RNZ National. 2016-08-25. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

25 August 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:05 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Discovery (BBC); 1:05 The Thursday Feature (RNZ); 2:05 The Cultural Frontline; 3:05 Lady Jean by Noel Virtue read by Anne Budd (RNZ); 3:30 NZ Books (RNZ) 5:10 Witness (BBC) 5:45 The Day in Parliament

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including:
6:16 and 6:50 Business News
6:26 Rural News
6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Thursday 25 August 2016
BODY:
"Voices under the rubble" after earthquake hits Italy. Major attack on American University in Kabul. Gun City disagrees another mass killing in NZ likely. Summer water crisis could be looming in Hawke's Bay. A British backpacker stabbed in Australia, terror links feared. Oz Kiwi advocates bring their message to Parliament.
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Duration: 29'33"

06:06
Sports News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
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Duration: 2'15"

06:10
'The town isn't there anymore' - Italy reels after quake
BODY:
'The town isn't there anymore'. Italy reels after a massive 6.2 magntitude earthquake rocks the centre of the country.
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Duration: 2'49"

06:12
Death toll rises in massive quake in central Italy
BODY:
Journalist Josephine McKenna in Rome says it "looks like a war zone" as rescuers use their bare hands as they frantically search for survivors of the earthquake.
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Duration: 3'32"

06:20
Early Business News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
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Duration: 2'05"

06:25
Rural News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
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Duration: 4'48"

06:45
New Zealander says Italy earthquake was "terrifying"
BODY:
A New Zealander in Italy describes the terror of the massive 6.2 magnitude earthquake that has hit central Italy.
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Duration: 3'06"

06:50
Meridian good start to year but price volatility expected
BODY:
It was the day of the energy utilities yesterday for profit results, outlooks and annual meetings.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'48"

06:52
Genesis Energy looking to boost customer experience
BODY:
The country's biggest energy retailer Genesis Energy had a stronger full-year profit.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'11"

06:54
Electricity industry profits subdued by low wholesale prices
BODY:
With all the power companies having reported we asked an analyst about the quality of the results and outlook for the sector.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'17"

06:57
Vector looks to new technology to drive earnings
BODY:
The Auckland-based electricity lines company, Vector, also had a solid profit lift from an asset sale gain which sent the bottom line up 84 percent on last year.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'10"

06:57
Metlifecare says demand from aging population driving growth
BODY:
Among the other companies reporting yesterday was retirement village operator, Metlifecare.
Topics: business
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Duration: 51"

06:58
A2 Milk looks to develop markets
BODY:
A2 Milk's shares were battered nearly 9 percent lower.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 52"

06:59
Markets Update for 25 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 53"

07:06
Sports News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'43"

07:14
"Voices under the rubble" after earthquake hits Italy
BODY:
The BBC's Jenny Hill talks to us from Amatrice, which has suffered devastating damage in the huge Italian earthquake.
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Duration: 6'11"

07:14
"Voices under the rubble" after earthquake hits Italy
BODY:
The BBC's Jenny Hill talks to us from Amatrice, which has suffered devastating damage in the huge Italian earthquake. Rescue efforts continue as the death toll mounts.
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Duration: 6'11"

07:20
Major attack on American University in Kabul
BODY:
Students remain trapped in the American University of Afghanistan campus after a car bomb explodes. Our correspondent in Kabul has the latest.
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Duration: 4'01"

07:27
Gun City disagrees another mass killing in NZ likely
BODY:
We speak with the owner of Gun City, who disputes Police Association claims that guns are too easy to obtain, making another mass killing inevitable.
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Duration: 5'45"

07:36
A British backpacker stabbed in Australia, terror links feared
BODY:
Investigations continue into the motives of a 29 year old French man who stabbed and killed a British backpacker in Australia while yelling Allah Akbar. Police say it could be a terrorist act.
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Duration: 4'02"

07:38
Summer water crisis could be looming in Hawke's Bay
BODY:
A summer water crisis could be looming in Hawke's Bay - Hastings District Council plans to supply all of Havelock North's water but its own research suggests there won't be enough water to go round.
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Duration: 3'40"

07:47
All Blacks management names team to play the Wallabies
BODY:
21-year-old Anton Lienert-Brown takes the place of injured Ryan Crotty in a largely unchanged All Blacks team to play the Wallabies on Saturday.
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Duration: 2'01"

07:48
Oz Kiwi advocates bring their message to Parliament.
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Oz Kiwi group says it will keep fighting for the right of New Zealanders to be treated fairly by the Australian government.
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Duration: 5'16"

07:55
Paintings removal done to put focus on Treaty claim
BODY:
The man at the centre of a dispute over the ownership of 18 rare paintings taken from a Maori trust board in the King Country has explained why he took them. Rongo Wetere says he wanted to draw attention to his iwi's Treaty of Waitangi claim.
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Duration: 3'12"

07:58
Two Goldie paintings sold at Auckland auction
BODY:
A Hawke's Bay retiree has gone home with two Charles Frederick Goldie portraits from an auction in Auckland last night.
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Duration: 3'08"

08:04
Amatrice quake survivor describes the carnage
BODY:
American man Kevin Galiè who lives not far from the epicentre of the Amatrice earthquake tells Morning Report about how he, his home and neighbours fared in the quake.
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Duration: 5'30"

08:06
Sports News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics:
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Duration: 2'36"

08:16
Online schools advocates sceptical of government's bill.
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A parent whose three children learn online, and a profession of e-learning from the University of Canterbury, discuss the Government's plan to set up more online schools.
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Duration: 5'52"

08:20
Christchurch council to hand social housing over to trust
BODY:
The Christchurch City Council votes today on turning its entire portfolio of social housing over to a charitable trust to manage. The council insists it isn't a case of privatisation by stealth of the country's second largest stock of social housing.
Topics: housing
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Duration: 2'51"

08:31
Markets Update for 25 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
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Tags:
Duration: 45"

08:37
Planet that could support life is discovered
BODY:
A planet's been found orbiting our nearest star. Grant Christie from Stardrome Observatory says it's too early to say but it's possible it could support life.
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Duration: 4'52"

08:40
Land-banking touting shows needs for crackdown - Labour
BODY:
The Labour Party says the shameless touting of properties for sale as being good for land-banking shows the need for a serious crackdown on speculators.
Topics: housing
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Duration: 2'26"

08:43
Water contamination crisis highlights upcoming elections
BODY:
Havelock North's water contamination is being highlighted as a reason why people should care about local body elections.
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Duration: 3'05"

08:50
Tuhoe backs plan to bowl historic Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre
BODY:
Tuhoe is backing the controversial plans to bowl the historic Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre next to Lake Waikaremoana.
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Duration: 3'09"

08:52
Pitcairn pigtails may have belonged to Bounty mutineers
BODY:
DNA experts are to investigate a collection of 18th century pigtails believed to be from the Bounty mutineers who settled Pitcairn Island in the late 1700s. Scientists hope to be able to extract DNA from the hair and match it to living descendants of the crewmen.
Topics: history
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Duration: 3'36"

08:57
In first, NZ ballet dancer to take guest role in Australia
BODY:
The leading man from the Royal New Zealand Ballet's production of Giselle will reprise his role in Australia. It's the first time a New Zealand dancer has been invited to be a guest performer with The Australian Ballet.
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Duration: 4'39"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Hell Hound by Susy Pointon, read by Helen Jones. A woman lives alone, but she's not lonely. She doesn't want a dog, she doesn't need a dog... but a dog chooses her.

=AUDIO=

09:09
Govt responds on surgical mesh
BODY:
Recommendations on surgical mesh have been accepted by the Government, but there's still no guarantee its use - which can cause devastating health problems - will be monitored. The Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman has announced the Government accepts all the recommendations of the Health Select committee, following a two year inquiry, including measures to ensure there is informed consent for patients. Nine to Noon talks to mesh campaigner Charlotte Korte, who successfully lobbied for the inquiry to be held.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: surgical mesh
Duration: 13'23"

09:22
Cut price medical treatment for those in need
BODY:
Auckland Regional Charity Hospital is helping around 50 people a year who aren't considered sick enough to be treated in the public system, and it has capacity to help more patients from around the country. They may need surgery, or treatment that can improve their quality of life, or get them back to work. Dr Luigi Sussman is a surgeon and he is the director of the Auckland Regional Charity Hospital.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: Dr Luigi Sussman, Auckland Regional Charity Hospital, surgery, health
Duration: 12'42"

09:39
Project Glow Wear
BODY:
While people are encouraged to ditch the car for their daily commute those walking or cycling are at risk if they can't be seen by vehicles.Greater Wellington Regional Council figures show most cyclists are hit at peak times because they weren't seen by drivers and pedestrians wearing dark clothing is among factors for fatal crashes.With that in mind, the council has just hosted a design competition - Project Glow Wear - which features clothing, coats and accessories using materials which reflect light, so they are better seen in the dark. GWRC's Manager of Sustainable Transport Melanie Thornton and winner of the Arrow Uniform's Commercial Viability Award Kataraina Filer from Stokes Valley.
EXTENDED BODY:
While people are encouraged to ditch the car for their daily commute those walking or cycling are at risk if they can't be seen by vehicles.
Greater Wellington Regional Council figures show most cyclists are hit at peak times because they weren't seen by drivers and pedestrians wearing dark clothing is among factors for fatal crashes. With that in mind, the council has just hosted a design competition - Project Glow Wear - which features clothing, coats and accessories using materials which reflect light, so they are better seen in the dark.
GWRC's Manager of Sustainable Transport Melanie Thornton and winner of the Arrow Uniform's Commercial Viability Award Kataraina Filer from Stokes Valley.
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: Project Glow Wear, high viz, fashion, visibility, cyclists, pedestrians, Greater Wellington Regional Council, GWRC, Melanie Thornton, Kataraina Filer
Duration: 8'09"

09:47
UK Correspondent Matt Dathan
BODY:
Matt Dathan reports from the UK.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: UK
Duration: 13'10"

10:08
Keeping track of time
BODY:
Kevin Karney is an expert in cosmology and has a special interest in timekeeping and the art and science of sundials who has been in New Zealand on a lecture tour sponsored by the Australian and New Zealand Associations of Decorative & Fine Arts.In an age where every second is counted and people's lives run to tight schedules framed by time, what is the story behind how humans began keeping track of time?
EXTENDED BODY:
In 2016 our lives run to tight schedules in which every second counts and is counted. But how and when did humans begin to keep time?
According to Karney, archaeological sites reveal that ancient people were more concerned with telling the time of the year than the time of the day. Agriculture (and peoples’ livelihoods) revolved around the changing seasons – equinoxes, solstices - which were marked by feasts and sacrifices.
Until medieval times, sundials measured 12 hours between sunrise and sunset so what was known as ‘an hour’ varied in length depending on the time of the year.
Kevin says it wasn’t until almost the Renaissance that sundials became clever enough to measure ‘common hours’ (hours of equal length) when the Arabs discovered that if the shadow-caster of the sundial was parallel to the earth’s axis a sundial could give equal-length hours (common hours).
Modern timekeeping was ushered in with the arrival of pendulum clocks. A blind, and very old, Galileo described the first pendulum clock to his son in in 1630. His son drew a picture of it from which Dutchman Christiaan Huygens later developed the first pendulum clock – in 1656.
These first clocks were extremely inaccurate. “If you told the time to within half an hour with one of those you were doing well” says Karney.
The rise of international trade – and the growing importance of precise navigation – brought about the development of ‘mean time’ (basically, the time told by the stars).
“If you wanted to get your ship from A to B and not run up on rocks, you had to work out longitude very carefully, and to tell longitude you had to have very accurate time.”
It turns out hourglasses were very important for mariners, too. Sailors would toss a log over the back of a ship tied on to a bit of knotted rope. The bit of rope would run out and the sailor holding the rope would count the number of knots that passed through his fingers in 30 seconds - and that was the speed of the ship. This is why ships’ speeds are still measured in knots.
Before time zones were introduced in late 19th century, ‘mean time’ was ‘local mean time’ established by the sun hours of particular places. “The time in Auckland would be different from the time in Dunedin because you’re on different longitudes.”
New Zealand was the first country in the world to introduce ‘national mean time’, says Karney, prompted by a new telegraph cable crossing Cook Strait in 1866. To save confusion, the time in Wellington became ‘New Zealand Mean Time’.
From 1880, Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) became the national standard for the world. Then in 1971 (the much more accurate) atomic time was adopted in the internationally-accepted Co-ordinated Universal Time (UTC). UTC is now distributed by a bureau in Paris which co-ordinates the world’s atomic clocks.
Karney says that although most of us really don’t need to tell the time with great accuracy, we are now inescapably trapped by time, even when we drive. “You can’t drive your car without a GPS device – and that of course uses exquisite timing from three satellites and triangulation.”
Topics: science, history
Regions:
Tags: cosmology, timekeeping
Duration: 25'38"

10:39
Book review - Dear Amy by Helen Callaghan
BODY:
Reviewed by Catriona Ferguson, published by Penguin Random House.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'37"

11:07
Technology for good: Find Your Billion
BODY:
Nine to Noon talks to award-winning educational innovator Chris Clay, about Find Your Billion, a series of free workshops getting young people involved in cutting-edge technologies to help others. The workshops are part of the Singularity University New Zealand summit, where tech experts, thinkers and entrepreneurs from around the world will gather in Christchurch to discuss the potential of exponentially accelerating technologies. We also talk with Margaux Giles, teenage co-founder of Disaster Mesh, who completed a similar workshop in the United States.
EXTENDED BODY:
Nine to Noon talks to award-winning educational innovator Chris Clay, about Find Your Billion, a series of free workshops getting young people involved in cutting-edge technologies to help others.
The workshops are part of the Singularity University New Zealand summit, where tech experts, thinkers and entrepreneurs from around the world will gather in Christchurch to discuss the potential of exponentially accelerating technologies.
We also talk with Margaux Giles, teenage co-founder of Disaster Mesh, who completed a similar workshop in the United States.
People can register here
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Find Your Billion
Duration: 15'45"

11:29
Parenting: Dealing with disability
BODY:
Having a child diagnosed with a serious disability can be a life-changing moment for parents. Wellington high school teacher Tessa Prebble is trying to make the experience easier on parents with her podcast The One in A Million Baby.
EXTENDED BODY:
Having a child diagnosed with a disability is a life-changing and often isolating experience.
Wellington high school teacher Tessa Prebble is trying to make the experience easier on parents with her podcast The One in A Million Baby.
In Tessa's podcast, parents of children with severe disabilities who share their experiences and insights of how best to cope.
The One in A Million Baby was Tessa's response to her experience with her daughter Eva, who was born in April 2014.
“Within a couple of days, they discovered she was blind, she was deaf – profoundly in both – she had low muscle tone, she had brain and heart abnormalities. They came up with a working diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, which is another genetic condition that affects multiple areas of the body.”
Tessa says she did not cope well with that diagnosis.
Social workers and nurses advised her to go out and meet other parents of children with special needs, but she says she resisted the idea strongly at first.
“I didn’t want to be part of that club, for a start. I didn’t want to be in this new world… Because of those feelings of not wanting to be there I felt ashamed and I didn’t want to meet those parents because I thought ‘They’ll be full of acceptance and love and they won’t understand where I’m coming from’."
The podcast originated as an attempt to talk to herself as she was in those first couple of weeks after Eva was born – the ‘gap’ between “when the diagnosis comes in and you’re terrified and feeling all the feelings and when you’re ready to meet other parents” Tessa says.
She observes that many parents find it too confronting to see older children or adults with their child’s condition so online advice can be a comfort. The podcast format allows people to receive information and feel less alone without actively going out and meeting people before they are ready to.
“I wanted to be able to share stories, show parents they weren’t alone, show parents that whatever they were feeling it was normal and someone else had felt that way.”
Most parents featured in the podcast have talked about the importance of allowing themselves time to mourn and honour the loss of hopes they had not just their children's lives, but for their own lives, she says.
“It’s really important to allow yourself time to grieve for the child or for the life you thought you were going to have. ‘Cause the reality is, it’s not just about you seeing the child and their life not being quite what you thought, but it’s about your life being not quite what you thought.”
What does she recommend family and friends ‘not’ say to a parent of a special needs child?
“Everyone is going to want different things to be said to them. For me personally, I didn’t want to hear ‘Everything happens for a reason’, I didn’t want to hear “God only gives you as much as you can handle’ because I certainly didn’t feel like I could handle it. I also didn’t want to hear how strong I was and that I’d be fine because that felt like people were excusing themselves from worry."
Tessa says parents can be protective of special needs children for good reason, but it is a good idea to teach family and friends how to feed and babysit their child so that it’s not “all on them”.
She also advises parents to see a couples counsellor pre-emptively as having a disabled child can take a huge toll on a relationship.
“Anyone who has gone through a grieving process knows that their grief doesn’t look like someone else’s grief.”
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: disability, parenting
Duration: 17'35"

11:47
Viewing with Lara Strongman
BODY:
Lara Strongman reviews the Hillary series on TV One and Real Housewives of Auckland on Bravo
Topics: media
Regions:
Tags: television
Duration: 12'34"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Govt responds on surgical mesh
[image:70397:full]
Recommendations on surgical mesh have been accepted by the Government, but there's still no guarantee its use - which can cause devastating health problems - will be monitored. The Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman has announced the Government accepts all the recommendations of the Health Select committee, following a two year inquiry, including measures to ensure there is informed consent for patients. Nine to Noon talks to mesh campaigner Charlotte Korte, who successfully lobbied for the inquiry to be held.
09:20 Cut price medical treatment for those in need
[image:77163:full]
Auckland Regional Charity Hospital is helping around 50 people a year who aren't considered sick enough to be treated in the public system, and it has capacity to help more patients from around the country. They may need surgery, or treatment that can improve their quality of life, or get them back to work. Dr Luigi Sussman is a surgeon and he is the director of the Auckland Regional Charity Hospital.
09:35 Project Glow Wear
While people are encouraged to ditch the car for their daily commute those walking or cycling are at risk if they can't be seen by vehicles.Greater Wellington Regional Council figures show most cyclists are hit at peak times because they weren't seen by drivers and pedestrians wearing dark clothing is among factors for fatal crashes.With that in mind, the council has just hosted a design competition - Project Glow Wear - which features clothing, coats and accessories using materials which reflect light, so they are better seen in the dark. GWRC's Manager of Sustainable Transport Melanie Thornton and winner of the Arrow Uniform's Commercial Viability Award Kataraina Filer from Stokes Valley.
[gallery:2405]
09:45 UK Correspondent Matt Dathan
Matt Dathan reports from the UK
10:05 Keeping track of time
Kevin Karney is an expert in cosmology and has a special interest in timekeeping and the art and science of sundials who has been in New Zealand on a lecture tour sponsored by the Australian and New Zealand Associations of Decorative & Fine Arts.In an age where every second is counted and people's lives run to tight schedules framed by time, what is the story behind how humans began keeping track of time?
[gallery:2391]
10:35 Book review - Dear Amy by Helen Callaghan
Reviewed by Catriona Ferguson, published by Penguin Random House
10:45 The Reading
Hell Hound, a short story by Susy Pointon read by Helen Jones.
11:05 Technology for good: Find Your Billion
[image:79156:full] no metadata
Nine to Noon talks to award-winning educational innovator Chris Clay, about Find Your Billion, a series of free workshops getting young people involved in cutting-edge technologies to help others. The workshops are part of the Singularity University New Zealand summit, where where tech experts, thinkers and entrepreneurs from around the world will gather in Christchurch to dicuss the potential of exponentially accelerating technologies. We also talk with Margaux Giles, teenage co-founder of Disaster Mesh, who completed a similar workshop in the United States.
11:25 Parenting: Dealing with Disability
[image:79136:full] no metadata
Having a child diagnosed with a serious disability can be a life-changing moment for parents. The experience can be socially isolating and families and friends can sometimes struggle to know how to best respond. Tessa Prebble is a Wellington highschool teacher who's trying to make the experience easier on parents though her podcast, The One in A Million Baby.

11:45 Viewing with Lara Strongman
Lara Strongman reviews the Hillary series on TV One and Real Housewives of Auckland on Bravo

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
Regional council launches its own investigation into contaminated Havelock North water and Police expect to interview the Routeburn track tragedy survivor soon.
Topics:
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Tags:
Duration: 15'25"

12:17
Fonterra lifts forecast payout to farmers as dairy prices rise
BODY:
As you may have heard in the news .... Fonterra has lifted its forecast payout to dairy farmers following a sharp rise in global prices.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra
Duration: 1'24"

12:18
Ebos posts sharp rise in profit
BODY:
Listed healthcare and animal products company, Ebos, has posted a 20 percent rise in its full year profit as its newly acquired businesses boosted sales.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Ebos
Duration: 1'30"

12:20
Hellaby Holdings FY profit down 28%, but top of expectations
BODY:
The diversified industrial investment concern, Hellaby Holdings, has reported a sharp fall in its annual profit, hit by weak oil and gas prices.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Hellaby Holdings
Duration: 1'47"

12:22
Methven reports stronger profit
BODY:
The shower and tap-ware maker, Methven, has reported a stronger full-year profit off the back of the strong local housing market.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Methven
Duration: 1'03"

12:23
Scales' bumper crop lifts full-year profit expectations
BODY:
A bumper apple crop has delivered a strong first half profit for exporter, Scales, and prompted it to upgrade its full year expections.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Scales
Duration: 51"

12:24
Midday Markets for 25 August 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Brad Gordon from Macquarie Private Wealth.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'41"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
The All Blacks have thrust debutant 21-year-old Anton Lienert-Brown into the starting side to face what coach Steve Hansen believes will be a Wallabies team intent on revenge in Wellington.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'34"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 25 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'31"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:15
'Clear link' between concussion and cognitive problems
BODY:
New research shows a clear link between concussion and cognitive difficulties in rugby players later in life. The study has been published in the online journal Sports Medicine. And was carried out by AUT in partnership with New Zealand Rugby, and funded by World Rugby. Dr Alice Theadom is a senior lecturer, and deputy director of AUT's National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences.
EXTENDED BODY:
A New Zealand study has found support for a clear link between concussion and cognitive difficulties in rugby players later in life.
The study, published in online journal Sports Medicine, was carried out by AUT in partnership with New Zealand Rugby, and funded by World Rugby.
AUT lecturer and National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences deputy director Alice Theadom said the study revealed a previously unknown link between concussion and long-term cognitive effects.
"Now this research showed that there is a clear link, and so now that really points us in the direction that we do need to be doing far more work in this area, and we need to understand the links much more clearly - but obviously we do need to be aware that this is a different period of rugby, and there have been a lot of changes since then."
She said the study did not look specifically at dementia, and instead looked at effects on different areas of cognitive functioning.
It looked at 366 elite and community rugby players, and used cricket and hockey players as a non-contact sport control group, and found those in the two rugby groups suffered more concussions than the non-contact group.
"So the elite and the community rugby players performed worse in terms of what we call cognitive flexibility, which is where people have to switch quickly between tasks and also executive functioning, which is about making decisions and planning and organising activities."
She said the elite group also had more difficulty in complex attention tasks and processing information than the non-contact groups, but there was not much difference between the elite and community rugby players.
"But when we looked at the number of concussions people experience over their careers, 85 percent of the elite group experienced at least one concussion, 77 percent of the community athletes experienced at least one concussion and 23 percent of the non-contact athletes experienced at least one concussion."
This made progress on a previous study that delivered no conclusive findings, with the difference being the severity of the concussion studied and the length of time between injury and cognitive effect. she said.
"So these are previously what we would have considered to be relatively minor injuries, and we've been looking at the effects much longer and further down the line, so the fact that we saw any effect at all I think is certainly notable," Prof Theadom said.
"Before we conducted this study we didn't actually know if there were any long-term effects or not."
Meanwhile, in a bid to further study concussions in community sport, Otago's provincial rugby players will from this week wear an electronic microchip behind their ears during all home matches to measure the forces at play with head knocks.
The device, no bigger than a $2 coin, was the culmination of a two-year partnership between the University of Otago, which would conduct ground-breaking research into rugby-related concussions, and Auckland company CSx.
With the support of New Zealand Rugby, all 23 Otago players will wear the device for the first time in Thursday's home match against Wellington.
Ultimately, researchers from Otago's South Island brain injury group will seek to examine the relationship between head impacts and neck strength.
Topics: sport, health
Regions:
Tags: concussion
Duration: 8'57"

13:24
Viruses more dangerous in the morning
BODY:
A new study by the University of Cambridge has found that viruses could be 10 times more successful, when they infect people in the morning. And the authors say the findings could lead to new ways of stopping pandemics. Dr Rachel Edgar is the first author on the study.
EXTENDED BODY:
image:26604:full]
A new study by the University of Cambridge has found that viruses could be 10 times more successful, when they infect people in the morning. And the authors say the findings could lead to new ways of stopping pandemics.
Dr Rachel Edgar is the first author on the study.
Topics: health, science
Regions:
Tags: viruses
Duration: 6'00"

13:30
Aussie town to go 'Off Grid'
BODY:
It's the Aussie town, that plans to go completely off the grid. The town of Tyalgum is located in the hills near the Queensland-New South Wales border. It has just 300 residents, and if it's successful, it would be Australia's first town to pull the plug. Andrew Price is the project's director, and runs the company Australian Radio Towers.
EXTENDED BODY:
It's the Aussie town that plans to go completely off the grid. The town of Tyalgum is located in the hills near the Queensland-New South Wales border. It has just 300 residents, and if it's successful, it would be Australia's first town to pull the plug.
Andrew Price is the project's director, and runs the company Australian Radio Towers.
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags: Australia, electricity, off the grid
Duration: 10'13"

13:41
Favourite album: Suede
BODY:
Chosen by Susan Ware.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 18'20"

14:08
Theatre Critic: Sally Woodfield on Edinburgh
BODY:
Freelance theatre reviewer Sally Woodfield has been in Scotland for the 69th annual Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: theatre
Duration: 8'47"

14:17
Geoffonomics: conscious consumption
BODY:
Geoff Simmons, economist at the Morgan Foundation talks about conscious consumption and making your purchase or investment decisions on an ethical/ environmental basis.
Topics: money, business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 17'09"

14:34
The history of teenagers in New Zealand
BODY:
Teenagers are one of the most talked about, worried about, and analysed groups in modern NZ society. Was it always this way? Historian Grant Morris of Victoria University looks at teenagers in history.
EXTENDED BODY:
Teenagers are one of the most talked about, worried about and analysed groups in modern NZ society.
But was it always this way? What role have teenagers played in our nation's history?
Historian Grant Morris of Victoria University has studied the subject.
The word 'teenager' is a 20th century invention, he says, and originated overseas. In New Zealand the word started to be used around the middle of last century.
In the 19th century you were either a child or an adult. Children were dependent on their parents, although they often worked, and adults were expected to work and raise families.
The vast majority of 13 to 19 year olds, known commonly as youths, didn't attend school or tertiary study.
Boys would often help out with farm work and girls with domestic work; others worked in industry. Working age was from age 12; some of this work was paid, some of it not.
In Maori society there was an expectation that once someone reached puberty, they would effectively become an adult and work.
Teenagers didn't exist in colonial times and this situation did not change markedly until secondary schooling became more common during the early 20th century and a school leaving age was introduced and gradually raised.
Teenage males served in World War I and World War II despite the recruitment focus being on men aged over 20.
But the teenager we know today emerged after World War II
As New Zealand became more prosperous, and the influence of the United States grew, language, dress and cultural tastes developed that were particular to this group. And they came to be seen as a distinct group.
Bodgies, widgies, boy racers, skaties and homies are all examples of teenage sub-groups since the 1950s. And from the start teenagers have shown rebellious tendencies which has caused older generations to fret.
The Mazengarb Report on juvenile delinquency in Lower Hutt, published in 1954, caused a moral panic at the time as it revealed teenagers were drinking and having sex.
Subsequent research, rightly or wrongly, strongly associated teenagers with problem drinking, illegal drug use, drink driving and unsafe sex.
“Throughout our history teenagers are first ignored as a distinct group, and then they tend to be recognised only as a group – rather than as individuals,” Mr Morris says.

Topics: history
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'37"

15:08
The Expats: Mike Harris on canyoning in Japan
BODY:
Our expat this week has lived in Japan for more than 20 years. He runs a canyoning company in Minakami.
EXTENDED BODY:
Our expat this week has lived in Japan for more than 20 years. Mike Harris runs a canyoning company in Minakami
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: expats
Duration: 11'09"

15:19
Masterpieces with Toby Morris
BODY:
Cartoonist and Illustrator Toby Morris shares his favourite New Zealand comic. He's leading a masterclass with Sarah Laing at Auckland's National Writers Forum in September, running workshops, classes and discussions for writers from all genres.
EXTENDED BODY:
Cartoonist and Illustrator Toby Morris shares his favourite New Zealand comic.
He's leading a masterclass with Sarah Laing at Auckland's National Writers Forum in September, running workshops, classes and discussions for writers from all genres.
Topics: arts
Regions:
Tags: cartoons
Duration: 13'07"

15:35
This way Up: What is Vaping?
BODY:
New Zealand's overhauling the law governing the sale of e-cigarettes, with changes expected by the end of the year. This Way Up's Simon Morton has been looking at what we know about the science and the safety of using e-cigarettes, and at how effective they are as a way of quitting smoking.
EXTENDED BODY:
New Zealand's overhauling the law governing the sale of e-cigarettes, with changes expected by the end of the year. This Way Up's Simon Morton has been looking at what we know about the science and the safety of using e-cigarettes, and at how effective they are as a way of quitting smoking.
Topics: health, technology
Regions:
Tags: e-cigarettes
Duration: 10'40"

15:50
One Quick Question for 25 August 2016
BODY:
Do I have Argentinian ants in my Christchurch kitchen? Cor Vink of Canterbury Museum answers.
Dr Sharon Marsden of Massey University answers why people say "the" Waikato or "the" Wairarapa.
What are my legal obligations as a citizen? Mark Henaghan the Dean of Law at the University of Otago answers.

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'57"

15:56
The Panel pre-show for 25 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'08"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 First song
1:15 Clear Link between concussion and cognitive problems
[image:61166:full]
New research shows a clear link between concussion and cognitive difficulties in rugby players later in life. The study has been published in the online journal Sports Medicine. And was carried out by AUT in partnership with New Zealand Rugby, and funded by World Rugby.
Dr Alice Theadom is a senior lecturer, and deputy director of AUT's National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences.
1:25 Viruses more dangerous in the morning
[image:26604:full]
A new study by the University of Cambridge has found that viruses could be 10 times more successful, when they infect people in the morning. And the authors say the findings could lead to new ways of stopping pandemics. Dr Rachel Edgar is the first author on the study.
1:35 Aussie town to go 'Off Grid'
[image:79349:full]
It's the Aussie town, that plans to go completely off the grid. The town of Tyalgum is located in the hills near the Queensland-New South Wales border. It has just 300 residents, and if it's successful, it would be Australia's first town to pull the plug.
Andrew Price is the project's director, and runs the company Australian Radio Towers.
1:40 Favourite album: Suede
2:10 Theatre Critic: Sally Woodfield on Edinburgh
2:20 Geoffonomics: conscious consumption
Geoff Simmons, economist at the Morgan Foundation talks about conscious consumption and making your purchase or investment decisions on an ethical/ environmental basis.
2:35 The History of Teenagers in New Zealand
Teenagers are one of the most talked about, worried about, and analysed groups in modern NZ society.
Was it always this way?
Historian Grant Morris of Victoria University looks at teenagers in history...
[image:79341:full]
[image:79315:half]
3:10 Masterpieces with Toby Morris
Cartoonist and Illustrator Toby Morris shares his favourite New Zealand comic.
He's leading a masterclass with Sarah Laing at Auckland's National Writers Forum in September, running workshops, classes and discussions for writers from all genres.
3:25 The Expats: Mike Harris on canyoning in Japan
Our expat this week has lived in Japan for more than 20 years. He runs a canyoning company in Minakami
[gallery:2407]
3:30 This Way Up
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:50
One Quick Question for 25 August 2016
BODY:
Do I have Argentinian ants in my Christchurch kitchen? Cor Vink of Canterbury Museum answers.
Dr Sharon Marsden of Massey University answers why people say "the" Waikato or "the" Wairarapa.
What are my legal obligations as a citizen? Mark Henaghan the Dean of Law at the University of Otago answers.

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'57"

15:56
The Panel pre-show for 25 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'08"

16:03
The Panel with Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay have been up to. A Queenstwon mayoral candidate is using the slogan 100% Pure Passion and he claims the 100% Pure NZ campaign was his idea. Tourism lecturer David Simmons tallks about New Zealand's preparedness for a continuing tourism boom. Is it ok to sit on your land and watch it gain value rather than building much needed housing on it? An eight-year old who shot her first deer bit into its heart as tradition dictates. Is that ok?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 24'35"

16:05
The Panel with Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay (Part 2)
BODY:
Christine Stephens of Massey University's Health and Ageing Research Unit discusses to what degree age brings peace of mind. What the Panelists Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay have been thinking about. A US survey's found people aren't going to church because of the parking problems. Why do we get offended when religious leaders flash cash about? He's labelled a psychopath but do you want to have a deeper understanding of Donald Trump? A new book claims that rower Eric Murray was told to think about his career not having children.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 26'23"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'41"

16:11
100% not original
BODY:
A Queenstown mayoral candidate is using the slogan 100% Pure Passion and he claims the 100% Pure NZ campaign was his idea.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: marketing
Duration: 3'33"

16:14
Can we keep up with tourism demand?
BODY:
Tourism lecturer David Simmons tallks about New Zealand's preparedness for a continuing tourism boom.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: tourism
Duration: 8'17"

16:24
Land banking
BODY:
Is it ok to sit on your land and watch it gain value rather than building much needed housing on it?
Topics: housing
Regions:
Tags: land banking
Duration: 3'54"

16:28
Hunter's initiation
BODY:
An eight-year old who shot her first deer bit into its heart as tradition dictates. Is that ok?
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'20"

16:33
Old and content
BODY:
Christine Stephens of Massey University's Health and Ageing Research Unit discusses to what degree age brings peace of mind.
Topics: health
Regions:
Tags: aging
Duration: 7'53"

16:41
Panel Says
BODY:
What the Panelists Sally Wenley and Andrew Clay have been thinking about.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'44"

16:47
Parking hassles at church
BODY:
A US survey's found people aren't going to church because of the parking problems.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: parking
Duration: 1'36"

16:49
The eye of the needle
BODY:
Why do we get offended when religious leaders flash cash about?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Destiny Church
Duration: 5'47"

16:55
Trump
BODY:
He's labelled a psychopath but do you want to have a deeper understanding of Donald Trump?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'42"

16:55
Sports biographies
BODY:
A new book claims that rower Eric Murray was told to think about his career not having children.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: coaching
Duration: 2'54"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
RNZ Checkpoint with John Campbell Thursday 25th August 2016
BODY:
Watch Thursday's full programme here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:10
Czech woman spent month alone in DoC hut
BODY:
A young Czech woman has survived almost a month in a DoC hut on the Routeburn track, after her companion died. Otago Lakes central area commander inspector Olaf Jensen explains how she was found.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'19"

17:12
DoC on how Czech woman was found
BODY:
DoC's Wakatipu operations manager Geoff Owen joins Checkpoint to discuss how a Czech woman was found in a DoC hut where she spent almost a month after her partner's death.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags:
Duration: 4'39"

17:16
Routeburn rescue perplexing for an area not too remote
BODY:
The area where a woman became lost on the Routeburn track is popular with tourists and it's surprising she didn't come across anyone else the month she was there, a guide says.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: Routeburn track, DOC
Duration: 3'46"

17:19
Italy's quake death toll continues to climb
BODY:
The death toll in Italy continues to climb after a 6.2 magnitude earthquake caused buildings to come down, trapping people under debris in the country's central region.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Italy, earthquake
Duration: 3'41"

17:23
HBRC warns Hastings Council of investigation into bores
BODY:
Hawke's Bay Regional Council's interim CEO Liz Lambert has informed Hastings District Council it is investigating the Brookvale bores, which she says 'may be in breach of consents and conditions'.
Topics:
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Brookvale bores, campylobactor
Duration: 4'38"

17:28
Bill passes allowing shops to trade on Easter Sunday
BODY:
Parliament has finally passed legislation that will make it legal for shops to trade on Easter Sunday, if their local councils agree.
Topics: law, politics
Regions:
Tags: Easter Sunday trading
Duration: 3'16"

17:34
Evening business for 25 August 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'55"

17:38
Helen Kelly receives cancer treatment in Cuba
BODY:
Former Council of Trade Unions president Helen Kelly is in Cuba having treatment for terminal lung cancer. She told Checkpoint it's a "last ditch" attempt, and hope it buys her some time.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Helen Kelly
Duration: 5'18"

17:43
Chch Council told to remove sea level rise warnings
BODY:
Christchurch City Council has been slammed for not removing sea level rise warnings from property reports. It's been told to remove them immediately, but the council says it needs more time.
Topics:
Regions: Canterbury
Tags: Christchurch City Council, property reports
Duration: 3'15"

17:49
Hastings Mayor Lawrence Yule on HBRC investigation
BODY:
Hastings District Mayor Lawrence Yule discusses the letter his council was sent by Hawke's Bay Regional Council about its investigation into the area's bores.
Topics:
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: campylobactor
Duration: 6'36"

17:56
Can the wounded Wallabies turn things around
BODY:
Wallabies will take on the All Blacks in Wellington this weekend, after losing five games in a row - four of those on home soil.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: wallabies, All Blacks
Duration: 2'53"

18:08
Woman survives a month on remote track after companion dies
BODY:
Department of Conservation's Wakatipu operations manager Geoff Owen has praised the actions of a woman stuck on the Routeburn Track for almost a month. RNZ reporter Ian Telfer joins us from Queenstown.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: Routeburn track, DOC
Duration: 4'29"

18:16
Fonterra raises forecast payout but caution remains
BODY:
Debt-laden dairy farmers have been given some relief after Fonterra raised its forecast payout by 50 cents to $4.75 a kilogram of milk solids.
Topics: business, farming
Regions:
Tags: Fonterra, dairy
Duration: 2'06"

18:18
Small Central Otago town takes on big Aussie bank
BODY:
The people of Ranfurly are rallying together to oppose Westpac's plans to close the town's only bank. Central Otago Mayor Tony Lepper joins Checkpoint from Clyde.
Topics:
Regions: Otago
Tags: Ranfurly, banking
Duration: 3'53"

18:22
Govt urged to do more to oppose Aus detention camps
BODY:
Protestors gathered at Parliament today to call on the government to step up and put pressure on the Australian government on its use of offshore detention camps.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags: Australian detention centres
Duration: 6'17"

18:24
Christchurch's design lab leads the way with hospital design
BODY:
Canterbury District Health Board's world-leading Design Lab has opened to the public. RNZ reporter Rachel Graham went along to find out what it's all about.
Topics: arts, health
Regions:
Tags: Canterbury District Health Board
Duration: 4'04"

18:50
Today In Parliament for 25 August 2016 - evening edition
BODY:
The Shop Trading Hours Amendment Bill passes final reading by 62 votes to 59, following a personal vote. The bill will allow local authorities to make decisions about shop trading on Easter Sunday. Debate on the bills sees Labour MPs calling on their Government counterparts to vote with their consciences, as opposed to along party lines.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'09"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Ian Gurvitz – Welcome to DumbF***istan

===6:55 PM. | In Parliament===
=DESCRIPTION=

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

20:10
Nights' Culture - Comics & Graphic Novels
BODY:
Adrian Kinnaird looks at the new Terry Teo TV series (based on the classic NZ graphic novel by Bob Kerr and Stephen Ballantyne from 1982, and original TV series from 1985) grabbed headlines: first for its perceived 'edgier' content, then for TVNZ's decision to screen it OnDemand first instead of on air (due to a ratings disagreement with the producers - TVNZ wanted edits to bring it from a PG rating to a G). With all of the episodes of the new show now available to view, Adrian thought it might be interesting to take a look at this history of NZ's most icon and enduring comic-book character since Footrot Flats.
EXTENDED BODY:
Adrian Kinnaird looks at the new Terry Teo TV series (based on the classic NZ graphic novel by Bob Kerr and Stephen Ballantyne from 1982, and original TV series from 1985) grabbed headlines: first for its perceived 'edgier' content, then for TVNZ's decision to screen it OnDemand first instead of on air (due to a ratings disagreement with the producers - TVNZ wanted edits to bring it from a PG rating to a G). With all of the episodes of the new show now available to view, Adrian thought it might be interesting to take a look at this history of NZ's most icon and enduring comic-book character since Footrot Flats.
Topics: arts, media, history
Regions:
Tags: television, TVNZ, Footrot Flats, Terry and the Gunrunners, The Jaquie Brown Diaries, comics, The Jaquie Brown Odyssey
Duration: 19'23"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 My Heels are Killing Me
RNZ's Sonia Sly reports from Fashion Week in Auckland. She'll be joined by a well known fashion identity to discuss the highlights and lowlights on the catwalk this year.
[gallery:2402]
7:35 New Horizons
[image:70330:quarter]
It's 50 years since Bob Dylan released his seventh studio album Blonde On Blonde. MOJO Magazine celebrated the fact in its July issue with a tribute CD and William Dart looks at the plusses and minuses.Details.
8:12 Nights' Culture - Comics & Graphic Novels
[image:74614:quarter]
Adrian Kinnaird looks at the new Terry Teo TV series (based on the classic NZ graphic novel by Bob Kerr and Stephen Ballantyne from 1982, and original TV series from 1985) grabbed headlines: first for its perceived 'edgier' content, then for TVNZ's decision to screen it OnDemand first instead of on air (due to a ratings disagreement with the producers - TVNZ wanted edits to bring it from a PG rating to a G). With all of the episodes of the new show now available to view, Adrian thought it might be interesting to take a look at this history of NZ's most icon and enduring comic-book character since Footrot Flats.
8:30 Window on the World
At Coney Island amusement park between 1903 and 1943 there was an extraordinary exhibit: tiny, premature babies. 'Dr Martin Couney's infant incubator' facility was staffed by nurses in starched white uniforms and if you paid a quarter, you could see the babies in their incubators. Journalist Claire Prentice has been following the story and tracked down some of those babies, now in their 70s, 80s and 90s, who were put in the show. She discovers how Dr Couney brought the incubator to prominence in the USA through World's Fairs and amusement parks, and explores how a man who was shunned by the medical establishment changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives.
9:07 Our Changing World
[image:79075:quarter]
Tonight our changing world has a fascinating mix: glow in the dark firefly squid - and bioluminescence.
Miriam Sharpe is on a Marsden-funded hunt for the secret behind an intense blue glow produced by bioluminescent firefly squid. Miriam and her University of Otago colleague Kurt Krause tell Alison Ballance that the light comes from tiny protein crystals, that using a synchotron is part of the hunt, and why trying to grow protein crystals is like looking after a cat.
9:30 This Way Up
On this episode This Way Up's Simon Morton meets people training and using epilepsy assistance dogs. He discovers that up to 2 percent of New Zealanders have epilepsy which is a neurological disorder characterised by recurrent seizures that affects about 50 million people worldwide.
[gallery:2377]
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International.
11:07 Music 101 pocket edition
[image:70547:quarter]
In the Music 101 Pocket Edition tonight, Shayne P Carter plays future classics on the baby grand.We introduce you to Unsanitary Napkin.Kid Congo Powers on performing in The Cramps, The Bad Seeds and The Pink Monkey Birds and tunes from Frank Ocean, Marching Church, Devo and Ross McHenry

===7:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music commentator and critic William Dart offers fascinating insights and surprising links across contemporary music.

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | Our Changing World===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlights from the world of science and the environment, with Alison Ballance

===9:30 PM. | This Way Up===
=DESCRIPTION=

Exploring the things we use and consume. Some content may offend. (RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

Coverage of the earthquake in central Italy: more than two hundred are dead, dozens are still missing. Also a Czech woman rescued from the routeburn track, after her male companion had fallen do his death in a slip.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | Music 101===
=DESCRIPTION=

Music, interviews, live performances, behind the scenes, industry issues, career profiles, new, back catalogue, undiscovered, greatest hits, tall tales - with a focus on New Zealand/Aotearoa (RNZ)

Favourite item:

Request information

Year 2016

Reference number 288320

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 25 Aug 2016