytranada was one you were likely to come across only if you were paying close attention to the world of dance remixes. But the release of Kaytranada’s first full-length album proves he is an artist whose work is destined for the wider world.
Kaytranada is Louis Kevin Celestin, 23-year-old son of Haitian immigrants, living in Montreal. He’s been DJing, mixing and making his own recordings since his early teens. But it was a 2012 unofficial remix of Janet Jackson’s megahit ‘If’ – posted on SoundCloud - that really got people’s attention. Since that SoundCloud hit, he’s toured internationally, played opening sets for Madonna and - for this first album - recorded official collaborations with a variety of artists, from silk-voiced British star Craig David to underground hero Syd The Kid (of hip-hop collective Odd Future and soon-to-tour-here neo-soul band The Internet.) Her voice drifts through the dance-scape, like one of Celestin’s customised sounds.
Not all of the guests are vocalists. There’s also a collaboration with Canadian instrumental hip-hop combo BadBadNotGood, blending one of their organic rhythm tracks with another of Kaytranada’s patented synthscapes.
The album opens with high-hat and handclaps, a wobbly bass, and a synthesiser flapping around as though it’s trying to turn the sound system inside out. It immediately locates us on a dance floor; one where the contours seem to be shifting with almost every beat.
The overall mood of 99.9% is mellow, but not melancholy, and when it picks up it feels bright without being aggressive. While the guests all bring their individual personalities, it’s Celestin’s production that gives it coherence.
Songs featured: Track Uno, Together, Got It Good, You’re The One, Glowed Up, Weight Off, Breakdance Lesson.
Kaytranada's 99.9% world tour will be touching down 28th October at Studio, Auckland.
99.9% is available on XL Recordings.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Kaytranada, XL recordings
Duration: 9'07"

19:30
Beyond The Bloodhounds by Adia Victoria
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria.
As the birthplace of the blues, America’s southern states have always had a romantic lure; ask anyone, from the Rolling Stones to Nick Cave. It might seem a whole lot less romantic, though, if it was where you actually came from – particularly if you were black and poor.
Adia Victoria – actually her first and middle names – is the daughter of a Trinidadian father and Philadelphia-born mother, and grew up in South Carolina, in the forbiddingly-named city of Spartanburg. On first listening, her music seems like the same kind of punk-soaked blues we’ve been hearing from southern-infatuated rockers for years. But when she sings about the South – as she does in a number of these songs - it is not some gothic south of the imagination, but an actual place. And, in the words of her song ‘Stuck In The South’, it’s southern hell.
The barely contained rage of ‘Stuck In The South’ would be hard to fabricate, no matter how much southern blues you had soaked up. It’s a rage born of prejudice and poverty. And that rage might be Adia Victoria’s major point of difference – whether the subject is society or sex - in a record that can sometimes rest on some fairly generic rock motifs.
In fact, Adia cites as two of her primary inspirations, Kurt Cobain and Fiona Apple: artists whose music never had anything to say about rock’s southern roots, but who certainly shared some of this record’s claustrophobic and paranoiac atmosphere.
A lot of the songs seem to be about surviving the direst of circumstances, though it can be hard to tell whether she’s singing from the time of slavery or the present day. The album’s title, Beyond The Bloodhounds, comes from a track called ‘And Then You Die’. Again it evokes the South, both past and present, quoting from the old gospel song and civil rights anthem ‘Keep Your Eyes On The Prize’.
The album has more musical variation than is obvious on first hearing, and my favourite comes right at the end. Titled ‘Mexico Blues', it is not strictly a blues, yet it’s certainly blue; a haunted road song with a melody that hovers between the minor and the major in a way that seems to start in Mississippi, heads south of the border yet winds up somewhere almost Oriental.
Songs featured: Dead Eyes, Stuck in the South, Head Rot, Invisible Hands, Mortimer’s Blues, And Then You Die, Mexico Blues.
Beyond The Bloodhounds is available on Atlantic Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Adia Victoria, music, music review
Duration: 10'28"

19:30
Mudcrutch 2 by Mudcrutch
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty's first band, Mudcrutch.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty's first band, Mudcrutch.
If records weren’t meant to seem as familiar as old friends, the first time you heard them, then Tom Petty obviously never got that memo.
Those squeezed-out Southern vowels, those fat, ringing guitar chords – it’s obviously Tom, right from the opening bars of this album, despite its different guise.
It was always hard to tell the difference between a Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers record and one of his supposed solo recordings, which always featured most of the Heartbreakers anyway. And lately he’s added yet another identity while retaining that same instantly recognisable sound: Mudcrutch. That was the somewhat unappetising name of Petty’s first band, with which he first ventured from his native Florida to California, back in the early 70s, looking for fame and fortune. In fact, Mudcrutch split up before they ever made a record, though fortune and fame came soon enough with Petty’s next group, the Heartbreakers, which also included Mudcrutch members Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench. Just a few years ago, when it was looking like Petty had achieved everything he had set out to do and more, he got the notion to reform that unrecorded band. That didn’t take too much doing; as I say, Campbell and Tench were already on the payroll. Still, just those few cosmetic changes – old name, different drummer, second guitarist Tom Leadon and Petty on bass – were enough to revitalise things. The resulting album – simply titled Mudcrutch – was as enjoyable as anything the veteran had done in years; a mix of new Petty gems and a few country-rock classics which I assume were part of the original Mudcrutch repertoire. And it worked so well that he’s done it again.
Songs like these sound as though they have already existed for years, and certainly we’ve heard things very like them before, yet concrete similarities are elusive. It as though we have tuned to some parallel universe radio, where the 60s are still in full swing, the British invasion is underway and obscure American garage bands are scoring occasional hits.
One difference between this and the earlier Mudcrutch set is the absence this time of any cover songs, and that makes Mudcrutch 2 the slightly weaker album. What might have seemed at first like padding – a swampy romp through the Byrds’ ‘Lover Of The Bayou’ or the trucker anthem ‘Six Days On The Road’ – were the things you wouldn’t find on a Heartbreakers or Petty solo record, and helped create the sense of a band that had been cryogenically frozen for thirty years. Also, these were manifestly good songs, which made up for the fact that there were only eight new Petty originals in the set. Once again, Petty has come up with two thirds of the set, but this time he’s filled it out with originals from the other Mudcrutch members. And a song like Tom Leadon’s ‘Other Side Of The Mountain’ doesn’t sound stylistically out of place; it’s just not a great song, nor is it redeemed by a vocal that, after Petty’s inimitable tones, just sounds a bit characterless.
The most confident contribution comes from pianist Benmont Tench, who released his own solo album the year before last, and his Jerry Lee Lewis-like ‘Welcome To Hell’ sounds better than just an out-take.
But it’s another Petty song that Mudcrutch 2 finishes on, and again it’s familiar but new. ‘I ain’t gonna be hungry no more’ goes the refrain – which, after all these years and millions of record sales, has to be true. Yet on the best of these tracks Petty still sounds hungry, like an old coyote. It’s hard to know what keeps him that way, but it might ultimately be why he’s still this good.
Songs featured: Trailer, Dreams Of Flying, Hope, Save Your Water, Hungry No More, The Other Side Of The Mountain, Welcome To Hell.
Mudcrutch 2 is available on Reprise Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Mudcrutch, Tom Petty
Duration: 10'30"

7:30 The Sampler
Nick Bollinger reviews the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada; the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria; and a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty's first band, Mudcrutch.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Philosophy
What makes for a good life? Philosopher at large Ann Kerwin looks at Todd May's book A Significant Life - Human Meaning in a Silent Universe
8:30 Window on the World
Since the early 1980's, a ground-breaking Argentine forensics team known as the EAAF, has advised and taught other teams working across Latin America, to unearth the bones that provide clues to South America's 'disappeared'. Our 'Window on the World' feature tonight follows them to Colombia and the search for victims of the country's 50-year-long armed conflict. We also hear the voices of families looking for missing young students in Mexico.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
The BBC's Middle East correspondent Jim Muir revisits the Zagros and Taurus mountains of northern Iraq where 25 years ago, he reported on the mass exodus of Iraqi Kurds into the Zagros and Taurus mountains of northern Iraq. Thousands were killed by the helicopter gunships and tanks of Saddam Hussein's pursuing forces, and more died in the freezing rain and snow, before a safe haven was established under western air protection.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Each month, Global Village devotes an entire show to the best of new world music releases. Among the highlights this time: The first reissue of the the original Wailers' a new self-titled release from Ziggy Marley top neo-folk bands on the scene today: the Welsh duo 9Bach, Scottish band Breabach, & Irish supergroup, The Gloaming African guitar great Djelimady Tounkara.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
The Sampler for 14 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada; the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria; and a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty’s first band, Mudcrutch.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada; the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria; and a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty’s first band, Mudcrutch.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Kaytranada, Adia Victoria, Mudcrutch, music, music review
Duration: 30'00"

19:30
99.9% by Kaytranada
BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger steps to the dance-friendly debut of Canadian-Haitian DJ/producer Kaytranada.
Until recently, the name Kaytranada was one you were likely to come across only if you were paying close attention to the world of dance remixes. But the release of Kaytranada’s first full-length album proves he is an artist whose work is destined for the wider world.
Kaytranada is Louis Kevin Celestin, 23-year-old son of Haitian immigrants, living in Montreal. He’s been DJing, mixing and making his own recordings since his early teens. But it was a 2012 unofficial remix of Janet Jackson’s megahit ‘If’ – posted on SoundCloud - that really got people’s attention. Since that SoundCloud hit, he’s toured internationally, played opening sets for Madonna and - for this first album - recorded official collaborations with a variety of artists, from silk-voiced British star Craig David to underground hero Syd The Kid (of hip-hop collective Odd Future and soon-to-tour-here neo-soul band The Internet.) Her voice drifts through the dance-scape, like one of Celestin’s customised sounds.
Not all of the guests are vocalists. There’s also a collaboration with Canadian instrumental hip-hop combo BadBadNotGood, blending one of their organic rhythm tracks with another of Kaytranada’s patented synthscapes.
The album opens with high-hat and handclaps, a wobbly bass, and a synthesiser flapping around as though it’s trying to turn the sound system inside out. It immediately locates us on a dance floor; one where the contours seem to be shifting with almost every beat.
The overall mood of 99.9% is mellow, but not melancholy, and when it picks up it feels bright without being aggressive. While the guests all bring their individual personalities, it’s Celestin’s production that gives it coherence.
Songs featured: Track Uno, Together, Got It Good, You’re The One, Glowed Up, Weight Off, Breakdance Lesson.
Kaytranada's 99.9% world tour will be touching down 28th October at Studio, Auckland.
99.9% is available on XL Recordings.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Kaytranada, XL recordings
Duration: 9'07"

19:30
Beyond The Bloodhounds by Adia Victoria
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews the Southern punk-blues of Adia Victoria.
As the birthplace of the blues, America’s southern states have always had a romantic lure; ask anyone, from the Rolling Stones to Nick Cave. It might seem a whole lot less romantic, though, if it was where you actually came from – particularly if you were black and poor.
Adia Victoria – actually her first and middle names – is the daughter of a Trinidadian father and Philadelphia-born mother, and grew up in South Carolina, in the forbiddingly-named city of Spartanburg. On first listening, her music seems like the same kind of punk-soaked blues we’ve been hearing from southern-infatuated rockers for years. But when she sings about the South – as she does in a number of these songs - it is not some gothic south of the imagination, but an actual place. And, in the words of her song ‘Stuck In The South’, it’s southern hell.
The barely contained rage of ‘Stuck In The South’ would be hard to fabricate, no matter how much southern blues you had soaked up. It’s a rage born of prejudice and poverty. And that rage might be Adia Victoria’s major point of difference – whether the subject is society or sex - in a record that can sometimes rest on some fairly generic rock motifs.
In fact, Adia cites as two of her primary inspirations, Kurt Cobain and Fiona Apple: artists whose music never had anything to say about rock’s southern roots, but who certainly shared some of this record’s claustrophobic and paranoiac atmosphere.
A lot of the songs seem to be about surviving the direst of circumstances, though it can be hard to tell whether she’s singing from the time of slavery or the present day. The album’s title, Beyond The Bloodhounds, comes from a track called ‘And Then You Die’. Again it evokes the South, both past and present, quoting from the old gospel song and civil rights anthem ‘Keep Your Eyes On The Prize’.
The album has more musical variation than is obvious on first hearing, and my favourite comes right at the end. Titled ‘Mexico Blues', it is not strictly a blues, yet it’s certainly blue; a haunted road song with a melody that hovers between the minor and the major in a way that seems to start in Mississippi, heads south of the border yet winds up somewhere almost Oriental.
Songs featured: Dead Eyes, Stuck in the South, Head Rot, Invisible Hands, Mortimer’s Blues, And Then You Die, Mexico Blues.
Beyond The Bloodhounds is available on Atlantic Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Adia Victoria, music, music review
Duration: 10'28"

19:30
Mudcrutch 2 by Mudcrutch
BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty's first band, Mudcrutch.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger checks a new set of familiar sounds from Tom Petty's first band, Mudcrutch.
If records weren’t meant to seem as familiar as old friends, the first time you heard them, then Tom Petty obviously never got that memo.
Those squeezed-out Southern vowels, those fat, ringing guitar chords – it’s obviously Tom, right from the opening bars of this album, despite its different guise.
It was always hard to tell the difference between a Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers record and one of his supposed solo recordings, which always featured most of the Heartbreakers anyway. And lately he’s added yet another identity while retaining that same instantly recognisable sound: Mudcrutch. That was the somewhat unappetising name of Petty’s first band, with which he first ventured from his native Florida to California, back in the early 70s, looking for fame and fortune. In fact, Mudcrutch split up before they ever made a record, though fortune and fame came soon enough with Petty’s next group, the Heartbreakers, which also included Mudcrutch members Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench. Just a few years ago, when it was looking like Petty had achieved everything he had set out to do and more, he got the notion to reform that unrecorded band. That didn’t take too much doing; as I say, Campbell and Tench were already on the payroll. Still, just those few cosmetic changes – old name, different drummer, second guitarist Tom Leadon and Petty on bass – were enough to revitalise things. The resulting album – simply titled Mudcrutch – was as enjoyable as anything the veteran had done in years; a mix of new Petty gems and a few country-rock classics which I assume were part of the original Mudcrutch repertoire. And it worked so well that he’s done it again.
Songs like these sound as though they have already existed for years, and certainly we’ve heard things very like them before, yet concrete similarities are elusive. It as though we have tuned to some parallel universe radio, where the 60s are still in full swing, the British invasion is underway and obscure American garage bands are scoring occasional hits.
One difference between this and the earlier Mudcrutch set is the absence this time of any cover songs, and that makes Mudcrutch 2 the slightly weaker album. What might have seemed at first like padding – a swampy romp through the Byrds’ ‘Lover Of The Bayou’ or the trucker anthem ‘Six Days On The Road’ – were the things you wouldn’t find on a Heartbreakers or Petty solo record, and helped create the sense of a band that had been cryogenically frozen for thirty years. Also, these were manifestly good songs, which made up for the fact that there were only eight new Petty originals in the set. Once again, Petty has come up with two thirds of the set, but this time he’s filled it out with originals from the other Mudcrutch members. And a song like Tom Leadon’s ‘Other Side Of The Mountain’ doesn’t sound stylistically out of place; it’s just not a great song, nor is it redeemed by a vocal that, after Petty’s inimitable tones, just sounds a bit characterless.
The most confident contribution comes from pianist Benmont Tench, who released his own solo album the year before last, and his Jerry Lee Lewis-like ‘Welcome To Hell’ sounds better than just an out-take.
But it’s another Petty song that Mudcrutch 2 finishes on, and again it’s familiar but new. ‘I ain’t gonna be hungry no more’ goes the refrain – which, after all these years and millions of record sales, has to be true. Yet on the best of these tracks Petty still sounds hungry, like an old coyote. It’s hard to know what keeps him that way, but it might ultimately be why he’s still this good.
Songs featured: Trailer, Dreams Of Flying, Hope, Save Your Water, Hungry No More, The Other Side Of The Mountain, Welcome To Hell.
Mudcrutch 2 is available on Reprise Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Mudcrutch, Tom Petty
Duration: 10'30"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Gene Genie - Conservation genomics: In the final of his series of panels considering the implications of genetic research Dr Adam Rutherford discusses ancient DNA and conservation genomics with University of Otago researchers Dr Catherine Collins, Professor Neil Gemmell and Dr Michael Knapp. (5 of 5, RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

A selection world music, along with jazz, rock, folk and other styles, artists and songs with world and roots influences chosen and presented by Wichita radio host Chris Heim (KMUW)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288248

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ Collection
RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 14 Jun 2016

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