RNZ National. 2016-06-28. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

28 June 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Spectrum (RNZ); 1:15 From the World (BBC); 2:05 Hidden Treasures (RNZ) 3. The River by David Hill read by Peter Vere Jones (RNZ); 3:30 An Author's View (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Tuesday 28 June 2016
BODY:
With Guyon Espiner and Philippa Tolley. Inquiry reveals NZ's foreign trust rules are inadequate; Review: New Zealand foreign trust rules are 'light handed'; Labour says foreign trusts report a 'rebuke to John Key'; Mark Todd will compete in eighth Olympics; Brexit fallout NZ Prince tribute painter invited to singer's memorial; and Iceland get "life changing" Euro 2016 victory against England.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 28'39"

06:06
Sports News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

06:14
Company very likely to have paid ransom for release of hostages
BODY:
A risk consultant says he is almost certain Macmahon Holdings would have paid a ransom to free seven kidnapped mine workers, including a New Zealander, in Nigeria. Global Media Risk Consultant, Shannon Sedgwick talks to RNZ reporter Max Towle.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Nigeria
Duration: 2'52"

06:18
Iceland look for "life changing" Euro 2016 victory
BODY:
Football fever takes over Iceland ahead of its EURO 2016 quarterfinal match against England. Philippa Tolley speaks to Reykjavic correspondent Gudjón Helgason.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Iceland, Euro 2016
Duration: 3'45"

06:21
Early Business News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'34"

06:25
Morning Rural News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'26"

06:28
Foreign trust numbers expected to fall with more disclosure
BODY:
The tougher rules for foreign trusts an inquiry has recommended will weed out any crooks using foreign trusts to hide their money here. Political reporter Benedict Collins has the story.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 3'18"

06:35
Sports News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'52"

06:43
CYF refuses to comment on prior knowledge of Moko's killers
BODY:
Child Youth and Family says Moko Rangitoheriri's killers were on its radar before before the toddler's death. Tania Shailer and David William Haerewa have been given the highest sentence ever imposed in New Zealand for the manslaughter of a child: 17 years in prison. Sharon Brettkelly reports.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'02"

06:51
Foreign trust rejigging recommendations
BODY:
A senior tax partner at PwC, Geof Nightingale says proposed changes to the foreign trust regime will go a long way to underpinning New Zealand's reputation and deter tax dodging and money laundering.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 1'36"

06:52
Govt outlines measures to crack down on tax avoidance
BODY:
The Government has also outlined its next steps to crack down on tax avoidance by multinational companies. They include stronger rules preventing excessive payments from a New Zealand company to its foreign parent, greater disclosure requirements, and further sharing of tax data with foreign authorities.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: tax, Foreign trusts
Duration: 54"

06:53
Rate cut in August seen as almost a certainty
BODY:
A rate cut by the Reserve Bank in August is becoming almost a certainty in the wake of the British vote to exit the European Union. The market volatility that has arisen and the overall rise in the New Zealand dollar has tipped the scales towards a cut in the official cash rate to 2%.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Reserve Bank, Brexit
Duration: 1'32"

06:55
NZME confident it can deliver revenue and profit growth
BODY:
Investors were less than enthusiastic about the debut of the media and entertainment company, NZME, on the local stock exchange. It closed at 80 cents yesterday and took the best part of an hour before its first trade, and traded at a relatively narrow range.
Topics: business, economy, media
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'16"

06:58
Business news from Australia
BODY:
In Australia voters go to the polls soon, and the issue of tax cuts for corporates has become a big issue.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: Asutralia
Duration: 1'56"

07:08
Sports News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Euro 2016, soccer
Duration: 2'52"

07:11
Inquiry reveals NZ's foreign trust rules are inadequate
BODY:
The Prime Minister has been forced to backtrack on his claims that New Zealand has a world class foreign trust system that doesn't need changing. John Key defended the rules covering foreign trusts after the Panama Papers revealed they were being used by foreigners to hide money -- he described the New Zealand trust regime as legitimate.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: foriegn trusts, Panama Papers
Duration: 4'54"

07:16
Review: New Zealand foreign trust rules are 'light handed'
BODY:
Tax specialist John Shewan says foreigners planning to use New Zealand trusts for dodgy purposes will be discouraged if his recommendations for tightening disclosure rules are adopted.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 3'30"

07:20
Lawyer for Moko's killer says poverty & mental illness to blame
BODY:
Ron Mansfield,the lawyer for Tania Shailer, says Child Youth and Family had been involved with Shailer's family, and enough people knew there were problems that action should have been taken sooner.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Moko Rangitoheriri
Duration: 4'31"

07:25
Political turmoil continues in UK in wake of Brexit vote
BODY:
Political tumult continues in Britain in the wake of the Brexit vote. Conservatives are bringing forward the contest to replace David Cameron as prime minister and the rebellion against Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn intensifies. Natalie Powell in London has the latest.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: David Cameron, Jeremy Corbyn, Brexit, UK
Duration: 6'00"

07:35
The minister of revenue on foreign trusts
BODY:
Revenue Minister Michael Woodhouse acknowledges the foreign trust disclosure rules need tightening but insists the Government has not sat on its hands over making changes.
Topics: economy, politics
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 6'42"

07:44
Labour says foreign trusts report a 'rebuke to John Key'
BODY:
Responding to Shewan report into Foreign Trust Regime, Labour's leader says New Zealand shouldn't be providing hiding places for rich foreigners' money.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 5'41"

07:47
Mark Todd will compete in eighth Olympics
BODY:
Sir Mark Todd rides again - at the Olympics. He's been named in the equestrian team for Rio and become New Zealand's most capped Olympian. At 60 years old, he's set to become the oldest as well. And he's not just along for the ride, he's planning to be on the podium when the medals are handed out.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: equestrian, Rio 2016, Olympics
Duration: 2'43"

07:52
Auckland Transport prefers other options to heavy rail
BODY:
The chairman of Auckland Transport Lester Levy tells us there will be public transport solutions to Auckland airport but it could take some time.
Topics: transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 4'43"

07:55
NZ Prince tribute painter invited to singer's memorial
BODY:
A Māori artist who painted a mural of Prince has received a personal invitation to the musician's private memorial. Māori Issues Correspondent Mihingarangi Forbes has the story.
EXTENDED BODY:
A Māori artist who painted a tribute wall to the late musician Prince has received a personal invitation to the official memorial service in August.
Graham Hoete - also known as Mr G - said he felt inspired to honour Prince by crafting a massive wall mural in Sydney.
After the image went viral, he travelled to Minesotta and painted another 8m mural on a wall in Prince's hometown Chanhassen, which was formally unveiled by the city's mayor late last week.
Mr G said he only painted people who inspired him, and Prince was a creative genius so he wanted to pay tribute to him through his art.
He took a picture of the 'purple rain' themed mural, posted it to Facebook and it was shared and reshared by Prince's mourners around the globe.
"Yeah, it was pretty crazy, man. I think it was mostly due to the fact that he had just passed."
Among the messages was an invitation to Prince's hometown in Minesotta.
"I spoke to my wife about it for a week and I thought, 'yeah, I am going to cruise over there and do one'. I thought it will be an honour to do one in his home town and dedicate it to his family and the city of Chanhassan, where he was brought up. So I put another call out on Facebook to see if anyone could help me with some walls, because that was the main thing I really needed. I needed a wall."
Mr G presented the gift of the US mural in te reo Māori and carried out a one-man haka to one of his musical legends in front of thousands of Minesotta locals.
During the presentation he was passed a note from Prince's brother.
"He said on behalf of him and the entire family he'd just like to thank you for the beautiful mural that you've painted, our hearts are very touched by it. They were so moved and impacted by the fact that I'd travelled halfway around the world to do something like that for them, and he said 'I want your's and your wife's details, I'd like to invite you to the official memorial'."
Prince's memorial won't be till August, and Mr G said it was an invitation that was still difficult to comprehend.
"Yeah man, I was like 'holy far out, I think this is the one where like Stevie Wonder is going to be there'. Yeah, it's invite only."
Just weeks before the Prince experience, Mr G found a wall to pay tribute to basketballer Steven Adams.
"I thought, well, I might just pop over to Oklahoma to do a painting of the bro, just to let him know that all of Aotearoa is behind him."
The Adams mural also went far and wide, and he became the subject of dozens and dozens of television news reports, but it was the Prince mural that put the boy from Mōtītī Island on the map.
His mother Kathy Hoete remembered him drawing Star Wars pictures when he was five.
"From small beginnings really, he started off on his own and trying to get out in that big world by himself. And he's finally getting there, he's done us proud."
Father Kereama Hoete, who still lives on Mōtītī Island, said it had been hard to keep up with all the media attention his son had been receiving, and said for a moment they were a bit concerned for him.
"We were just going to our daughter's place and the phone just keep ringing and we got a bit worried, my wife and I. We thought he might need a bit of support but he got more support over there than us. We're just so happy for him."
Mr G is already moving onto his next mural, which will be a painting of silver screen legend Joan Crawford.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Prince, painting, mural
Duration: 3'10"

08:06
Sports News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'26"

08:12
Moko's killers should have got murder charge - law professor
BODY:
Law professor Chris Gallivan says justice must be seen to be done and for that reason the killers of Moko Rangitoheriri should have faced murder charges, even if it meant a risk of acquittal.
Topics: crime
Regions:
Tags: Moko Rangitoheriri
Duration: 5'58"

08:16
Law changes needed to toughen up 'light handed' disclosures
BODY:
Law professor Michael Littlewood welcomes promise of changes to foreign trust disclosure rules and says they will make it hard for people to use New Zealand as a tax haven.
Topics: law, crime
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 3'34"

08:21
Brexit has shaken global markets for a second day
BODY:
Volatility continues on the world's markets in the wake of Britain's vote to quit the European Union. RNZ Economic Correspondent Patrick O'Meara looks at the latest movements and discusses the implications for New Zealand.
Topics: economy
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, EU
Duration: 3'54"

08:25
Muslim New Zealanders claim they are being profiled at airport
BODY:
New Zealand Muslims say they're singled out for inspections when returning to the country, often having to hand over their mobile phones to be checked. Mohamed Hassan reports.
Topics: transport, spiritual practices
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'43"

08:29
Auckland Future will shift spending, rather than rebate rates
BODY:
A pledge by the centre-right to cut Auckland Council's budgets by hundreds of millions of dollars won't necessarily result in rates being cut. Todd Niall reports.
Topics: politics, economy
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'38"

08:32
Markets Update for 28 June 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'05"

08:35
Chch developers accused of undermining rebuild
BODY:
High profile Christchurch property developers are embroiled in a legal fight over who should be allowed to build shops where in the central city. Conan Young reports.
Topics: economy
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: property
Duration: 3'02"

08:42
Social Agency says low income people forgotten
BODY:
With the median house price in Sydney topping a million dollars, the Australian dream of owning your own home is fast fading. Demelza Leslie talks to social agencies who are dismayed housing affordability is being ignored in the Australian election campaign.
Topics: politics, housing
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 2'53"

08:47
First day of Wimbledon tournament wraps up
BODY:
New Zealand tennis number one Marina Erakovic has shown plenty of grit to win her first round match at Wimbledon in a clash which took two hours and 33 minutes.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: tennis
Duration: 3'01"

08:49
Michael Hill donation triggers rush of Hundertwasser support
BODY:
Global jewellery retailer and Whangarei old boy, Sir Michael Hill, has given fundraising for the city's Hundertwasser arts centre a boost - and his generosity has encouraged others to dig a little deeper. Lois Williams has the story.
Topics: arts
Regions: Northland
Tags:
Duration: 3'49"

08:53
Iceland get "life changing" Euro 2016 victory against England
BODY:
Elation for Iceland, despair for England as the unfancied small country knocks England out of the Euro 16 football tournament. As the final whistle blows, we talk to a our very excited correspondent in Reykjavic, Gudjon Helgason.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: England, Iceland
Duration: 2'02"

08:55
Driverless buses could be on roads within 4 years
BODY:
New Zealanders could be travelling on driverless buses within four years. The country's largest bus company, NZ Bus, expects so-called autonomous buses will be a third of their bus fleet within a decade.
Topics: transport
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: driverless buses, autonomous buses, Nz Bus
Duration: 3'20"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading

=AUDIO=

09:10
Rail link to Auckland airport dumped
BODY:
Transport planners in Auckland have decided to abandon heavy rail options for Auckland airport Jon Reeves, is from the Public Transport Users Association. He says NZTA and Auckland Transport are overlooking obvious solutions while putting faith in uncosted, undeveloped plans which are over a decade away. Kathryn Ryan also speaks with Matt Lowrie the editor of Transportblog.
Topics: business, economy, transport
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 17'35"

09:27
Iraqi army retakes Fallujah, what comes next?
BODY:
Ten years ago retired US Army Colonel Anthony Dean was about to take charge of a battalion in the city of Ramadi. At the time coalition forces were still counting the cost of a bloody campaign to retake Fallujah from al Qaeda in Iraq, the group which eventually evolved into Islamic State, which went on to capture Fallujah again two years ago. Now the city has been liberated by the Iraqi Army. But Anthony Dean says the latest effort to take the city has failed to learn the lessons of previous efforts.
Topics: conflict, author interview
Regions:
Tags: Iraq war, Islamic State, Al Qaeda, Iraq
Duration: 13'22"

09:40
Dine Academy
BODY:
Dine Academy gives school kids interested in cooking a chance to try catering for big events - and get paid while they're doing it. Mike Kirk helped set up Dine Academy a couple of years ago and so far it's had 300 participants - 80 percent of whom got a job offer at the end of the programme.
Topics: business, food
Regions:
Tags: education, employment, catering
Duration: 5'18"

09:40
Book Review - Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets
BODY:
Robert Patman reviews 'Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets' by Svetlana Alexievich (translated by Bela Shayevich), published by Text Publishing
Topics: books, politics
Regions:
Tags: Russia, communism
Duration: 5'41"

09:50
South America Correspondent - Donna Bowater
BODY:
Rio is broke.. what does that mean for Olympics? And the suspension of Rio's drug testing lab's license six weeks out from the Rio Games.
Topics: politics, sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, Rouseff, Donna Bowater, Michel Temer, Olympics, Rio 2016
Duration: 10'40"

10:06
Ash Burgess: mountain biking ambassador
BODY:
Ash Burgess is a young Wellington woman determined to bring people of all ages and abilities into the sport of mountain biking. She's the co-founder of the popular women's riding club Revolve. She's behind a hugely successful children's mountain bike programme WORD, which has plans to go national. Ash also founded Joyride which runs skill sessions for people of all abilities. She teaches children cycle skills in a school programme called Pedal Ready. And in her spare time, she leads adventure cycle tours around the world - she's heading to Kyrgyzstan with a group of cyclists to cover 550 kilometers in 14 days.
EXTENDED BODY:
Ash Burgess is a young Wellington woman determined to bring people of all ages and abilities into the sport of mountain biking. She's the co-founder of the popular women's riding club Revolve. She's behind a hugely successful children's mountain bike programme WORD, which has plans to go national. Ash also founded Joyride which runs skill sessions for people of all abilities. She teaches children cycle skills in a school programme called Pedal Ready. And in her spare time, she leads adventure cycle tours around the world - she's heading to Kyrgyzstan with a group of cyclists to cover 550 kilometers in 14 days.
Read an edited excerpt of the interview below:
How did you get into mountain biking?
I really got into it in Wellington with mountain biking so accessible. We’re really lucky to have our downtown 10 minutes ride away and we’re in the trails and that was something I immediately picked up on. I joined a local cycling club PNP Cycling club and they run a series of races and thought that was my way in and a great way to meet people. And that led to knowing some people at bike shops and at On Yer Bike, Nigel had wanted to start a women’s cycle group, so asked myself and my friend if we would lead this women’s road ride and we did and sure enough 20 women showed up on the first day and we were just floored. That was the beginning of Revolve cycle club.
Did you try out all of the different types of cycling?
Yeah, I just found that I loved being on a bike. I liked the freedom of it, I loved the adventure; big long rides or just going for a short one during lunchtime for a ride on the trails that you could do in an hour. I think there is something quite special about the adventures that you can do on a bike.
The biggest thing with mountain biking is balance, and starting on the easiest trails. One of the things we talk about in WORD and Joyride is we want people to have a good time, so we start with the lowest common denominator so we’re starting on grade 1 trails, which is the equivalent to a flat gravelly road and from there they get narrower and varied with the different obstacles that are on the trail, so we always start small and build our way up.
Is it a sport that is dominated by more men than women?
It is. There are more men than women doing it. But it’s hard to say because you look at co-ed mountain bike events for example and yeah there are more men.
What are the women you are trying to encourage into it say are reasons why they don’t want to commit to it as a sport?
Time, money, confidence. I think they are a lot of the same reasons why men don’t get into it, as well. It’s quite similar. But I have found that having women’s skills courses and women-specific events are actually quite encouraging to women.
What are some of the main reasons people give you to explain why they have a resistance towards mountain biking? I am more likely to walk or run - slowly. One of those reasons is that I like to let my mind wander when I’m out walking, but I have a perception that you can’t do that when you’re out cycling.
Yeah, you can certainly let your mind wander when you’re cycling up hill, or when you’re doing something that you feel is easy, but it’s going down hill when you can’t think about anything else and that’s the beauty of it. You’re in that flow.
I think that’s almost the assumption with mountain biking, that it is hard and scary. But it’s not. It’s what you make of it. That’s why there’s such a wide variety of trails and we’ve got the amazing New Zealand cycle trails and most towns around New Zealand have an incredible range of mountain bike trails now that we are really lucky to have.
Tell me how that works, because I know Revolve is involved in that and it can get a bit controversial, again because the walkers and the runners all want to use the same space and also because people think, especially in trying to protect the green belt spaces and no one should be carving any more through them… how well does that get navigated?
The mountain bike community is very good at being good mountain bike ambassadors, if that makes sense. Mountain bikers want to share the trails, we feel so lucky that we can even use the trails. They are certainly the ones who are building the trails, but they also are maintaining them and getting out there on the weekends and doing the planting as well. Miramar and Aro Valley are really good examples of local-built trails, but also local-maintained trails. For WORD, our after-school programme, one of the days we actually do a trail maintenance session and I think there is something special about working on the trails you are actually using. We compare it to… you don’t see kids out on the soccer field mowing the lawn before they start playing, but mountain bikers are actually out there, they are creating the surface they’re enjoying.
Topics: sport, environment, transport
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: Biking
Duration: 24'51"

11:08
Business with Rod Oram
BODY:
The economics and business of Brexit.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: Brexit
Duration: 18'31"

11:30
How Kiwi doco makers use film to drive change
BODY:
Borderless Productions' documentary On the Backs of Women offers a window into the lives of three entrepreneurial women battling poverty in Myanmar. The film has recently won best documentary at the Doc Edge film festival. The company's Qiujing Wong and Dean Easterbrook talk to Kathryn Ryan about their style of film making and the importance of micro-finance in fighting poverty.
EXTENDED BODY:
Borderless Productions' documentary On the Backs of Women offers a window into the lives of three entrepreneurial women battling poverty in Myanmar. The film recently won Best Short Documentary at the Documentary Edge film festival.
Qiujing Wong and Dean Easterbrook from Borderless Productions talk with Kathryn Ryan about their style of filmmaking and the importance of micro-finance in fighting poverty.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: microfinance, documentary, Myanmar, Africa, film, Asia, movies
Duration: 14'57"

11:50
Media with Gavin Ellis
BODY:
Is the British press ruing it's support of Brexit? And why newspaper readership is rising while circulation continues to fall?
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: Brexit, print, journalism, UK
Duration: 14'45"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Rail link to Auckland airport dumped
Transport planners in Auckland have decided to abandon heavy rail options for the city's airport. Jon Reeves, is from the Public Transport Users Association. He says NZTA and Auckland Transport are overlooking obvious solutions while putting faith in uncosted, undeveloped plans which are over a decade away. Kathryn also speaks with Matt Lowrie the editor of Transportblog
09:15 Fallujah retaken, what next for Iraq?
Ten years ago retired US Army Colonel Anthony Dean was about to take charge of a battalion in the city of Ramadi. At the time coalition forces were still counting the cost of a bloody campaign to retake Fallujah from al Qaeda in Iraq, the group which eventually evolved into Islamic State, which went on to capture Fallujah again two years ago. Now the city has been liberated by the Iraqi Army. But Anthony Dean says the latest effort to take the city has failed to learn the lessons of previous efforts.
09:30 Dine Academy
Dine Academy gives kids interested in cooking a chance to try catering for big events - and get paid while they're doing it. Mike Kirk helped set up Dine Academy a couple of years ago and so far it's had 300 participants - 80 percent of whom got a job offer at the end of the programme.
09:45 South America Correspondent Donna Bowater
Rio is broke.. what does that mean for Olympics? And the suspension of Rio's drug testing lab's license six weeks out from the Rio Games.
10:05 Ash Burgess: mountain biking ambassador
[image:72520:full] no metadata
Ash Burgess is a young Wellington woman determined to bring people of all ages and abilities into the sport of mountain biking. She's the co-founder of the popular women's riding club Revolve. She's also behind a hugely successful children's mountain bike programme WORD, which has plans to go national. Ash also founded Joyride which runs skill sessions for people of all abilities. She teaches children cycle skills in a school programme called Pedal Ready. In her spare time, she leads adventure cycle tours around the world - next week she's heading to Kyrgyzstan with a group of cyclists to cover 550 kilometers in 14 days.
10:35 Book review - Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets by Svetlana Alexievich (translated by Bela Shayevich)
reviewed by Prof Robert Patman, published by Text Publishing
10:45 The Reading
My Father's Ears, by Karen Goa read by Michele Amas (Part 2 of 10)
11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram
The economics and business of Brexit.
11:20 How Kiwi doco makers use film to drive change
Borderless Productions' documentary On the Backs of Women offers a window into the lives of three entrepreneurial women battling poverty in Myanmar. The film has recently won best documentary at the Doc Edge film festival. The company's Qiujing Wong and Dean Easterbrook talk to Kathryn Ryan about their style of film making and the importance of micro-finance in fighting poverty.
[gallery:2186]
[embed] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_aaI91_Ovo&feature=youtu.be
11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis
Is the British press ruing it's support of Brexit and why newspaper readership is rising while circulation continues to fall.

=PLAYLIST=

Artist: She & Him
Song: Sunday Girl
Composer: Stein
Album: n/a
Label: She & Him
Time: 9.26
Artist: Florence and the Machine
Song: Dog Days Are Over
Composer: Welch and Summers
Album: Lungs
Label: Island
Time: 10.07
Artist: Kimbra
Song: Settle Down
Composer: Johnson
Album: Vows
Label: NZ on Air
Time: 10.40
Artist: Little Jimmy Ray
Song: You Need to Fall in Love
Composer: n/a
Album: single
Label: Gallant
Time: 11.40

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
The growing gap between the rich and the poor. A New Zealand diplomat in Korea loses his immunity.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 15'26"

12:21
NZ tax reputation should be helped by Shewan report
BODY:
The country's international standing as a partner in the global campaign against tax evasion should be enhanced by the proposed changes to the foreign trust regime, according to a tax expert.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: tax evasion
Duration: 1'01"

12:22
Internet of Things expected to take off by year end
BODY:
One of the world's largest cloud-based network providers says New Zealand can expect to see a boom in the number of services and devices connecting to the Internet of Things, by the end of the year
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Internent of Things
Duration: 1'26"

12:23
Midday Markets for 28 June 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Angus Marks at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'34"

12:25
Business briefs
BODY:
The food manufacturer, Speirs Group, says it will delist from the NZX's Alternative Market next month as shareholders have approved a move to the Unlisted platform from August the 1st.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
Iceland have stunned England 2-1 to pull off one of the biggest shocks in European football history, and force the resignation of the England manager Roy Hodgson.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'44"

12:34
Midday Rural News for 28 June 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'40"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

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13:15
Iceland's historic football win over England
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Iceland is the smallest country in the tournament - it has a population of just 320 thousand people - less than the population of Wellington. And yet it pulled one off the biggest sporting shocks in football history - beating England two points to 1 in, and eliminating it from Euro 2016 in the process. Jesse speaks with the Icelandic consul to New Zealand, and also a 94 year old Icelandic Kiwi who got so excited during the game he had to take his heart pills.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 10'12"

13:25
Irish to te reo Maori
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Aoife Finn is an Irish student, who's been completing her PhD in te reo Maori. And now she's in New Zealand to try it out in conversation. Te Wananga o Aotearoa has sponsored Aoife's visit to New Zealand for Maori language week.
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Aoife Finn is an Irish student, who's been completing her PhD in te reo Maori. And now she's in New Zealand to try it out in conversation. Te Wananga o Aotearoa has sponsored Aoife's visit to New Zealand for Maori language week.
Aoife Finn talks to Jesse about why she wanted to learn Maori.
Topics: education, te ao Maori
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Duration: 9'35"

13:35
Dan Slevin on New York fashion and film
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Legendary New York fashion photographer Bill Cunningham passed away this weekend at the age of 87 after a stroke. Dan Slevin looks back on the documentary made about him, and other films centred around New York fashion.
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Legendary New York fashion photographer Bill Cunningham passed away this weekend at the age of 87 after a stroke. Dan Slevin looks back on the documentary made about him, and other films centred around New York fashion.
Topics: arts
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Tags: Bill Cunningham
Duration: 9'35"

13:44
Favourite album
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'Time' by ELO, chosen by Simon Kennedy.
Topics: music
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Duration: 15'07"

14:07
Books with Pip Adam
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Reviewing three online 'journals' - 'Sweet Mammalian', 'The Pantograph Punch' and 'Starling'.
Topics: books
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Duration: 6'41"

14:14
The World's Greatest Guitar Solos!
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Hundreds of our listeners have shared their favourite guitar solos of all time. Trevor Reekie has compiled the top picks and will play them all for us.
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Hundreds of our listeners have shared their favourite guitar solos of all time. Trevor Reekie has compiled the top picks and joins Jesse Mulligan to run through them for us, and try to determine what makes for the guitar X factor in an over-subscribed genre…
Mike Bloomfield: Stop, Super Session
The late American guitarist Mike Bloomfield featured on Bob Dylan’s rock singles from ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ to ‘Like A Rolling Stone’ and ‘Tombstone Blues’. He backed Dylan at Newport in 1965 for the controversial set that announced Dylan turning electric. Bloomfield also played with Paul Butterfield, later Electric Flag. The following video is from the album Super Session, 1968. Bloomfield died in 1981.
Les Paul: How High the Moon
Les Paul (1915–2009) not only designed the iconic Les Paul model guitar made by Gibson which rivaled the Fender Stratocaster, he also revolutionised sound recording by pioneering the multi-track recorder. He played with Nat King Cole and Bing Crosby.
Joe Satriani: Surfing with the Alien
Teacher to the stars (Kirk Hammett, Steve Vai) Joe Satriani has won heaps of Grammys. He released Surfing with the Alien in 1987. He's toured with Mick Jagger on his solo tours, and came to Guitar Fest in Taranaki in 2008. He is an improviser, although he says “it’s easier to improvise than it is to improvise and be good”.
Larry Carlton, Steely Dan: Kid Charlemagne
The following clip is taken from Steely Dan’s 5th album The Royal Scam released in 1976. Session guy Larry Carlton has received four Grammys and played on Michael Jackson’s Off The Wall.
Jennifer Batten: Beat it, live
Talking of Michael Jackson, Jennifer Batten (1957-) broke the stereotypes of the male dominated rock industry to perform three world tours with Michael Jackson between 1999 and 2001. I interviewed Jennifer - she knew Eddie Van Halen’s solo, and went from being a geek to a freak playing with Jackson. She also played and recorded with Jeff Beck, and rates Australian woman Orianthi, an equally brilliant guitarist.
Jeff Beck: Immigrant Song, live
He’s had an awesome career and unlike Jimmy Page and others is still out there today. It’s hard to fault Jeff Beck. He played Auckland in 2009. He’s one of three great guitarists who came out of the Yardbirds (Clapton, Beck, Page), formed the Jeff Beck Group which featured Ron Wood, Rod Stewart, Mickey Waller and followed the success of Cream, which was in turn followed by Led Zep in cracking America. On April 4, 2009 Jeff Beck was inducted into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame by Jimmy Page who had known Beck since they were teenagers and later played in The Yardbirds together. Beck also performed that night and this clip features him bringing out Jimmy Page who played 12-string rhythm and Beck rampages his way through Immigrant Song. He doesn't use plectrums (guitar picks).
Stevie Ray Vaughn: Lenny
Stevie Ray Vaughn (1954 – 1990) dedicated Lenny to his wife who rounded up enough money ($350) from seven of her friends to pay for a vintage Fender Stratocaster that Stevie found in a second hand shop. Stevie Ray Vaughn died aged 35 in a helicopter crash. In his short career he mastered a blues style that was informed by Jimmy Hendrix. In 1978 he formed his band Double Trouble, named after an Otis Rush track. He played with David Bowie on ‘Let's Dance’, but it was when he recorded with record man John Hammond that he started to break through, going on to record six studio albums. Lenny is taken from his debut album on Epic called Texas Flood from 1983. Rumour has it that about the time Stevie Ray came to New Zealand to play on the TV commercial for Europa called 'Travelling On', Vaughn was a recovering alcoholic and drug dependent so while he was here he went to AA meetings - can you imagine the stir he caused when he stood up and recited "I'm Stevie Ray Vaughn, and I'm an alcoholic". Stevie was one of the greats, cut down before he was at the top of his game.
Richard Thompson: Shoot Out the Lights
It’s wonderful to see a number of discerning listeners shout out for Richard Thompson – He played at Womad at 2015 with his trio and was just stunning. I had the pleasure of not only interviewing him but also gifting him a book by musician/sailor Andrew Fagan (The Mockers) called Swirly World Sails South. Andrew asked me to give it to him because when he lived in London Andrew was Richard’s guitar technician. These days Richard lives in LA. He started off in the Fairport Convention in 1967, and considering they were an electric folk band they achieved phenomenal success. His solo career has produced an enviable back catalogue of 25 solo albums and his songs have been covered by artists including REM, Elvis Costello, Sandy Denny, Los Lobos, Jefferson Starship, Graham Parker, David Byrne, and David Gilmour. An incredible talent, and still gigging. His guitar style was less informed by the blues than by Celtic inspirations and possibly that's his point of difference. Jeff Beck rates Thompson as one of the best living guitarists around – high praise.
Neil Young: Like a Hurricane
Lots of requests for Neil, who is capable of any number of solos ranging from sparse and emotive to a mesmerising blast of fuzz and fury. Neil started off in Buffalo Springfield and later joined Crosby Stills & Nash as well as having a wonderful solo career. His acoustic style and his song writing are legendary but when you hear him in full flight playing his black Les Paul it’s an incredible sound. Technically it’s all over the shop but it’s so incredibly creative and intense – I have the feeling he’s one of those guitarists who wouldn’t play the same solo twice. This one is from the 1977 album American Stars 'n Bars.
Mark Knopfler, Dire Straits: Sultans of Swing
This is pretty much the song that put Mark Knopfler on every guitarists radar. Played on a Fender Strat, he’s one of those guitarists who mashes licks and chords and has such a delicate touch. Once again, he doesn’t use a plectrum so his left hand technique is very melodic. Sultans of Swing was released as a demo in 1978 and played by the late English DJ Charlie Gillett in the post punk era but it did nothing. Re-released in 1979 on Vertigo and Warner Music, it was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic. Mark Knopfler went to be a producer for Bob Dylan and Randy Newman. Curious fact: Knopfler is left-handed, but plays the guitar right-handed… that could be his point of difference.
Mick Taylor, Rolling Stones: Time Waits for No Man
Mick Taylor came from the school of John Mayall, who had a knack for finding great guitar players – first Eric Clapton, then Peter Green and then Mick Taylor. Taylor was 18 at the time, and relatively shy when he joined Mayall who then recommended him to Jagger when Brian Jones was dumped from the Stones – so Taylor’s first gig with the Stones was the Free Concert in Hyde Park in 1969 when he was 20. He played on 'Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers' and 'Exile on Main Street' but one suspects the stress, drugs - and dealing with Keith - got to him in the end. Recorded in 1974 'Time Waits for No One' featured on the album It’s Only Rock 'n Roll. Mick Taylor's extended guitar solo may have been inspired by a visit to Brazil following the Stones' European Tour 1973. It was to be Taylor’s swan song with The Stones. He asserts he was robbed of a song writing credit because it was during a period when Keith Richards was frequently absent. One of the few people to leave The Stones and live to tell the tale.
Eric Clapton, John Mayall Bluesbreakers: All Your Love
'All Your Love' was written by blues man Otis Rush in 1958. Mayall recorded it with Clapton when Eric was just 21. It’s one of those seminal albums. Clapton left Mayall and went on to form Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & The Domino’s...
Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac: Albatross
This got a big reaction from our audience. It features Peter Green on guitar who had left John Mayall with two other ex Mayall band members: Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. Released as a single in 1968, it topped the charts.
There’s an interesting story about the 1959 Sunburst Les Paul guitar Peter Green used to play back in the day of Fleetwood Mac. Green used it on many of his big hits including 'Oh Well, Black Magic Woman' and 'Man of the World'. He sold it to Gary Moore from Thin Lizzy (and a stellar solo career).
Gary Moore: Parisienne Walkways
Gary played the 1959 Sunburst he bought from Peter Green for his entire career, eventually putting it up for sale. It was on the market for a few years before Kirk Hammett from Metallica paid an undisclosed sum for it… the guitar is unique in that one of the pick-ups was wired in the wrong way around, giving it a unique tone. Moore died in 2011 aged 58. This solo is an excerpt from his hit 'Parisienne Walkways' recorded live. It was his signature song performed on a signature guitar.
Robert Fripp with Brian Eno: Baby’s on Fire
‘Baby’s on Fire’ from Eno’s Here Come The Warm Jets features an off the wall solo, triple-tracked by Robert Fripp, originally a founding member of King Crimson. Eno and Fripp have collaborated a lot over the years on all manner of records including 'No Pussyfooting' and contributions to David Bowies single ‘Heroes’. Robert Fripp is a most unusual man who is married to singer Toyah Wilcox - he’s had an amazing creative career.
Prince: Purple Rain, live
Huge voting turn out for Prince’s guitar skills. This performance is taken from the televised half-time open air performance at the 2007 Super Bowl in Miami – the weather was wet and it’s incredible that he played but Prince rose to the occasion, and it was viewed by over 100 million people. Prince is an icon of creative artistry with a distinctive and tasteful style, and always visual and exciting.
Jimmy Page, Led Zeppelin: Dazed and Confused
Jimmy Page started off as a session musician from a very young age playing on some of the biggest hits of the 60s. He later joined the Yardbirds while Beck was in the band, Page took over on guitar and the New Yardbirds slowly morphed into Led Zeppelin - a name suggested by Keith Moon. This track (written by Jake Holmes) was from the first album recorded in 1968, which featured Page using a violin bow. I think a lot of Led Zeppelin’s mystique and influence was their timing - they became the biggest band in America and went on to influence an incredible array of musicians.
Jimi Hendrix: Little Wing
Hendrix was going nowhere in the States, playing back-up to the likes of Little Richard. English women were Hendrix’s saviour. Linda Keith, who was the girlfriend of Keith Richards, saw Jimi and introduced him to Chas Chandler from the Animals who became his manager. History has it that Hendrix agreed to go to the UK as long as Chandler could introduce him to Eric Clapton. Within a month of living in London, Hendrix had made a name for himself. An incredibly, fully-formed guitarist, it was like he came out of nowhere. He was dead by the age of 27. Recorded in 1967 and included on the second album Axis Bold As Love ‘Little Wing’ has been covered a myriad of times by artists as diverse as Nigel Kennedy and Chaka Khan.
David Gilmour, Pink Floyd: Comfortably Numb
Taken from The Wall, released in 1979, this song and solo was by far the top audience choice from the feedback sent to Jesse. It’s also Noel Gallagher’s favorite guitar solo. David Gilmour is an incredibly fluid and tasteful player. He joined Pink Floyd in 1968 to replace Syd Barrett. It is amazing how, over the years, Pink Floyd - once placed firmly in the counter culture - has become mainstream, and that has got to because of the album Dark Side of the Moon. For the solos on ‘Comfortably Numb’, David Gilmour is obviously using a couple of effects, like a Big Muff and a delay, but it really is just his fingers, his vibrato, his choice of notes and how he sets his effects.
Topics: music
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Tags: Guitar solos
Duration: 45'56"

15:09
Fish have feelings, too
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Fish feel pain, sadness and even behave in very Machiavellian ways, figuring out how to take advantage of other fish.
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Fish experience joy and loss, and they have the capacity to play and plan and even scheme against each other – says Jonathan Balcombe, author of What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins.
Balcombe says new advances in science are allowing researchers to understand aquatic creatures in new ways and prove fish feel so much more than they’re generally given credit for. His critics say the evidence is anecdotal and hopeful at best.
Jonathan Balcombe is the Director of Animal Sentience with the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy.
Interview highlights
Jonathan Balcombe: The two most common contexts [in which] we think of fishes are either as a source of food or as a source of recreation. But they have their own lives and they’re richly lived lives. They have social lives, they recognise each other as individuals. They have tool use, they have sex lives. There’s evidence for play, planning, scheming, cognition, emotion. There’s a whole gamut of experiences they have.
I like to say that sentience is the bedrock of ethics – and sentience is the capacity to feel... Because they can feel, they can experience pain and suffering and also pleasure and joy and the whole spectrum of experiences that may come within that.
Do they have the same experiences we have? No, I don’t suggest they do. We have some they don’t. But we should be aware of the possibility that they have some that we don’t.
In a recent study, rainbowfishes were divided into two groups and put into two chambers. One was an enriched chamber – it had dimmer light, which fishes prefer, it had places to hide, rocks and vegetation. There was another chamber that was attached – they could swim over to this chamber if they wished – it was an empty, brightly lit chamber. So there was nowhere to hide and they would probably feel exposed there. You can probably guess all of the fishes spent all of their time in the first chamber.
Then they injected half of these rainbowfishes with an acid solution which is caustic and we may expect caused lasting pain. The other group were injected with a saline solution – so apart from the prick of the needle they probably didn’t feel any lasting pain – if they are sensate to pain.
They all remained in the same enriched chamber until they dissolved a painkiller – in this case Lidocaine – into the barren, avoided chamber – the brightly lit one. And lo and behold some of the fishes began to wander over into that chamber and spend time there. It was only those who were injected with the acid. The ones who were injected with the saline remained in the enriched chamber. The ones injected with the acid went over to where they could get pain relief.
Grouper fishes are large chunky fishes of reefs and morays are slender fishes of reefs that are eels – they’re sort of like the ferrets of the sea. Groupers, when going foraging, will often try to recruit a moray to join them in the foraging foray. The grouper signals to the moray with a head shake or a full body shimmy – you can watch YouTube videos of them in action. And if the moray is in the mood they swim off together. They look like a couple of pals out of a Disney film. They swim over the reef and they work as a team. The way it works is if they chase a fish and the fish hides in the reef, the moray goes in after it and can either catch that fish, or if the fish escapes into the open water you know who’s waiting – it’s the grouper... The grouper will spend up to 25 minutes pointing, hoping the moray will get the message and come over and try to ferret this fish out.
A fish can get stress relief by getting caressed, by getting a massage - that to them feels good. The motivation for so-called ‘client’ fishes to wait their turn to be plucked over by cleaner fishes on reefs is a really widespread, well-known, well-studied symbiosis in the seas. I think the main motivation besides getting parasite removal service is that it feels really nice. It’s like us going to a spa, it feels good. And they have that, too.
I do hope we will bring fishes into our circle of moral concern... We kill huge numbers of fishes, huge numbers. It’s easy to forget they're individuals.
Topics: author interview
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Tags: Johnathan Balcolmbe
Duration: 21'26"

15:44
The Panel pre-show for 28 June 2016
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Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 15'18"

21:06
Native seed bank
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The New Zealand Indigenous Flora Seed Bank is collecting and storing the seeds of native plants as a long-term insurance policy to ensure the survival of species.
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In the last three years the seeds of more than 200 native species have been deposited in New Zealand’s native seed bank. And by the time they finish, the 'bankers' hope to have seeds from all 3000-or-so native plant taxa.
Drying seeds and putting them in long-term cold storage is an insurance policy and a way of conserving biodiversity.
The seed bank is run by Jessica Schnell and Craig McGill, from Massey University, along with growing numbers of trained seed collectors who work around the country.
A dedicated band of volunteers also work in the lab at Palmerston North, cleaning the tens of thousands of seeds that are collected each year.
Jessica is the seed bank coordinator and she says the busy time of year is from late summer to early winter, when most seeds ripen. Each year she targets about 80 different plants.
“I aim to collect 10,000 seeds for each species,” says Jessica. “But sometimes that’s not practical.” If plants are very rare, then Jessica says she tries to collect at least 500 seeds.

To ensure the best genetic diversity in a collection of seeds, Craig says they collect from at least 50 different plants at a range of locations. They are also careful never to over-collect, which means in practice that they don’t collect more than 20 percent of the seeds on a single plant.
Back in the lab, the seeds are cleaned in fresh water and any fleshy coverings are removed. Then the seeds are taken to Agresearch to be dried, before being deposited in the Margot Forde Germplasm Centre, which is also New Zealand's national gene bank of grassland plants. The seeds are stored at -20° Celsius.
Before they are stored the viability of the seeds is checked using a small x-ray machine.
“The x-ray machine allows us to look inside the seed, and determine if it is full or empty, or if there is a predation problem. A lot of the seed we are collecting has been eaten by bugs or has larvae in it,” says Craig.

Soon after the seeds have been banked Jessica carries out a germination trial on some of them to ensure that the seeds are still viable.
Not all native seeds can be stored. Craig says the fleshy mangrove seed is a good example of what is known as a recalcitrant or non-orthodox seed.
Jessica is spending a few months working at the Millennium Seed Bank in the UK trying to work out a way of drying and storing kohekohe seeds, which are another problematic species.
The New Zealand Indigenous Flora Seed Bank is a project to collect and store seeds from New Zealand flora. It builds on the Memorandum of Collaboration signed between the New Zealand Plant Conservation Network and the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew. It was initially set up with funding from MWH New Zealand Limited, and also involves Agresearch, the Department of Conservation, Landcare Research and Massey University.
The grass and clover seed bank at the Margot Forde Germplasm Centre has featured on Our Changing World previously.
Topics: environment, science
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Tags: seeds, native plants, Flora, seed bank, conservation
Duration: 15'52"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Iceland's historic football win over England
Iceland is the smallest country in the tournament - it has a population of just 320 thousand people - less than the population of Wellington. And yet it pulled one off the biggest sporting shocks in football history - beating England two points to 1 in, and eliminating it from Euro 2016 in the process.
Jesse speaks with the Icelandic consul to New Zealand, and also a 94 year old Icelandic Kiwi who got so excited during the game he had to take his heart pills.
1:25 Irish to te reo Māori
Aoife Finn is an Irish student, who's been completing her PhD in te reo Māori. And now she's in New Zealand to try it out in conversation. Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has sponsored Aoife's visit to New Zealand for Māori language week.
1:35 Dan Slevin on New York fashion and film
Legendary New York fashion photographer Bill Cunningham passed away this weekend at the age of 87 after a stroke. Dan Slevin looks back on the documentary made about him, and other films centred around New York fashion.
[embed] https://youtu.be/NYqiLJBXbss
1:40 Favourite album
2:10 The World's Greatest Guitar Solos!
Hundreds of our listeners have shared their favourite guitar solos of all time. Trevor Reekie has compiled the top picks and will play them all for us.
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3:10 Fish have feelings
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Fish feel pain, sadness and even behave in very Machivellian ways, figuring out how to take advantage of other fish. Jonathan Balcombe is the director of animal sentience for the Humane Society Institute for Science, he explores the latest science that paints a very different picture of life under the sea. His new book is What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins.
3:30 Science and environment stories
Stories from Our Changing World.
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

=PLAYLIST=

JESSE MULLIGAN : AFTERNOONS 1 - 4pm
Tuesday 28th June
JESSE'S SONG:
ARTIST: Marlon Williams
TITLE: Arahura
COMP: Marlon Williams
ALBUM: Unreleased
LIVE: RNZ Auckland
FAVOURITE ALBUM:
ARTIST: Electric Light Orchestra
TITLE: Ticket To The Moon
COMP: Jeff Lynne
ALBUM: Time
LABEL: Jet
ARTIST: Electric Light Orchestra
TITLE: Here Is The News
COMP: Jeff Lynne
ALBUM: Time
LABEL: Jet
ARTIST: Electric Light Orchestra
TITLE: 21st Century Man
COMP: Jeff Lynne
ALBUM: Time
LABEL: Jet
GREAT GUITAR SOLOS:
ARTIST: Mike Bloomfield
TITLE: Stop
COMP: Jerry Ragovoy, Mort Shuman
ALBUM: Super Session
LABEL: Columbia
ARTIST: Les Paul & Mary Ford
TITLE: How High The Moon
COMP: Morgan Lewis, Nancy Hamilton
ALBUM: Two For The Show
LABEL: Capitol
ARTIST: Joe Satriani
TITLE: Surfing with the Alien
COMP: Joe Satriani
ALBUM: Surfing with the Alien
LABEL: Relativity
ARTIST: Steely Dan
TITLE: Kid Charlemagne - (feat: Larry Carlton)
COMP: Walter Becker, Donald Fagen
ALBUM: The Royal Scam
LABEL: ABC
ARTIST: Michael Jackson
TITLE: Beat It (Feat: Jennifer Batten)
COMP: Michael Jackson
ALBUM: Thriller
LABEL: Epic
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Immigrant Song (Feat: Jeff Beck)
COMP: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin III
LABEL: Atlantic
ARTIST: Stevie Ray Vaughn
TITLE: Lenny
COMP: Stevie Ray Vaughn
ALBUM: Texas Flood.
LABEL: Epic

ARTIST: Richard Thompson
TITLE: Shoot Out the Lights
COMP: Shoot Out the Lights
ALBUM: Richard Thompson
LABEL: Hannibal

ARTIST: Neil Young
TITLE: Like A Hurricane
COMP: Neil Young
ALBUM: American Stars 'n Bars
LABEL: Reprise
ARTIST: Dire Straits
TITLE: Sultans of Swing
COMP: Mark Knopfler
ALBUM: Dire Straits
LABEL: Warner
ARTIST: The Rolling Stones
TITLE: Time Waits For No Man (Feat: Mick Taylor)
COMP: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards
ALBUM: It's Only Rock 'n Roll
LABEL: RSO
ARTIST: John Mayall's Bluesbreakers
TITLE: All Your Love (Feat: Eric Clapton)
COMP: Otis Rush
ALBUM: Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton
LABEL: Decca
ARTIST: Fleetwood Mac
TITLE: Albatross (Feat: Peter Green)
COMP: Peter Green
ALBUM: The Pious Bird of Good Omen
LABEL: Reprise
ARTIST: Gary Moore
TITLE: Parisienne Walkways
COMP: Phil Lynott, Gary Moore
ALBUM: Back On The Streets
LABEL: MCA

ARTIST: Eno
TITLE: Babys on Fire (Here Come The Warm Jets) (Feat: Robert Fripp)
COMP: Brian Eno
ALBUM: Here Come the Warm Jets.
LABEL: Island
ARTIST: Prince
TITLE: Purple Rain (live)
COMP: Prince
ALBUM: Super Bowl Halftime Show (2007)
LABEL: Download
ARTIST: Led Zeppelin
TITLE: Dazed and Confused (Feat: Jimmy Page)
COMP: Jimmy Page (Inspired by Jake Holmes)
ALBUM: Led Zeppelin
LABEL: Atlantic
ARTIST: Jimi Hendrix
TITLE: Little Wing
COMP: Jimi Hendrix
ALBUM: Axis: Bold as Love
LABEL: Polydor
ARTIST: Pink Floyd
TITLE: Comfortably Numb (feat: David Gilmour)
COMP: Roger Waters, David Gilmour
ALBUM: The Wall
LABEL: Harvest
PANEL HALF TIME SONG:
ARTIST: The Muttonbirds
TITLE: Nature
COMP: Wayne Mason
ALBUM: Nature
LABEL: Virgin

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
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An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

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15:44
The Panel pre-show for 28 June 2016
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Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
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Duration: 15'18"

16:03
The Panel with Ali Jones and Claire Matthews (Part 1)
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What the Panelists Ali Jones and Claire Matthews have been up to. John Shewan's review of foreign Trusts in the wake of the Panama Papers has found currents disclosure rules are inadequate. .Can we define what Brexit is really all about? Stephen Bonnar QC explains why choices are made between murder and manslaughter charges.
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Duration: 23'01"

16:05
The Panel with Ali Jones and Claire Matthews (Part 2)
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University of Queensland research in conjunction with the Australian Government has found people who spend 30 minutes a week in parks are less likely to have high blood pressure or mental health issues. What the Panelists Ali Jones and Claire Matthews have been thinking about. Listener feedback from the discussion on 12 year-olds going to the movies without an adult. What does the future hold for tranpsort in New Zealand cities? We ask Stephen Hewett of Beca Engineering. Earthquakes, storms, economic bust, and a housing crisis - these are the threats to Wellington's future.
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Duration: 27'24"

16:07
Panel Intro
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What the Panelists Ali Jones and Claire Matthews have been up to.
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Duration: 2'54"

16:10
Review into foreign Trusts
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John Shewan's review of foreign Trusts in the wake of the Panama Papers has found currents disclosure rules are inadequate.
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Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 1'32"

16:12
Brexit - is racism at the crux of it?
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Can we define what Brexit is really all about?
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Tags: Brexit
Duration: 10'58"

16:23
Child killings and manslaughter convictions
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Stephen Bonnar QC explains why choices are made between murder and manslaughter charges.
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Tags: child abuse
Duration: 7'10"

16:31
Lowering your blood pressure in the park
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University of Queensland research in conjunction with the Australian Government has found people who spend 30 minutes a week in parks are less likely to have high blood pressure or mental health issues.
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Tags: parks, blod pressure
Duration: 2'11"

16:33
Panel Says
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What the Panelists Ali Jones and Claire Matthews have been thinking about.
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Duration: 10'18"

16:45
Kids doing stuff without adults
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Listener feedback from the discussion on 12 year-olds going to the movies without an adult..
Topics: arts, business
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Duration: 2'59"

16:48
Auckland's transport still up in the air
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What does the future hold for tranpsort in New Zealand cities? We ask Stephen Hewett of Beca Engineering.
Topics: transport
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Duration: 7'25"

16:57
The four horsemen of Wellington's apocalypse
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Earthquakes, storms, economic bust, and a housing crisis - these are the threats to Wellington's future.
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Duration: 2'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

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17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Tuesday 28th June 2016
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Watch Tuesday's full programme here. It begins five minutes in.
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Duration: 00"

17:09
PM and Labour leader head to head over foreign trusts
BODY:
The Prime Minister and the Labour leader have gone head to head in Parliament, with John Key facing accusations he misled New Zealanders over problems with the foreign trust regime.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Foreign trusts
Duration: 3'31"

17:17
Britain in turmoil post-Brexit
BODY:
With uncertainty on the rise in Britain, racial abuse has spiked, and pundits and voters alike are wondering who the country's new PM will be. Catherine Drew joins Checkpoint.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK, Brexit
Duration: 5'07"

17:23
Pharmac will fund Keytruda
BODY:
Melanoma sufferers will now have two treatment options after Pharmac announced today it would also fund Keytruda.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: melanoma
Duration: 3'38"

17:29
Reykjavik gets ready to celebrate
BODY:
Football fans in Iceland supping at the English Pub were gobsmacked after the tiny country beat England 2-1 in the Euro 2016, knocking them out of the tournament.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Iceland
Duration: 3'15"

17:35
Evening Business for 28 June 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 1'55"

17:38
Fears about reporting child abuse putting lives at risk
BODY:
Child advocates say lives are being put at risk because people are too afraid to report suspected cases of child abuse.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: child abuse
Duration: 3'38"

17:42
Diplomatic immunity waived for NZer in Korea
BODY:
The Foreign Minister says he understands a New Zealand staff member based at the Embassy in South Korea has now been interviewed by the police there..
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: South Korea
Duration: 2'30"

17:44
Residents held hostage by boy racers
BODY:
Residents of Governors Bay close to Christchurch say they feel like they're being held hostage in their own homes by boy racers.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: polics, boy racers
Duration: 2'41"

17:48
Sports news for Tuesday 28 June
BODY:
Latest sports news from the RNZ Sport team.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'01"

17:52
Supreme Court throws out Texas abortion law
BODY:
Abortion rights activists are celebrating in the United States, after the country's Supreme Court struck down a Texas law that limited pregnancy terminations.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: US, abortion
Duration: 2'17"

17:55
1000+ dog owners sign up for free registration
BODY:
More than 1000 owners of menacing dogs have signed up to the Auckland Council's offer to register their pets for free - five times the number they were expecting.
Topics:
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: dogs
Duration: 3'28"

18:08
NZ's rich have biggest slice of pie
BODY:
In its latest survey of household wealth, Statistics New Zealand found that the country's richest individuals - those in the top 10 percent - held 60 percent of all wealth by the end of July last year.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: wealth
Duration: 4'25"

18:13
Local councils having to pick up policing tab
BODY:
Local councils are increasing the pressure on central government over what they call the systemic underfunding of the police.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: police, local government
Duration: 3'18"

18:16
Battleground seats must-wins in Aussie election
BODY:
With less than four days until the Australian federal election, the fight for key marginal Western Sydney seats, such as Parramatta, is ramping up.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 3'19"

18:19
Stress may contribute to breast cancer
BODY:
Scientists at Monash University have found that stress drives metastasis - the spread of an existing cancer from the original tumour - in mice with breast cancer.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: stress
Duration: 4'16"

18:24
Marcus Willis stuns Ricardas Berankis
BODY:
British qualifier Marcus Willis - ranked 772 in the world - caused a huge upset with victory over world number 54 Ricardas Berankis at Wimbledon.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Wimbledon.
Duration: 2'55"

18:27
Shock football win for Iceland
BODY:
Yvette Shapiro is Irish and a passionate supporter of the Irish team, whose own dreams of a European Cup fairy tale were ended by France.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: UK, Iceland
Duration: 3'43"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 28 June 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
Week begins with welcome for MPs from around the Pacific. House passes a motion from Labour's Phil Twyford mourning the death of British MP Jo Cox. Questions for the prime minister include the referendum decision for the UK to leave the EU and the Shewan report on disclosure rules for foreign trusts based in New Zealand. The Speaker also accepts Labour's request for a snap debate on this issue.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'10"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Marlon Williams - in Session

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:12
Our Own Odysseys - the USS Enterprise
BODY:
Dr Dave McKay shares his experiences aboard aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, aka the 'Big E'.
EXTENDED BODY:
Dave McKay had three stints on the USS Enterprise – not the starship, the aircraft carrier affectionately known as 'Big E'.
What was life like aboard? Bryan Crump finds out.
An extract from the interview
Dave McKay: My father was a port engineer and I hung out at the port a lot. I really enjoyed the guttural energy of the ship, the way the ship feels like a living organism. To me, although made of steel, it has a soul... Of course, when you shut it down it becomes quite dead, but whilst it’s out at sea it has this incredible life about it. I would relate it to the ship is the body and the people onboard are like the red corpuscles and the white blood cells that are sort of running around keeping it going.
When I got aboard I got this craving, I loved the smell of the ship. [The smell] is a combination of chicken soup, think of Campbell’s chicken soup, sump oil and jet fuel. It really is a one-of-a-kind smell. All destroyers and frigates and cruisers have a smell about them. Also on an aircraft carrier you can smell steam – there’s a lot of steam being used. Campbell’s chicken soup and sump oil and… I guess, David Lange would have said the smell of uranium, too. But thankfully they shield that from all the crew.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: travel
Duration: 18'43"

20:12
Nights' Pundit - Military History
BODY:
1 July marks the centennial of the "bloodiest day in the history of the British Army", the start of the First Battle of the Somme . We'll hear from historian and author Dr. Damien Fenton.
Topics: history, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 19'57"

=SHOW NOTES=

[image_crop:12153:full]
7:12 Our Own Odysseys - USS Enterprise
What's life like aboard an aircraft carrier? We'll ask Dr Dave McKay who spent time on the ship affectionately known as "big E".
[gallery:2188]
7:30 The Sampler

=SHOW NOTES=

=AUDIO=

19:30
American Tunes by Allen Toussaint
BODY:
An American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
EXTENDED BODY:
An American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
One great American journey came to an end last year with the death of Allen Toussaint, the great New Orleans musician, composer and producer. This month saw the release of his final recordings, and they are a reminder of what we’ve lost and what he’s left behind.
No one played New Orleans blues with more dignity and formality than Toussaint. Listening to the opening track – an original he calls ‘Delores’ Boyfriend’ I can see him in his suit and tie, his eternally elegant self. But there’s also a touch of his gentle humour; those teasing pauses at the start, where you know what he’s going to play next but he makes you wait for it; that uplifting key change; and his acknowledgement of the greats who went before him, especially Professor Longhair, who created many of the signature New Orleans licks and who Toussaint himself dubbed ‘the Bach of rock.’
Though Toussaint surely didn’t know this would be his last album, he was clearly in a reflective, almost career-summing mode. And one purpose of the record seems to be to pay respects to his mentors. If Toussaint’s approach to Professor Longhair’s barrelhouse compositions was to formalise them, turn them into almost-classical pieces, the other New Orleans hero he pays homage to here was a classical composer: Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Active in the mid-19th century, Gottschalk had studied music in Paris, but his compositions were inspired not only by the Chopin he heard in Europe but by the drums of Congo Square and folk melodies of the Caribbean. And Toussaint’s approach to Gottschalk’s ‘Danza’ is to give it just a bit less of the Paris salon and a touch more of the New Orleans barrelhouse.
Though Toussaint was a lovely understated vocalist, and of course wrote many lyrical songs, this last album is largely instrumental, and looks beyond the New Orleans he grew up in to jazz heroes like Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn.
He also revisits one of his own better-known tunes, ‘Southern Nights’, in a gentle instrumental arrangement. But he saves his voice for the album’s title track, ‘American Tune’. a Paul Simon song, of course, and the lyric seems particularly poignant as Toussaint sings it, as if in conversation with himself, answering his own phrases with thoughtful little runs on the piano. Of course there is an irony here, in that Simon’s so-titled ‘American Tune’ isn’t so American; it has its origins in a chorale from Bach’s St Matthew’s Passion. Yet that’s clearly the kind of synthesis Toussaint appreciated. The meeting of musics - and making it funky - was what he was all about. And this album is ultimately a memorial to that.
Songs featured: Delores’ Boyfriend, Southern Nights, Hey Little Girl, Danza op. 33, American Tune.
American Tunes is available on Nonesuch Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Allen Toussaint, New Orleans
Duration: 6'51"

19:30
Juarez by Terry Allen
BODY:
Nick Bollinger delves into a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger delves into a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen.
There are many ways of telling a tale, and the American artist Terry Allen has used more than a few of them in his time. Now 73, this painter, sculptor, songwriter, dramatist and musician has made his living from a combination of all these things ever since he left his hometown of Lubbock, Texas in the early sixties. And he draws on all of them for the mysterious tale that has been central to his life’s work.
Allen calls it Juarez: A Simple Story. It was the basis of his first album, which was first released just over forty years ago, has been revisited a number of times in a number of ways over the subsequent years. Now it has been re-released in a model reissue, with illustrations and essays that put the whole thing in its historic and artistic context.
Allen introduces the four main characters and gives a brief outline of the plot right near the start of the record. But that barely describes the real action in this tale, which seems to span centuries and civilisations, and takes place largely in the minds of the characters – who aren’t really characters in the usual theatrical sense. Rather, they are archetypes, or, in Allen’s own words “emotional climates or atmospheres in a state of dispossession.” The song ‘Cortez Sail’ begins with the character known as Jabo driving (‘probably a Buick’) out of Los Angeles, but segues into the saga of the Conquistador Cortez and his brutal conquest of the Aztec empire.
The relationship between that bloody historical tale and Allen’s more low-rent 20th century one is never entirely clear, though the former might foreshadow in some symbolic way the bloodshed that follows. Yet in spite of the violent denouement, there is romance along the way.
Allen is a magnificent, poetic lyricist, and wraps his unreconstructed Texan drawl around songs full of detail and wordplay.
But he has many skills. And as the long accompanying essay by Brendan Greaves reveals, the starting point for this project was a set of drawings Allen produced in the 1960s when he was fresh out of art college. Some of these are reproduced here, along with Greaves’ essay, and they are beautiful and surreal. Allen would travel with the visual works, and sometimes perform the songs in the galleries where they were exhibited.
Eventually he made the recordings contained in this album. They are plain: mostly just Allen at his piano, which he plays in a thumping honky-tonk style, joined occasionally by one or other guitarist.
Terry Allen has made a lot of records since Juarez, some more musically sophisticated. ‘Cantina Carlotta’, first heard as part of Juarez, reappeared in the 80s on the record Bloodlines, where Allen was accompanied by the Panhandle Mystery Band, led by the great Lloyd Maines (father of the Dixie Chicks’ Natalie Maines.) On another disc he was joined by Indian musicians, especially appropriate for his song ‘New Delhi Freight Train’, a surreal tale of Jesse James on the run that I first heard covered by Little Feat. He has also continued to work as a visual artist, and his works are held in many museum collections.
But Juarez remains the piece he keeps circling back to, as though haunted by it. The story, he says in the liner notes, didn’t present itself all at once but grew as the piece grew. He’s not even sure where it came from. ‘The characters’ he says, ‘came out of the drawings and the songs, but really just came out of nowhere.’ And listening to this, I’m thinking that might be where the best stuff comes from.
Songs featured: The Juarez Device, Cortez Sail, Honeymoon In Cortez, Border Palace, Cantina Carlotta, La Despedida.
Juarez has been reissued on Paradise Of Bachelors.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Terry Allen, music, music review
Duration: 11'51"

19:30
Modern Country by William Tyler
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler.
It seems odd to say it, but arguably the most epic tale I’ve heard this year is on a record with no words.
William Tyler is a guitar player - an extremely good one. Just in terms of technique, he’s phenomenal, moving around the instrument in a variety of tunings and fingering styles, from a deft clawhammer picking reminiscent of John Fahey, to gritty electric plucking in the manner of Ry Cooder.
He’s in his mid-thirties, but has been a presence on the alternative scene of his Nashville home since his teens, playing in groups like Lambchop and Silver Jews, and on albums by everyone from Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy to Candi Staton.
But his solo records are where he sets out his own musical vision, and it’s an expansive one. Modern Country is his most expansive yet, both sonically and conceptually. The title suggests multiple meanings: on a regional level it might refer to Tyler’s Nashville base, the cradle of ‘modern country’ music. Yet while his music, like Nashville country, is connected to all kinds of early rural sounds, it is also consciously modern, in the manner of a 20th century abstractionist or stream-of-consciousness poet.
It would be easy to say it sounds like the soundtrack to a road movie, and much of it does. But this music doesn’t need cameras or a narrative. It is its own movie, and the way Tyler uses sounds and motifs creates a narrative as strong, in its own way, as any screenplay.
The album begins with a simple eight-bar melody, traced on an electric guitar. If the tune seems familiar, it is a close relative of the theme Bob Dylan recorded for Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, which Dave Rawlings reframed last year for his epic ballad ‘The Trip’ on his Nashville Obsolete album. Wherever this melody rears its head, it always seems to depict a journey, and always through a mythic American landscape. But Tyler’s landscape isn’t the wild west of Billy the Kid or the world on the rails described in Rawlings’ song. This is modern country. And the old theme lingers like a ghost of America’s past, while Tyler’s traveller passes through an apocalypse of dying cities and fossil-fuelled destruction. At least, that’s what I hear; and I believe that’s what Tyler meant when he named his version of this tune ‘Highway Anxiety’, though I like to think the music would have provided me with those images anyway.
While he invites you to think of this music as country, Tyler’s compositions actually have as much in common with modern classical: think of the way Steve Reich or Philip Glass use repetition, and the majestic minimalism of Tyler’s music starts to make sense. Old folk songs are the building blocks of many of his pieces: sometimes a whole tune, other times just a fragment, like the figure from ‘Wildwood Flower’ that is the jumping-off point for the tune he calls ‘Kingdom Of Jones’.
William Tyler’s Modern Country is an ambitious album – a concept album without words – and he carries it off gloriously. Did I say masterpiece? Eulogising the guitarist Jerry Garcia in 1996, no less a wordspinner than Bob Dylan said: “There's a lot of spaces and advances between the Carter Family, Buddy Holly and say, Ornette Coleman, a lot of universes, but he filled them all.” Remarkably, I think those words might apply here too.
Songs featured: Gone clear, Albion Moonlight, I’m Gonna Live Forever, Highway Anxiety, Kingdom Of Jones.
Modern Country is available on Merge Records.

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: William Tyler, music, music review
Duration: 11'03"

19:30
The Sampler for 28 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler; the reissue of a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen; and an American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler; the reissue of a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen; and an American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: William Tyler, Terry Allen, Allen Toussaint, music, music review
Duration: 29'46"

7:30 The Sampler
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler; the reissue of a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen; and an American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
8:12 Nights' Pundit - Military History
1 July marks the centennial of the "bloodiest day in the history of the British Army", the start of the First Battle of the Somme. We'll talk to historian and author Dr Damien Fenton.
8:30 Window on the World
Ukraine - Back from the war - Since the start of the conflict in Ukraine, huge numbers of men have been conscripted into service on the frontline. Many are now returning home to a civilian society which has little understanding of their experiences or how the fighting has changed them. Reporter David Stern follows of a group of Ukrainian veterans as they attempt to adjust to life after the war fare. As Europe's only active conflict in a generation enters its third year, the programme explores the unique pressures and dilemmas that a huge cross-section of Ukrainian men face after demobilisation.
9:07 Tuesday Feature
Syrian Voices - Five years ago, protests in Syria as part of the Arab Spring, were put down with violence by the Syrian Government. The mass protests quickly became an armed rebellion, with increasing sectarian involvement. As the conflict escalated, other countries became involved with Russia commencing air strikes in September 2015, and areas of the country becoming strongholds of so-called Islamic State militants. In our Tuesday feature this week, the BBC's Lyse Doucet talks to those who have survived - or are surviving - the conflict in Syria.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
This week the Global Village explores some contemporary English and Irish folk artists and recordings - including music from PolkaWorks, Martin Carthy & Eiza Carthy, The Elizabethan Session, The Gloaming, The Imagined Village, and Altan. Plus some traditionally inspired music from Central Europe from Slovakia’s Banda and Hungary’s Márta Sebestyén.

===7:35 PM. | The Sampler===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly review and analysis of new CD releases

=AUDIO=

19:30
American Tunes by Allen Toussaint
BODY:
An American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
EXTENDED BODY:
An American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
One great American journey came to an end last year with the death of Allen Toussaint, the great New Orleans musician, composer and producer. This month saw the release of his final recordings, and they are a reminder of what we’ve lost and what he’s left behind.
No one played New Orleans blues with more dignity and formality than Toussaint. Listening to the opening track – an original he calls ‘Delores’ Boyfriend’ I can see him in his suit and tie, his eternally elegant self. But there’s also a touch of his gentle humour; those teasing pauses at the start, where you know what he’s going to play next but he makes you wait for it; that uplifting key change; and his acknowledgement of the greats who went before him, especially Professor Longhair, who created many of the signature New Orleans licks and who Toussaint himself dubbed ‘the Bach of rock.’
Though Toussaint surely didn’t know this would be his last album, he was clearly in a reflective, almost career-summing mode. And one purpose of the record seems to be to pay respects to his mentors. If Toussaint’s approach to Professor Longhair’s barrelhouse compositions was to formalise them, turn them into almost-classical pieces, the other New Orleans hero he pays homage to here was a classical composer: Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Active in the mid-19th century, Gottschalk had studied music in Paris, but his compositions were inspired not only by the Chopin he heard in Europe but by the drums of Congo Square and folk melodies of the Caribbean. And Toussaint’s approach to Gottschalk’s ‘Danza’ is to give it just a bit less of the Paris salon and a touch more of the New Orleans barrelhouse.
Though Toussaint was a lovely understated vocalist, and of course wrote many lyrical songs, this last album is largely instrumental, and looks beyond the New Orleans he grew up in to jazz heroes like Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn.
He also revisits one of his own better-known tunes, ‘Southern Nights’, in a gentle instrumental arrangement. But he saves his voice for the album’s title track, ‘American Tune’. a Paul Simon song, of course, and the lyric seems particularly poignant as Toussaint sings it, as if in conversation with himself, answering his own phrases with thoughtful little runs on the piano. Of course there is an irony here, in that Simon’s so-titled ‘American Tune’ isn’t so American; it has its origins in a chorale from Bach’s St Matthew’s Passion. Yet that’s clearly the kind of synthesis Toussaint appreciated. The meeting of musics - and making it funky - was what he was all about. And this album is ultimately a memorial to that.
Songs featured: Delores’ Boyfriend, Southern Nights, Hey Little Girl, Danza op. 33, American Tune.
American Tunes is available on Nonesuch Records.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: music, music review, Allen Toussaint, New Orleans
Duration: 6'51"

19:30
Juarez by Terry Allen
BODY:
Nick Bollinger delves into a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger delves into a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen.
There are many ways of telling a tale, and the American artist Terry Allen has used more than a few of them in his time. Now 73, this painter, sculptor, songwriter, dramatist and musician has made his living from a combination of all these things ever since he left his hometown of Lubbock, Texas in the early sixties. And he draws on all of them for the mysterious tale that has been central to his life’s work.
Allen calls it Juarez: A Simple Story. It was the basis of his first album, which was first released just over forty years ago, has been revisited a number of times in a number of ways over the subsequent years. Now it has been re-released in a model reissue, with illustrations and essays that put the whole thing in its historic and artistic context.
Allen introduces the four main characters and gives a brief outline of the plot right near the start of the record. But that barely describes the real action in this tale, which seems to span centuries and civilisations, and takes place largely in the minds of the characters – who aren’t really characters in the usual theatrical sense. Rather, they are archetypes, or, in Allen’s own words “emotional climates or atmospheres in a state of dispossession.” The song ‘Cortez Sail’ begins with the character known as Jabo driving (‘probably a Buick’) out of Los Angeles, but segues into the saga of the Conquistador Cortez and his brutal conquest of the Aztec empire.
The relationship between that bloody historical tale and Allen’s more low-rent 20th century one is never entirely clear, though the former might foreshadow in some symbolic way the bloodshed that follows. Yet in spite of the violent denouement, there is romance along the way.
Allen is a magnificent, poetic lyricist, and wraps his unreconstructed Texan drawl around songs full of detail and wordplay.
But he has many skills. And as the long accompanying essay by Brendan Greaves reveals, the starting point for this project was a set of drawings Allen produced in the 1960s when he was fresh out of art college. Some of these are reproduced here, along with Greaves’ essay, and they are beautiful and surreal. Allen would travel with the visual works, and sometimes perform the songs in the galleries where they were exhibited.
Eventually he made the recordings contained in this album. They are plain: mostly just Allen at his piano, which he plays in a thumping honky-tonk style, joined occasionally by one or other guitarist.
Terry Allen has made a lot of records since Juarez, some more musically sophisticated. ‘Cantina Carlotta’, first heard as part of Juarez, reappeared in the 80s on the record Bloodlines, where Allen was accompanied by the Panhandle Mystery Band, led by the great Lloyd Maines (father of the Dixie Chicks’ Natalie Maines.) On another disc he was joined by Indian musicians, especially appropriate for his song ‘New Delhi Freight Train’, a surreal tale of Jesse James on the run that I first heard covered by Little Feat. He has also continued to work as a visual artist, and his works are held in many museum collections.
But Juarez remains the piece he keeps circling back to, as though haunted by it. The story, he says in the liner notes, didn’t present itself all at once but grew as the piece grew. He’s not even sure where it came from. ‘The characters’ he says, ‘came out of the drawings and the songs, but really just came out of nowhere.’ And listening to this, I’m thinking that might be where the best stuff comes from.
Songs featured: The Juarez Device, Cortez Sail, Honeymoon In Cortez, Border Palace, Cantina Carlotta, La Despedida.
Juarez has been reissued on Paradise Of Bachelors.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Terry Allen, music, music review
Duration: 11'51"

19:30
Modern Country by William Tyler
BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler.
It seems odd to say it, but arguably the most epic tale I’ve heard this year is on a record with no words.
William Tyler is a guitar player - an extremely good one. Just in terms of technique, he’s phenomenal, moving around the instrument in a variety of tunings and fingering styles, from a deft clawhammer picking reminiscent of John Fahey, to gritty electric plucking in the manner of Ry Cooder.
He’s in his mid-thirties, but has been a presence on the alternative scene of his Nashville home since his teens, playing in groups like Lambchop and Silver Jews, and on albums by everyone from Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy to Candi Staton.
But his solo records are where he sets out his own musical vision, and it’s an expansive one. Modern Country is his most expansive yet, both sonically and conceptually. The title suggests multiple meanings: on a regional level it might refer to Tyler’s Nashville base, the cradle of ‘modern country’ music. Yet while his music, like Nashville country, is connected to all kinds of early rural sounds, it is also consciously modern, in the manner of a 20th century abstractionist or stream-of-consciousness poet.
It would be easy to say it sounds like the soundtrack to a road movie, and much of it does. But this music doesn’t need cameras or a narrative. It is its own movie, and the way Tyler uses sounds and motifs creates a narrative as strong, in its own way, as any screenplay.
The album begins with a simple eight-bar melody, traced on an electric guitar. If the tune seems familiar, it is a close relative of the theme Bob Dylan recorded for Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, which Dave Rawlings reframed last year for his epic ballad ‘The Trip’ on his Nashville Obsolete album. Wherever this melody rears its head, it always seems to depict a journey, and always through a mythic American landscape. But Tyler’s landscape isn’t the wild west of Billy the Kid or the world on the rails described in Rawlings’ song. This is modern country. And the old theme lingers like a ghost of America’s past, while Tyler’s traveller passes through an apocalypse of dying cities and fossil-fuelled destruction. At least, that’s what I hear; and I believe that’s what Tyler meant when he named his version of this tune ‘Highway Anxiety’, though I like to think the music would have provided me with those images anyway.
While he invites you to think of this music as country, Tyler’s compositions actually have as much in common with modern classical: think of the way Steve Reich or Philip Glass use repetition, and the majestic minimalism of Tyler’s music starts to make sense. Old folk songs are the building blocks of many of his pieces: sometimes a whole tune, other times just a fragment, like the figure from ‘Wildwood Flower’ that is the jumping-off point for the tune he calls ‘Kingdom Of Jones’.
William Tyler’s Modern Country is an ambitious album – a concept album without words – and he carries it off gloriously. Did I say masterpiece? Eulogising the guitarist Jerry Garcia in 1996, no less a wordspinner than Bob Dylan said: “There's a lot of spaces and advances between the Carter Family, Buddy Holly and say, Ornette Coleman, a lot of universes, but he filled them all.” Remarkably, I think those words might apply here too.
Songs featured: Gone clear, Albion Moonlight, I’m Gonna Live Forever, Highway Anxiety, Kingdom Of Jones.
Modern Country is available on Merge Records.

Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: William Tyler, music, music review
Duration: 11'03"

19:30
The Sampler for 28 June
BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler; the reissue of a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen; and an American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
EXTENDED BODY:
In The Sampler this week Nick Bollinger reviews a saga without words from guitarist William Tyler; the reissue of a mid-seventies epic from Texan sculptor and songwriter Terry Allen; and an American journey comes to an end with the final album from Allen Toussaint.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: William Tyler, Terry Allen, Allen Toussaint, music, music review
Duration: 29'46"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Award winning former British broadcaster Mark Coles presents his pick of the best new music releases and demos from around the planet. A glorious mix of brand new sounds from all over the world, real conversations with music makers and tales of everyday life as seen from an English garden shed. (MCM)

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Year 2016

Reference number 288262

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 28 Jun 2016