RNZ National. 2016-08-31. 00:00-23:59.

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A 24-hour recording of RNZ National. The following rundown is sourced from the broadcaster’s website. Note some overseas/copyright restricted items may not appear in the supplied rundown:

31 August 2016

===12:04 AM. | All Night Programme===
=DESCRIPTION=

Including: 12:06 Music after Midnight; 12:30 Insight (RNZ); 1:15 Country Life (RNZ); 2:05 The Forum (BBC); 3:05 Lady Jean by Noel Virtue read by Anne Budd (RNZ); 3:30 Diversions (RNZ); 5:10 Witness (BBC)

===6:00 AM. | Morning Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's three-hour breakfast news show with news and interviews, bulletins on the hour and half-hour, including: 6:16 and 6:50 Business News 6:18 Pacific News 6:26 Rural News 6:48 and 7:45 NZ Newspapers

=AUDIO=

06:00
Top Stories for Wednesday 31 August 2016
BODY:
Havelock North's residents grill leaders. Hastings mayor says boil-water notice may be lifted tomorrow. Apple ordered to pay Ireland $20 billion in unpaid taxes. 'Big Five' power companies told to remove contract clauses. Theft of dairy cows from Ashburton perplexes locals. 900 cyber attacks detected each month by GCSB. Lung cancer patients say they must be next for Keytruda. New Hamilton partnership school will fill a gap.
Topics:
Regions:
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Duration: 31'42"

06:06
Sports News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'28"

06:13
PM doubts new immigrant party will have any impact
BODY:
Many immigrants say they like the sound of a new political party that aims to catch their votes, but John Key says he doubts the party will have much impact.
Topics: politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'51"

06:17
Security expert tells how ISIS makes money from cyber crime
BODY:
Australian terrorism expert says Islamic State is using cyber crime to make money, as well as spread terrorism.
Topics:
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Duration: 2'20"

06:17
Early Business News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'19"

06:22
Morning Rural News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sector.
Topics: rural, farming
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Duration: 5'20"

06:35
Havelock North communications were poor, say residents
BODY:
As the Hastings mayor Lawrence Yule apologises at a public meeting for the Havelock North water contamination, two elderly residents say they were not told enough when the illness struck.
Topics: health
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Tags:
Duration: 2'43"

06:42
Italian coastguard rescues 6500 migrants in 24 hours
BODY:
The Italian coastguard has rescued six thousand five hundred (6500) migrants in just one day.
Topics:
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Duration: 3'47"

06:47
New charter schools target Maori teens
BODY:
Two new charter schools are given the go ahead - both are aiming to give a boost to Maori students who they say are struggling to achieve in the state system.
Topics:
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Duration: 2'18"

06:48
Z Energy revises down operating profit by 16%
BODY:
The fuel company, Z Energy, has revised down its underlying profit forecast for the current year, by 16 percent, because of a fall in refining margins and lower gains from its takeover of Caltex.
Topics: business
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Tags:
Duration: 1'28"

06:50
Two more rate cuts needed to get inflaiton back on track
BODY:
The Reserve Bank will have to cut interest rates twice more to 1-point-5 percent to nudge inflation back into its target band in a strongly growing economy.
Topics: business
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Tags:
Duration: 1'05"

06:53
Corporate reporting season beats market expectations
BODY:
Company profitability is in generally good shape if the latest company earnings season has been anything to go by.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'49"

06:55
Building consents fall in July
BODY:
Housing affordability to set to worsen as building consents fail to match the sharp rise in prices around the country.
Topics: business
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Duration: 1'02"

06:57
Tiwai Point aluminium smelter may close
BODY:
A new report by the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment says many fossil fuel power plants around the country will be closed if the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter shuts down.
Topics: business
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Tags:
Duration: 1'07"

06:58
Commerce Commission reprimands power companies over contracts
BODY:
The Commerce Commission has reprimanded nine power companies for contracts which favour the companies and not customers.
Topics: business
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Tags:
Duration: 1'08"

06:59
Morning Markets for 31 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'15"

07:06
Sports News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
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Tags:
Duration: 2'32"

07:08
Havelock North's residents grill leaders
BODY:
About 400 people were given their first chance last night to question local council and health officials about the gastric bug that left more than a third of the town's residents sick.
Topics: health
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Tags:
Duration: 3'20"

07:12
Hastings mayor says boil-water notice may be lifted tomorrow
BODY:
Hastings mayor Lawrence Yule hopes the boil-water notice in Havelock North will be lifted tomorrow.
Topics:
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Duration: 5'03"

07:16
Apple ordered to pay Ireland $20 billion in unpaid taxes
BODY:
The world's most profitable company Apple has been ordered to pay 20 billion New Zealand dollars in unpaid taxes to Ireland.
Topics: business
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Duration: 4'17"

07:25
'Big Five' power companies told to remove contract clauses
BODY:
Five big power companies have been told by the Commerce Commission their contracts with customers are unfair. Five were giving themselves the right to hike prices without telling anyone.
Topics: business
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Duration: 2'28"

07:28
Theft of dairy cows from Ashburton perplexes locals
BODY:
An Ashburton dairy farmer joins us to discuss the logistics of stealing 500 dairy cows from a local farm. Police are still investigating reports of the theft but are no closer to determining what happened.
Topics: farming
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Duration: 3'55"

07:35
900 cyber attacks detected each month by GCSB
BODY:
Cyber attacks, on businesses and individuals, are on the rise. The GCSB says it's detecting 900 different attacks every month.
Topics:
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Duration: 3'38"

07:36
Lung cancer patients say they must be next for Keytruda
BODY:
Lung cancer patients say they need to be next in line for potentially life-saving but expensive new drugs.
Topics: health
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Tags:
Duration: 3'35"

07:42
New Hamilton partnership school will fill a gap
BODY:
The head of Hamilton's first charter school, Cath Rau, says language, culture, identity make a difference for Maori students.
Topics:
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Duration: 4'48"

07:48
Richie McCaw movie Chasing Great 'flawed'
BODY:
The Richie McCaw movie Chasing Great had its world premiere in Auckland last night, and was well received. But critics found it a flawed movie - one more for the rugby fanatics, and not those wanting an insight into Richie McCaw's life.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 3'48"

07:56
Schoolgirls flocking to rugby after Rio success
BODY:
Rio success is spurring interest among girls in Sevens rugby. The silver medallists were a hit when they visited a schools tournament in Wellington yesterday.
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Duration: 3'30"

08:06
Sports News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
An update from the team at RNZ Sport.
Topics: sport
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Duration: 2'38"

08:08
Working on options to address demand for swimmable waterways
BODY:
The Environment Minister, Nick Smith, says the Government is committed to improving the water quality of lakes and rivers. But he says people who insist that every lake and river should be safe to swim in are being unrealistic.
Topics: environment
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Duration: 2'23"

08:13
Fed Farmers calls for calm amid criticism of industry
BODY:
As the Hawke's Bay hunt continues for the reason behind Havelock North's water contamination; criticism is being levelled at the agriculture industry for playing a part in the contamination. But Federated Farmers president William Rolleston says that criticism is unfair. We speak with him.
Topics: farming
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Duration: 6'12"

08:25
Tax analyst says US feels picked on by EU's Apple decision
BODY:
American tax analyst Lee Sheppard says US feels picked on by EU's Apple decision.
Topics: economy
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Duration: 5'16"

08:28
Rapid growth brings big traffic woes to Queenstown
BODY:
Increasing numbers of tourists and a rapidly growing population are causing headaches for motorists in Queenstown.
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Duration: 2'53"

08:30
Markets Update for 31 August 2016
BODY:
A brief update of movements in the financial sector.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags:
Duration: 1'08"

08:36
Trans-Atlantic trade deal in doubt
BODY:
Another big trade deal is in doubt. The controversial TransAtlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, known as Tee-TIP, is under threat, with German and French Ministers declaring the talks have failed.
Topics:
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Duration: 3'40"

08:39
Don't become a victim of cyber ransom
BODY:
Cyber ransom demands are on the rise. Stephen Polley is an internet security expert who's been helping victims of online criminals.
Topics: internet
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Tags:
Duration: 3'11"

08:44
Housing consent numbers rise, but not enough to meet demand
BODY:
Mortgage lenders are warning house prices will continue to rise as building consents fail to keep up with demand.
Topics: housing
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Duration: 3'04"

08:54
Study of tuatara DNA reveals links to our own
BODY:
A study of the tuatara's DNA has found the ancient reptile has a surprising link - to humans.
Topics:
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Duration: 3'40"

=SHOW NOTES=

===9:06 AM. | Nine To Noon===
=DESCRIPTION=

Current affairs and topics of interest, including: 10:45 The Reading: Love as a Stranger by Owen Marshall, read by Katherine McCrae. Sarah sucumbs to a fleeting romantic distraction during a dismal period of life. (Part 3 of 10, RNZ)

=AUDIO=

09:08
Medsafe responds to concerns over surgical mesh
BODY:
Over the last year Nine to Noon has spoken in depth to several people reporting horrific side effects from surgical mesh implants. Now a new survey of people who suffered complications from surgical mesh implants found 95 percent don't believe they were properly informed about its risks. It found 93 percent of the patients experienced pain, and nearly half had mesh erosion (44.6) and recurrence of their original problems (44.6) which included bladder/bowel and pelvic organ prolapse to hernias. The Government last week agreed to recommendations of the Health Select Committee for options to be investigated to set up a surgical mesh registry to record any complications. Kathryn Ryan talks to Patricia Sullivan from advocacy group Mesh Down Under which conducted the survey and Stewart Jessamine, Director Protection, Regulation and Assurance at Medsafe.
Topics: health, life and society
Regions:
Tags: health, surgical mesh, Medsafe, Stewart Jessamine, Mesh Downunder, Patricia Sullivan
Duration: 28'36"

09:36
Indigenous people in prison - can the vicious cycle be broken?
BODY:
Around 15 percent of New Zealand's population is Maori and yet they make up over 50 percent of prison inmates. In Canada indigenous people represent 25% of the inmates in state prisons, despite making up only 4.4% of the country's population. Nine to Noon talks to Canada's Justice Minister and Attorney General, Jody Wilson-Raybould who's First Nations herself, on tackling the high number of indigenous people in our prisons.
EXTENDED BODY:
In New Zealand today, over 50 percent of the prison population is Māori – despite Māori being only 15 percent of the population.
This, according to Canadian Justice Minister and Attorney-General Jody Wilson-Raybould, is a problem present in many formerly colonial nations.
In Canada, indigenous peoples are 4.4 percent of the population - yet make up 25 percent of those behind bars.
“There are many factors that have led to the situation we’re in," she told Nine to Noon.
“It’s not simply just within the criminal justice system – but looking more broadly across government… understanding poverty, marginalisation and inequality.”
Ms Wilson-Raybould is in New Zealand on an official visit to assist her review of the Canadian justice system, a process aimed at tackling these levels of over-representation directly.
On Monday, she met with New Zealand's Ministry of Justice to discuss the similarity of the problem faced by the two nations.
“I think we have a lot to learn from each other.” she noted.
Good for indigenous peoples, good for the country
Such a review is no easy task.
Ms Wilson-Raybould said she firmly believed that a “revolving door” existed within the criminal justice system in Canadian society – with those who came out of the prison system not having adequate facilities of care, and subsequently re-offending.
“We need to ensure we can do as much as we can to support that individual when they leave the system – for their addictions, for mental health issues, and to find a place back into their communities.”
Additionally, she supported restorative justice processes as a “circuit-breaker” for the high imprisonment rate of indigenous peoples.
“There are a number of communities and provinces in our country that have put in place sentencing circles and a community focus to rehabilitation.”
These strategies, she said, would lower the rate of re-offending tremendously.
Other methods of lowering the rate of Canadian indigenous imprisonment included plans to support indigenous community empowerment – and install culturally appropriate training programmes for members of the justice system.
“Many people who find themselves in the criminal justice system come from child welfare backgrounds” she said.
“So we need to understand those links, ensuring we provide space for individuals to connect in their communities… recognising issues with lack of housing, lack of economic opportunities, and education.”
So what’s the next move?
“We’re at a place where we need to bring Canadian people into the conversation," she concluded.
“We need to move the dialogue to understand that… if we reconcile with indigenous peoples in Canada, it will be good not only for indigenous people’s quality of life – but for our country.”
Topics: politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: prison, justice, Indigenous
Duration: 13'20"

09:49
Australia Correspondent Karen Middleton
BODY:
An inquest into the Lindt Cafe siege raises suggestions that the military should be in similar incidents in future, an illegal explicit photo sharing website is shut down and the fallout from Australia's performance at the Olympics begins.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Australia
Duration: 10'24"

10:14
Gold Rush: Jim Richards
BODY:
Stuck upside down in an underwater pothole in an ill-fitting wetsuit in Guyana, sleeping with snakes in rural Pakistan and hunting for fish with a rocket launcher in the rainforests of Laos. Those are just a few of the stories related in Jim Richard's book Gold Rush, documenting his life as an itinerant geologist chasing a big score in some of the worlds wildest places.
Topics: author interview
Regions:
Tags: mining, gold, diamonds
Duration: 29'19"

10:43
Book review - To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey
BODY:
Reviewed by Ralph McAllister, published by Hachette NZ.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'44"

11:06
Marty Duda's artist of the week - Angel Olsen
BODY:
Raised in St Louis and now living in North Carolina, Angel Olsen has just released her third album. While the first two recalled vintage Roy Orbison and Patsy Cline reworked for 21st century indie rockers, Olsen's new record, My Woman, finds her stepping out into pure pop and 60-style girl group music with a hint of Tori Amos thrown in for good measure.
EXTENDED BODY:
Raised in St Louis and now living in North Carolina, Angel Olsen has just released her third album. While the first two recalled vintage Roy Orbison and Patsy Cline reworked for 21st century indie rockers, Olsen's new record, My Woman, finds her stepping out into pure pop and 60-style girl group music with a hint of Tori Amos thrown in for good measure.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Angel Olsen
Duration: 20'32"

11:27
The dark side of tiger tourism
BODY:
A study of Thailand's rapidly expanding 'tiger tourism' has found that its growth is fuelling the cruel treatment of tigers for the entertainment of visitors.
EXTENDED BODY:
A study of Thailand's rapidly expanding 'tiger tourism' has found that its growth is fuelling the cruel treatment of tigers for the entertainment of visitors.
World Animal Protection has results from a study which shows that there has been a 33 percent rise in the number of captive tigers.
Parks where tourists can feed baby tigers and get photographed with tigers have been in the spotlight recently.
In June a raid at the Tiger Temple found 137 tigers, 40 tiger cub bodies in a freezer, 30 cubs preserved in jars and about 1000 tiger skin amulets or talismans. The Tiger Temple remains closed.
The study has found young tigers are getting stressed and injured by being handled hundreds of times a day by tourists and punished when they don't 'behave'.
Tigers up to the age of three or four are mainly used in these venues.
The study was carried out by Jan Schmidt-Burbach, a wildlife veterinarian and advisor to the charity, who's looked into how tiger tourism works.
The business is booming with 30 million tourists visiting Thailand every year and every fourth tourist wanting their picture taken with a tiger.
So it’s a lucrative business and one with little transparency when it comes to animal welfare, he says.
“These tigers are being kept in severely inadequate conditions they are really suffering on a daily basis and are being exposed to very cruel practices,” Schmidt-Burbach says.
These tourist shows involve tigers jumping through flaming hoops and being prodded into a reaction with a bar when people pose with them for selfies, he says.
World Animal Protection has been monitoring the industry since 2010 and has seen a 30 percent increase in what it calls ‘wildlife entertainment’.
It has called for ban on all tiger breeding for the industry.
“The worrying thing for us, is this industry relies on a steady increase of young tigers; mostly it’s young tigers being used only for first 2 or 3 years.
“So why pay for the upkeep of older tigers for next ten years, doesn’t really make sense. So we are really asking questions what happens with all the adult tigers these venues are accumulating?”
Topics: life and society
Regions:
Tags: animals, tourism, Jan Schmidt-Burbach, tigers, tiger tourism, Thailand
Duration: 14'52"

11:46
Science commentator Siouxsie Wiles
BODY:
This week, science commentator Dr Siouxsie Wiles tells us all about using plants to mop up chemical pollutants and reveal how much carbon dioxide is being produced by power plants and talks about a new paper that looks how the success of IVF is influenced by the solutions that developing embryos are cultured in.
Topics: science
Regions:
Tags: IVF, climate change
Duration: 12'47"

=SHOW NOTES=

09:05 Medsafe responds to concerns over surgical mesh
[thumbnail:79290:full]
Over the last year Nine to Noon has spoken in depth to several people reporting horrific side effects from surgical mesh implants. Now a new survey of people who suffered complications from surgical mesh implants found 95 percent don't believe they were properly informed about its risks. It found 93 percent of the patients experienced pain, and nearly half had mesh erosion (44.6) and recurrence of their original problems (44.6) which included bladder/bowel and pelvic organ prolapse to hernias. The Government last week agreed to recommendations of the Health Select Committee for options to be investigated to set up a surgical mesh registry to record any complications.
Kathryn Ryan talks to Patricia Sullivan from advocacy group Mesh Down Under which conducted the survey and Stewart Jessamine, Director Protection, Regulation and Assurance at Medsafe.
09:20 Indigenous people in prison. Can the vicious cycle be broken?
[image:79878:third]
Around 15 percent of New Zealand's population is Maori and yet they make up over 50 percent of prison inmates. In Canada indigenous people represent 25% of the inmates in state prisons, despite making up only 4.4% of the country's population. Nine to Noon talks to Canada's Justice Minister and Attorney General, Jody Wilson-Raybould who's First Nations herself, on tackling the high number of indigenous people in our prisons.
09:45 Australia Correspondent Karen Middleton
An inquest into the Lindt Cafe siege raises suggestions that the military should be in similar incidents in future, an illegal explicit photo sharing website is shut down and the fallout from Australia’s performance at the Olympics begins.
10:05 Gold Rush: Jim Richards
Stuck upside down in an underwater pothole in an ill-fitting wetsuit in Guyana, sleeping with snakes in rural Pakistan and hunting for fish with a rocket launcher in the rainforests of Laos. Those are just a few of the stories related in Jim Richard's book Gold Rush, documenting his life as an itinerant geologist chasing a big score in some of the worlds wildest places.
[gallery:2418]
10:35 Book review - To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey
Reviewed by Ralph McAllister, published by Hachette NZ.
10:45 The Reading
11:05 Marty Duda's artist of the week - Angel Olsen
Raised in St Louis and now living in North Carolina, Angel Olsen has just released her third album. While the first two recalled vintage Roy Orbison and Patsy Cline reworked for 21st century indie rockers, Olsen’s new record, My Woman, finds her stepping out into pure pop and 60-style girl group music with a hint of Tori Amos thrown in for good measure.
Angel Olsen - Acrobat
Angel Olsen - Lights Out
Angel Olsen - Burn Your Fire For No Witness
Angel Olsen - Shut Up Kiss Me
11:20 The dark side of tiger tourism
A study of Thailand's rapidly expanding 'tiger tourism' has found that its growth is fueling the cruel treatment of tigers for the entertainment of visitors. Charity World Animal Protection has results from a study which shows that there has been a 33 percent rise in the number of captive tigers. The study has found young tigers are getting stressed and injured by being handled hundreds of times a day by tourists and punished when they don't 'behave'.The study was carried out by Jan Schmidt-Burbach - a wildlife veterinarian and advisor to the charity, who's looked into how tiger tourism works.
[gallery:2337]
11:45 Science commentator Siouxsie Wiles
This week, science commentator Dr Siouxsie Wiles tells us all about using plants to mop up chemical pollutants and reveal how much carbon dioxide is being produced by power plants and talks about a new paper that looks how the success of IVF is influenced by the solutions that developing embryos are cultured in.

===Noon | Midday Report===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, followed by updates and reports until 1.00pm, including: 12:16 Business News 12:26 Sport 12:34 Rural News 12:43 Worldwatch

=AUDIO=

12:00
Midday News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
The Ruataniwha Dam project hits a snag as a key land swap deal is ruled unlawful and Westpac and Fisher Funds dump their investments in arms companies after a public outcry.
Topics:
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Duration: 15'11"

12:19
NZX aims to make it easier for companies to comply with rules
BODY:
The stock exchange operator, NZX, wants to align its rules for listed companies more closely to those of the Financial Markets Authority.
Topics: business
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Tags: NZX
Duration: 1'21"

12:20
What is smart technology?
BODY:
An energy think tank says too few people understand smart technology that could cut their power bills and reduce the need for expensive investment in electricity.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Smart Grid Forum.
Duration: 1'10"

12:22
Woolies turn around expected to help
BODY:
Over the Tasman and the supermarket chain, Woolworths, is hoping the heavy losses are behind it as it slashes jobs and prices.
Topics: business
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Tags: Woolworths
Duration: 1'09"

12:23
Midday Markets for 31 August 2016
BODY:
For the latest from the markets we're joined by Don Lewthwaite at First NZ Capital.
Topics: business, economy
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Tags: markets
Duration: 2'31"

12:26
Business briefs
BODY:
Kiwifruit grower and exporter Seeka Industries has bought the Kiwi Crush and Kiwi Crushies product ranges from Auckland based Vital Food Processors for an undisclosed sum.
Topics: business
Regions:
Tags: Seeka Industries
Duration: 24"

12:26
Midday Sports News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
The New Zealand cricket captain Kane Williamson has defended his decision to bowl first after his side fell to a crushing 204 run loss to South Africa in the second and final test in Pretoria.
Topics: sport
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Tags:
Duration: 2'33"

12:35
Midday Rural News for 31 August 2016
BODY:
News from the rural and farming sectors.
Topics: rural, farming
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Tags:
Duration: 8'47"

=SHOW NOTES=

===1:06 PM. | Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm===
=DESCRIPTION=

An upbeat mix of the curious and the compelling, ranging from the stories of the day to the great questions of our time (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

13:06
The Millennial Whoop
BODY:
A musical idiosyncracy explained.
EXTENDED BODY:
A musical idiosyncracy explained.
Did this song start the Millennial Whoop?
More about this story:
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'03"

13:13
Ruataniwha Appeal Court decision significant
BODY:
Theappeal court has ruled the process used to acquire protected conservation land for the Ruataniwha Dam was unlawful. Hawkes Bay reporter Peter Fowler has the details
Topics: law
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: Ruataniwha Dam
Duration: 7'16"

13:20
Tax crackdown on Apple
BODY:
A three-year investigation by the European Competition Commission, has ruled that Apple should pay up to €13bn in back taxes. T
EXTENDED BODY:
A three-year investigation by the European Competition Commission, has ruled that Apple should pay up to €13bn in back taxes. The Commision said Ireland had enabled Apple to pay substantially less than other businesses, in effect paying a corporate tax rate of no more than one per cent.
Large multinationals like Apple and Facebook have also been criticised here for paying virtually no tax despite making billions in New Zealand.
Adrian Sawyer is a professor of taxation and research director at the College of Business and Law, University of Canterbury - he discusses the latest moves to crack down on tax loopholes.
Topics: business, politics
Regions:
Tags: Apple
Duration: 10'01"

13:30
Russell Baillie reviews Chasing Great
BODY:
NZ Herald reviewer, Russell Baillie gives his verdict on Chasing Great.
EXTENDED BODY:
NZ Herald reviewer, Russell Baillie gives his verdict on Chasing Great.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Mccaw, Chasing Great
Duration: 7'17"

13:38
Sound Archives: Lord Ernest Rutherford
BODY:
Yesterday was the 145th birthday of Lord Ernest Rutherford, who was born near Nelson in 1871. He is of course the man on the $100 note and 'the father of nuclear physics' who was awarded the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 1908. Last weekend saw the re-opening of "Rutherford's Den", the cupboard-below-the-stairs where he carried out some of his earliest experiments at Canterbury University College in Christchurch.
EXTENDED BODY:
Yesterday was the 145th birthday of Lord Ernest Rutherford, who was born near Nelson in 1871. He is of course the man on the $100 note and 'the father of nuclear physics' who was awarded the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 1908.
Last weekend saw the re-opening of "Rutherford's Den", the cupboard-below-the-stairs where he carried out some of his earliest experiments at Canterbury University College in Christchurch. This is now a fully-fledged interactive science exhibit about the man and his discoveries.
Sarah Johnston from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision is hear today to tell us about it and play some recordings from the sound archives, including the man himself.
Topics: history
Regions:
Tags: Ernest Rutherford
Duration: 11'35"

13:49
Favourite album
BODY:
Red, Hot and Blue, the Cole Porter tribute album. Chosen by Alison Beaumont.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 10'20"

14:07
Music Critic - Simon Sweetman
BODY:
Two American albums, the new one from Jonathan Richman and Allen Toussaint's 'American Tunes'.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags: Jonathan Richman, Allen Toussaint
Duration: 15'29"

14:23
Bookmarks with David Hedley
BODY:
Our guest on today's edition of Bookmarks is one of the few remaining independent booksellers in New Zealand. David Hedley's Masterton shop specialises in New Zealand history, biography, and art books, especially those pertaining to Wairarapa and the town of Masterton.
EXTENDED BODY:
David Hedley is a Wairarapa bookseller who has also had a successful parallel career as a specialist publisher.
Hedleys Books in Masterton is one of the few independent booksellers left in New Zealand and has been family run since 1907.
You wouldn’t expect a Wairarapa bookseller to pepper conversation with references to George Harrison and Jeff Beck; but David is friends with some of the biggest names in rock music.
It started with a collaboration back in the 1970s with a UK company, Genesis Publications, to print limited edition hand-made books.
The owner of that company was good friends with George Harrison and David too became close to the former Beatle. Through Harrison he met Derek Taylor, the Beatles publicist.
“Derek was a great guy. Not only had he had dealings with The Beatles, but also Californian bands such as The Beach Boys, The Mamas and Papas and The Byrds. “
Later in life Taylor entered the corporate music world and worked for Warner Brothers Records for a time and at Apple Corp.
David co-published, with Genesis, Taylor’s limited edition memoir, 50 Years Adrift (In An Open-Necked Shirt), a project with which Harrison was heavily involved.
Fifty Years Adrift was a huge success not least David says, because Harrison agreed to help promote it.
“I was talking to George at his home Friar Park and he said ‘Do you think the book will sell?’ And I said ‘Well it will sell if you help promote it!”
Harrison came to Australia and New Zealand in 1986 to promote the book which sold out all 2000 copies.
“He was being a great friend to Derek, he was very good to his friends and there was quite a network in that sense.”
David has been involved in a string of publishing projects that have touched on the world of pop and rock and roll.
He’s just finished publicity in California with guitar legend Jeff Beck for a limited edition memoir, BECKC01, and he says he has another publishing project coming up with another music icon, Mick Fleetwood.
Topics: books
Regions:
Tags: David Hedley
Duration: 36'13"

15:10
The emotional power of music
BODY:
Science tells us music is not only the food of love, it can make wine taste better and relieve pain. Physics professor John Powell, who also has a master's degree in music composition, looks at the science of music in his new book, Why You Love Music.
EXTENDED BODY:
Science tells us music is not only the food of love, it can make wine taste better and relieve pain. Physics professor John Powell, who also has a master's degree in music composition, looks at the science of music in his new book, Why You Love Music.
“Give a psychologist a list of your ten favourite songs and you’ll get a good assessment of your personality” - John Powell

In the 1990s, psychologists honed what are known as the ‘Big Five’ personality traits – Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extroversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism.
John says they then were able to match those personality traits with types of music – and found that people who shared musical taste also had similar personalities.
“People who like reflective and contemplative music – like jazz, classic, folk and blues – are generally high on openness (intellectually), and are generally poor at sports, good with words and politically liberal” John says.
This goes back to our teenage years when social cliques were formed, he says.
Although most of us feel the deepest (and a lifelong) love for the music we listen to between the ages of 15 and 25, it’s never too late to embrace a new form of music, John says. It can be as simple as choosing to do so.
“If you marry somebody who’s into Parisian swing jazz from the 1940s and they play a lot to you, you’ll start coming up with a mental pattern of what’s going to happen next in that music. You’ll become comfortable with it and you’ll start to fall in love with it.”
The digital age, by allowing access to so much music, can keep some people from venturing beyond what they know and like, while offering others infinite possibilities. John finds that young people now have more eclectic taste than those in the past.
“Nowadays, if a 20 year gives a playlist to another 20 year old, quite often you’ll have Sinatra followed by rock followed by African drumming - and I think that’s really marvellous.”
It's not news that music has the power to invigorate or relax us, but John takes the idea further. He says music holds the keys to our body’s “inner pharmacy” and we can use it to exercise some control over which chemicals our pharmacy is dispensing.
“If I was falling asleep in a motorway I would probably put something like [Brian] Eno’s ‘Babys On Fire’ on – which is very driving, rhythmic music and exciting and fun – or things like ‘Carmina Burana' [composed by Carl Orff].”
And when John wants to order up some mood-elevation from the ‘inner pharmacy’?
The second movement of Joaquín Rodrigo’s 'Concierto de Aranjuez' - “very chirpy and sunny and a tonic for everybody.”
John Powell is the author of Why You Love Music.
Topics: music
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 25'43"

15:32
Jenny and Jools
BODY:
In August 2013 Labour MP Louisa Wall's Marriage Amendment Act came into effect. Since the passing of this historic law, more than two thousand same sex couples have tied the knot. RNZ's Eyewitness series takes us back to the night of 17 April 2013, to the third and final reading of the bill in Parliament and the vote that meant that marriage equality was now the law in New Zealand.
EXTENDED BODY:
In 2013 Labour MP Louisa Wall’s Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill became law in New Zealand.
RNZ’s Eyewitness series takes us back to Parliament on the night of 17 April 2013 and the third and final reading of the Bill in front of a packed public gallery.

This historic Bill, granting same sex couples in New Zealand the right to marry, came nearly thirty years after the Homosexual Law Reform Act of 1986, which decriminalised homosexual acts between consenting adults, and just nine years after the passing of the Civil Union Law in 2004. Since the passing of the Bill into law, more than two thousand gay and lesbian couples have since exercised their legal right to marry.
Sitting in the gallery that night were two very special witnesses to this moment of history. For seven years Kapiti Coast couple Jenny Rowan and Jools Joslin had argued in court for the right to marry and had been denied at every turn.
In 1995 Jools and Jenny were one of three lesbian couples in New Zealand who each applied for a licence to marry. Their applications were denied. They challenged that decision in the High Court and then again in the Court of Appeal. They lost, both times, in what became known as the Quilter case. In 1998 Jools and Jenny sued New Zealand before the United Nations Human Rights Committee on the grounds of discrimination but again lost.
The couple had celebrated an unofficial wedding in 1996 and were later legally wed in Canada but by the early 2000s, had largely given up the struggle to gain the right to marry in their own country.

Archival audio courtesy of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision

Topics: history, identity, politics, inequality, law, life and society
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags: lgbtiq, Civil Unions, marriage equality, marriage amendment act
Duration: 10'31"

15:49
One Quick Question for 31 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
EXTENDED BODY:
How many TV programmes have been made? 1Quick Question from a six-year-old with Panelists theories.
Dr Siouxsie Wiles of the University of Auckland answers: Why shower before swimming in a pool?
Dr Jacqui Allen answers: Why do we cough involuntarily when we have a tickle in our throats?

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'11"

15:54
The Panel pre-show for 31 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'46"

=SHOW NOTES=

1:10 The Millennial Whoop
A musical idiosyncracy explained.
Did this song start the Millennial Whoop?
[embed] https://youtu.be/Iwuy4hHO3YQ
1:15 Tax crackdown on Apple
A three-year investigation by the European Competition Commission, has ruled that Apple should pay up to €13bn in back taxes. The Commision said Ireland had enabled Apple to pay substantially less than other businesses, in effect paying a corporate tax rate of no more than one per cent.
Large multinationals like Apple and Facebook have also been criticised here for paying virtually no tax despite making billions in New Zealand.
Adrian Sawyer is a professor of taxation and research director at the College of Business and Law, University of Canterbury - he discusses the latest moves to crack down on tax loopholes.
1:25 Russell Baillie reviews Chasing Great
[image:79989:full]
NZ Herald reviewer, Russell Baillie gives his verdict on Chasing Great.
[embed] https://youtu.be/In67DiC-U4E
1:35 Sound Archives: Lord Ernest Rutherford
[image:79997:half]
Yesterday was the 145th birthday of Lord Ernest Rutherford, who was born near Nelson in 1871. He is of course the man on the $100 note and 'the father of nuclear physics' who was awarded the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 1908.
Last weekend saw the re-opening of "Rutherford's Den", the cupboard-below-the-stairs where he carried out some of his earliest experiments at Canterbury University College in Christchurch. This is now a fully-fledged interactive science exhibit about the man and his discoveries.
Sarah Johnston from Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision is hear today to tell us about it and play some recordings from the sound archives, including the man himself.
1:40 Favourite album: Red, Hot and Blue, the Cole Porter tribute album
2:20 Bookmarks with David Hedley
Our guest on today's edition of Bookmarks is one of the few remaining independent booksellers in New Zealand. David Hedley's Masterton shop specialises in New Zealand history, biography, and art books, especially those pertaining to Wairarapa and the town of Masterton. They also have a niche publishing division HEDLEY BOOKS which has produced a diverse range of material including many volumes on the history of popular music.
David Hedley talks about his long connection to music and the books which accompany it.
[image:80008:full]
3:10 Why You Love Music
Science tells us music is not only the food of love, it can make wine taste better, loosen your pocketbook and relieve pain.
Physics professor John Powell, who also has a master's degree in music composition, looks at the science of music in his new book, Why You Love Music.
He explains the latest psychological and sociological studies that look everything from why some music gives us shivers, to how music can heal us.
[image:79916:full]
3:35 RNZ Eyewitness
3:45 The Panel Pre-Show

===4:06 PM. | The Panel===
=DESCRIPTION=

An hour of discussion featuring a range of panellists from right along the opinion spectrum (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

15:49
One Quick Question for 31 August 2016
BODY:
We find the answers to any queries you can think up.
EXTENDED BODY:
How many TV programmes have been made? 1Quick Question from a six-year-old with Panelists theories.
Dr Siouxsie Wiles of the University of Auckland answers: Why shower before swimming in a pool?
Dr Jacqui Allen answers: Why do we cough involuntarily when we have a tickle in our throats?

Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'11"

15:54
The Panel pre-show for 31 August 2016
BODY:
Your feedback, and a preview of the guests and topics on The Panel.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'46"

16:03
The Panel with Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett (Part 1)
BODY:
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett have been up to. Henry Chung of Massey University talks about what the Hawke's Bay water contamination situation is doing to our overseas image. Official crime statistics show reported burglaries have gone up by nearly 12%.While the black market for tobacco fuels an increase in armed robberies. The European Commission has told Apple to pay Ireland 13bn euros in back tax. The corporate giant is to appeal. Some of your feedback on taking kids out of school during term time.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 22'58"

16:05
The Panel with Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett (Part 2)
BODY:
Is your life lived on social media? What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett have been thinking about. A listener bemoans the state of New Zealand drivers. Are we really that bad? We talk to driving instructor Sarah McPhee about how prepared our restricted licence-holders are for life on the roads. Road safety advocate Clive Matthew-Wilson talks about foreign drivers difficulties on NZ roads and fake licences. And he looks at Mitsubishi's mileage cheating scandal. Well-known novelists are co-authoring with lesser-known writers. Why's this happening?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 27'28"

16:07
Panel Intro
BODY:
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett have been up to.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'03"

16:10
Havelock North's water crisis is bad for our image
BODY:
Henry Chung of Massey University talks about what the Hawke's Bay water contamination situation is doing to our overseas image.
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water
Duration: 10'13"

16:21
Burglaries and the black market
BODY:
Official crime statistics show reported burglaries have gone up by nearly 12%.While the black market for tobacco fuels an increase in armed robberies.
Topics: crime, politics
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'31"

16:25
Apple ordered to pay 13bn euros in tax
BODY:
The European Commission has told Apple to pay Ireland 13bn euros in back tax. The corporate giant is to appeal.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags: Apple, EU
Duration: 2'41"

16:28
Holidays in school term time
BODY:
Some of your feedback on taking kids out of school during term time.
Topics: education
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 1'57"

16:33
Livestream your life
BODY:
Is your life lived on social media?
Topics: technology
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'56"

16:36
Panel says
BODY:
What the Panelists Catherine Robertson and Barry Corbett have been thinking about:
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'15"

16:42
How bad are we at driving?
BODY:
A listener bemoans the state of New Zealand drivers. Are we really that bad? We talk to driving instructor Sarah McPhee about how prepared our restricted licence-holders are for life on the roads.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 8'43"

16:51
Foreign drivers
BODY:
Road safety advocate Clive Matthew-Wilson talks about foreign drivers difficulties on NZ roads and fake licences. And he looks at Mitsubishi's mileage cheating scandal.
Topics: transport
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'29"

16:57
Co-authors
BODY:
Well-known novelists are co-authoring with lesser-known writers. Why's this happening?
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 2'51"

=SHOW NOTES=

===5:00 PM. | Checkpoint===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weekday drive-time news and current affairs programme

=AUDIO=

17:00
Checkpoint with John Campbell, Wednesday 31 August 2016
BODY:
Watch Wednesday's full show here.
Topics:
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 00"

17:12
Tauranga agencies struggling with growing number of homeless
BODY:
Record numbers of homeless seeking help in Tauranga has left social agencies at breaking point.
EXTENDED BODY:
A “tsunami” of homelessness has ripped through Tauranga, with more than 30 families seeking emergency accommodation each week, social agencies say.
Ngati Ranginui Iwi Society CEO Steph O'Sullivan said homelessness in the Bay of Plenty was a growing, significant issue. The number of homeless seeking help was more than social agencies in the region had ever seen before.
“I wonder how many people out there are going to be staggered by this and the revelation of the issue here, because the good news story of regional economic growth is fantastic, but not everyone is sharing in that story,” Ms O’Sullivan said.
“People automatically I think assume sometimes there’s drug and alcohol issues, or such issues, but in fact some of them are working. So they’re going off to their job every day and going back to live in their car at night.
“Women [are] living in cars with their children who have got brain injuries, behavioural issues and are trying to get them off to school every morning, trying to deal with beneficiary type issues… wicked, systemic issues. [Homelessness] is alive and well here.”
One school principal estimated 10 percent of the children at her school were living transient lives, in which they had no fixed abode.
About 30 families were being referred to emergency accommodation, including motels, each week, Ms O’Sullivan said.
Ms O’Sullivan estimated about 250 families were on the Housing New Zealand waiting list and 600 more homes were urgently needed in the region.
Te Tuinga Whanau is a social support service based in Tauranga. Its executive director, Tommy Wilson, has worked with the homeless for 25 years, and said he'd never seen so many people needing help at once.
Up to nine families a day were turning up asking for help.
“They’re coming up from rural places, they’re coming from around the corner. I think we’ve taken the plaster off and people are starting to present themselves now, so we’re starting to get a handle on how big this situation is,” Mr Wilson said.
“It’s never been like it is now. It’s a tsunami.”
Te Tuinga Whanau has established the Whare 4 Whanau programme, which Mr Wilson said he believed was the first of its kind in New Zealand.
About three families could stay at the whare at one time, where they would receive intense support from social workers. Mr Wilson called it “social service super glue”.
“We need to create a place where they can come… then we can start putting their broken pieces back together again.
“You can keep throwing blankets and motels and food parcels at them, but we don’t want them to come back. We want to fix them up so they can go about their lives and live in a place they can call home.”
'Half a dozen a week'
Ministry of Social Development spokesperson for social housing Kay Read said her organisation was not seeing anything like the numbers described by the social agencies.
She estimated that about 48 families had come to the agency for help in the last two months.
"What we are seeing is more in the realm of half a dozen a week of people that are requiring support for emergency accommodation... That's been over the last eight weeks, and we are providing them with that support."
She was unable to say on the spot how many people in the city were being lodged in emergency accommodation such as motels, as had been happening in Auckland.
Related

Topics: housing, life and society
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 8'00"

17:18
Ministry of Social Development on Tauranga homelessness
BODY:
Ministry of Social Development's spokesperson for social housing Kay Read responds to claims of increasing homelessness in Tauranga.
Topics: life and society, housing
Regions: Bay of Plenty
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 3'53"

17:23
NZ officials expected to look at EU-Apple ruling
BODY:
An investigation in Europe has concluded Apple's Irish tax benefits are illegal, prompting New Zealand's Prime Minister to respond to questions of whether multinationals here are paying enough tax.
Topics: politics, law
Regions:
Tags: Apple, tax
Duration: 52"

17:25
Apple NZ continues to dodge questions from John Campbell
BODY:
John Campbell has been trying to get Apple to answer a number of questions on its costs and tax for almost a year. Today he revisited his past attempts and continued on his hunt for answers.
Topics: technology, law
Regions:
Tags: Apple, tax
Duration: 3'44"

17:28
Second public meeting in Havelock North underway
BODY:
The second of two public meetings into Havelock North's water contamination crisis is about to get underway. RNZ reporter Michael Cropp joins Checkpoint from the meeting.
EXTENDED BODY:
Topics: health
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags:
Duration: 6'17"

17:40
Evening Business for 31 August 2016
BODY:
News from the business sector, including a market report.
EXTENDED BODY:
Topics: business, economy
Regions:
Tags: markets
Duration: 2'35"

17:40
Three more Kiwisaver providers to dump weapons investments
BODY:
Three more default KiwiSaver providers are moving to dump their investments in companies that make cluster bombs, landmines or nuclear weapons.
Topics: law, economy
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver, ethics
Duration: 1'52"

17:42
Ruataniwha Dam in doubt after Appeal Court Ruling
BODY:
Hawke's Bay Regional Council's process to acquire conservation land to build the $900 million Ruataniwha Dam was unlawful, the Court of Appeal has ruled.
Topics: environment
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 3'15"

17:45
Te Puea Marae prepares to shut its doors to the homeless
BODY:
Te Puea Marae closes its doors tonight after first opening them to the homeless three months ago.
EXTENDED BODY:
Topics: te ao Maori, housing, life and society
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: homelessness
Duration: 4'05"

17:49
Lawyer launches class action against steel mesh makers
BODY:
An Auckland lawyer has launched a class action targeting the makers of steel mesh in the floors of tens of thousands of New Zealand homes.
Topics: law, housing
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags: Steel Mesh
Duration: 3'09"

17:53
Geoffrey Palmer wants judges to have final say on euthansia
BODY:
Former Prime Minister Sir Geoffrey Palmer is calling for Family Court judges to have the final say on a person's right to choose how and when they might die.
Topics: law, health, life and society, politics
Regions:
Tags: euthansia
Duration: 2'58"

17:57
Apartment owners complain about Airbnb rentals
BODY:
Some apartment owners are complaining about their neighbours renting their properties through accommodation sharing website Airbnb.
Topics: housing, technology
Regions:
Tags: tourism, Airbnb
Duration: 3'19"

18:12
Education Ministry fails to spend budget on new schools
BODY:
Despite numerous concerns about overcrowding, the Ministry of Education failed to spend all the money put aside to build new schools and classrooms in the last financial year.
Topics: education, politics, te ao Maori
Regions:
Tags: budgets
Duration: 3'35"

18:13
Apple vows to fight Euro Commission over unpaid taxes
BODY:
Tech giant Apple has vowed to fight a European Commission order for it to pay Ireland up to 13 billion euros in unpaid taxes.
Topics: technology, law
Regions:
Tags: taxes, Apple
Duration: 2'01"

18:14
Havelock North boil notice to stay in place
BODY:
Hawkes' Bay residents hoping to finally have a boil-water notice lifted, will have to wait even longer. Alex Ashton visited Havelock North locals who are increasingly frustrated.
Topics: health, politics
Regions: Hawkes Bay
Tags: water
Duration: 3'46"

18:18
Auckland liquor hires teens to protect store from robbers
BODY:
A South Auckland liquor store is so fed up with being robbed and police doing nothing, it's hired two teenagers to call on for back-up.
Topics: crime
Regions: Auckland Region
Tags:
Duration: 3'41"

18:27
Major civil defence exercise starts in Beehive
BODY:
The first stage of a major civil defence exercise to test the country's readiness for a tsunami took place in the basement of the Beehive.
Topics: Civil Defence
Regions: Wellington Region
Tags:
Duration: 2'13"

18:27
Tom Walsh wins two Diamond League competitions
BODY:
Olympic shotputter Tom Walsh has flourished post Rio, winning two Diamond League competitions in Paris and then Poland.
Topics: sport
Regions:
Tags: Rio 2016, Diamond League, Poland, France, Shotput
Duration: 3'54"

=SHOW NOTES=

===6:30 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Highlighting the RNZ stories you're sharing on-line
Sheila Watt-Cloutier: Arctic and Inuit

===7:06 PM. | Nights===
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ's weeknight programme of entertainment and information

=AUDIO=

19:15
The ethics of KiwiSaver funds
BODY:
Ethical investing for KiwiSaver providers following revelations some funds are going to cluster bomb manufacturers and landmine companies. Michael Littlewood is the former co-director of the Retirement Policy Research Centre at Auckland University and has written an opinion piece on socially responsible investments by KiwiSaver schemes.
EXTENDED BODY:
An RNZ investigation earlier this month found several default KiwiSaver providers either directly or indirectly, invested in tobacco companies and weapons manufacturers.
So what's an ethical Kiwi saver to do?
Michael Littlewood tells Bryan Crump ethical investing is impossible in practice.
Mr Littlewood is the former co-director of Auckland University's Retirement Policy Research Centre.
He says KiwiSaver investment in weapons manufacture is more a question of social responsibility than criminal responsibility as New Zealand’s Cluster Munitions Prohibition Act (2009) states that a person commits an offense only if they intend or know their funds will be used in the development or production of cluster ammunitions.
Statements made by KiwiSaver fund managers have been more about PR than legal defence, he says.
“Some of our customers have expressed concern about this, so we’ll make our lives a bit easier and say we won’t invest in those particular type of shares.”
So could KiwiSaver providers band together to take a stand? Mr Littlewood predicts they'd have trouble agreeing on a definition of ‘socially responsible’.
“Should you also not be investing in property companies that own the land and buildings that these offending companies lease? Or what about not buying the other products that these companies produce?
“Are we happy about tobacco? What about liquor? What about oil exploration? Some people say responsible investing should exclude new oil exploration.”
Mr Littlewood says that is near impossible to be a ‘socially responsible investor’ given the complexity of world financial markets.
Even the UN’s Principles for Social Investing (which the ACC and New Zealand Super Fund have adopted) he describes as “pretty relaxed”.
"[The PRI principles still allow] those funds to invest in companies with small to moderate environmental, social or governance issues, even into arms or munitions companies, as long as they don’t make anti-personnel weapons or cluster munitions, into nuclear energy production… and even fossil fuel exploration,” he says.
He points out that even though it may be illegal to knowingly invest in companies manufacturing cluster munitions, it is still legal to invest in companies manufacturing land mines.
New Zealand’s Cluster Munitions Act also includes exceptions, he says.
“You can have cluster munitions as long as you’re aiming it at an offending aircraft, not aiming it at the ground.”
He goes further and asks if the production of arms is necessarily socially irresponsible.
“We’ve got an army. How do we arm an army if we can’t buy munitions?”
Can people investing their money independently (rather than with a KiwiSaver fund) invest with social responsibility?
Mr Littlewood says we cannot know with any certainty that government investments and bond funds don’t have interests in companies we oppose, or trust our banks to exercise the same kind of moral judgement we would ourselves.
Is the idea of socially responsible investing ‘a crock’?
“Personally, yes, I think it is.”
So do we all just need to learn to love the bomb-makers? What are the alternatives?
He suggests people may be better placed to make social change from the inside.
“You might have a better position as a shareholder, ‘cause you can say ‘I am a shareholder in your company and I don’t like what you’re doing. And if you can convince enough of your fellow shareholders to do that, then perhaps progress could be made.”
Read ‘Default ‘socially responsible investment for KiwiSaver? An alternative view’ by Michael Littlewood
Topics: business, money
Regions:
Tags: KiwiSaver schemes, investment, social responsibility
Duration: 24'45"

20:12
Nights' Overseas Reports - Canada
BODY:
Journalist for Medicine Hat News, Peggy Revell reports from Canada. http://pegomancy.com/ https://twitter.com/pegspirate Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada... Tu 30 Aug 7pm [Wed 1pm NZT] prerec : rnz studio // skype. 001-587-253-0440 mob. 001-587-253-0440 contact : peggy.revell@gmail.com pegspirate@gmail.com
Topics: life and society, politics, economy
Regions:
Tags: Canada
Duration: 21'48"

=SHOW NOTES=

7:12 Ethical Kiwisaver investment
Michael Littlewood, former co-director of the Retirement Policy Research Centre at Auckland University, discusses socially responsible Kiwisaver investment.
7:30 At The Movies
Simon Morris reviews the remake of Ben-Hur, and a new comedy starring Mila Kunis and Christina Applegate - Bad Moms. Pick of the crop though is a small but perfectly formed film from Jordan. Theeb was nominated for a Best Foreign Film Oscar this year.
8:12 Nights' Overseas - Canada
Journalist for Medicine Hat News, Peggy Revell, reports from Canada on the nation's farewell to alt rock heroes The Tragically Hip, a return to peace-keeping and the exit from parliament of Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper.
8:30 Window on the World
Looping Swans reveals how Swan Lake has shaped the history of modern Russia and - even now - emerged as a powerful political 'meme' in the Putin era. When tanks rolled into Moscow on 19 August 1991 during a dramatic anti-Perestroika coup by Soviet hardliners, the USSR's state-controlled airwaves offered a curious response: a continuous loop of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake. Ballet, of all things, served as balm for the revolution underway.
9:07 The Drama Hour
We have the second part of Mervyn Thompson's autobiographical survey of kiwi theatre, Passing Through, plus The Harvest, A fable of love and commitment. After being market gardeners all their lives, age forces a couple to sell up. Though no longer gardeners, the old lady gathers a harvest of a different kind.
10:17 Late Edition
A round up of today's RNZ News and feature interviews as well as Date Line Pacific from RNZ International,
11:07 At the Eleventh Hour
Nick Tipping hosts a journey through the jazz spectrum playing favourites, standards and new releases along the way. This week: Inspired by a new addition to his family Nick takes a journey through jazz tunes with girls' names.

===7:35 PM. | At The Movies===
=DESCRIPTION=

A weekly topical magazine about current film releases and film related topics. (RNZ)

=AUDIO=

19:30
At The Movies for 31 August 2015
BODY:
On At The Movies, Simon Morris reviews the remake of Ben-Hur, and a new comedy starring Mila Kunis and Chrsitina Applegate - Bad Moms. Pick of the crop though is a small but perfectly formed film from Jordan. Theeb was nominated for a Best Foreign Film Oscar this year.
Topics: movies
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 23'19"

19:31
Ben Hur Review
BODY:
A remake of the famous - and multi-Oscar winning - 1959 classic "Story of the Christ." Starring Jack Huston and Morgan Freeman.
Topics: movies
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 6'15"

19:32
Bad Moms Review
BODY:
When the pressure to be perfect is too much, three Moms go Bad. Starring Mila Kunis, Christina Applegate and Kristen Bell.
Topics: movies
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 5'36"

19:33
Theeb Review
BODY:
A little Bedouin boy tags along when his brother guides a British soldier through the Arabian Desert during World War One. Nominated for an Oscar and a Bafta this year.
Topics: movies
Regions:
Tags:
Duration: 4'42"

=SHOW NOTES=

===8:30 PM. | Windows On The World===
=DESCRIPTION=

International public radio features and documentaries

===9:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

Passing Through by Mervyn Thompson. The autobiographical one-man show which effectively became an obituary for one of New Zealand theatre's more colourful and controversial figures in 20th Century Theatre. (Part 2 of 2, RNZ)

===10:00 PM. | Late Edition===
=AUDIO=

The great cow heist; the economic impact of Havelock North's water contamination crisis. In Dateline Pacific the PNG government expells PNG student protestors from University.
=DESCRIPTION=

RNZ news, including Dateline Pacific and the day's best interviews from RNZ National

===11:06 PM. | None (National)===
=DESCRIPTION=

(RNZ)

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Year 2016

Reference number 288326

Media type AUDIO

Collection Sound Collection

Ngā Taonga Korero Collection

Genre Untelescoped radio airchecks
Radio airchecks
Radio programs
Sound recordings

Credits RNZ National (estab. 2016), Broadcaster

Duration 24:00:00

Date 31 Aug 2016